When to Rob a Bank

When to Rob a Bank

In celebration of the 10th anniversary of the landmark book Freakonomics comes this curated collection from the most readable economics blog in the universe. It?s the perfect solution for the millions of readers who love all things Freakonomics. Surprising and erudite, eloquent and witty, When to Rob a Bank demonstrates the brilliance that has made the Freakonomics guys an In celebration of the 10th anniversary of the landmark book Freakonomics comes this curated collection from the most re...

DownloadRead Online
Title:When to Rob a Bank
Author:Steven D. Levitt
Rating:
Genres:Nonfiction
ISBN:When to Rob a Bank
ISBN
Edition Language:English
Format Type:Hardcover
Number of Pages:400 pages pages

When to Rob a Bank Reviews

  • Jeff
    May 05, 2015

    DNF'd. This book is really patchy. The blogs - for that's what they were - go from really bad, almost facetious and ill-researched topics to some interesting ideas. The percentage of interesting to blah is only about 10% so rather than waste 90% of my time, I will spend it reading some...

    Full disclosure, I did not finish this book. I had to put it down after 50 pages or so because my blood pressure was through the roof and my eye was twitching. The collection of blog posts in this book range from interesting to unreasonably insane. Unfortunately there were too many ...

    This book is a blog highlight reel, and lacks all of the analytical depth that the earlier writings of these "rogue" economists drew me in with. The effect is one of having an intelligent friend mention stray thoughts he'd had earlier that afternoon, many of which could lead to great d...

    This is a collection of blog essays from the Freakonomics blog. The first part of the book arranges the essays by topic. As mentioned in the book itself, the second part of the book lacks any organization; the essays seem to be in a completely random order. The essays are short, and ar...

    Levitt should NOT NARRATE. Please have Dubner read all future books. (I listened to the audiobook.) I love Levitt?s brain, but when he talks it?s hard for me to concentrate on what he says. He does not enunciate his words. My mind wanders. I replayed two sentences twice and I st...

    Because I am a big fan of Levitt and Dubner Works, I feel entitled to write this review. I have to admit, there has never been in my reading life, a series in which I was extremely absorbed like the Freaknomics Series. I never read all books published under one title consequently. I al...

    There is no good answer to that question, which is why the subtitle makes a lot of sense. The authors of Freakonomics collected pieces from their blog in the book When to Rob a Bank...and 131 more warped suggestions and well-intended rants. In celebration of the tenth anniversary of Fr...

    After a certain amount of disappointment caused by the previous Freaknomics inspired book, Think Like a Freak, I was prepared to find the latest equally disappointing. After all, the authors admit this is just a transcription of parts of their blog. In economics terms, as they point ou...

    When to Rob a Bank by Steven Levitt & Stephen Dubner. This makes the fourth Freakonomics branded book I?ve read by Levitt and Dubner and the experience has been uneven at best. The first Freakonoimics book was interesting, albeit a little directionless. Super Freakonomics had...

    DNF. Abandoned at 32% Source: Library e-book Sometimes when I'm reading something dense or intense, I like to have a book going on the side that lends itself to an easy pick up/put down as a breather. Well, this one is definitely easy to put down. This book reminded me of three...

    Freakonomics this is not -- I love Freakonomics and Levitt was great with it. This is a follow-up but content taken from his blog. This is okay and it makes for a great light ---sporadic read. That means you can read it like a bathroom reader and consume a page or two at a time and not...

    Insightful and entertaining as ever! Due to it's chaos organized way of publishing made it an easy read too. ...

    Interesting. There are many thought provoking articles about a myriad of topics. Mostly random, but still thorough. I enjoyed the Global Warming post, and there is also some comedy. ...

    Love this series Another interesting look at life from these two. I listen to their podcasts, but I didn't realize they had a blog. Fun, thought-provoking reading. ...

    This is just a collection of blog entries you can read online for free, which would have disappointed me more if I'd bought it instead of getting it out of the library. I've never read the blog, so it is useful to have the top posts curated in one place that I can read without backligh...

    If you like ?Freakonomics?, the book, you will find this collection similar. It is the same folks, covering the same kinds of topics with the same kind of humor and style. But these are snippets from their online blog, and while some topics curried a lot of interest in me, most of ...

    I bought this on sale on Amazon and I'm really sorry I did. I vaguely remember at least somewhat enjoying Freakonomics, but this is a hot mess of disorganized blogorrhea that accomplished nothing except making me angry. There's little to no actual data or in-depth analysis, just a bunc...

    This collection of blog posts from the Freakonomics blog is, page for page, probably the most thought provoking book I think I have ever read! Hilarious, sad, interesting, depressing, disappointing, uplifting, and so on. Amazing, quick book that reads more like a magazine. Highly recom...

    Freakonomics was awesome! Superfreakonomics was good. This book - well, this is just a collection of blogposts of the authors with a tinge of the characteristic 'freakonomics' humor and analysis in them. The 300 odd pages can make for a casual read on a boring Sunday afternoon, but ...

    If you're a regular reader of the Freakonomics blog posts and/or a fan of their podcasts you've likely heard most of the pieces collected here in a sort of greatest hits book from those sources. None the less enjoyable though. ...

  • David
    Jul 05, 2016

    DNF'd. This book is really patchy. The blogs - for that's what they were - go from really bad, almost facetious and ill-researched topics to some interesting ideas. The percentage of interesting to blah is only about 10% so rather than waste 90% of my time, I will spend it reading some...

    Full disclosure, I did not finish this book. I had to put it down after 50 pages or so because my blood pressure was through the roof and my eye was twitching. The collection of blog posts in this book range from interesting to unreasonably insane. Unfortunately there were too many ...

    This book is a blog highlight reel, and lacks all of the analytical depth that the earlier writings of these "rogue" economists drew me in with. The effect is one of having an intelligent friend mention stray thoughts he'd had earlier that afternoon, many of which could lead to great d...

    This is a collection of blog essays from the Freakonomics blog. The first part of the book arranges the essays by topic. As mentioned in the book itself, the second part of the book lacks any organization; the essays seem to be in a completely random order. The essays are short, and ar...

  • kat
    May 10, 2016

    DNF'd. This book is really patchy. The blogs - for that's what they were - go from really bad, almost facetious and ill-researched topics to some interesting ideas. The percentage of interesting to blah is only about 10% so rather than waste 90% of my time, I will spend it reading some...

    Full disclosure, I did not finish this book. I had to put it down after 50 pages or so because my blood pressure was through the roof and my eye was twitching. The collection of blog posts in this book range from interesting to unreasonably insane. Unfortunately there were too many ...

    This book is a blog highlight reel, and lacks all of the analytical depth that the earlier writings of these "rogue" economists drew me in with. The effect is one of having an intelligent friend mention stray thoughts he'd had earlier that afternoon, many of which could lead to great d...

    This is a collection of blog essays from the Freakonomics blog. The first part of the book arranges the essays by topic. As mentioned in the book itself, the second part of the book lacks any organization; the essays seem to be in a completely random order. The essays are short, and ar...

    Levitt should NOT NARRATE. Please have Dubner read all future books. (I listened to the audiobook.) I love Levitt?s brain, but when he talks it?s hard for me to concentrate on what he says. He does not enunciate his words. My mind wanders. I replayed two sentences twice and I st...

    Because I am a big fan of Levitt and Dubner Works, I feel entitled to write this review. I have to admit, there has never been in my reading life, a series in which I was extremely absorbed like the Freaknomics Series. I never read all books published under one title consequently. I al...

    There is no good answer to that question, which is why the subtitle makes a lot of sense. The authors of Freakonomics collected pieces from their blog in the book When to Rob a Bank...and 131 more warped suggestions and well-intended rants. In celebration of the tenth anniversary of Fr...

    After a certain amount of disappointment caused by the previous Freaknomics inspired book, Think Like a Freak, I was prepared to find the latest equally disappointing. After all, the authors admit this is just a transcription of parts of their blog. In economics terms, as they point ou...

    When to Rob a Bank by Steven Levitt & Stephen Dubner. This makes the fourth Freakonomics branded book I?ve read by Levitt and Dubner and the experience has been uneven at best. The first Freakonoimics book was interesting, albeit a little directionless. Super Freakonomics had...

    DNF. Abandoned at 32% Source: Library e-book Sometimes when I'm reading something dense or intense, I like to have a book going on the side that lends itself to an easy pick up/put down as a breather. Well, this one is definitely easy to put down. This book reminded me of three...

    Freakonomics this is not -- I love Freakonomics and Levitt was great with it. This is a follow-up but content taken from his blog. This is okay and it makes for a great light ---sporadic read. That means you can read it like a bathroom reader and consume a page or two at a time and not...

    Insightful and entertaining as ever! Due to it's chaos organized way of publishing made it an easy read too. ...

    Interesting. There are many thought provoking articles about a myriad of topics. Mostly random, but still thorough. I enjoyed the Global Warming post, and there is also some comedy. ...

    Love this series Another interesting look at life from these two. I listen to their podcasts, but I didn't realize they had a blog. Fun, thought-provoking reading. ...

    This is just a collection of blog entries you can read online for free, which would have disappointed me more if I'd bought it instead of getting it out of the library. I've never read the blog, so it is useful to have the top posts curated in one place that I can read without backligh...

    If you like ?Freakonomics?, the book, you will find this collection similar. It is the same folks, covering the same kinds of topics with the same kind of humor and style. But these are snippets from their online blog, and while some topics curried a lot of interest in me, most of ...

    I bought this on sale on Amazon and I'm really sorry I did. I vaguely remember at least somewhat enjoying Freakonomics, but this is a hot mess of disorganized blogorrhea that accomplished nothing except making me angry. There's little to no actual data or in-depth analysis, just a bunc...

  • Petra X
    Aug 29, 2016

    DNF'd. This book is really patchy. The blogs - for that's what they were - go from really bad, almost facetious and ill-researched topics to some interesting ideas. The percentage of interesting to blah is only about 10% so rather than waste 90% of my time, I will spend it reading some...

  • Erik
    Aug 18, 2015

    DNF'd. This book is really patchy. The blogs - for that's what they were - go from really bad, almost facetious and ill-researched topics to some interesting ideas. The percentage of interesting to blah is only about 10% so rather than waste 90% of my time, I will spend it reading some...

    Full disclosure, I did not finish this book. I had to put it down after 50 pages or so because my blood pressure was through the roof and my eye was twitching. The collection of blog posts in this book range from interesting to unreasonably insane. Unfortunately there were too many ...

    This book is a blog highlight reel, and lacks all of the analytical depth that the earlier writings of these "rogue" economists drew me in with. The effect is one of having an intelligent friend mention stray thoughts he'd had earlier that afternoon, many of which could lead to great d...

    This is a collection of blog essays from the Freakonomics blog. The first part of the book arranges the essays by topic. As mentioned in the book itself, the second part of the book lacks any organization; the essays seem to be in a completely random order. The essays are short, and ar...

    Levitt should NOT NARRATE. Please have Dubner read all future books. (I listened to the audiobook.) I love Levitt?s brain, but when he talks it?s hard for me to concentrate on what he says. He does not enunciate his words. My mind wanders. I replayed two sentences twice and I st...

    Because I am a big fan of Levitt and Dubner Works, I feel entitled to write this review. I have to admit, there has never been in my reading life, a series in which I was extremely absorbed like the Freaknomics Series. I never read all books published under one title consequently. I al...

    There is no good answer to that question, which is why the subtitle makes a lot of sense. The authors of Freakonomics collected pieces from their blog in the book When to Rob a Bank...and 131 more warped suggestions and well-intended rants. In celebration of the tenth anniversary of Fr...

    After a certain amount of disappointment caused by the previous Freaknomics inspired book, Think Like a Freak, I was prepared to find the latest equally disappointing. After all, the authors admit this is just a transcription of parts of their blog. In economics terms, as they point ou...

    When to Rob a Bank by Steven Levitt & Stephen Dubner. This makes the fourth Freakonomics branded book I?ve read by Levitt and Dubner and the experience has been uneven at best. The first Freakonoimics book was interesting, albeit a little directionless. Super Freakonomics had...

    DNF. Abandoned at 32% Source: Library e-book Sometimes when I'm reading something dense or intense, I like to have a book going on the side that lends itself to an easy pick up/put down as a breather. Well, this one is definitely easy to put down. This book reminded me of three...

    Freakonomics this is not -- I love Freakonomics and Levitt was great with it. This is a follow-up but content taken from his blog. This is okay and it makes for a great light ---sporadic read. That means you can read it like a bathroom reader and consume a page or two at a time and not...

    Insightful and entertaining as ever! Due to it's chaos organized way of publishing made it an easy read too. ...

    Interesting. There are many thought provoking articles about a myriad of topics. Mostly random, but still thorough. I enjoyed the Global Warming post, and there is also some comedy. ...

