So Nude, So Dead

So Nude, So Dead

He?d been a promising piano prodigy, once. Now he was just an addict, scraping to get by, letting his hunger for drugs consume him. But a man?s life can always get worse - as Ray Stone discovers when he wakes up beside a beautiful nightclub singer only to find her dead... and 16 ounces of pure heroin missing. On the run from the law, desperate to prove his innocence and fi He?d been a promising piano prodigy, once. Now he was just an addict, scraping to get by, letting his hunger for dr...

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Title:So Nude, So Dead
Author:Evan Hunter
Rating:
Genres:Mystery
ISBN:The Evil Sleep!
ISBN
Edition Language:English
Format Type:Paperback
Number of Pages:192 pages pages

So Nude, So Dead Reviews

  • Corey
    Aug 09, 2015

    This pulp novel from the early 1950s is of interest principally because it was the first crime novel ever published by Ed McBain, who would go on to become one of the masters of crime fiction, best known for his 87th Precinct series. This book first appeared in 1952 as The Evil Sleep!,...

    Ed McBain (writing as Richard Marsten) takes his first 'stab' at crime fiction. Initially, I thought this may be one man's anti-drug campaign in novel form, but it settles out into an adrenaline fuelled finish. After just finishing Lawrence Block's first novel, Sinner Man, I though...

    Evan Hunter, writing under the pseudonym of Ed McBain, penned this book 60 years ago. It was his first of many, and he shows some surprisingly mature chops as a young writer in this one. Former pianist Ray Stone is a heroin addict in the midst of severe withdrawal, and on the run as...

    Ed McBain's debut novel is a fun, quasi PI read. Ray Stone is an addict. A former pianist who has succumbed to his vice. It's while indulging in this deadly habit that he finds himself chief suspect in the murder of young nightclub singer Eileen; the naked blonde who was dead his de...

    Originally published in 1952 under the title THE EVIL SLEEP! by his, at the time, Evan Hunter pseudonym, it was released in 1956 under this title as by Richard Marsten, another pen name. It hasn't been available in more than fifty years. Hard Case Crime is bringing this edition in July...

    So Nude, So Dead was the first crime novel by the writer most famously known as Ed McBain, and was originally published in 1952 as The Evil Sleep! (under the name of Evan Hunter), and again in 1956 as So Nude, So Dead under the pen name of Richard Marsten. Thanks to those wonderful peo...

    "There's a monkey on my back, a fifteen-pound monkey and his name is Horse." Brilliant. ...

    "So Nude, So Dead" and "Unavailable for over 50 Years" screams the cover. How can you NOT read this early Ed McBain novel, and what's with the pseudonym anyway? Good grief, at about the same time, James Baldwin published "Giovanni's Room" under his own name and it was a far more contro...

    Plot is okay and it's development becomes quite enjoyable once you stop paying too much attention to the story holes (like where are the cops?!?), loose ends and coincidences. The final whodunit is decent although far from shocking. All in all, it's a good, honest and unpretentious wri...

    I picked this up in a bookstore the other day because I liked the lurid, 1950s pulp style of the cover, and the opening chapter was good. I hadn't read Ed McBain before, and I was surprised to read a first novel in which the plotting, dialog, and characters are solid throughout. Th...

    This is a great book that stacks the deck so high against one person that despite Ray Stone's history of addiction to heroin and all the heartbreak he caused the people in his life, you cheer for him to not only clear his name but to also beat his addiction. Awesome book. ...

    What?s in a name? A lot if you decide to call your book ??So Nude, So Dead??. This is a title to conjure with, what on Earth is it about? As this is a ??Hard Case?? title it is likely to be hardboiled and not adverse to a little violence and titillation. However, cons...

    SO NUDE, SO DEAD. (1952). Ed McBain. ***. There?s some history here. This novel was first published as, ?The Evil Sleep,? under the pseudonym Evan Hunter. It was then re-issued as ?So Nude, So Dead,? as by Richard Marston. It was, indeed, Ed McBain?s first crime novel, but...

    A wild ride down a dark street. ...

  • Josh
    Nov 03, 2015

    This pulp novel from the early 1950s is of interest principally because it was the first crime novel ever published by Ed McBain, who would go on to become one of the masters of crime fiction, best known for his 87th Precinct series. This book first appeared in 1952 as The Evil Sleep!,...

    Ed McBain (writing as Richard Marsten) takes his first 'stab' at crime fiction. Initially, I thought this may be one man's anti-drug campaign in novel form, but it settles out into an adrenaline fuelled finish. After just finishing Lawrence Block's first novel, Sinner Man, I though...

    Evan Hunter, writing under the pseudonym of Ed McBain, penned this book 60 years ago. It was his first of many, and he shows some surprisingly mature chops as a young writer in this one. Former pianist Ray Stone is a heroin addict in the midst of severe withdrawal, and on the run as...

    Ed McBain's debut novel is a fun, quasi PI read. Ray Stone is an addict. A former pianist who has succumbed to his vice. It's while indulging in this deadly habit that he finds himself chief suspect in the murder of young nightclub singer Eileen; the naked blonde who was dead his de...

  • Randy
    May 27, 2015

    This pulp novel from the early 1950s is of interest principally because it was the first crime novel ever published by Ed McBain, who would go on to become one of the masters of crime fiction, best known for his 87th Precinct series. This book first appeared in 1952 as The Evil Sleep!,...

    Ed McBain (writing as Richard Marsten) takes his first 'stab' at crime fiction. Initially, I thought this may be one man's anti-drug campaign in novel form, but it settles out into an adrenaline fuelled finish. After just finishing Lawrence Block's first novel, Sinner Man, I though...

    Evan Hunter, writing under the pseudonym of Ed McBain, penned this book 60 years ago. It was his first of many, and he shows some surprisingly mature chops as a young writer in this one. Former pianist Ray Stone is a heroin addict in the midst of severe withdrawal, and on the run as...

    Ed McBain's debut novel is a fun, quasi PI read. Ray Stone is an addict. A former pianist who has succumbed to his vice. It's while indulging in this deadly habit that he finds himself chief suspect in the murder of young nightclub singer Eileen; the naked blonde who was dead his de...

    Originally published in 1952 under the title THE EVIL SLEEP! by his, at the time, Evan Hunter pseudonym, it was released in 1956 under this title as by Richard Marsten, another pen name. It hasn't been available in more than fifty years. Hard Case Crime is bringing this edition in July...

  • Tony
    Oct 17, 2015

    This pulp novel from the early 1950s is of interest principally because it was the first crime novel ever published by Ed McBain, who would go on to become one of the masters of crime fiction, best known for his 87th Precinct series. This book first appeared in 1952 as The Evil Sleep!,...

    Ed McBain (writing as Richard Marsten) takes his first 'stab' at crime fiction. Initially, I thought this may be one man's anti-drug campaign in novel form, but it settles out into an adrenaline fuelled finish. After just finishing Lawrence Block's first novel, Sinner Man, I though...

    Evan Hunter, writing under the pseudonym of Ed McBain, penned this book 60 years ago. It was his first of many, and he shows some surprisingly mature chops as a young writer in this one. Former pianist Ray Stone is a heroin addict in the midst of severe withdrawal, and on the run as...

    Ed McBain's debut novel is a fun, quasi PI read. Ray Stone is an addict. A former pianist who has succumbed to his vice. It's while indulging in this deadly habit that he finds himself chief suspect in the murder of young nightclub singer Eileen; the naked blonde who was dead his de...

    Originally published in 1952 under the title THE EVIL SLEEP! by his, at the time, Evan Hunter pseudonym, it was released in 1956 under this title as by Richard Marsten, another pen name. It hasn't been available in more than fifty years. Hard Case Crime is bringing this edition in July...

    So Nude, So Dead was the first crime novel by the writer most famously known as Ed McBain, and was originally published in 1952 as The Evil Sleep! (under the name of Evan Hunter), and again in 1956 as So Nude, So Dead under the pen name of Richard Marsten. Thanks to those wonderful peo...