    Love this series Another interesting look at life from these two. I listen to their podcasts, but I didn't realize they had a blog. Fun, thought-provoking reading. ...

    This is just a collection of blog entries you can read online for free, which would have disappointed me more if I'd bought it instead of getting it out of the library. I've never read the blog, so it is useful to have the top posts curated in one place that I can read without backligh...

    If you like ?Freakonomics?, the book, you will find this collection similar. It is the same folks, covering the same kinds of topics with the same kind of humor and style. But these are snippets from their online blog, and while some topics curried a lot of interest in me, most of ...

    I bought this on sale on Amazon and I'm really sorry I did. I vaguely remember at least somewhat enjoying Freakonomics, but this is a hot mess of disorganized blogorrhea that accomplished nothing except making me angry. There's little to no actual data or in-depth analysis, just a bunc...

    This collection of blog posts from the Freakonomics blog is, page for page, probably the most thought provoking book I think I have ever read! Hilarious, sad, interesting, depressing, disappointing, uplifting, and so on. Amazing, quick book that reads more like a magazine. Highly recom...

  • Lesa
    May 20, 2015

    DNF'd. This book is really patchy. The blogs - for that's what they were - go from really bad, almost facetious and ill-researched topics to some interesting ideas. The percentage of interesting to blah is only about 10% so rather than waste 90% of my time, I will spend it reading some...

    Full disclosure, I did not finish this book. I had to put it down after 50 pages or so because my blood pressure was through the roof and my eye was twitching. The collection of blog posts in this book range from interesting to unreasonably insane. Unfortunately there were too many ...

    This book is a blog highlight reel, and lacks all of the analytical depth that the earlier writings of these "rogue" economists drew me in with. The effect is one of having an intelligent friend mention stray thoughts he'd had earlier that afternoon, many of which could lead to great d...

    This is a collection of blog essays from the Freakonomics blog. The first part of the book arranges the essays by topic. As mentioned in the book itself, the second part of the book lacks any organization; the essays seem to be in a completely random order. The essays are short, and ar...

    Levitt should NOT NARRATE. Please have Dubner read all future books. (I listened to the audiobook.) I love Levitt?s brain, but when he talks it?s hard for me to concentrate on what he says. He does not enunciate his words. My mind wanders. I replayed two sentences twice and I st...

    Because I am a big fan of Levitt and Dubner Works, I feel entitled to write this review. I have to admit, there has never been in my reading life, a series in which I was extremely absorbed like the Freaknomics Series. I never read all books published under one title consequently. I al...

    There is no good answer to that question, which is why the subtitle makes a lot of sense. The authors of Freakonomics collected pieces from their blog in the book When to Rob a Bank...and 131 more warped suggestions and well-intended rants. In celebration of the tenth anniversary of Fr...

  • Jay
    Sep 13, 2016

    DNF'd. This book is really patchy. The blogs - for that's what they were - go from really bad, almost facetious and ill-researched topics to some interesting ideas. The percentage of interesting to blah is only about 10% so rather than waste 90% of my time, I will spend it reading some...

    Full disclosure, I did not finish this book. I had to put it down after 50 pages or so because my blood pressure was through the roof and my eye was twitching. The collection of blog posts in this book range from interesting to unreasonably insane. Unfortunately there were too many ...

    This book is a blog highlight reel, and lacks all of the analytical depth that the earlier writings of these "rogue" economists drew me in with. The effect is one of having an intelligent friend mention stray thoughts he'd had earlier that afternoon, many of which could lead to great d...

    This is a collection of blog essays from the Freakonomics blog. The first part of the book arranges the essays by topic. As mentioned in the book itself, the second part of the book lacks any organization; the essays seem to be in a completely random order. The essays are short, and ar...

    Levitt should NOT NARRATE. Please have Dubner read all future books. (I listened to the audiobook.) I love Levitt?s brain, but when he talks it?s hard for me to concentrate on what he says. He does not enunciate his words. My mind wanders. I replayed two sentences twice and I st...

    Because I am a big fan of Levitt and Dubner Works, I feel entitled to write this review. I have to admit, there has never been in my reading life, a series in which I was extremely absorbed like the Freaknomics Series. I never read all books published under one title consequently. I al...

    There is no good answer to that question, which is why the subtitle makes a lot of sense. The authors of Freakonomics collected pieces from their blog in the book When to Rob a Bank...and 131 more warped suggestions and well-intended rants. In celebration of the tenth anniversary of Fr...

    After a certain amount of disappointment caused by the previous Freaknomics inspired book, Think Like a Freak, I was prepared to find the latest equally disappointing. After all, the authors admit this is just a transcription of parts of their blog. In economics terms, as they point ou...

    When to Rob a Bank by Steven Levitt & Stephen Dubner. This makes the fourth Freakonomics branded book I?ve read by Levitt and Dubner and the experience has been uneven at best. The first Freakonoimics book was interesting, albeit a little directionless. Super Freakonomics had...

    DNF. Abandoned at 32% Source: Library e-book Sometimes when I'm reading something dense or intense, I like to have a book going on the side that lends itself to an easy pick up/put down as a breather. Well, this one is definitely easy to put down. This book reminded me of three...

    Freakonomics this is not -- I love Freakonomics and Levitt was great with it. This is a follow-up but content taken from his blog. This is okay and it makes for a great light ---sporadic read. That means you can read it like a bathroom reader and consume a page or two at a time and not...

    Insightful and entertaining as ever! Due to it's chaos organized way of publishing made it an easy read too. ...

    Interesting. There are many thought provoking articles about a myriad of topics. Mostly random, but still thorough. I enjoyed the Global Warming post, and there is also some comedy. ...

    Love this series Another interesting look at life from these two. I listen to their podcasts, but I didn't realize they had a blog. Fun, thought-provoking reading. ...

    This is just a collection of blog entries you can read online for free, which would have disappointed me more if I'd bought it instead of getting it out of the library. I've never read the blog, so it is useful to have the top posts curated in one place that I can read without backligh...

    If you like ?Freakonomics?, the book, you will find this collection similar. It is the same folks, covering the same kinds of topics with the same kind of humor and style. But these are snippets from their online blog, and while some topics curried a lot of interest in me, most of ...

  • Johnny Williams
    May 23, 2015

    DNF'd. This book is really patchy. The blogs - for that's what they were - go from really bad, almost facetious and ill-researched topics to some interesting ideas. The percentage of interesting to blah is only about 10% so rather than waste 90% of my time, I will spend it reading some...

    Full disclosure, I did not finish this book. I had to put it down after 50 pages or so because my blood pressure was through the roof and my eye was twitching. The collection of blog posts in this book range from interesting to unreasonably insane. Unfortunately there were too many ...

    This book is a blog highlight reel, and lacks all of the analytical depth that the earlier writings of these "rogue" economists drew me in with. The effect is one of having an intelligent friend mention stray thoughts he'd had earlier that afternoon, many of which could lead to great d...

    This is a collection of blog essays from the Freakonomics blog. The first part of the book arranges the essays by topic. As mentioned in the book itself, the second part of the book lacks any organization; the essays seem to be in a completely random order. The essays are short, and ar...

    Levitt should NOT NARRATE. Please have Dubner read all future books. (I listened to the audiobook.) I love Levitt?s brain, but when he talks it?s hard for me to concentrate on what he says. He does not enunciate his words. My mind wanders. I replayed two sentences twice and I st...

    Because I am a big fan of Levitt and Dubner Works, I feel entitled to write this review. I have to admit, there has never been in my reading life, a series in which I was extremely absorbed like the Freaknomics Series. I never read all books published under one title consequently. I al...

    There is no good answer to that question, which is why the subtitle makes a lot of sense. The authors of Freakonomics collected pieces from their blog in the book When to Rob a Bank...and 131 more warped suggestions and well-intended rants. In celebration of the tenth anniversary of Fr...

    After a certain amount of disappointment caused by the previous Freaknomics inspired book, Think Like a Freak, I was prepared to find the latest equally disappointing. After all, the authors admit this is just a transcription of parts of their blog. In economics terms, as they point ou...

    When to Rob a Bank by Steven Levitt & Stephen Dubner. This makes the fourth Freakonomics branded book I?ve read by Levitt and Dubner and the experience has been uneven at best. The first Freakonoimics book was interesting, albeit a little directionless. Super Freakonomics had...

    DNF. Abandoned at 32% Source: Library e-book Sometimes when I'm reading something dense or intense, I like to have a book going on the side that lends itself to an easy pick up/put down as a breather. Well, this one is definitely easy to put down. This book reminded me of three...

    Freakonomics this is not -- I love Freakonomics and Levitt was great with it. This is a follow-up but content taken from his blog. This is okay and it makes for a great light ---sporadic read. That means you can read it like a bathroom reader and consume a page or two at a time and not...

  • Priya
    Dec 30, 2015

    DNF'd. This book is really patchy. The blogs - for that's what they were - go from really bad, almost facetious and ill-researched topics to some interesting ideas. The percentage of interesting to blah is only about 10% so rather than waste 90% of my time, I will spend it reading some...

    Full disclosure, I did not finish this book. I had to put it down after 50 pages or so because my blood pressure was through the roof and my eye was twitching. The collection of blog posts in this book range from interesting to unreasonably insane. Unfortunately there were too many ...

    This book is a blog highlight reel, and lacks all of the analytical depth that the earlier writings of these "rogue" economists drew me in with. The effect is one of having an intelligent friend mention stray thoughts he'd had earlier that afternoon, many of which could lead to great d...

    This is a collection of blog essays from the Freakonomics blog. The first part of the book arranges the essays by topic. As mentioned in the book itself, the second part of the book lacks any organization; the essays seem to be in a completely random order. The essays are short, and ar...

    Levitt should NOT NARRATE. Please have Dubner read all future books. (I listened to the audiobook.) I love Levitt?s brain, but when he talks it?s hard for me to concentrate on what he says. He does not enunciate his words. My mind wanders. I replayed two sentences twice and I st...

    Because I am a big fan of Levitt and Dubner Works, I feel entitled to write this review. I have to admit, there has never been in my reading life, a series in which I was extremely absorbed like the Freaknomics Series. I never read all books published under one title consequently. I al...

    There is no good answer to that question, which is why the subtitle makes a lot of sense. The authors of Freakonomics collected pieces from their blog in the book When to Rob a Bank...and 131 more warped suggestions and well-intended rants. In celebration of the tenth anniversary of Fr...

    After a certain amount of disappointment caused by the previous Freaknomics inspired book, Think Like a Freak, I was prepared to find the latest equally disappointing. After all, the authors admit this is just a transcription of parts of their blog. In economics terms, as they point ou...

    When to Rob a Bank by Steven Levitt & Stephen Dubner. This makes the fourth Freakonomics branded book I?ve read by Levitt and Dubner and the experience has been uneven at best. The first Freakonoimics book was interesting, albeit a little directionless. Super Freakonomics had...

    DNF. Abandoned at 32% Source: Library e-book Sometimes when I'm reading something dense or intense, I like to have a book going on the side that lends itself to an easy pick up/put down as a breather. Well, this one is definitely easy to put down. This book reminded me of three...

    Freakonomics this is not -- I love Freakonomics and Levitt was great with it. This is a follow-up but content taken from his blog. This is okay and it makes for a great light ---sporadic read. That means you can read it like a bathroom reader and consume a page or two at a time and not...

    Insightful and entertaining as ever! Due to it's chaos organized way of publishing made it an easy read too. ...

    Interesting. There are many thought provoking articles about a myriad of topics. Mostly random, but still thorough. I enjoyed the Global Warming post, and there is also some comedy. ...

    Love this series Another interesting look at life from these two. I listen to their podcasts, but I didn't realize they had a blog. Fun, thought-provoking reading. ...

    This is just a collection of blog entries you can read online for free, which would have disappointed me more if I'd bought it instead of getting it out of the library. I've never read the blog, so it is useful to have the top posts curated in one place that I can read without backligh...

    If you like ?Freakonomics?, the book, you will find this collection similar. It is the same folks, covering the same kinds of topics with the same kind of humor and style. But these are snippets from their online blog, and while some topics curried a lot of interest in me, most of ...

    I bought this on sale on Amazon and I'm really sorry I did. I vaguely remember at least somewhat enjoying Freakonomics, but this is a hot mess of disorganized blogorrhea that accomplished nothing except making me angry. There's little to no actual data or in-depth analysis, just a bunc...

    This collection of blog posts from the Freakonomics blog is, page for page, probably the most thought provoking book I think I have ever read! Hilarious, sad, interesting, depressing, disappointing, uplifting, and so on. Amazing, quick book that reads more like a magazine. Highly recom...