    "There's a monkey on my back, a fifteen-pound monkey and his name is Horse." Brilliant. ...

    "So Nude, So Dead" and "Unavailable for over 50 Years" screams the cover. How can you NOT read this early Ed McBain novel, and what's with the pseudonym anyway? Good grief, at about the same time, James Baldwin published "Giovanni's Room" under his own name and it was a far more contro...

    Plot is okay and it's development becomes quite enjoyable once you stop paying too much attention to the story holes (like where are the cops?!?), loose ends and coincidences. The final whodunit is decent although far from shocking. All in all, it's a good, honest and unpretentious wri...

    I picked this up in a bookstore the other day because I liked the lurid, 1950s pulp style of the cover, and the opening chapter was good. I hadn't read Ed McBain before, and I was surprised to read a first novel in which the plotting, dialog, and characters are solid throughout. Th...

    This is a great book that stacks the deck so high against one person that despite Ray Stone's history of addiction to heroin and all the heartbreak he caused the people in his life, you cheer for him to not only clear his name but to also beat his addiction. Awesome book. ...

    What?s in a name? A lot if you decide to call your book ??So Nude, So Dead??. This is a title to conjure with, what on Earth is it about? As this is a ??Hard Case?? title it is likely to be hardboiled and not adverse to a little violence and titillation. However, cons...

    SO NUDE, SO DEAD. (1952). Ed McBain. ***. There?s some history here. This novel was first published as, ?The Evil Sleep,? under the pseudonym Evan Hunter. It was then re-issued as ?So Nude, So Dead,? as by Richard Marston. It was, indeed, Ed McBain?s first crime novel, but...

  • Carol
    Feb 13, 2018

    This pulp novel from the early 1950s is of interest principally because it was the first crime novel ever published by Ed McBain, who would go on to become one of the masters of crime fiction, best known for his 87th Precinct series. This book first appeared in 1952 as The Evil Sleep!,...

    Ed McBain (writing as Richard Marsten) takes his first 'stab' at crime fiction. Initially, I thought this may be one man's anti-drug campaign in novel form, but it settles out into an adrenaline fuelled finish. After just finishing Lawrence Block's first novel, Sinner Man, I though...

    Evan Hunter, writing under the pseudonym of Ed McBain, penned this book 60 years ago. It was his first of many, and he shows some surprisingly mature chops as a young writer in this one. Former pianist Ray Stone is a heroin addict in the midst of severe withdrawal, and on the run as...

    Ed McBain's debut novel is a fun, quasi PI read. Ray Stone is an addict. A former pianist who has succumbed to his vice. It's while indulging in this deadly habit that he finds himself chief suspect in the murder of young nightclub singer Eileen; the naked blonde who was dead his de...

    Originally published in 1952 under the title THE EVIL SLEEP! by his, at the time, Evan Hunter pseudonym, it was released in 1956 under this title as by Richard Marsten, another pen name. It hasn't been available in more than fifty years. Hard Case Crime is bringing this edition in July...

    So Nude, So Dead was the first crime novel by the writer most famously known as Ed McBain, and was originally published in 1952 as The Evil Sleep! (under the name of Evan Hunter), and again in 1956 as So Nude, So Dead under the pen name of Richard Marsten. Thanks to those wonderful peo...

    "There's a monkey on my back, a fifteen-pound monkey and his name is Horse." Brilliant. ...

    "So Nude, So Dead" and "Unavailable for over 50 Years" screams the cover. How can you NOT read this early Ed McBain novel, and what's with the pseudonym anyway? Good grief, at about the same time, James Baldwin published "Giovanni's Room" under his own name and it was a far more contro...

    Plot is okay and it's development becomes quite enjoyable once you stop paying too much attention to the story holes (like where are the cops?!?), loose ends and coincidences. The final whodunit is decent although far from shocking. All in all, it's a good, honest and unpretentious wri...

    I picked this up in a bookstore the other day because I liked the lurid, 1950s pulp style of the cover, and the opening chapter was good. I hadn't read Ed McBain before, and I was surprised to read a first novel in which the plotting, dialog, and characters are solid throughout. Th...

    This is a great book that stacks the deck so high against one person that despite Ray Stone's history of addiction to heroin and all the heartbreak he caused the people in his life, you cheer for him to not only clear his name but to also beat his addiction. Awesome book. ...

    What?s in a name? A lot if you decide to call your book ??So Nude, So Dead??. This is a title to conjure with, what on Earth is it about? As this is a ??Hard Case?? title it is likely to be hardboiled and not adverse to a little violence and titillation. However, cons...

    SO NUDE, SO DEAD. (1952). Ed McBain. ***. There?s some history here. This novel was first published as, ?The Evil Sleep,? under the pseudonym Evan Hunter. It was then re-issued as ?So Nude, So Dead,? as by Richard Marston. It was, indeed, Ed McBain?s first crime novel, but...

    A wild ride down a dark street. ...

    Ray Stone awakes in a hotel room, his body already craving his next shot of heroine, to find his one night stand dead with two bullets in her gut and sixteen ounces of pure horse stolen. I have read many noir novels from the 50?s and 60?s, most of them courtesy of the Hard Case...

    So Nude, So Dead was first published in 1952 with the title The Evil Sleep! under the name Evan Hunter (two years before he found success with The Blackboard Jungle), then reprinted four years later with its current title under the pseudonym Richard Marsten, and finally re-issued in 20...

    The author of So Nude, So Dead is listed as Richard Marsten on Goodreads but is really Ed McBain of 87th Precinct fame. So Nude, So Dead (McBain obviously belonged to the Bill Davis school of book titling) was a first novel, but it is still entertaining over five decades later. It is a...

    Another Hard Case Crime book, another four stars. This one was the first crime book by "Ed McBain" and the hook is genius...A junkie "hophead" in 1950s New York must solve a murder he's the prime suspect in...while fighting off his own withdrawals! Compellingly readable, dependably...

    Evan Hunter/Ed McBain/Richard Marston's first novel. Very well done for a first novel. A heroin addict is on the run for a murder he didn't commit and has to find the real killer while in withdrawal from his addiction. Published 3 times over the years under his 3 pseudonyms. This is th...

    Great story! This is a real page turner. Not only is Ray a dope fiend with a monkey on his back, but he wakes up next to a dead girl with 16 oz of pure heroin missing. Right from the start, I was hooked and had a hard time putting it down at all. I'd highly recommend it! ...

    So Nude, So Dead, So Dull. There is a reason why this has not been reprinted in 50 years. While McBain went on to produce much better books, this one is boring. Read about 70 pages and quit. Might read last chapter, but probably not. Very little mystery, but way too much about drug add...

    I enjoyed this pulp novel about an is one framed for murder, who struggles against his addiction while trying to find the real murderer. ...

    Good early read from Ed McBain. I love how his character changes as the book progresses. the first few paragraphs of Chapter Eleven are worth the time in itself, Pure McBain. ...

    Heroin addict wakes up next to a corpse. The frame fits,the police are searching for him. Now he has to solve the murder and get a fix. ...

  • Mike
    May 04, 2016

    This pulp novel from the early 1950s is of interest principally because it was the first crime novel ever published by Ed McBain, who would go on to become one of the masters of crime fiction, best known for his 87th Precinct series. This book first appeared in 1952 as The Evil Sleep!,...

    Ed McBain (writing as Richard Marsten) takes his first 'stab' at crime fiction. Initially, I thought this may be one man's anti-drug campaign in novel form, but it settles out into an adrenaline fuelled finish. After just finishing Lawrence Block's first novel, Sinner Man, I though...

    Evan Hunter, writing under the pseudonym of Ed McBain, penned this book 60 years ago. It was his first of many, and he shows some surprisingly mature chops as a young writer in this one. Former pianist Ray Stone is a heroin addict in the midst of severe withdrawal, and on the run as...