    Freakonomics was awesome! Superfreakonomics was good. This book - well, this is just a collection of blogposts of the authors with a tinge of the characteristic 'freakonomics' humor and analysis in them. The 300 odd pages can make for a casual read on a boring Sunday afternoon, but ...

  • Jane Stewart
    Jul 03, 2015

    DNF'd. This book is really patchy. The blogs - for that's what they were - go from really bad, almost facetious and ill-researched topics to some interesting ideas. The percentage of interesting to blah is only about 10% so rather than waste 90% of my time, I will spend it reading some...

    Full disclosure, I did not finish this book. I had to put it down after 50 pages or so because my blood pressure was through the roof and my eye was twitching. The collection of blog posts in this book range from interesting to unreasonably insane. Unfortunately there were too many ...

    This book is a blog highlight reel, and lacks all of the analytical depth that the earlier writings of these "rogue" economists drew me in with. The effect is one of having an intelligent friend mention stray thoughts he'd had earlier that afternoon, many of which could lead to great d...

    This is a collection of blog essays from the Freakonomics blog. The first part of the book arranges the essays by topic. As mentioned in the book itself, the second part of the book lacks any organization; the essays seem to be in a completely random order. The essays are short, and ar...

    Levitt should NOT NARRATE. Please have Dubner read all future books. (I listened to the audiobook.) I love Levitt?s brain, but when he talks it?s hard for me to concentrate on what he says. He does not enunciate his words. My mind wanders. I replayed two sentences twice and I st...

  • Luis
    Sep 18, 2017

    DNF'd. This book is really patchy. The blogs - for that's what they were - go from really bad, almost facetious and ill-researched topics to some interesting ideas. The percentage of interesting to blah is only about 10% so rather than waste 90% of my time, I will spend it reading some...

    Full disclosure, I did not finish this book. I had to put it down after 50 pages or so because my blood pressure was through the roof and my eye was twitching. The collection of blog posts in this book range from interesting to unreasonably insane. Unfortunately there were too many ...

    This book is a blog highlight reel, and lacks all of the analytical depth that the earlier writings of these "rogue" economists drew me in with. The effect is one of having an intelligent friend mention stray thoughts he'd had earlier that afternoon, many of which could lead to great d...

    This is a collection of blog essays from the Freakonomics blog. The first part of the book arranges the essays by topic. As mentioned in the book itself, the second part of the book lacks any organization; the essays seem to be in a completely random order. The essays are short, and ar...

    Levitt should NOT NARRATE. Please have Dubner read all future books. (I listened to the audiobook.) I love Levitt?s brain, but when he talks it?s hard for me to concentrate on what he says. He does not enunciate his words. My mind wanders. I replayed two sentences twice and I st...

    Because I am a big fan of Levitt and Dubner Works, I feel entitled to write this review. I have to admit, there has never been in my reading life, a series in which I was extremely absorbed like the Freaknomics Series. I never read all books published under one title consequently. I al...

    There is no good answer to that question, which is why the subtitle makes a lot of sense. The authors of Freakonomics collected pieces from their blog in the book When to Rob a Bank...and 131 more warped suggestions and well-intended rants. In celebration of the tenth anniversary of Fr...

    After a certain amount of disappointment caused by the previous Freaknomics inspired book, Think Like a Freak, I was prepared to find the latest equally disappointing. After all, the authors admit this is just a transcription of parts of their blog. In economics terms, as they point ou...

    When to Rob a Bank by Steven Levitt & Stephen Dubner. This makes the fourth Freakonomics branded book I?ve read by Levitt and Dubner and the experience has been uneven at best. The first Freakonoimics book was interesting, albeit a little directionless. Super Freakonomics had...

    DNF. Abandoned at 32% Source: Library e-book Sometimes when I'm reading something dense or intense, I like to have a book going on the side that lends itself to an easy pick up/put down as a breather. Well, this one is definitely easy to put down. This book reminded me of three...

    Freakonomics this is not -- I love Freakonomics and Levitt was great with it. This is a follow-up but content taken from his blog. This is okay and it makes for a great light ---sporadic read. That means you can read it like a bathroom reader and consume a page or two at a time and not...

    Insightful and entertaining as ever! Due to it's chaos organized way of publishing made it an easy read too. ...

    Interesting. There are many thought provoking articles about a myriad of topics. Mostly random, but still thorough. I enjoyed the Global Warming post, and there is also some comedy. ...

    Love this series Another interesting look at life from these two. I listen to their podcasts, but I didn't realize they had a blog. Fun, thought-provoking reading. ...

    This is just a collection of blog entries you can read online for free, which would have disappointed me more if I'd bought it instead of getting it out of the library. I've never read the blog, so it is useful to have the top posts curated in one place that I can read without backligh...

    If you like ?Freakonomics?, the book, you will find this collection similar. It is the same folks, covering the same kinds of topics with the same kind of humor and style. But these are snippets from their online blog, and while some topics curried a lot of interest in me, most of ...

    I bought this on sale on Amazon and I'm really sorry I did. I vaguely remember at least somewhat enjoying Freakonomics, but this is a hot mess of disorganized blogorrhea that accomplished nothing except making me angry. There's little to no actual data or in-depth analysis, just a bunc...

    This collection of blog posts from the Freakonomics blog is, page for page, probably the most thought provoking book I think I have ever read! Hilarious, sad, interesting, depressing, disappointing, uplifting, and so on. Amazing, quick book that reads more like a magazine. Highly recom...

    Freakonomics was awesome! Superfreakonomics was good. This book - well, this is just a collection of blogposts of the authors with a tinge of the characteristic 'freakonomics' humor and analysis in them. The 300 odd pages can make for a casual read on a boring Sunday afternoon, but ...

    If you're a regular reader of the Freakonomics blog posts and/or a fan of their podcasts you've likely heard most of the pieces collected here in a sort of greatest hits book from those sources. None the less enjoyable though. ...

    Just a collection of their blog posts, which are mostly excellent, but also pretty superficial due to the nature of the medium. But a good, quick read and a reminder of how much I love their writing and the way they see the world. Maybe I should have been an economist. ...

    When to Rob a Bank is indeed a collection of well-intended rants. Just like the companies that fill drinking water that is accessible to you for free in a bottle and then charge you for it, this book gathers the best of the blog posts from the "Freakonomics" blog, edits them, categoriz...

    I'm rating this three stars for both the content and the narration. This is a collection of the authors' blog posts on a variety of subjects, and while some of them were interesting to me, others were not. I have to admit that I had no idea who these authors were and I never read their...

    I do see why some people disliked this book so much - it's humorous and the ideas explored here are...well, blogs. They aren't detailed studies, they are opinions and thought experiments expressed in a short and funny way. Some are interesting and thought provoking, others might seem q...

    I really enjoyed this collection of blog posts from the authors of Freakonomics. The book went by quickly for me as you can hop from short blog post to short blog post. Along the way you will revisit some stories or ideas from previous books, but also get a more in depth look at our au...

  • Jami
    Jul 18, 2017

    DNF'd. This book is really patchy. The blogs - for that's what they were - go from really bad, almost facetious and ill-researched topics to some interesting ideas. The percentage of interesting to blah is only about 10% so rather than waste 90% of my time, I will spend it reading some...

    Full disclosure, I did not finish this book. I had to put it down after 50 pages or so because my blood pressure was through the roof and my eye was twitching. The collection of blog posts in this book range from interesting to unreasonably insane. Unfortunately there were too many ...

    This book is a blog highlight reel, and lacks all of the analytical depth that the earlier writings of these "rogue" economists drew me in with. The effect is one of having an intelligent friend mention stray thoughts he'd had earlier that afternoon, many of which could lead to great d...

    This is a collection of blog essays from the Freakonomics blog. The first part of the book arranges the essays by topic. As mentioned in the book itself, the second part of the book lacks any organization; the essays seem to be in a completely random order. The essays are short, and ar...

    Levitt should NOT NARRATE. Please have Dubner read all future books. (I listened to the audiobook.) I love Levitt?s brain, but when he talks it?s hard for me to concentrate on what he says. He does not enunciate his words. My mind wanders. I replayed two sentences twice and I st...

    Because I am a big fan of Levitt and Dubner Works, I feel entitled to write this review. I have to admit, there has never been in my reading life, a series in which I was extremely absorbed like the Freaknomics Series. I never read all books published under one title consequently. I al...

    There is no good answer to that question, which is why the subtitle makes a lot of sense. The authors of Freakonomics collected pieces from their blog in the book When to Rob a Bank...and 131 more warped suggestions and well-intended rants. In celebration of the tenth anniversary of Fr...

    After a certain amount of disappointment caused by the previous Freaknomics inspired book, Think Like a Freak, I was prepared to find the latest equally disappointing. After all, the authors admit this is just a transcription of parts of their blog. In economics terms, as they point ou...

    When to Rob a Bank by Steven Levitt & Stephen Dubner. This makes the fourth Freakonomics branded book I?ve read by Levitt and Dubner and the experience has been uneven at best. The first Freakonoimics book was interesting, albeit a little directionless. Super Freakonomics had...

    DNF. Abandoned at 32% Source: Library e-book Sometimes when I'm reading something dense or intense, I like to have a book going on the side that lends itself to an easy pick up/put down as a breather. Well, this one is definitely easy to put down. This book reminded me of three...

    Freakonomics this is not -- I love Freakonomics and Levitt was great with it. This is a follow-up but content taken from his blog. This is okay and it makes for a great light ---sporadic read. That means you can read it like a bathroom reader and consume a page or two at a time and not...

    Insightful and entertaining as ever! Due to it's chaos organized way of publishing made it an easy read too. ...

    Interesting. There are many thought provoking articles about a myriad of topics. Mostly random, but still thorough. I enjoyed the Global Warming post, and there is also some comedy. ...

    Love this series Another interesting look at life from these two. I listen to their podcasts, but I didn't realize they had a blog. Fun, thought-provoking reading. ...

    This is just a collection of blog entries you can read online for free, which would have disappointed me more if I'd bought it instead of getting it out of the library. I've never read the blog, so it is useful to have the top posts curated in one place that I can read without backligh...

    If you like ?Freakonomics?, the book, you will find this collection similar. It is the same folks, covering the same kinds of topics with the same kind of humor and style. But these are snippets from their online blog, and while some topics curried a lot of interest in me, most of ...

    I bought this on sale on Amazon and I'm really sorry I did. I vaguely remember at least somewhat enjoying Freakonomics, but this is a hot mess of disorganized blogorrhea that accomplished nothing except making me angry. There's little to no actual data or in-depth analysis, just a bunc...

    This collection of blog posts from the Freakonomics blog is, page for page, probably the most thought provoking book I think I have ever read! Hilarious, sad, interesting, depressing, disappointing, uplifting, and so on. Amazing, quick book that reads more like a magazine. Highly recom...

    Freakonomics was awesome! Superfreakonomics was good. This book - well, this is just a collection of blogposts of the authors with a tinge of the characteristic 'freakonomics' humor and analysis in them. The 300 odd pages can make for a casual read on a boring Sunday afternoon, but ...

    If you're a regular reader of the Freakonomics blog posts and/or a fan of their podcasts you've likely heard most of the pieces collected here in a sort of greatest hits book from those sources. None the less enjoyable though. ...

    Just a collection of their blog posts, which are mostly excellent, but also pretty superficial due to the nature of the medium. But a good, quick read and a reminder of how much I love their writing and the way they see the world. Maybe I should have been an economist. ...

    When to Rob a Bank is indeed a collection of well-intended rants. Just like the companies that fill drinking water that is accessible to you for free in a bottle and then charge you for it, this book gathers the best of the blog posts from the "Freakonomics" blog, edits them, categoriz...

    I'm rating this three stars for both the content and the narration. This is a collection of the authors' blog posts on a variety of subjects, and while some of them were interesting to me, others were not. I have to admit that I had no idea who these authors were and I never read their...

  • Lara7
    Jul 25, 2017

    DNF'd. This book is really patchy. The blogs - for that's what they were - go from really bad, almost facetious and ill-researched topics to some interesting ideas. The percentage of interesting to blah is only about 10% so rather than waste 90% of my time, I will spend it reading some...

    Full disclosure, I did not finish this book. I had to put it down after 50 pages or so because my blood pressure was through the roof and my eye was twitching. The collection of blog posts in this book range from interesting to unreasonably insane. Unfortunately there were too many ...

    This book is a blog highlight reel, and lacks all of the analytical depth that the earlier writings of these "rogue" economists drew me in with. The effect is one of having an intelligent friend mention stray thoughts he'd had earlier that afternoon, many of which could lead to great d...

    This is a collection of blog essays from the Freakonomics blog. The first part of the book arranges the essays by topic. As mentioned in the book itself, the second part of the book lacks any organization; the essays seem to be in a completely random order. The essays are short, and ar...