    Ed McBain's debut novel is a fun, quasi PI read. Ray Stone is an addict. A former pianist who has succumbed to his vice. It's while indulging in this deadly habit that he finds himself chief suspect in the murder of young nightclub singer Eileen; the naked blonde who was dead his de...

    Originally published in 1952 under the title THE EVIL SLEEP! by his, at the time, Evan Hunter pseudonym, it was released in 1956 under this title as by Richard Marsten, another pen name. It hasn't been available in more than fifty years. Hard Case Crime is bringing this edition in July...

    So Nude, So Dead was the first crime novel by the writer most famously known as Ed McBain, and was originally published in 1952 as The Evil Sleep! (under the name of Evan Hunter), and again in 1956 as So Nude, So Dead under the pen name of Richard Marsten. Thanks to those wonderful peo...

    "There's a monkey on my back, a fifteen-pound monkey and his name is Horse." Brilliant. ...

    "So Nude, So Dead" and "Unavailable for over 50 Years" screams the cover. How can you NOT read this early Ed McBain novel, and what's with the pseudonym anyway? Good grief, at about the same time, James Baldwin published "Giovanni's Room" under his own name and it was a far more contro...

    Plot is okay and it's development becomes quite enjoyable once you stop paying too much attention to the story holes (like where are the cops?!?), loose ends and coincidences. The final whodunit is decent although far from shocking. All in all, it's a good, honest and unpretentious wri...

    I picked this up in a bookstore the other day because I liked the lurid, 1950s pulp style of the cover, and the opening chapter was good. I hadn't read Ed McBain before, and I was surprised to read a first novel in which the plotting, dialog, and characters are solid throughout. Th...

    This is a great book that stacks the deck so high against one person that despite Ray Stone's history of addiction to heroin and all the heartbreak he caused the people in his life, you cheer for him to not only clear his name but to also beat his addiction. Awesome book. ...

    What?s in a name? A lot if you decide to call your book ??So Nude, So Dead??. This is a title to conjure with, what on Earth is it about? As this is a ??Hard Case?? title it is likely to be hardboiled and not adverse to a little violence and titillation. However, cons...

    SO NUDE, SO DEAD. (1952). Ed McBain. ***. There?s some history here. This novel was first published as, ?The Evil Sleep,? under the pseudonym Evan Hunter. It was then re-issued as ?So Nude, So Dead,? as by Richard Marston. It was, indeed, Ed McBain?s first crime novel, but...

    A wild ride down a dark street. ...

    Ray Stone awakes in a hotel room, his body already craving his next shot of heroine, to find his one night stand dead with two bullets in her gut and sixteen ounces of pure horse stolen. I have read many noir novels from the 50?s and 60?s, most of them courtesy of the Hard Case...

    So Nude, So Dead was first published in 1952 with the title The Evil Sleep! under the name Evan Hunter (two years before he found success with The Blackboard Jungle), then reprinted four years later with its current title under the pseudonym Richard Marsten, and finally re-issued in 20...

    The author of So Nude, So Dead is listed as Richard Marsten on Goodreads but is really Ed McBain of 87th Precinct fame. So Nude, So Dead (McBain obviously belonged to the Bill Davis school of book titling) was a first novel, but it is still entertaining over five decades later. It is a...

    Another Hard Case Crime book, another four stars. This one was the first crime book by "Ed McBain" and the hook is genius...A junkie "hophead" in 1950s New York must solve a murder he's the prime suspect in...while fighting off his own withdrawals! Compellingly readable, dependably...

    Evan Hunter/Ed McBain/Richard Marston's first novel. Very well done for a first novel. A heroin addict is on the run for a murder he didn't commit and has to find the real killer while in withdrawal from his addiction. Published 3 times over the years under his 3 pseudonyms. This is th...

    Great story! This is a real page turner. Not only is Ray a dope fiend with a monkey on his back, but he wakes up next to a dead girl with 16 oz of pure heroin missing. Right from the start, I was hooked and had a hard time putting it down at all. I'd highly recommend it! ...

    So Nude, So Dead, So Dull. There is a reason why this has not been reprinted in 50 years. While McBain went on to produce much better books, this one is boring. Read about 70 pages and quit. Might read last chapter, but probably not. Very little mystery, but way too much about drug add...

    I enjoyed this pulp novel about an is one framed for murder, who struggles against his addiction while trying to find the real murderer. ...

    Good early read from Ed McBain. I love how his character changes as the book progresses. the first few paragraphs of Chapter Eleven are worth the time in itself, Pure McBain. ...

    Heroin addict wakes up next to a corpse. The frame fits,the police are searching for him. Now he has to solve the murder and get a fix. ...

    A great crime novel about a heroin addict framed for murder and on the run unable to get a fix. The mystery was great and the action was gripping. I didn't want to stop reading. Loved it. ...

    Published 65 years ago, this classic crime noire was a fun read. It fell slightly below the usually higher standard for HCC. I never liked Ray... ...

    I enjoyed it. Hard to put down. Rush, rush, rushing. ...

    As I go further down the rabbit hole that is the Hard Case Crime imprint, I have become a junky looking for his next fix -- much like the main character in this novel. I am not surprised that McBain went on to have lucrative career as a crime/detective novelist. This being his first no...

    The protagonist waking up next to a dead body and everyone in the city believing he is a crazed killer is a staple of noir fiction. There are hundreds of such novels because it is such a compelling set-up. Here, Ed McBain gives us his take on the man-on-the-run noir thriller and he doe...

    Even though much of it is hard to get through, I'm giving Ed McBain's first crime novel--"So Nude, So Dead"--two stars. I bought it mostly from the title and cover art, I'll admit. But the story inside is NOT your usual noir. If you want a more typical noir story, there is one inclu...

  • Steve
    Feb 17, 2016

    This pulp novel from the early 1950s is of interest principally because it was the first crime novel ever published by Ed McBain, who would go on to become one of the masters of crime fiction, best known for his 87th Precinct series. This book first appeared in 1952 as The Evil Sleep!,...

    Ed McBain (writing as Richard Marsten) takes his first 'stab' at crime fiction. Initially, I thought this may be one man's anti-drug campaign in novel form, but it settles out into an adrenaline fuelled finish. After just finishing Lawrence Block's first novel, Sinner Man, I though...

    Evan Hunter, writing under the pseudonym of Ed McBain, penned this book 60 years ago. It was his first of many, and he shows some surprisingly mature chops as a young writer in this one. Former pianist Ray Stone is a heroin addict in the midst of severe withdrawal, and on the run as...

  • James Thane
    Jan 15, 2018

    This pulp novel from the early 1950s is of interest principally because it was the first crime novel ever published by Ed McBain, who would go on to become one of the masters of crime fiction, best known for his 87th Precinct series. This book first appeared in 1952 as The Evil Sleep!,...

  • Craig Childs
    May 06, 2018

    This pulp novel from the early 1950s is of interest principally because it was the first crime novel ever published by Ed McBain, who would go on to become one of the masters of crime fiction, best known for his 87th Precinct series. This book first appeared in 1952 as The Evil Sleep!,...

    Ed McBain (writing as Richard Marsten) takes his first 'stab' at crime fiction. Initially, I thought this may be one man's anti-drug campaign in novel form, but it settles out into an adrenaline fuelled finish. After just finishing Lawrence Block's first novel, Sinner Man, I though...

    Evan Hunter, writing under the pseudonym of Ed McBain, penned this book 60 years ago. It was his first of many, and he shows some surprisingly mature chops as a young writer in this one. Former pianist Ray Stone is a heroin addict in the midst of severe withdrawal, and on the run as...

    Ed McBain's debut novel is a fun, quasi PI read. Ray Stone is an addict. A former pianist who has succumbed to his vice. It's while indulging in this deadly habit that he finds himself chief suspect in the murder of young nightclub singer Eileen; the naked blonde who was dead his de...

    Originally published in 1952 under the title THE EVIL SLEEP! by his, at the time, Evan Hunter pseudonym, it was released in 1956 under this title as by Richard Marsten, another pen name. It hasn't been available in more than fifty years. Hard Case Crime is bringing this edition in July...

    So Nude, So Dead was the first crime novel by the writer most famously known as Ed McBain, and was originally published in 1952 as The Evil Sleep! (under the name of Evan Hunter), and again in 1956 as So Nude, So Dead under the pen name of Richard Marsten. Thanks to those wonderful peo...

    "There's a monkey on my back, a fifteen-pound monkey and his name is Horse." Brilliant. ...

    "So Nude, So Dead" and "Unavailable for over 50 Years" screams the cover. How can you NOT read this early Ed McBain novel, and what's with the pseudonym anyway? Good grief, at about the same time, James Baldwin published "Giovanni's Room" under his own name and it was a far more contro...

    Plot is okay and it's development becomes quite enjoyable once you stop paying too much attention to the story holes (like where are the cops?!?), loose ends and coincidences. The final whodunit is decent although far from shocking. All in all, it's a good, honest and unpretentious wri...

    I picked this up in a bookstore the other day because I liked the lurid, 1950s pulp style of the cover, and the opening chapter was good. I hadn't read Ed McBain before, and I was surprised to read a first novel in which the plotting, dialog, and characters are solid throughout. Th...

    This is a great book that stacks the deck so high against one person that despite Ray Stone's history of addiction to heroin and all the heartbreak he caused the people in his life, you cheer for him to not only clear his name but to also beat his addiction. Awesome book. ...

    What?s in a name? A lot if you decide to call your book ??So Nude, So Dead??. This is a title to conjure with, what on Earth is it about? As this is a ??Hard Case?? title it is likely to be hardboiled and not adverse to a little violence and titillation. However, cons...

    SO NUDE, SO DEAD. (1952). Ed McBain. ***. There?s some history here. This novel was first published as, ?The Evil Sleep,? under the pseudonym Evan Hunter. It was then re-issued as ?So Nude, So Dead,? as by Richard Marston. It was, indeed, Ed McBain?s first crime novel, but...

    A wild ride down a dark street. ...

    Ray Stone awakes in a hotel room, his body already craving his next shot of heroine, to find his one night stand dead with two bullets in her gut and sixteen ounces of pure horse stolen. I have read many noir novels from the 50?s and 60?s, most of them courtesy of the Hard Case...

  • Paul
    Nov 14, 2017

    This pulp novel from the early 1950s is of interest principally because it was the first crime novel ever published by Ed McBain, who would go on to become one of the masters of crime fiction, best known for his 87th Precinct series. This book first appeared in 1952 as The Evil Sleep!,...

    Ed McBain (writing as Richard Marsten) takes his first 'stab' at crime fiction. Initially, I thought this may be one man's anti-drug campaign in novel form, but it settles out into an adrenaline fuelled finish. After just finishing Lawrence Block's first novel, Sinner Man, I though...

  • Sarah
    Feb 06, 2018

    This pulp novel from the early 1950s is of interest principally because it was the first crime novel ever published by Ed McBain, who would go on to become one of the masters of crime fiction, best known for his 87th Precinct series. This book first appeared in 1952 as The Evil Sleep!,...

    Ed McBain (writing as Richard Marsten) takes his first 'stab' at crime fiction. Initially, I thought this may be one man's anti-drug campaign in novel form, but it settles out into an adrenaline fuelled finish. After just finishing Lawrence Block's first novel, Sinner Man, I though...

    Evan Hunter, writing under the pseudonym of Ed McBain, penned this book 60 years ago. It was his first of many, and he shows some surprisingly mature chops as a young writer in this one. Former pianist Ray Stone is a heroin addict in the midst of severe withdrawal, and on the run as...

    Ed McBain's debut novel is a fun, quasi PI read. Ray Stone is an addict. A former pianist who has succumbed to his vice. It's while indulging in this deadly habit that he finds himself chief suspect in the murder of young nightclub singer Eileen; the naked blonde who was dead his de...

    Originally published in 1952 under the title THE EVIL SLEEP! by his, at the time, Evan Hunter pseudonym, it was released in 1956 under this title as by Richard Marsten, another pen name. It hasn't been available in more than fifty years. Hard Case Crime is bringing this edition in July...

    So Nude, So Dead was the first crime novel by the writer most famously known as Ed McBain, and was originally published in 1952 as The Evil Sleep! (under the name of Evan Hunter), and again in 1956 as So Nude, So Dead under the pen name of Richard Marsten. Thanks to those wonderful peo...

    "There's a monkey on my back, a fifteen-pound monkey and his name is Horse." Brilliant. ...

    "So Nude, So Dead" and "Unavailable for over 50 Years" screams the cover. How can you NOT read this early Ed McBain novel, and what's with the pseudonym anyway? Good grief, at about the same time, James Baldwin published "Giovanni's Room" under his own name and it was a far more contro...

    Plot is okay and it's development becomes quite enjoyable once you stop paying too much attention to the story holes (like where are the cops?!?), loose ends and coincidences. The final whodunit is decent although far from shocking. All in all, it's a good, honest and unpretentious wri...

    I picked this up in a bookstore the other day because I liked the lurid, 1950s pulp style of the cover, and the opening chapter was good. I hadn't read Ed McBain before, and I was surprised to read a first novel in which the plotting, dialog, and characters are solid throughout. Th...

    This is a great book that stacks the deck so high against one person that despite Ray Stone's history of addiction to heroin and all the heartbreak he caused the people in his life, you cheer for him to not only clear his name but to also beat his addiction. Awesome book. ...

    What?s in a name? A lot if you decide to call your book ??So Nude, So Dead??. This is a title to conjure with, what on Earth is it about? As this is a ??Hard Case?? title it is likely to be hardboiled and not adverse to a little violence and titillation. However, cons...

    SO NUDE, SO DEAD. (1952). Ed McBain. ***. There?s some history here. This novel was first published as, ?The Evil Sleep,? under the pseudonym Evan Hunter. It was then re-issued as ?So Nude, So Dead,? as by Richard Marston. It was, indeed, Ed McBain?s first crime novel, but...

    A wild ride down a dark street. ...

    Ray Stone awakes in a hotel room, his body already craving his next shot of heroine, to find his one night stand dead with two bullets in her gut and sixteen ounces of pure horse stolen. I have read many noir novels from the 50?s and 60?s, most of them courtesy of the Hard Case...

    So Nude, So Dead was first published in 1952 with the title The Evil Sleep! under the name Evan Hunter (two years before he found success with The Blackboard Jungle), then reprinted four years later with its current title under the pseudonym Richard Marsten, and finally re-issued in 20...

    The author of So Nude, So Dead is listed as Richard Marsten on Goodreads but is really Ed McBain of 87th Precinct fame. So Nude, So Dead (McBain obviously belonged to the Bill Davis school of book titling) was a first novel, but it is still entertaining over five decades later. It is a...

    Another Hard Case Crime book, another four stars. This one was the first crime book by "Ed McBain" and the hook is genius...A junkie "hophead" in 1950s New York must solve a murder he's the prime suspect in...while fighting off his own withdrawals! Compellingly readable, dependably...

    Evan Hunter/Ed McBain/Richard Marston's first novel. Very well done for a first novel. A heroin addict is on the run for a murder he didn't commit and has to find the real killer while in withdrawal from his addiction. Published 3 times over the years under his 3 pseudonyms. This is th...

    Great story! This is a real page turner. Not only is Ray a dope fiend with a monkey on his back, but he wakes up next to a dead girl with 16 oz of pure heroin missing. Right from the start, I was hooked and had a hard time putting it down at all. I'd highly recommend it! ...

    So Nude, So Dead, So Dull. There is a reason why this has not been reprinted in 50 years. While McBain went on to produce much better books, this one is boring. Read about 70 pages and quit. Might read last chapter, but probably not. Very little mystery, but way too much about drug add...

    I enjoyed this pulp novel about an is one framed for murder, who struggles against his addiction while trying to find the real murderer. ...