    Levitt should NOT NARRATE. Please have Dubner read all future books. (I listened to the audiobook.) I love Levitt?s brain, but when he talks it?s hard for me to concentrate on what he says. He does not enunciate his words. My mind wanders. I replayed two sentences twice and I st...

    Because I am a big fan of Levitt and Dubner Works, I feel entitled to write this review. I have to admit, there has never been in my reading life, a series in which I was extremely absorbed like the Freaknomics Series. I never read all books published under one title consequently. I al...

    There is no good answer to that question, which is why the subtitle makes a lot of sense. The authors of Freakonomics collected pieces from their blog in the book When to Rob a Bank...and 131 more warped suggestions and well-intended rants. In celebration of the tenth anniversary of Fr...

    After a certain amount of disappointment caused by the previous Freaknomics inspired book, Think Like a Freak, I was prepared to find the latest equally disappointing. After all, the authors admit this is just a transcription of parts of their blog. In economics terms, as they point ou...

    When to Rob a Bank by Steven Levitt & Stephen Dubner. This makes the fourth Freakonomics branded book I?ve read by Levitt and Dubner and the experience has been uneven at best. The first Freakonoimics book was interesting, albeit a little directionless. Super Freakonomics had...

    DNF. Abandoned at 32% Source: Library e-book Sometimes when I'm reading something dense or intense, I like to have a book going on the side that lends itself to an easy pick up/put down as a breather. Well, this one is definitely easy to put down. This book reminded me of three...

    Freakonomics this is not -- I love Freakonomics and Levitt was great with it. This is a follow-up but content taken from his blog. This is okay and it makes for a great light ---sporadic read. That means you can read it like a bathroom reader and consume a page or two at a time and not...

    Insightful and entertaining as ever! Due to it's chaos organized way of publishing made it an easy read too. ...

    Interesting. There are many thought provoking articles about a myriad of topics. Mostly random, but still thorough. I enjoyed the Global Warming post, and there is also some comedy. ...

    Love this series Another interesting look at life from these two. I listen to their podcasts, but I didn't realize they had a blog. Fun, thought-provoking reading. ...

    This is just a collection of blog entries you can read online for free, which would have disappointed me more if I'd bought it instead of getting it out of the library. I've never read the blog, so it is useful to have the top posts curated in one place that I can read without backligh...

    If you like ?Freakonomics?, the book, you will find this collection similar. It is the same folks, covering the same kinds of topics with the same kind of humor and style. But these are snippets from their online blog, and while some topics curried a lot of interest in me, most of ...

    I bought this on sale on Amazon and I'm really sorry I did. I vaguely remember at least somewhat enjoying Freakonomics, but this is a hot mess of disorganized blogorrhea that accomplished nothing except making me angry. There's little to no actual data or in-depth analysis, just a bunc...

    This collection of blog posts from the Freakonomics blog is, page for page, probably the most thought provoking book I think I have ever read! Hilarious, sad, interesting, depressing, disappointing, uplifting, and so on. Amazing, quick book that reads more like a magazine. Highly recom...

    Freakonomics was awesome! Superfreakonomics was good. This book - well, this is just a collection of blogposts of the authors with a tinge of the characteristic 'freakonomics' humor and analysis in them. The 300 odd pages can make for a casual read on a boring Sunday afternoon, but ...

    If you're a regular reader of the Freakonomics blog posts and/or a fan of their podcasts you've likely heard most of the pieces collected here in a sort of greatest hits book from those sources. None the less enjoyable though. ...

    Just a collection of their blog posts, which are mostly excellent, but also pretty superficial due to the nature of the medium. But a good, quick read and a reminder of how much I love their writing and the way they see the world. Maybe I should have been an economist. ...

    When to Rob a Bank is indeed a collection of well-intended rants. Just like the companies that fill drinking water that is accessible to you for free in a bottle and then charge you for it, this book gathers the best of the blog posts from the "Freakonomics" blog, edits them, categoriz...

    I'm rating this three stars for both the content and the narration. This is a collection of the authors' blog posts on a variety of subjects, and while some of them were interesting to me, others were not. I have to admit that I had no idea who these authors were and I never read their...

    I do see why some people disliked this book so much - it's humorous and the ideas explored here are...well, blogs. They aren't detailed studies, they are opinions and thought experiments expressed in a short and funny way. Some are interesting and thought provoking, others might seem q...

    I really enjoyed this collection of blog posts from the authors of Freakonomics. The book went by quickly for me as you can hop from short blog post to short blog post. Along the way you will revisit some stories or ideas from previous books, but also get a more in depth look at our au...

    Overall, I found myself really bored by this book. The little "gems of knowledge" were superficial and not particularly interesting. The authors expose on his gambling habits were a real snooze. The more I tried to finish this book, the more I realized I hated wasting my time on it. T...

    collection of blog posts, but still good. best takeaway: Bank employees who embezzle never take vacation (because the temp would discover the cooked books). ...

  • Brian Clegg
    Jun 27, 2015

    DNF'd. This book is really patchy. The blogs - for that's what they were - go from really bad, almost facetious and ill-researched topics to some interesting ideas. The percentage of interesting to blah is only about 10% so rather than waste 90% of my time, I will spend it reading some...

    Full disclosure, I did not finish this book. I had to put it down after 50 pages or so because my blood pressure was through the roof and my eye was twitching. The collection of blog posts in this book range from interesting to unreasonably insane. Unfortunately there were too many ...

    This book is a blog highlight reel, and lacks all of the analytical depth that the earlier writings of these "rogue" economists drew me in with. The effect is one of having an intelligent friend mention stray thoughts he'd had earlier that afternoon, many of which could lead to great d...

    This is a collection of blog essays from the Freakonomics blog. The first part of the book arranges the essays by topic. As mentioned in the book itself, the second part of the book lacks any organization; the essays seem to be in a completely random order. The essays are short, and ar...

    Levitt should NOT NARRATE. Please have Dubner read all future books. (I listened to the audiobook.) I love Levitt?s brain, but when he talks it?s hard for me to concentrate on what he says. He does not enunciate his words. My mind wanders. I replayed two sentences twice and I st...

    Because I am a big fan of Levitt and Dubner Works, I feel entitled to write this review. I have to admit, there has never been in my reading life, a series in which I was extremely absorbed like the Freaknomics Series. I never read all books published under one title consequently. I al...

    There is no good answer to that question, which is why the subtitle makes a lot of sense. The authors of Freakonomics collected pieces from their blog in the book When to Rob a Bank...and 131 more warped suggestions and well-intended rants. In celebration of the tenth anniversary of Fr...

    After a certain amount of disappointment caused by the previous Freaknomics inspired book, Think Like a Freak, I was prepared to find the latest equally disappointing. After all, the authors admit this is just a transcription of parts of their blog. In economics terms, as they point ou...

  • Holly
    May 24, 2017

    DNF'd. This book is really patchy. The blogs - for that's what they were - go from really bad, almost facetious and ill-researched topics to some interesting ideas. The percentage of interesting to blah is only about 10% so rather than waste 90% of my time, I will spend it reading some...

    Full disclosure, I did not finish this book. I had to put it down after 50 pages or so because my blood pressure was through the roof and my eye was twitching. The collection of blog posts in this book range from interesting to unreasonably insane. Unfortunately there were too many ...

    This book is a blog highlight reel, and lacks all of the analytical depth that the earlier writings of these "rogue" economists drew me in with. The effect is one of having an intelligent friend mention stray thoughts he'd had earlier that afternoon, many of which could lead to great d...

    This is a collection of blog essays from the Freakonomics blog. The first part of the book arranges the essays by topic. As mentioned in the book itself, the second part of the book lacks any organization; the essays seem to be in a completely random order. The essays are short, and ar...

    Levitt should NOT NARRATE. Please have Dubner read all future books. (I listened to the audiobook.) I love Levitt?s brain, but when he talks it?s hard for me to concentrate on what he says. He does not enunciate his words. My mind wanders. I replayed two sentences twice and I st...

    Because I am a big fan of Levitt and Dubner Works, I feel entitled to write this review. I have to admit, there has never been in my reading life, a series in which I was extremely absorbed like the Freaknomics Series. I never read all books published under one title consequently. I al...

    There is no good answer to that question, which is why the subtitle makes a lot of sense. The authors of Freakonomics collected pieces from their blog in the book When to Rob a Bank...and 131 more warped suggestions and well-intended rants. In celebration of the tenth anniversary of Fr...

    After a certain amount of disappointment caused by the previous Freaknomics inspired book, Think Like a Freak, I was prepared to find the latest equally disappointing. After all, the authors admit this is just a transcription of parts of their blog. In economics terms, as they point ou...

    When to Rob a Bank by Steven Levitt & Stephen Dubner. This makes the fourth Freakonomics branded book I?ve read by Levitt and Dubner and the experience has been uneven at best. The first Freakonoimics book was interesting, albeit a little directionless. Super Freakonomics had...

    DNF. Abandoned at 32% Source: Library e-book Sometimes when I'm reading something dense or intense, I like to have a book going on the side that lends itself to an easy pick up/put down as a breather. Well, this one is definitely easy to put down. This book reminded me of three...

    Freakonomics this is not -- I love Freakonomics and Levitt was great with it. This is a follow-up but content taken from his blog. This is okay and it makes for a great light ---sporadic read. That means you can read it like a bathroom reader and consume a page or two at a time and not...

    Insightful and entertaining as ever! Due to it's chaos organized way of publishing made it an easy read too. ...

    Interesting. There are many thought provoking articles about a myriad of topics. Mostly random, but still thorough. I enjoyed the Global Warming post, and there is also some comedy. ...

    Love this series Another interesting look at life from these two. I listen to their podcasts, but I didn't realize they had a blog. Fun, thought-provoking reading. ...

    This is just a collection of blog entries you can read online for free, which would have disappointed me more if I'd bought it instead of getting it out of the library. I've never read the blog, so it is useful to have the top posts curated in one place that I can read without backligh...

    If you like ?Freakonomics?, the book, you will find this collection similar. It is the same folks, covering the same kinds of topics with the same kind of humor and style. But these are snippets from their online blog, and while some topics curried a lot of interest in me, most of ...

    I bought this on sale on Amazon and I'm really sorry I did. I vaguely remember at least somewhat enjoying Freakonomics, but this is a hot mess of disorganized blogorrhea that accomplished nothing except making me angry. There's little to no actual data or in-depth analysis, just a bunc...

    This collection of blog posts from the Freakonomics blog is, page for page, probably the most thought provoking book I think I have ever read! Hilarious, sad, interesting, depressing, disappointing, uplifting, and so on. Amazing, quick book that reads more like a magazine. Highly recom...

    Freakonomics was awesome! Superfreakonomics was good. This book - well, this is just a collection of blogposts of the authors with a tinge of the characteristic 'freakonomics' humor and analysis in them. The 300 odd pages can make for a casual read on a boring Sunday afternoon, but ...

    If you're a regular reader of the Freakonomics blog posts and/or a fan of their podcasts you've likely heard most of the pieces collected here in a sort of greatest hits book from those sources. None the less enjoyable though. ...

    Just a collection of their blog posts, which are mostly excellent, but also pretty superficial due to the nature of the medium. But a good, quick read and a reminder of how much I love their writing and the way they see the world. Maybe I should have been an economist. ...

    When to Rob a Bank is indeed a collection of well-intended rants. Just like the companies that fill drinking water that is accessible to you for free in a bottle and then charge you for it, this book gathers the best of the blog posts from the "Freakonomics" blog, edits them, categoriz...

    I'm rating this three stars for both the content and the narration. This is a collection of the authors' blog posts on a variety of subjects, and while some of them were interesting to me, others were not. I have to admit that I had no idea who these authors were and I never read their...

    I do see why some people disliked this book so much - it's humorous and the ideas explored here are...well, blogs. They aren't detailed studies, they are opinions and thought experiments expressed in a short and funny way. Some are interesting and thought provoking, others might seem q...

    I really enjoyed this collection of blog posts from the authors of Freakonomics. The book went by quickly for me as you can hop from short blog post to short blog post. Along the way you will revisit some stories or ideas from previous books, but also get a more in depth look at our au...

    Overall, I found myself really bored by this book. The little "gems of knowledge" were superficial and not particularly interesting. The authors expose on his gambling habits were a real snooze. The more I tried to finish this book, the more I realized I hated wasting my time on it. T...

  • Lukas Lovas
    Jul 10, 2017

    DNF'd. This book is really patchy. The blogs - for that's what they were - go from really bad, almost facetious and ill-researched topics to some interesting ideas. The percentage of interesting to blah is only about 10% so rather than waste 90% of my time, I will spend it reading some...

    Full disclosure, I did not finish this book. I had to put it down after 50 pages or so because my blood pressure was through the roof and my eye was twitching. The collection of blog posts in this book range from interesting to unreasonably insane. Unfortunately there were too many ...