  • Roger
    Aug 13, 2017

    This pulp novel from the early 1950s is of interest principally because it was the first crime novel ever published by Ed McBain, who would go on to become one of the masters of crime fiction, best known for his 87th Precinct series. This book first appeared in 1952 as The Evil Sleep!,...

    Ed McBain (writing as Richard Marsten) takes his first 'stab' at crime fiction. Initially, I thought this may be one man's anti-drug campaign in novel form, but it settles out into an adrenaline fuelled finish. After just finishing Lawrence Block's first novel, Sinner Man, I though...

    Evan Hunter, writing under the pseudonym of Ed McBain, penned this book 60 years ago. It was his first of many, and he shows some surprisingly mature chops as a young writer in this one. Former pianist Ray Stone is a heroin addict in the midst of severe withdrawal, and on the run as...

    Ed McBain's debut novel is a fun, quasi PI read. Ray Stone is an addict. A former pianist who has succumbed to his vice. It's while indulging in this deadly habit that he finds himself chief suspect in the murder of young nightclub singer Eileen; the naked blonde who was dead his de...

    Originally published in 1952 under the title THE EVIL SLEEP! by his, at the time, Evan Hunter pseudonym, it was released in 1956 under this title as by Richard Marsten, another pen name. It hasn't been available in more than fifty years. Hard Case Crime is bringing this edition in July...

    So Nude, So Dead was the first crime novel by the writer most famously known as Ed McBain, and was originally published in 1952 as The Evil Sleep! (under the name of Evan Hunter), and again in 1956 as So Nude, So Dead under the pen name of Richard Marsten. Thanks to those wonderful peo...

    "There's a monkey on my back, a fifteen-pound monkey and his name is Horse." Brilliant. ...

    "So Nude, So Dead" and "Unavailable for over 50 Years" screams the cover. How can you NOT read this early Ed McBain novel, and what's with the pseudonym anyway? Good grief, at about the same time, James Baldwin published "Giovanni's Room" under his own name and it was a far more contro...

    Plot is okay and it's development becomes quite enjoyable once you stop paying too much attention to the story holes (like where are the cops?!?), loose ends and coincidences. The final whodunit is decent although far from shocking. All in all, it's a good, honest and unpretentious wri...

    I picked this up in a bookstore the other day because I liked the lurid, 1950s pulp style of the cover, and the opening chapter was good. I hadn't read Ed McBain before, and I was surprised to read a first novel in which the plotting, dialog, and characters are solid throughout. Th...

    This is a great book that stacks the deck so high against one person that despite Ray Stone's history of addiction to heroin and all the heartbreak he caused the people in his life, you cheer for him to not only clear his name but to also beat his addiction. Awesome book. ...

    What?s in a name? A lot if you decide to call your book ??So Nude, So Dead??. This is a title to conjure with, what on Earth is it about? As this is a ??Hard Case?? title it is likely to be hardboiled and not adverse to a little violence and titillation. However, cons...

    SO NUDE, SO DEAD. (1952). Ed McBain. ***. There?s some history here. This novel was first published as, ?The Evil Sleep,? under the pseudonym Evan Hunter. It was then re-issued as ?So Nude, So Dead,? as by Richard Marston. It was, indeed, Ed McBain?s first crime novel, but...

    A wild ride down a dark street. ...

    Ray Stone awakes in a hotel room, his body already craving his next shot of heroine, to find his one night stand dead with two bullets in her gut and sixteen ounces of pure horse stolen. I have read many noir novels from the 50?s and 60?s, most of them courtesy of the Hard Case...

    So Nude, So Dead was first published in 1952 with the title The Evil Sleep! under the name Evan Hunter (two years before he found success with The Blackboard Jungle), then reprinted four years later with its current title under the pseudonym Richard Marsten, and finally re-issued in 20...

    The author of So Nude, So Dead is listed as Richard Marsten on Goodreads but is really Ed McBain of 87th Precinct fame. So Nude, So Dead (McBain obviously belonged to the Bill Davis school of book titling) was a first novel, but it is still entertaining over five decades later. It is a...

  • Bert
    Aug 16, 2015

    This pulp novel from the early 1950s is of interest principally because it was the first crime novel ever published by Ed McBain, who would go on to become one of the masters of crime fiction, best known for his 87th Precinct series. This book first appeared in 1952 as The Evil Sleep!,...

    Ed McBain (writing as Richard Marsten) takes his first 'stab' at crime fiction. Initially, I thought this may be one man's anti-drug campaign in novel form, but it settles out into an adrenaline fuelled finish. After just finishing Lawrence Block's first novel, Sinner Man, I though...

    Evan Hunter, writing under the pseudonym of Ed McBain, penned this book 60 years ago. It was his first of many, and he shows some surprisingly mature chops as a young writer in this one. Former pianist Ray Stone is a heroin addict in the midst of severe withdrawal, and on the run as...

    Ed McBain's debut novel is a fun, quasi PI read. Ray Stone is an addict. A former pianist who has succumbed to his vice. It's while indulging in this deadly habit that he finds himself chief suspect in the murder of young nightclub singer Eileen; the naked blonde who was dead his de...

    Originally published in 1952 under the title THE EVIL SLEEP! by his, at the time, Evan Hunter pseudonym, it was released in 1956 under this title as by Richard Marsten, another pen name. It hasn't been available in more than fifty years. Hard Case Crime is bringing this edition in July...

    So Nude, So Dead was the first crime novel by the writer most famously known as Ed McBain, and was originally published in 1952 as The Evil Sleep! (under the name of Evan Hunter), and again in 1956 as So Nude, So Dead under the pen name of Richard Marsten. Thanks to those wonderful peo...

    "There's a monkey on my back, a fifteen-pound monkey and his name is Horse." Brilliant. ...

  • Raven
    Jul 27, 2015

    This pulp novel from the early 1950s is of interest principally because it was the first crime novel ever published by Ed McBain, who would go on to become one of the masters of crime fiction, best known for his 87th Precinct series. This book first appeared in 1952 as The Evil Sleep!,...

    Ed McBain (writing as Richard Marsten) takes his first 'stab' at crime fiction. Initially, I thought this may be one man's anti-drug campaign in novel form, but it settles out into an adrenaline fuelled finish. After just finishing Lawrence Block's first novel, Sinner Man, I though...

    Evan Hunter, writing under the pseudonym of Ed McBain, penned this book 60 years ago. It was his first of many, and he shows some surprisingly mature chops as a young writer in this one. Former pianist Ray Stone is a heroin addict in the midst of severe withdrawal, and on the run as...

    Ed McBain's debut novel is a fun, quasi PI read. Ray Stone is an addict. A former pianist who has succumbed to his vice. It's while indulging in this deadly habit that he finds himself chief suspect in the murder of young nightclub singer Eileen; the naked blonde who was dead his de...

    Originally published in 1952 under the title THE EVIL SLEEP! by his, at the time, Evan Hunter pseudonym, it was released in 1956 under this title as by Richard Marsten, another pen name. It hasn't been available in more than fifty years. Hard Case Crime is bringing this edition in July...

    So Nude, So Dead was the first crime novel by the writer most famously known as Ed McBain, and was originally published in 1952 as The Evil Sleep! (under the name of Evan Hunter), and again in 1956 as So Nude, So Dead under the pen name of Richard Marsten. Thanks to those wonderful peo...

  • Jure
    Jun 17, 2016

    This pulp novel from the early 1950s is of interest principally because it was the first crime novel ever published by Ed McBain, who would go on to become one of the masters of crime fiction, best known for his 87th Precinct series. This book first appeared in 1952 as The Evil Sleep!,...

    Ed McBain (writing as Richard Marsten) takes his first 'stab' at crime fiction. Initially, I thought this may be one man's anti-drug campaign in novel form, but it settles out into an adrenaline fuelled finish. After just finishing Lawrence Block's first novel, Sinner Man, I though...

    Evan Hunter, writing under the pseudonym of Ed McBain, penned this book 60 years ago. It was his first of many, and he shows some surprisingly mature chops as a young writer in this one. Former pianist Ray Stone is a heroin addict in the midst of severe withdrawal, and on the run as...

    Ed McBain's debut novel is a fun, quasi PI read. Ray Stone is an addict. A former pianist who has succumbed to his vice. It's while indulging in this deadly habit that he finds himself chief suspect in the murder of young nightclub singer Eileen; the naked blonde who was dead his de...

    Originally published in 1952 under the title THE EVIL SLEEP! by his, at the time, Evan Hunter pseudonym, it was released in 1956 under this title as by Richard Marsten, another pen name. It hasn't been available in more than fifty years. Hard Case Crime is bringing this edition in July...

    So Nude, So Dead was the first crime novel by the writer most famously known as Ed McBain, and was originally published in 1952 as The Evil Sleep! (under the name of Evan Hunter), and again in 1956 as So Nude, So Dead under the pen name of Richard Marsten. Thanks to those wonderful peo...

    "There's a monkey on my back, a fifteen-pound monkey and his name is Horse." Brilliant. ...

    "So Nude, So Dead" and "Unavailable for over 50 Years" screams the cover. How can you NOT read this early Ed McBain novel, and what's with the pseudonym anyway? Good grief, at about the same time, James Baldwin published "Giovanni's Room" under his own name and it was a far more contro...

    Plot is okay and it's development becomes quite enjoyable once you stop paying too much attention to the story holes (like where are the cops?!?), loose ends and coincidences. The final whodunit is decent although far from shocking. All in all, it's a good, honest and unpretentious wri...

  • Brian
    May 12, 2018

    This pulp novel from the early 1950s is of interest principally because it was the first crime novel ever published by Ed McBain, who would go on to become one of the masters of crime fiction, best known for his 87th Precinct series. This book first appeared in 1952 as The Evil Sleep!,...

    Ed McBain (writing as Richard Marsten) takes his first 'stab' at crime fiction. Initially, I thought this may be one man's anti-drug campaign in novel form, but it settles out into an adrenaline fuelled finish. After just finishing Lawrence Block's first novel, Sinner Man, I though...

    Evan Hunter, writing under the pseudonym of Ed McBain, penned this book 60 years ago. It was his first of many, and he shows some surprisingly mature chops as a young writer in this one. Former pianist Ray Stone is a heroin addict in the midst of severe withdrawal, and on the run as...

    Ed McBain's debut novel is a fun, quasi PI read. Ray Stone is an addict. A former pianist who has succumbed to his vice. It's while indulging in this deadly habit that he finds himself chief suspect in the murder of young nightclub singer Eileen; the naked blonde who was dead his de...

    Originally published in 1952 under the title THE EVIL SLEEP! by his, at the time, Evan Hunter pseudonym, it was released in 1956 under this title as by Richard Marsten, another pen name. It hasn't been available in more than fifty years. Hard Case Crime is bringing this edition in July...

    So Nude, So Dead was the first crime novel by the writer most famously known as Ed McBain, and was originally published in 1952 as The Evil Sleep! (under the name of Evan Hunter), and again in 1956 as So Nude, So Dead under the pen name of Richard Marsten. Thanks to those wonderful peo...

    "There's a monkey on my back, a fifteen-pound monkey and his name is Horse." Brilliant. ...

    "So Nude, So Dead" and "Unavailable for over 50 Years" screams the cover. How can you NOT read this early Ed McBain novel, and what's with the pseudonym anyway? Good grief, at about the same time, James Baldwin published "Giovanni's Room" under his own name and it was a far more contro...

    Plot is okay and it's development becomes quite enjoyable once you stop paying too much attention to the story holes (like where are the cops?!?), loose ends and coincidences. The final whodunit is decent although far from shocking. All in all, it's a good, honest and unpretentious wri...

    I picked this up in a bookstore the other day because I liked the lurid, 1950s pulp style of the cover, and the opening chapter was good. I hadn't read Ed McBain before, and I was surprised to read a first novel in which the plotting, dialog, and characters are solid throughout. Th...

    This is a great book that stacks the deck so high against one person that despite Ray Stone's history of addiction to heroin and all the heartbreak he caused the people in his life, you cheer for him to not only clear his name but to also beat his addiction. Awesome book. ...

    What?s in a name? A lot if you decide to call your book ??So Nude, So Dead??. This is a title to conjure with, what on Earth is it about? As this is a ??Hard Case?? title it is likely to be hardboiled and not adverse to a little violence and titillation. However, cons...

    SO NUDE, SO DEAD. (1952). Ed McBain. ***. There?s some history here. This novel was first published as, ?The Evil Sleep,? under the pseudonym Evan Hunter. It was then re-issued as ?So Nude, So Dead,? as by Richard Marston. It was, indeed, Ed McBain?s first crime novel, but...

    A wild ride down a dark street. ...

    Ray Stone awakes in a hotel room, his body already craving his next shot of heroine, to find his one night stand dead with two bullets in her gut and sixteen ounces of pure horse stolen. I have read many noir novels from the 50?s and 60?s, most of them courtesy of the Hard Case...

    So Nude, So Dead was first published in 1952 with the title The Evil Sleep! under the name Evan Hunter (two years before he found success with The Blackboard Jungle), then reprinted four years later with its current title under the pseudonym Richard Marsten, and finally re-issued in 20...

    The author of So Nude, So Dead is listed as Richard Marsten on Goodreads but is really Ed McBain of 87th Precinct fame. So Nude, So Dead (McBain obviously belonged to the Bill Davis school of book titling) was a first novel, but it is still entertaining over five decades later. It is a...

    Another Hard Case Crime book, another four stars. This one was the first crime book by "Ed McBain" and the hook is genius...A junkie "hophead" in 1950s New York must solve a murder he's the prime suspect in...while fighting off his own withdrawals! Compellingly readable, dependably...

    Evan Hunter/Ed McBain/Richard Marston's first novel. Very well done for a first novel. A heroin addict is on the run for a murder he didn't commit and has to find the real killer while in withdrawal from his addiction. Published 3 times over the years under his 3 pseudonyms. This is th...

  • Ima Vanhood
    Mar 22, 2017

    This pulp novel from the early 1950s is of interest principally because it was the first crime novel ever published by Ed McBain, who would go on to become one of the masters of crime fiction, best known for his 87th Precinct series. This book first appeared in 1952 as The Evil Sleep!,...

    Ed McBain (writing as Richard Marsten) takes his first 'stab' at crime fiction. Initially, I thought this may be one man's anti-drug campaign in novel form, but it settles out into an adrenaline fuelled finish. After just finishing Lawrence Block's first novel, Sinner Man, I though...

    Evan Hunter, writing under the pseudonym of Ed McBain, penned this book 60 years ago. It was his first of many, and he shows some surprisingly mature chops as a young writer in this one. Former pianist Ray Stone is a heroin addict in the midst of severe withdrawal, and on the run as...

    Ed McBain's debut novel is a fun, quasi PI read. Ray Stone is an addict. A former pianist who has succumbed to his vice. It's while indulging in this deadly habit that he finds himself chief suspect in the murder of young nightclub singer Eileen; the naked blonde who was dead his de...

    Originally published in 1952 under the title THE EVIL SLEEP! by his, at the time, Evan Hunter pseudonym, it was released in 1956 under this title as by Richard Marsten, another pen name. It hasn't been available in more than fifty years. Hard Case Crime is bringing this edition in July...

    So Nude, So Dead was the first crime novel by the writer most famously known as Ed McBain, and was originally published in 1952 as The Evil Sleep! (under the name of Evan Hunter), and again in 1956 as So Nude, So Dead under the pen name of Richard Marsten. Thanks to those wonderful peo...

    "There's a monkey on my back, a fifteen-pound monkey and his name is Horse." Brilliant. ...