    This book is a blog highlight reel, and lacks all of the analytical depth that the earlier writings of these "rogue" economists drew me in with. The effect is one of having an intelligent friend mention stray thoughts he'd had earlier that afternoon, many of which could lead to great d...

    This is a collection of blog essays from the Freakonomics blog. The first part of the book arranges the essays by topic. As mentioned in the book itself, the second part of the book lacks any organization; the essays seem to be in a completely random order. The essays are short, and ar...

    Levitt should NOT NARRATE. Please have Dubner read all future books. (I listened to the audiobook.) I love Levitt?s brain, but when he talks it?s hard for me to concentrate on what he says. He does not enunciate his words. My mind wanders. I replayed two sentences twice and I st...

    Because I am a big fan of Levitt and Dubner Works, I feel entitled to write this review. I have to admit, there has never been in my reading life, a series in which I was extremely absorbed like the Freaknomics Series. I never read all books published under one title consequently. I al...

    There is no good answer to that question, which is why the subtitle makes a lot of sense. The authors of Freakonomics collected pieces from their blog in the book When to Rob a Bank...and 131 more warped suggestions and well-intended rants. In celebration of the tenth anniversary of Fr...

    After a certain amount of disappointment caused by the previous Freaknomics inspired book, Think Like a Freak, I was prepared to find the latest equally disappointing. After all, the authors admit this is just a transcription of parts of their blog. In economics terms, as they point ou...

    When to Rob a Bank by Steven Levitt & Stephen Dubner. This makes the fourth Freakonomics branded book I?ve read by Levitt and Dubner and the experience has been uneven at best. The first Freakonoimics book was interesting, albeit a little directionless. Super Freakonomics had...

    DNF. Abandoned at 32% Source: Library e-book Sometimes when I'm reading something dense or intense, I like to have a book going on the side that lends itself to an easy pick up/put down as a breather. Well, this one is definitely easy to put down. This book reminded me of three...

    Freakonomics this is not -- I love Freakonomics and Levitt was great with it. This is a follow-up but content taken from his blog. This is okay and it makes for a great light ---sporadic read. That means you can read it like a bathroom reader and consume a page or two at a time and not...

    Insightful and entertaining as ever! Due to it's chaos organized way of publishing made it an easy read too. ...

    Interesting. There are many thought provoking articles about a myriad of topics. Mostly random, but still thorough. I enjoyed the Global Warming post, and there is also some comedy. ...

    Love this series Another interesting look at life from these two. I listen to their podcasts, but I didn't realize they had a blog. Fun, thought-provoking reading. ...

    This is just a collection of blog entries you can read online for free, which would have disappointed me more if I'd bought it instead of getting it out of the library. I've never read the blog, so it is useful to have the top posts curated in one place that I can read without backligh...

    If you like ?Freakonomics?, the book, you will find this collection similar. It is the same folks, covering the same kinds of topics with the same kind of humor and style. But these are snippets from their online blog, and while some topics curried a lot of interest in me, most of ...

    I bought this on sale on Amazon and I'm really sorry I did. I vaguely remember at least somewhat enjoying Freakonomics, but this is a hot mess of disorganized blogorrhea that accomplished nothing except making me angry. There's little to no actual data or in-depth analysis, just a bunc...

    This collection of blog posts from the Freakonomics blog is, page for page, probably the most thought provoking book I think I have ever read! Hilarious, sad, interesting, depressing, disappointing, uplifting, and so on. Amazing, quick book that reads more like a magazine. Highly recom...

    Freakonomics was awesome! Superfreakonomics was good. This book - well, this is just a collection of blogposts of the authors with a tinge of the characteristic 'freakonomics' humor and analysis in them. The 300 odd pages can make for a casual read on a boring Sunday afternoon, but ...

    If you're a regular reader of the Freakonomics blog posts and/or a fan of their podcasts you've likely heard most of the pieces collected here in a sort of greatest hits book from those sources. None the less enjoyable though. ...

    Just a collection of their blog posts, which are mostly excellent, but also pretty superficial due to the nature of the medium. But a good, quick read and a reminder of how much I love their writing and the way they see the world. Maybe I should have been an economist. ...

    When to Rob a Bank is indeed a collection of well-intended rants. Just like the companies that fill drinking water that is accessible to you for free in a bottle and then charge you for it, this book gathers the best of the blog posts from the "Freakonomics" blog, edits them, categoriz...

    I'm rating this three stars for both the content and the narration. This is a collection of the authors' blog posts on a variety of subjects, and while some of them were interesting to me, others were not. I have to admit that I had no idea who these authors were and I never read their...

    I do see why some people disliked this book so much - it's humorous and the ideas explored here are...well, blogs. They aren't detailed studies, they are opinions and thought experiments expressed in a short and funny way. Some are interesting and thought provoking, others might seem q...

  • Blake
    Jun 15, 2015

    DNF'd. This book is really patchy. The blogs - for that's what they were - go from really bad, almost facetious and ill-researched topics to some interesting ideas. The percentage of interesting to blah is only about 10% so rather than waste 90% of my time, I will spend it reading some...

    Full disclosure, I did not finish this book. I had to put it down after 50 pages or so because my blood pressure was through the roof and my eye was twitching. The collection of blog posts in this book range from interesting to unreasonably insane. Unfortunately there were too many ...

    This book is a blog highlight reel, and lacks all of the analytical depth that the earlier writings of these "rogue" economists drew me in with. The effect is one of having an intelligent friend mention stray thoughts he'd had earlier that afternoon, many of which could lead to great d...

  • Logan Hughes
    May 22, 2015

    DNF'd. This book is really patchy. The blogs - for that's what they were - go from really bad, almost facetious and ill-researched topics to some interesting ideas. The percentage of interesting to blah is only about 10% so rather than waste 90% of my time, I will spend it reading some...

    Full disclosure, I did not finish this book. I had to put it down after 50 pages or so because my blood pressure was through the roof and my eye was twitching. The collection of blog posts in this book range from interesting to unreasonably insane. Unfortunately there were too many ...

    This book is a blog highlight reel, and lacks all of the analytical depth that the earlier writings of these "rogue" economists drew me in with. The effect is one of having an intelligent friend mention stray thoughts he'd had earlier that afternoon, many of which could lead to great d...

    This is a collection of blog essays from the Freakonomics blog. The first part of the book arranges the essays by topic. As mentioned in the book itself, the second part of the book lacks any organization; the essays seem to be in a completely random order. The essays are short, and ar...

    Levitt should NOT NARRATE. Please have Dubner read all future books. (I listened to the audiobook.) I love Levitt?s brain, but when he talks it?s hard for me to concentrate on what he says. He does not enunciate his words. My mind wanders. I replayed two sentences twice and I st...

    Because I am a big fan of Levitt and Dubner Works, I feel entitled to write this review. I have to admit, there has never been in my reading life, a series in which I was extremely absorbed like the Freaknomics Series. I never read all books published under one title consequently. I al...

    There is no good answer to that question, which is why the subtitle makes a lot of sense. The authors of Freakonomics collected pieces from their blog in the book When to Rob a Bank...and 131 more warped suggestions and well-intended rants. In celebration of the tenth anniversary of Fr...

    After a certain amount of disappointment caused by the previous Freaknomics inspired book, Think Like a Freak, I was prepared to find the latest equally disappointing. After all, the authors admit this is just a transcription of parts of their blog. In economics terms, as they point ou...

    When to Rob a Bank by Steven Levitt & Stephen Dubner. This makes the fourth Freakonomics branded book I?ve read by Levitt and Dubner and the experience has been uneven at best. The first Freakonoimics book was interesting, albeit a little directionless. Super Freakonomics had...

    DNF. Abandoned at 32% Source: Library e-book Sometimes when I'm reading something dense or intense, I like to have a book going on the side that lends itself to an easy pick up/put down as a breather. Well, this one is definitely easy to put down. This book reminded me of three...

    Freakonomics this is not -- I love Freakonomics and Levitt was great with it. This is a follow-up but content taken from his blog. This is okay and it makes for a great light ---sporadic read. That means you can read it like a bathroom reader and consume a page or two at a time and not...

    Insightful and entertaining as ever! Due to it's chaos organized way of publishing made it an easy read too. ...

    Interesting. There are many thought provoking articles about a myriad of topics. Mostly random, but still thorough. I enjoyed the Global Warming post, and there is also some comedy. ...

    Love this series Another interesting look at life from these two. I listen to their podcasts, but I didn't realize they had a blog. Fun, thought-provoking reading. ...

    This is just a collection of blog entries you can read online for free, which would have disappointed me more if I'd bought it instead of getting it out of the library. I've never read the blog, so it is useful to have the top posts curated in one place that I can read without backligh...

  • Camly Nguyen
    Aug 17, 2017

    DNF'd. This book is really patchy. The blogs - for that's what they were - go from really bad, almost facetious and ill-researched topics to some interesting ideas. The percentage of interesting to blah is only about 10% so rather than waste 90% of my time, I will spend it reading some...

    Full disclosure, I did not finish this book. I had to put it down after 50 pages or so because my blood pressure was through the roof and my eye was twitching. The collection of blog posts in this book range from interesting to unreasonably insane. Unfortunately there were too many ...

    This book is a blog highlight reel, and lacks all of the analytical depth that the earlier writings of these "rogue" economists drew me in with. The effect is one of having an intelligent friend mention stray thoughts he'd had earlier that afternoon, many of which could lead to great d...

    This is a collection of blog essays from the Freakonomics blog. The first part of the book arranges the essays by topic. As mentioned in the book itself, the second part of the book lacks any organization; the essays seem to be in a completely random order. The essays are short, and ar...

    Levitt should NOT NARRATE. Please have Dubner read all future books. (I listened to the audiobook.) I love Levitt?s brain, but when he talks it?s hard for me to concentrate on what he says. He does not enunciate his words. My mind wanders. I replayed two sentences twice and I st...

    Because I am a big fan of Levitt and Dubner Works, I feel entitled to write this review. I have to admit, there has never been in my reading life, a series in which I was extremely absorbed like the Freaknomics Series. I never read all books published under one title consequently. I al...

    There is no good answer to that question, which is why the subtitle makes a lot of sense. The authors of Freakonomics collected pieces from their blog in the book When to Rob a Bank...and 131 more warped suggestions and well-intended rants. In celebration of the tenth anniversary of Fr...

    After a certain amount of disappointment caused by the previous Freaknomics inspired book, Think Like a Freak, I was prepared to find the latest equally disappointing. After all, the authors admit this is just a transcription of parts of their blog. In economics terms, as they point ou...

    When to Rob a Bank by Steven Levitt & Stephen Dubner. This makes the fourth Freakonomics branded book I?ve read by Levitt and Dubner and the experience has been uneven at best. The first Freakonoimics book was interesting, albeit a little directionless. Super Freakonomics had...

    DNF. Abandoned at 32% Source: Library e-book Sometimes when I'm reading something dense or intense, I like to have a book going on the side that lends itself to an easy pick up/put down as a breather. Well, this one is definitely easy to put down. This book reminded me of three...

    Freakonomics this is not -- I love Freakonomics and Levitt was great with it. This is a follow-up but content taken from his blog. This is okay and it makes for a great light ---sporadic read. That means you can read it like a bathroom reader and consume a page or two at a time and not...

    Insightful and entertaining as ever! Due to it's chaos organized way of publishing made it an easy read too. ...

    Interesting. There are many thought provoking articles about a myriad of topics. Mostly random, but still thorough. I enjoyed the Global Warming post, and there is also some comedy. ...

    Love this series Another interesting look at life from these two. I listen to their podcasts, but I didn't realize they had a blog. Fun, thought-provoking reading. ...

    This is just a collection of blog entries you can read online for free, which would have disappointed me more if I'd bought it instead of getting it out of the library. I've never read the blog, so it is useful to have the top posts curated in one place that I can read without backligh...

    If you like ?Freakonomics?, the book, you will find this collection similar. It is the same folks, covering the same kinds of topics with the same kind of humor and style. But these are snippets from their online blog, and while some topics curried a lot of interest in me, most of ...

    I bought this on sale on Amazon and I'm really sorry I did. I vaguely remember at least somewhat enjoying Freakonomics, but this is a hot mess of disorganized blogorrhea that accomplished nothing except making me angry. There's little to no actual data or in-depth analysis, just a bunc...

    This collection of blog posts from the Freakonomics blog is, page for page, probably the most thought provoking book I think I have ever read! Hilarious, sad, interesting, depressing, disappointing, uplifting, and so on. Amazing, quick book that reads more like a magazine. Highly recom...

    Freakonomics was awesome! Superfreakonomics was good. This book - well, this is just a collection of blogposts of the authors with a tinge of the characteristic 'freakonomics' humor and analysis in them. The 300 odd pages can make for a casual read on a boring Sunday afternoon, but ...