    "So Nude, So Dead" and "Unavailable for over 50 Years" screams the cover. How can you NOT read this early Ed McBain novel, and what's with the pseudonym anyway? Good grief, at about the same time, James Baldwin published "Giovanni's Room" under his own name and it was a far more contro...

    Plot is okay and it's development becomes quite enjoyable once you stop paying too much attention to the story holes (like where are the cops?!?), loose ends and coincidences. The final whodunit is decent although far from shocking. All in all, it's a good, honest and unpretentious wri...

    I picked this up in a bookstore the other day because I liked the lurid, 1950s pulp style of the cover, and the opening chapter was good. I hadn't read Ed McBain before, and I was surprised to read a first novel in which the plotting, dialog, and characters are solid throughout. Th...

    This is a great book that stacks the deck so high against one person that despite Ray Stone's history of addiction to heroin and all the heartbreak he caused the people in his life, you cheer for him to not only clear his name but to also beat his addiction. Awesome book. ...

    What?s in a name? A lot if you decide to call your book ??So Nude, So Dead??. This is a title to conjure with, what on Earth is it about? As this is a ??Hard Case?? title it is likely to be hardboiled and not adverse to a little violence and titillation. However, cons...

    SO NUDE, SO DEAD. (1952). Ed McBain. ***. There?s some history here. This novel was first published as, ?The Evil Sleep,? under the pseudonym Evan Hunter. It was then re-issued as ?So Nude, So Dead,? as by Richard Marston. It was, indeed, Ed McBain?s first crime novel, but...

    A wild ride down a dark street. ...

    Ray Stone awakes in a hotel room, his body already craving his next shot of heroine, to find his one night stand dead with two bullets in her gut and sixteen ounces of pure horse stolen. I have read many noir novels from the 50?s and 60?s, most of them courtesy of the Hard Case...

    So Nude, So Dead was first published in 1952 with the title The Evil Sleep! under the name Evan Hunter (two years before he found success with The Blackboard Jungle), then reprinted four years later with its current title under the pseudonym Richard Marsten, and finally re-issued in 20...

    The author of So Nude, So Dead is listed as Richard Marsten on Goodreads but is really Ed McBain of 87th Precinct fame. So Nude, So Dead (McBain obviously belonged to the Bill Davis school of book titling) was a first novel, but it is still entertaining over five decades later. It is a...

    Another Hard Case Crime book, another four stars. This one was the first crime book by "Ed McBain" and the hook is genius...A junkie "hophead" in 1950s New York must solve a murder he's the prime suspect in...while fighting off his own withdrawals! Compellingly readable, dependably...

    Evan Hunter/Ed McBain/Richard Marston's first novel. Very well done for a first novel. A heroin addict is on the run for a murder he didn't commit and has to find the real killer while in withdrawal from his addiction. Published 3 times over the years under his 3 pseudonyms. This is th...

    Great story! This is a real page turner. Not only is Ray a dope fiend with a monkey on his back, but he wakes up next to a dead girl with 16 oz of pure heroin missing. Right from the start, I was hooked and had a hard time putting it down at all. I'd highly recommend it! ...

    So Nude, So Dead, So Dull. There is a reason why this has not been reprinted in 50 years. While McBain went on to produce much better books, this one is boring. Read about 70 pages and quit. Might read last chapter, but probably not. Very little mystery, but way too much about drug add...

    I enjoyed this pulp novel about an is one framed for murder, who struggles against his addiction while trying to find the real murderer. ...

    Good early read from Ed McBain. I love how his character changes as the book progresses. the first few paragraphs of Chapter Eleven are worth the time in itself, Pure McBain. ...

    Heroin addict wakes up next to a corpse. The frame fits,the police are searching for him. Now he has to solve the murder and get a fix. ...

    A great crime novel about a heroin addict framed for murder and on the run unable to get a fix. The mystery was great and the action was gripping. I didn't want to stop reading. Loved it. ...

    Published 65 years ago, this classic crime noire was a fun read. It fell slightly below the usually higher standard for HCC. I never liked Ray... ...

    I enjoyed it. Hard to put down. Rush, rush, rushing. ...

  • Kern
    Aug 06, 2017

    This pulp novel from the early 1950s is of interest principally because it was the first crime novel ever published by Ed McBain, who would go on to become one of the masters of crime fiction, best known for his 87th Precinct series. This book first appeared in 1952 as The Evil Sleep!,...

    Ed McBain (writing as Richard Marsten) takes his first 'stab' at crime fiction. Initially, I thought this may be one man's anti-drug campaign in novel form, but it settles out into an adrenaline fuelled finish. After just finishing Lawrence Block's first novel, Sinner Man, I though...

    Evan Hunter, writing under the pseudonym of Ed McBain, penned this book 60 years ago. It was his first of many, and he shows some surprisingly mature chops as a young writer in this one. Former pianist Ray Stone is a heroin addict in the midst of severe withdrawal, and on the run as...

    Ed McBain's debut novel is a fun, quasi PI read. Ray Stone is an addict. A former pianist who has succumbed to his vice. It's while indulging in this deadly habit that he finds himself chief suspect in the murder of young nightclub singer Eileen; the naked blonde who was dead his de...

    Originally published in 1952 under the title THE EVIL SLEEP! by his, at the time, Evan Hunter pseudonym, it was released in 1956 under this title as by Richard Marsten, another pen name. It hasn't been available in more than fifty years. Hard Case Crime is bringing this edition in July...

    So Nude, So Dead was the first crime novel by the writer most famously known as Ed McBain, and was originally published in 1952 as The Evil Sleep! (under the name of Evan Hunter), and again in 1956 as So Nude, So Dead under the pen name of Richard Marsten. Thanks to those wonderful peo...

    "There's a monkey on my back, a fifteen-pound monkey and his name is Horse." Brilliant. ...

    "So Nude, So Dead" and "Unavailable for over 50 Years" screams the cover. How can you NOT read this early Ed McBain novel, and what's with the pseudonym anyway? Good grief, at about the same time, James Baldwin published "Giovanni's Room" under his own name and it was a far more contro...

    Plot is okay and it's development becomes quite enjoyable once you stop paying too much attention to the story holes (like where are the cops?!?), loose ends and coincidences. The final whodunit is decent although far from shocking. All in all, it's a good, honest and unpretentious wri...

    I picked this up in a bookstore the other day because I liked the lurid, 1950s pulp style of the cover, and the opening chapter was good. I hadn't read Ed McBain before, and I was surprised to read a first novel in which the plotting, dialog, and characters are solid throughout. Th...

    This is a great book that stacks the deck so high against one person that despite Ray Stone's history of addiction to heroin and all the heartbreak he caused the people in his life, you cheer for him to not only clear his name but to also beat his addiction. Awesome book. ...

    What?s in a name? A lot if you decide to call your book ??So Nude, So Dead??. This is a title to conjure with, what on Earth is it about? As this is a ??Hard Case?? title it is likely to be hardboiled and not adverse to a little violence and titillation. However, cons...

    SO NUDE, SO DEAD. (1952). Ed McBain. ***. There?s some history here. This novel was first published as, ?The Evil Sleep,? under the pseudonym Evan Hunter. It was then re-issued as ?So Nude, So Dead,? as by Richard Marston. It was, indeed, Ed McBain?s first crime novel, but...

    A wild ride down a dark street. ...

    Ray Stone awakes in a hotel room, his body already craving his next shot of heroine, to find his one night stand dead with two bullets in her gut and sixteen ounces of pure horse stolen. I have read many noir novels from the 50?s and 60?s, most of them courtesy of the Hard Case...

    So Nude, So Dead was first published in 1952 with the title The Evil Sleep! under the name Evan Hunter (two years before he found success with The Blackboard Jungle), then reprinted four years later with its current title under the pseudonym Richard Marsten, and finally re-issued in 20...

    The author of So Nude, So Dead is listed as Richard Marsten on Goodreads but is really Ed McBain of 87th Precinct fame. So Nude, So Dead (McBain obviously belonged to the Bill Davis school of book titling) was a first novel, but it is still entertaining over five decades later. It is a...