    If you're a regular reader of the Freakonomics blog posts and/or a fan of their podcasts you've likely heard most of the pieces collected here in a sort of greatest hits book from those sources. None the less enjoyable though. ...

    Just a collection of their blog posts, which are mostly excellent, but also pretty superficial due to the nature of the medium. But a good, quick read and a reminder of how much I love their writing and the way they see the world. Maybe I should have been an economist. ...

    When to Rob a Bank is indeed a collection of well-intended rants. Just like the companies that fill drinking water that is accessible to you for free in a bottle and then charge you for it, this book gathers the best of the blog posts from the "Freakonomics" blog, edits them, categoriz...

    I'm rating this three stars for both the content and the narration. This is a collection of the authors' blog posts on a variety of subjects, and while some of them were interesting to me, others were not. I have to admit that I had no idea who these authors were and I never read their...

    I do see why some people disliked this book so much - it's humorous and the ideas explored here are...well, blogs. They aren't detailed studies, they are opinions and thought experiments expressed in a short and funny way. Some are interesting and thought provoking, others might seem q...

    I really enjoyed this collection of blog posts from the authors of Freakonomics. The book went by quickly for me as you can hop from short blog post to short blog post. Along the way you will revisit some stories or ideas from previous books, but also get a more in depth look at our au...

    Overall, I found myself really bored by this book. The little "gems of knowledge" were superficial and not particularly interesting. The authors expose on his gambling habits were a real snooze. The more I tried to finish this book, the more I realized I hated wasting my time on it. T...

    collection of blog posts, but still good. best takeaway: Bank employees who embezzle never take vacation (because the temp would discover the cooked books). ...

    Dnf 20% Eh, picked it up because of the cool title but Jesus, it's just a bunch of small essays. Should've known since it was written on the front page XD. ...

  • S.Baqer Al-Meshqab
    Jun 17, 2016

    DNF'd. This book is really patchy. The blogs - for that's what they were - go from really bad, almost facetious and ill-researched topics to some interesting ideas. The percentage of interesting to blah is only about 10% so rather than waste 90% of my time, I will spend it reading some...

    Full disclosure, I did not finish this book. I had to put it down after 50 pages or so because my blood pressure was through the roof and my eye was twitching. The collection of blog posts in this book range from interesting to unreasonably insane. Unfortunately there were too many ...

    This book is a blog highlight reel, and lacks all of the analytical depth that the earlier writings of these "rogue" economists drew me in with. The effect is one of having an intelligent friend mention stray thoughts he'd had earlier that afternoon, many of which could lead to great d...

    This is a collection of blog essays from the Freakonomics blog. The first part of the book arranges the essays by topic. As mentioned in the book itself, the second part of the book lacks any organization; the essays seem to be in a completely random order. The essays are short, and ar...

    Levitt should NOT NARRATE. Please have Dubner read all future books. (I listened to the audiobook.) I love Levitt?s brain, but when he talks it?s hard for me to concentrate on what he says. He does not enunciate his words. My mind wanders. I replayed two sentences twice and I st...

    Because I am a big fan of Levitt and Dubner Works, I feel entitled to write this review. I have to admit, there has never been in my reading life, a series in which I was extremely absorbed like the Freaknomics Series. I never read all books published under one title consequently. I al...

  • Yaaresse
    Jun 23, 2016

    DNF'd. This book is really patchy. The blogs - for that's what they were - go from really bad, almost facetious and ill-researched topics to some interesting ideas. The percentage of interesting to blah is only about 10% so rather than waste 90% of my time, I will spend it reading some...

    Full disclosure, I did not finish this book. I had to put it down after 50 pages or so because my blood pressure was through the roof and my eye was twitching. The collection of blog posts in this book range from interesting to unreasonably insane. Unfortunately there were too many ...

    This book is a blog highlight reel, and lacks all of the analytical depth that the earlier writings of these "rogue" economists drew me in with. The effect is one of having an intelligent friend mention stray thoughts he'd had earlier that afternoon, many of which could lead to great d...

    This is a collection of blog essays from the Freakonomics blog. The first part of the book arranges the essays by topic. As mentioned in the book itself, the second part of the book lacks any organization; the essays seem to be in a completely random order. The essays are short, and ar...

    Levitt should NOT NARRATE. Please have Dubner read all future books. (I listened to the audiobook.) I love Levitt?s brain, but when he talks it?s hard for me to concentrate on what he says. He does not enunciate his words. My mind wanders. I replayed two sentences twice and I st...

    Because I am a big fan of Levitt and Dubner Works, I feel entitled to write this review. I have to admit, there has never been in my reading life, a series in which I was extremely absorbed like the Freaknomics Series. I never read all books published under one title consequently. I al...

    There is no good answer to that question, which is why the subtitle makes a lot of sense. The authors of Freakonomics collected pieces from their blog in the book When to Rob a Bank...and 131 more warped suggestions and well-intended rants. In celebration of the tenth anniversary of Fr...

    After a certain amount of disappointment caused by the previous Freaknomics inspired book, Think Like a Freak, I was prepared to find the latest equally disappointing. After all, the authors admit this is just a transcription of parts of their blog. In economics terms, as they point ou...

    When to Rob a Bank by Steven Levitt & Stephen Dubner. This makes the fourth Freakonomics branded book I?ve read by Levitt and Dubner and the experience has been uneven at best. The first Freakonoimics book was interesting, albeit a little directionless. Super Freakonomics had...

    DNF. Abandoned at 32% Source: Library e-book Sometimes when I'm reading something dense or intense, I like to have a book going on the side that lends itself to an easy pick up/put down as a breather. Well, this one is definitely easy to put down. This book reminded me of three...

  • Jason Luu
    May 16, 2015

    DNF'd. This book is really patchy. The blogs - for that's what they were - go from really bad, almost facetious and ill-researched topics to some interesting ideas. The percentage of interesting to blah is only about 10% so rather than waste 90% of my time, I will spend it reading some...

    Full disclosure, I did not finish this book. I had to put it down after 50 pages or so because my blood pressure was through the roof and my eye was twitching. The collection of blog posts in this book range from interesting to unreasonably insane. Unfortunately there were too many ...

    This book is a blog highlight reel, and lacks all of the analytical depth that the earlier writings of these "rogue" economists drew me in with. The effect is one of having an intelligent friend mention stray thoughts he'd had earlier that afternoon, many of which could lead to great d...

    This is a collection of blog essays from the Freakonomics blog. The first part of the book arranges the essays by topic. As mentioned in the book itself, the second part of the book lacks any organization; the essays seem to be in a completely random order. The essays are short, and ar...

    Levitt should NOT NARRATE. Please have Dubner read all future books. (I listened to the audiobook.) I love Levitt?s brain, but when he talks it?s hard for me to concentrate on what he says. He does not enunciate his words. My mind wanders. I replayed two sentences twice and I st...

    Because I am a big fan of Levitt and Dubner Works, I feel entitled to write this review. I have to admit, there has never been in my reading life, a series in which I was extremely absorbed like the Freaknomics Series. I never read all books published under one title consequently. I al...

    There is no good answer to that question, which is why the subtitle makes a lot of sense. The authors of Freakonomics collected pieces from their blog in the book When to Rob a Bank...and 131 more warped suggestions and well-intended rants. In celebration of the tenth anniversary of Fr...

    After a certain amount of disappointment caused by the previous Freaknomics inspired book, Think Like a Freak, I was prepared to find the latest equally disappointing. After all, the authors admit this is just a transcription of parts of their blog. In economics terms, as they point ou...

    When to Rob a Bank by Steven Levitt & Stephen Dubner. This makes the fourth Freakonomics branded book I?ve read by Levitt and Dubner and the experience has been uneven at best. The first Freakonoimics book was interesting, albeit a little directionless. Super Freakonomics had...

  • Nathan Howell
    Jan 01, 2016

    DNF'd. This book is really patchy. The blogs - for that's what they were - go from really bad, almost facetious and ill-researched topics to some interesting ideas. The percentage of interesting to blah is only about 10% so rather than waste 90% of my time, I will spend it reading some...

    Full disclosure, I did not finish this book. I had to put it down after 50 pages or so because my blood pressure was through the roof and my eye was twitching. The collection of blog posts in this book range from interesting to unreasonably insane. Unfortunately there were too many ...

    This book is a blog highlight reel, and lacks all of the analytical depth that the earlier writings of these "rogue" economists drew me in with. The effect is one of having an intelligent friend mention stray thoughts he'd had earlier that afternoon, many of which could lead to great d...

    This is a collection of blog essays from the Freakonomics blog. The first part of the book arranges the essays by topic. As mentioned in the book itself, the second part of the book lacks any organization; the essays seem to be in a completely random order. The essays are short, and ar...

    Levitt should NOT NARRATE. Please have Dubner read all future books. (I listened to the audiobook.) I love Levitt?s brain, but when he talks it?s hard for me to concentrate on what he says. He does not enunciate his words. My mind wanders. I replayed two sentences twice and I st...

    Because I am a big fan of Levitt and Dubner Works, I feel entitled to write this review. I have to admit, there has never been in my reading life, a series in which I was extremely absorbed like the Freaknomics Series. I never read all books published under one title consequently. I al...

    There is no good answer to that question, which is why the subtitle makes a lot of sense. The authors of Freakonomics collected pieces from their blog in the book When to Rob a Bank...and 131 more warped suggestions and well-intended rants. In celebration of the tenth anniversary of Fr...

    After a certain amount of disappointment caused by the previous Freaknomics inspired book, Think Like a Freak, I was prepared to find the latest equally disappointing. After all, the authors admit this is just a transcription of parts of their blog. In economics terms, as they point ou...

    When to Rob a Bank by Steven Levitt & Stephen Dubner. This makes the fourth Freakonomics branded book I?ve read by Levitt and Dubner and the experience has been uneven at best. The first Freakonoimics book was interesting, albeit a little directionless. Super Freakonomics had...

    DNF. Abandoned at 32% Source: Library e-book Sometimes when I'm reading something dense or intense, I like to have a book going on the side that lends itself to an easy pick up/put down as a breather. Well, this one is definitely easy to put down. This book reminded me of three...

    Freakonomics this is not -- I love Freakonomics and Levitt was great with it. This is a follow-up but content taken from his blog. This is okay and it makes for a great light ---sporadic read. That means you can read it like a bathroom reader and consume a page or two at a time and not...

    Insightful and entertaining as ever! Due to it's chaos organized way of publishing made it an easy read too. ...

    Interesting. There are many thought provoking articles about a myriad of topics. Mostly random, but still thorough. I enjoyed the Global Warming post, and there is also some comedy. ...

    Love this series Another interesting look at life from these two. I listen to their podcasts, but I didn't realize they had a blog. Fun, thought-provoking reading. ...

    This is just a collection of blog entries you can read online for free, which would have disappointed me more if I'd bought it instead of getting it out of the library. I've never read the blog, so it is useful to have the top posts curated in one place that I can read without backligh...

    If you like ?Freakonomics?, the book, you will find this collection similar. It is the same folks, covering the same kinds of topics with the same kind of humor and style. But these are snippets from their online blog, and while some topics curried a lot of interest in me, most of ...

    I bought this on sale on Amazon and I'm really sorry I did. I vaguely remember at least somewhat enjoying Freakonomics, but this is a hot mess of disorganized blogorrhea that accomplished nothing except making me angry. There's little to no actual data or in-depth analysis, just a bunc...

    This collection of blog posts from the Freakonomics blog is, page for page, probably the most thought provoking book I think I have ever read! Hilarious, sad, interesting, depressing, disappointing, uplifting, and so on. Amazing, quick book that reads more like a magazine. Highly recom...

    Freakonomics was awesome! Superfreakonomics was good. This book - well, this is just a collection of blogposts of the authors with a tinge of the characteristic 'freakonomics' humor and analysis in them. The 300 odd pages can make for a casual read on a boring Sunday afternoon, but ...

    If you're a regular reader of the Freakonomics blog posts and/or a fan of their podcasts you've likely heard most of the pieces collected here in a sort of greatest hits book from those sources. None the less enjoyable though. ...

    Just a collection of their blog posts, which are mostly excellent, but also pretty superficial due to the nature of the medium. But a good, quick read and a reminder of how much I love their writing and the way they see the world. Maybe I should have been an economist. ...

  • Lauren
    Sep 21, 2017

    DNF'd. This book is really patchy. The blogs - for that's what they were - go from really bad, almost facetious and ill-researched topics to some interesting ideas. The percentage of interesting to blah is only about 10% so rather than waste 90% of my time, I will spend it reading some...

    Full disclosure, I did not finish this book. I had to put it down after 50 pages or so because my blood pressure was through the roof and my eye was twitching. The collection of blog posts in this book range from interesting to unreasonably insane. Unfortunately there were too many ...

    This book is a blog highlight reel, and lacks all of the analytical depth that the earlier writings of these "rogue" economists drew me in with. The effect is one of having an intelligent friend mention stray thoughts he'd had earlier that afternoon, many of which could lead to great d...

    This is a collection of blog essays from the Freakonomics blog. The first part of the book arranges the essays by topic. As mentioned in the book itself, the second part of the book lacks any organization; the essays seem to be in a completely random order. The essays are short, and ar...

    Levitt should NOT NARRATE. Please have Dubner read all future books. (I listened to the audiobook.) I love Levitt?s brain, but when he talks it?s hard for me to concentrate on what he says. He does not enunciate his words. My mind wanders. I replayed two sentences twice and I st...

    Because I am a big fan of Levitt and Dubner Works, I feel entitled to write this review. I have to admit, there has never been in my reading life, a series in which I was extremely absorbed like the Freaknomics Series. I never read all books published under one title consequently. I al...

    There is no good answer to that question, which is why the subtitle makes a lot of sense. The authors of Freakonomics collected pieces from their blog in the book When to Rob a Bank...and 131 more warped suggestions and well-intended rants. In celebration of the tenth anniversary of Fr...

    After a certain amount of disappointment caused by the previous Freaknomics inspired book, Think Like a Freak, I was prepared to find the latest equally disappointing. After all, the authors admit this is just a transcription of parts of their blog. In economics terms, as they point ou...

    When to Rob a Bank by Steven Levitt & Stephen Dubner. This makes the fourth Freakonomics branded book I?ve read by Levitt and Dubner and the experience has been uneven at best. The first Freakonoimics book was interesting, albeit a little directionless. Super Freakonomics had...

    DNF. Abandoned at 32% Source: Library e-book Sometimes when I'm reading something dense or intense, I like to have a book going on the side that lends itself to an easy pick up/put down as a breather. Well, this one is definitely easy to put down. This book reminded me of three...

    Freakonomics this is not -- I love Freakonomics and Levitt was great with it. This is a follow-up but content taken from his blog. This is okay and it makes for a great light ---sporadic read. That means you can read it like a bathroom reader and consume a page or two at a time and not...

    Insightful and entertaining as ever! Due to it's chaos organized way of publishing made it an easy read too. ...

    Interesting. There are many thought provoking articles about a myriad of topics. Mostly random, but still thorough. I enjoyed the Global Warming post, and there is also some comedy. ...

    Love this series Another interesting look at life from these two. I listen to their podcasts, but I didn't realize they had a blog. Fun, thought-provoking reading. ...

    This is just a collection of blog entries you can read online for free, which would have disappointed me more if I'd bought it instead of getting it out of the library. I've never read the blog, so it is useful to have the top posts curated in one place that I can read without backligh...

    If you like ?Freakonomics?, the book, you will find this collection similar. It is the same folks, covering the same kinds of topics with the same kind of humor and style. But these are snippets from their online blog, and while some topics curried a lot of interest in me, most of ...

    I bought this on sale on Amazon and I'm really sorry I did. I vaguely remember at least somewhat enjoying Freakonomics, but this is a hot mess of disorganized blogorrhea that accomplished nothing except making me angry. There's little to no actual data or in-depth analysis, just a bunc...

    This collection of blog posts from the Freakonomics blog is, page for page, probably the most thought provoking book I think I have ever read! Hilarious, sad, interesting, depressing, disappointing, uplifting, and so on. Amazing, quick book that reads more like a magazine. Highly recom...

    Freakonomics was awesome! Superfreakonomics was good. This book - well, this is just a collection of blogposts of the authors with a tinge of the characteristic 'freakonomics' humor and analysis in them. The 300 odd pages can make for a casual read on a boring Sunday afternoon, but ...

    If you're a regular reader of the Freakonomics blog posts and/or a fan of their podcasts you've likely heard most of the pieces collected here in a sort of greatest hits book from those sources. None the less enjoyable though. ...

    Just a collection of their blog posts, which are mostly excellent, but also pretty superficial due to the nature of the medium. But a good, quick read and a reminder of how much I love their writing and the way they see the world. Maybe I should have been an economist. ...

    When to Rob a Bank is indeed a collection of well-intended rants. Just like the companies that fill drinking water that is accessible to you for free in a bottle and then charge you for it, this book gathers the best of the blog posts from the "Freakonomics" blog, edits them, categoriz...

    I'm rating this three stars for both the content and the narration. This is a collection of the authors' blog posts on a variety of subjects, and while some of them were interesting to me, others were not. I have to admit that I had no idea who these authors were and I never read their...

    I do see why some people disliked this book so much - it's humorous and the ideas explored here are...well, blogs. They aren't detailed studies, they are opinions and thought experiments expressed in a short and funny way. Some are interesting and thought provoking, others might seem q...

    I really enjoyed this collection of blog posts from the authors of Freakonomics. The book went by quickly for me as you can hop from short blog post to short blog post. Along the way you will revisit some stories or ideas from previous books, but also get a more in depth look at our au...

    Overall, I found myself really bored by this book. The little "gems of knowledge" were superficial and not particularly interesting. The authors expose on his gambling habits were a real snooze. The more I tried to finish this book, the more I realized I hated wasting my time on it. T...

    collection of blog posts, but still good. best takeaway: Bank employees who embezzle never take vacation (because the temp would discover the cooked books). ...

    Dnf 20% Eh, picked it up because of the cool title but Jesus, it's just a bunch of small essays. Should've known since it was written on the front page XD. ...

    Reads like a BuzzFeed Top 10 slideshow. ...

  • Brittany
    Apr 11, 2017

    DNF'd. This book is really patchy. The blogs - for that's what they were - go from really bad, almost facetious and ill-researched topics to some interesting ideas. The percentage of interesting to blah is only about 10% so rather than waste 90% of my time, I will spend it reading some...

    Full disclosure, I did not finish this book. I had to put it down after 50 pages or so because my blood pressure was through the roof and my eye was twitching. The collection of blog posts in this book range from interesting to unreasonably insane. Unfortunately there were too many ...

    This book is a blog highlight reel, and lacks all of the analytical depth that the earlier writings of these "rogue" economists drew me in with. The effect is one of having an intelligent friend mention stray thoughts he'd had earlier that afternoon, many of which could lead to great d...

    This is a collection of blog essays from the Freakonomics blog. The first part of the book arranges the essays by topic. As mentioned in the book itself, the second part of the book lacks any organization; the essays seem to be in a completely random order. The essays are short, and ar...

    Levitt should NOT NARRATE. Please have Dubner read all future books. (I listened to the audiobook.) I love Levitt?s brain, but when he talks it?s hard for me to concentrate on what he says. He does not enunciate his words. My mind wanders. I replayed two sentences twice and I st...

    Because I am a big fan of Levitt and Dubner Works, I feel entitled to write this review. I have to admit, there has never been in my reading life, a series in which I was extremely absorbed like the Freaknomics Series. I never read all books published under one title consequently. I al...

    There is no good answer to that question, which is why the subtitle makes a lot of sense. The authors of Freakonomics collected pieces from their blog in the book When to Rob a Bank...and 131 more warped suggestions and well-intended rants. In celebration of the tenth anniversary of Fr...

    After a certain amount of disappointment caused by the previous Freaknomics inspired book, Think Like a Freak, I was prepared to find the latest equally disappointing. After all, the authors admit this is just a transcription of parts of their blog. In economics terms, as they point ou...

    When to Rob a Bank by Steven Levitt & Stephen Dubner. This makes the fourth Freakonomics branded book I?ve read by Levitt and Dubner and the experience has been uneven at best. The first Freakonoimics book was interesting, albeit a little directionless. Super Freakonomics had...

    DNF. Abandoned at 32% Source: Library e-book Sometimes when I'm reading something dense or intense, I like to have a book going on the side that lends itself to an easy pick up/put down as a breather. Well, this one is definitely easy to put down. This book reminded me of three...

    Freakonomics this is not -- I love Freakonomics and Levitt was great with it. This is a follow-up but content taken from his blog. This is okay and it makes for a great light ---sporadic read. That means you can read it like a bathroom reader and consume a page or two at a time and not...

    Insightful and entertaining as ever! Due to it's chaos organized way of publishing made it an easy read too. ...

    Interesting. There are many thought provoking articles about a myriad of topics. Mostly random, but still thorough. I enjoyed the Global Warming post, and there is also some comedy. ...

    Love this series Another interesting look at life from these two. I listen to their podcasts, but I didn't realize they had a blog. Fun, thought-provoking reading. ...

  • J.K. Riki
    Oct 12, 2015

    DNF'd. This book is really patchy. The blogs - for that's what they were - go from really bad, almost facetious and ill-researched topics to some interesting ideas. The percentage of interesting to blah is only about 10% so rather than waste 90% of my time, I will spend it reading some...

    Full disclosure, I did not finish this book. I had to put it down after 50 pages or so because my blood pressure was through the roof and my eye was twitching. The collection of blog posts in this book range from interesting to unreasonably insane. Unfortunately there were too many ...

  • Zieq Hakim
    May 28, 2016

    DNF'd. This book is really patchy. The blogs - for that's what they were - go from really bad, almost facetious and ill-researched topics to some interesting ideas. The percentage of interesting to blah is only about 10% so rather than waste 90% of my time, I will spend it reading some...

    Full disclosure, I did not finish this book. I had to put it down after 50 pages or so because my blood pressure was through the roof and my eye was twitching. The collection of blog posts in this book range from interesting to unreasonably insane. Unfortunately there were too many ...

    This book is a blog highlight reel, and lacks all of the analytical depth that the earlier writings of these "rogue" economists drew me in with. The effect is one of having an intelligent friend mention stray thoughts he'd had earlier that afternoon, many of which could lead to great d...

    This is a collection of blog essays from the Freakonomics blog. The first part of the book arranges the essays by topic. As mentioned in the book itself, the second part of the book lacks any organization; the essays seem to be in a completely random order. The essays are short, and ar...

    Levitt should NOT NARRATE. Please have Dubner read all future books. (I listened to the audiobook.) I love Levitt?s brain, but when he talks it?s hard for me to concentrate on what he says. He does not enunciate his words. My mind wanders. I replayed two sentences twice and I st...

    Because I am a big fan of Levitt and Dubner Works, I feel entitled to write this review. I have to admit, there has never been in my reading life, a series in which I was extremely absorbed like the Freaknomics Series. I never read all books published under one title consequently. I al...

    There is no good answer to that question, which is why the subtitle makes a lot of sense. The authors of Freakonomics collected pieces from their blog in the book When to Rob a Bank...and 131 more warped suggestions and well-intended rants. In celebration of the tenth anniversary of Fr...

    After a certain amount of disappointment caused by the previous Freaknomics inspired book, Think Like a Freak, I was prepared to find the latest equally disappointing. After all, the authors admit this is just a transcription of parts of their blog. In economics terms, as they point ou...

    When to Rob a Bank by Steven Levitt & Stephen Dubner. This makes the fourth Freakonomics branded book I?ve read by Levitt and Dubner and the experience has been uneven at best. The first Freakonoimics book was interesting, albeit a little directionless. Super Freakonomics had...

    DNF. Abandoned at 32% Source: Library e-book Sometimes when I'm reading something dense or intense, I like to have a book going on the side that lends itself to an easy pick up/put down as a breather. Well, this one is definitely easy to put down. This book reminded me of three...

    Freakonomics this is not -- I love Freakonomics and Levitt was great with it. This is a follow-up but content taken from his blog. This is okay and it makes for a great light ---sporadic read. That means you can read it like a bathroom reader and consume a page or two at a time and not...

    Insightful and entertaining as ever! Due to it's chaos organized way of publishing made it an easy read too. ...

  • Soheil
    Oct 03, 2017

    DNF'd. This book is really patchy. The blogs - for that's what they were - go from really bad, almost facetious and ill-researched topics to some interesting ideas. The percentage of interesting to blah is only about 10% so rather than waste 90% of my time, I will spend it reading some...

    Full disclosure, I did not finish this book. I had to put it down after 50 pages or so because my blood pressure was through the roof and my eye was twitching. The collection of blog posts in this book range from interesting to unreasonably insane. Unfortunately there were too many ...

    This book is a blog highlight reel, and lacks all of the analytical depth that the earlier writings of these "rogue" economists drew me in with. The effect is one of having an intelligent friend mention stray thoughts he'd had earlier that afternoon, many of which could lead to great d...

    This is a collection of blog essays from the Freakonomics blog. The first part of the book arranges the essays by topic. As mentioned in the book itself, the second part of the book lacks any organization; the essays seem to be in a completely random order. The essays are short, and ar...

    Levitt should NOT NARRATE. Please have Dubner read all future books. (I listened to the audiobook.) I love Levitt?s brain, but when he talks it?s hard for me to concentrate on what he says. He does not enunciate his words. My mind wanders. I replayed two sentences twice and I st...

    Because I am a big fan of Levitt and Dubner Works, I feel entitled to write this review. I have to admit, there has never been in my reading life, a series in which I was extremely absorbed like the Freaknomics Series. I never read all books published under one title consequently. I al...

    There is no good answer to that question, which is why the subtitle makes a lot of sense. The authors of Freakonomics collected pieces from their blog in the book When to Rob a Bank...and 131 more warped suggestions and well-intended rants. In celebration of the tenth anniversary of Fr...

    After a certain amount of disappointment caused by the previous Freaknomics inspired book, Think Like a Freak, I was prepared to find the latest equally disappointing. After all, the authors admit this is just a transcription of parts of their blog. In economics terms, as they point ou...

    When to Rob a Bank by Steven Levitt & Stephen Dubner. This makes the fourth Freakonomics branded book I?ve read by Levitt and Dubner and the experience has been uneven at best. The first Freakonoimics book was interesting, albeit a little directionless. Super Freakonomics had...

    DNF. Abandoned at 32% Source: Library e-book Sometimes when I'm reading something dense or intense, I like to have a book going on the side that lends itself to an easy pick up/put down as a breather. Well, this one is definitely easy to put down. This book reminded me of three...

    Freakonomics this is not -- I love Freakonomics and Levitt was great with it. This is a follow-up but content taken from his blog. This is okay and it makes for a great light ---sporadic read. That means you can read it like a bathroom reader and consume a page or two at a time and not...

    Insightful and entertaining as ever! Due to it's chaos organized way of publishing made it an easy read too. ...

    Interesting. There are many thought provoking articles about a myriad of topics. Mostly random, but still thorough. I enjoyed the Global Warming post, and there is also some comedy. ...

    Love this series Another interesting look at life from these two. I listen to their podcasts, but I didn't realize they had a blog. Fun, thought-provoking reading. ...

    This is just a collection of blog entries you can read online for free, which would have disappointed me more if I'd bought it instead of getting it out of the library. I've never read the blog, so it is useful to have the top posts curated in one place that I can read without backligh...

    If you like ?Freakonomics?, the book, you will find this collection similar. It is the same folks, covering the same kinds of topics with the same kind of humor and style. But these are snippets from their online blog, and while some topics curried a lot of interest in me, most of ...

    I bought this on sale on Amazon and I'm really sorry I did. I vaguely remember at least somewhat enjoying Freakonomics, but this is a hot mess of disorganized blogorrhea that accomplished nothing except making me angry. There's little to no actual data or in-depth analysis, just a bunc...

    This collection of blog posts from the Freakonomics blog is, page for page, probably the most thought provoking book I think I have ever read! Hilarious, sad, interesting, depressing, disappointing, uplifting, and so on. Amazing, quick book that reads more like a magazine. Highly recom...

    Freakonomics was awesome! Superfreakonomics was good. This book - well, this is just a collection of blogposts of the authors with a tinge of the characteristic 'freakonomics' humor and analysis in them. The 300 odd pages can make for a casual read on a boring Sunday afternoon, but ...

    If you're a regular reader of the Freakonomics blog posts and/or a fan of their podcasts you've likely heard most of the pieces collected here in a sort of greatest hits book from those sources. None the less enjoyable though. ...

    Just a collection of their blog posts, which are mostly excellent, but also pretty superficial due to the nature of the medium. But a good, quick read and a reminder of how much I love their writing and the way they see the world. Maybe I should have been an economist. ...

    When to Rob a Bank is indeed a collection of well-intended rants. Just like the companies that fill drinking water that is accessible to you for free in a bottle and then charge you for it, this book gathers the best of the blog posts from the "Freakonomics" blog, edits them, categoriz...

  • Blue Phoenix
    Jul 25, 2017

    DNF'd. This book is really patchy. The blogs - for that's what they were - go from really bad, almost facetious and ill-researched topics to some interesting ideas. The percentage of interesting to blah is only about 10% so rather than waste 90% of my time, I will spend it reading some...

    Full disclosure, I did not finish this book. I had to put it down after 50 pages or so because my blood pressure was through the roof and my eye was twitching. The collection of blog posts in this book range from interesting to unreasonably insane. Unfortunately there were too many ...

    This book is a blog highlight reel, and lacks all of the analytical depth that the earlier writings of these "rogue" economists drew me in with. The effect is one of having an intelligent friend mention stray thoughts he'd had earlier that afternoon, many of which could lead to great d...

    This is a collection of blog essays from the Freakonomics blog. The first part of the book arranges the essays by topic. As mentioned in the book itself, the second part of the book lacks any organization; the essays seem to be in a completely random order. The essays are short, and ar...

    Levitt should NOT NARRATE. Please have Dubner read all future books. (I listened to the audiobook.) I love Levitt?s brain, but when he talks it?s hard for me to concentrate on what he says. He does not enunciate his words. My mind wanders. I replayed two sentences twice and I st...

    Because I am a big fan of Levitt and Dubner Works, I feel entitled to write this review. I have to admit, there has never been in my reading life, a series in which I was extremely absorbed like the Freaknomics Series. I never read all books published under one title consequently. I al...

    There is no good answer to that question, which is why the subtitle makes a lot of sense. The authors of Freakonomics collected pieces from their blog in the book When to Rob a Bank...and 131 more warped suggestions and well-intended rants. In celebration of the tenth anniversary of Fr...

    After a certain amount of disappointment caused by the previous Freaknomics inspired book, Think Like a Freak, I was prepared to find the latest equally disappointing. After all, the authors admit this is just a transcription of parts of their blog. In economics terms, as they point ou...

    When to Rob a Bank by Steven Levitt & Stephen Dubner. This makes the fourth Freakonomics branded book I?ve read by Levitt and Dubner and the experience has been uneven at best. The first Freakonoimics book was interesting, albeit a little directionless. Super Freakonomics had...

    DNF. Abandoned at 32% Source: Library e-book Sometimes when I'm reading something dense or intense, I like to have a book going on the side that lends itself to an easy pick up/put down as a breather. Well, this one is definitely easy to put down. This book reminded me of three...

    Freakonomics this is not -- I love Freakonomics and Levitt was great with it. This is a follow-up but content taken from his blog. This is okay and it makes for a great light ---sporadic read. That means you can read it like a bathroom reader and consume a page or two at a time and not...

    Insightful and entertaining as ever! Due to it's chaos organized way of publishing made it an easy read too. ...

    Interesting. There are many thought provoking articles about a myriad of topics. Mostly random, but still thorough. I enjoyed the Global Warming post, and there is also some comedy. ...

  • Tim K
    Nov 30, 2017

    DNF'd. This book is really patchy. The blogs - for that's what they were - go from really bad, almost facetious and ill-researched topics to some interesting ideas. The percentage of interesting to blah is only about 10% so rather than waste 90% of my time, I will spend it reading some...

    Full disclosure, I did not finish this book. I had to put it down after 50 pages or so because my blood pressure was through the roof and my eye was twitching. The collection of blog posts in this book range from interesting to unreasonably insane. Unfortunately there were too many ...

    This book is a blog highlight reel, and lacks all of the analytical depth that the earlier writings of these "rogue" economists drew me in with. The effect is one of having an intelligent friend mention stray thoughts he'd had earlier that afternoon, many of which could lead to great d...

    This is a collection of blog essays from the Freakonomics blog. The first part of the book arranges the essays by topic. As mentioned in the book itself, the second part of the book lacks any organization; the essays seem to be in a completely random order. The essays are short, and ar...

    Levitt should NOT NARRATE. Please have Dubner read all future books. (I listened to the audiobook.) I love Levitt?s brain, but when he talks it?s hard for me to concentrate on what he says. He does not enunciate his words. My mind wanders. I replayed two sentences twice and I st...

    Because I am a big fan of Levitt and Dubner Works, I feel entitled to write this review. I have to admit, there has never been in my reading life, a series in which I was extremely absorbed like the Freaknomics Series. I never read all books published under one title consequently. I al...

    There is no good answer to that question, which is why the subtitle makes a lot of sense. The authors of Freakonomics collected pieces from their blog in the book When to Rob a Bank...and 131 more warped suggestions and well-intended rants. In celebration of the tenth anniversary of Fr...

    After a certain amount of disappointment caused by the previous Freaknomics inspired book, Think Like a Freak, I was prepared to find the latest equally disappointing. After all, the authors admit this is just a transcription of parts of their blog. In economics terms, as they point ou...

    When to Rob a Bank by Steven Levitt & Stephen Dubner. This makes the fourth Freakonomics branded book I?ve read by Levitt and Dubner and the experience has been uneven at best. The first Freakonoimics book was interesting, albeit a little directionless. Super Freakonomics had...

    DNF. Abandoned at 32% Source: Library e-book Sometimes when I'm reading something dense or intense, I like to have a book going on the side that lends itself to an easy pick up/put down as a breather. Well, this one is definitely easy to put down. This book reminded me of three...

    Freakonomics this is not -- I love Freakonomics and Levitt was great with it. This is a follow-up but content taken from his blog. This is okay and it makes for a great light ---sporadic read. That means you can read it like a bathroom reader and consume a page or two at a time and not...

    Insightful and entertaining as ever! Due to it's chaos organized way of publishing made it an easy read too. ...

    Interesting. There are many thought provoking articles about a myriad of topics. Mostly random, but still thorough. I enjoyed the Global Warming post, and there is also some comedy. ...

    Love this series Another interesting look at life from these two. I listen to their podcasts, but I didn't realize they had a blog. Fun, thought-provoking reading. ...

    This is just a collection of blog entries you can read online for free, which would have disappointed me more if I'd bought it instead of getting it out of the library. I've never read the blog, so it is useful to have the top posts curated in one place that I can read without backligh...

    If you like ?Freakonomics?, the book, you will find this collection similar. It is the same folks, covering the same kinds of topics with the same kind of humor and style. But these are snippets from their online blog, and while some topics curried a lot of interest in me, most of ...

    I bought this on sale on Amazon and I'm really sorry I did. I vaguely remember at least somewhat enjoying Freakonomics, but this is a hot mess of disorganized blogorrhea that accomplished nothing except making me angry. There's little to no actual data or in-depth analysis, just a bunc...

    This collection of blog posts from the Freakonomics blog is, page for page, probably the most thought provoking book I think I have ever read! Hilarious, sad, interesting, depressing, disappointing, uplifting, and so on. Amazing, quick book that reads more like a magazine. Highly recom...

    Freakonomics was awesome! Superfreakonomics was good. This book - well, this is just a collection of blogposts of the authors with a tinge of the characteristic 'freakonomics' humor and analysis in them. The 300 odd pages can make for a casual read on a boring Sunday afternoon, but ...

    If you're a regular reader of the Freakonomics blog posts and/or a fan of their podcasts you've likely heard most of the pieces collected here in a sort of greatest hits book from those sources. None the less enjoyable though. ...

    Just a collection of their blog posts, which are mostly excellent, but also pretty superficial due to the nature of the medium. But a good, quick read and a reminder of how much I love their writing and the way they see the world. Maybe I should have been an economist. ...

    When to Rob a Bank is indeed a collection of well-intended rants. Just like the companies that fill drinking water that is accessible to you for free in a bottle and then charge you for it, this book gathers the best of the blog posts from the "Freakonomics" blog, edits them, categoriz...

    I'm rating this three stars for both the content and the narration. This is a collection of the authors' blog posts on a variety of subjects, and while some of them were interesting to me, others were not. I have to admit that I had no idea who these authors were and I never read their...

    I do see why some people disliked this book so much - it's humorous and the ideas explored here are...well, blogs. They aren't detailed studies, they are opinions and thought experiments expressed in a short and funny way. Some are interesting and thought provoking, others might seem q...

    I really enjoyed this collection of blog posts from the authors of Freakonomics. The book went by quickly for me as you can hop from short blog post to short blog post. Along the way you will revisit some stories or ideas from previous books, but also get a more in depth look at our au...

    Overall, I found myself really bored by this book. The little "gems of knowledge" were superficial and not particularly interesting. The authors expose on his gambling habits were a real snooze. The more I tried to finish this book, the more I realized I hated wasting my time on it. T...

    collection of blog posts, but still good. best takeaway: Bank employees who embezzle never take vacation (because the temp would discover the cooked books). ...

    Dnf 20% Eh, picked it up because of the cool title but Jesus, it's just a bunch of small essays. Should've known since it was written on the front page XD. ...

    Reads like a BuzzFeed Top 10 slideshow. ...

    Most content was good to very good........ there were however some very mundane parts..... not as good a book as their previous publications........ but not a total disappointment. ...