    Another Hard Case Crime book, another four stars. This one was the first crime book by "Ed McBain" and the hook is genius...A junkie "hophead" in 1950s New York must solve a murder he's the prime suspect in...while fighting off his own withdrawals! Compellingly readable, dependably...

    Evan Hunter/Ed McBain/Richard Marston's first novel. Very well done for a first novel. A heroin addict is on the run for a murder he didn't commit and has to find the real killer while in withdrawal from his addiction. Published 3 times over the years under his 3 pseudonyms. This is th...

    Great story! This is a real page turner. Not only is Ray a dope fiend with a monkey on his back, but he wakes up next to a dead girl with 16 oz of pure heroin missing. Right from the start, I was hooked and had a hard time putting it down at all. I'd highly recommend it! ...

    So Nude, So Dead, So Dull. There is a reason why this has not been reprinted in 50 years. While McBain went on to produce much better books, this one is boring. Read about 70 pages and quit. Might read last chapter, but probably not. Very little mystery, but way too much about drug add...

    I enjoyed this pulp novel about an is one framed for murder, who struggles against his addiction while trying to find the real murderer. ...

    Good early read from Ed McBain. I love how his character changes as the book progresses. the first few paragraphs of Chapter Eleven are worth the time in itself, Pure McBain. ...

    Heroin addict wakes up next to a corpse. The frame fits,the police are searching for him. Now he has to solve the murder and get a fix. ...

    A great crime novel about a heroin addict framed for murder and on the run unable to get a fix. The mystery was great and the action was gripping. I didn't want to stop reading. Loved it. ...

    Published 65 years ago, this classic crime noire was a fun read. It fell slightly below the usually higher standard for HCC. I never liked Ray... ...

  • Michael Fredette
    Jul 01, 2017

    This pulp novel from the early 1950s is of interest principally because it was the first crime novel ever published by Ed McBain, who would go on to become one of the masters of crime fiction, best known for his 87th Precinct series. This book first appeared in 1952 as The Evil Sleep!,...

    Ed McBain (writing as Richard Marsten) takes his first 'stab' at crime fiction. Initially, I thought this may be one man's anti-drug campaign in novel form, but it settles out into an adrenaline fuelled finish. After just finishing Lawrence Block's first novel, Sinner Man, I though...

    Evan Hunter, writing under the pseudonym of Ed McBain, penned this book 60 years ago. It was his first of many, and he shows some surprisingly mature chops as a young writer in this one. Former pianist Ray Stone is a heroin addict in the midst of severe withdrawal, and on the run as...

    Ed McBain's debut novel is a fun, quasi PI read. Ray Stone is an addict. A former pianist who has succumbed to his vice. It's while indulging in this deadly habit that he finds himself chief suspect in the murder of young nightclub singer Eileen; the naked blonde who was dead his de...

    Originally published in 1952 under the title THE EVIL SLEEP! by his, at the time, Evan Hunter pseudonym, it was released in 1956 under this title as by Richard Marsten, another pen name. It hasn't been available in more than fifty years. Hard Case Crime is bringing this edition in July...

    So Nude, So Dead was the first crime novel by the writer most famously known as Ed McBain, and was originally published in 1952 as The Evil Sleep! (under the name of Evan Hunter), and again in 1956 as So Nude, So Dead under the pen name of Richard Marsten. Thanks to those wonderful peo...

    "There's a monkey on my back, a fifteen-pound monkey and his name is Horse." Brilliant. ...

    "So Nude, So Dead" and "Unavailable for over 50 Years" screams the cover. How can you NOT read this early Ed McBain novel, and what's with the pseudonym anyway? Good grief, at about the same time, James Baldwin published "Giovanni's Room" under his own name and it was a far more contro...

    Plot is okay and it's development becomes quite enjoyable once you stop paying too much attention to the story holes (like where are the cops?!?), loose ends and coincidences. The final whodunit is decent although far from shocking. All in all, it's a good, honest and unpretentious wri...

    I picked this up in a bookstore the other day because I liked the lurid, 1950s pulp style of the cover, and the opening chapter was good. I hadn't read Ed McBain before, and I was surprised to read a first novel in which the plotting, dialog, and characters are solid throughout. Th...

    This is a great book that stacks the deck so high against one person that despite Ray Stone's history of addiction to heroin and all the heartbreak he caused the people in his life, you cheer for him to not only clear his name but to also beat his addiction. Awesome book. ...

    What?s in a name? A lot if you decide to call your book ??So Nude, So Dead??. This is a title to conjure with, what on Earth is it about? As this is a ??Hard Case?? title it is likely to be hardboiled and not adverse to a little violence and titillation. However, cons...

    SO NUDE, SO DEAD. (1952). Ed McBain. ***. There?s some history here. This novel was first published as, ?The Evil Sleep,? under the pseudonym Evan Hunter. It was then re-issued as ?So Nude, So Dead,? as by Richard Marston. It was, indeed, Ed McBain?s first crime novel, but...

    A wild ride down a dark street. ...

    Ray Stone awakes in a hotel room, his body already craving his next shot of heroine, to find his one night stand dead with two bullets in her gut and sixteen ounces of pure horse stolen. I have read many noir novels from the 50?s and 60?s, most of them courtesy of the Hard Case...

    So Nude, So Dead was first published in 1952 with the title The Evil Sleep! under the name Evan Hunter (two years before he found success with The Blackboard Jungle), then reprinted four years later with its current title under the pseudonym Richard Marsten, and finally re-issued in 20...

  • Robert
    Sep 22, 2018

    This pulp novel from the early 1950s is of interest principally because it was the first crime novel ever published by Ed McBain, who would go on to become one of the masters of crime fiction, best known for his 87th Precinct series. This book first appeared in 1952 as The Evil Sleep!,...

    Ed McBain (writing as Richard Marsten) takes his first 'stab' at crime fiction. Initially, I thought this may be one man's anti-drug campaign in novel form, but it settles out into an adrenaline fuelled finish. After just finishing Lawrence Block's first novel, Sinner Man, I though...

    Evan Hunter, writing under the pseudonym of Ed McBain, penned this book 60 years ago. It was his first of many, and he shows some surprisingly mature chops as a young writer in this one. Former pianist Ray Stone is a heroin addict in the midst of severe withdrawal, and on the run as...

    Ed McBain's debut novel is a fun, quasi PI read. Ray Stone is an addict. A former pianist who has succumbed to his vice. It's while indulging in this deadly habit that he finds himself chief suspect in the murder of young nightclub singer Eileen; the naked blonde who was dead his de...

    Originally published in 1952 under the title THE EVIL SLEEP! by his, at the time, Evan Hunter pseudonym, it was released in 1956 under this title as by Richard Marsten, another pen name. It hasn't been available in more than fifty years. Hard Case Crime is bringing this edition in July...

    So Nude, So Dead was the first crime novel by the writer most famously known as Ed McBain, and was originally published in 1952 as The Evil Sleep! (under the name of Evan Hunter), and again in 1956 as So Nude, So Dead under the pen name of Richard Marsten. Thanks to those wonderful peo...

    "There's a monkey on my back, a fifteen-pound monkey and his name is Horse." Brilliant. ...

    "So Nude, So Dead" and "Unavailable for over 50 Years" screams the cover. How can you NOT read this early Ed McBain novel, and what's with the pseudonym anyway? Good grief, at about the same time, James Baldwin published "Giovanni's Room" under his own name and it was a far more contro...

    Plot is okay and it's development becomes quite enjoyable once you stop paying too much attention to the story holes (like where are the cops?!?), loose ends and coincidences. The final whodunit is decent although far from shocking. All in all, it's a good, honest and unpretentious wri...

    I picked this up in a bookstore the other day because I liked the lurid, 1950s pulp style of the cover, and the opening chapter was good. I hadn't read Ed McBain before, and I was surprised to read a first novel in which the plotting, dialog, and characters are solid throughout. Th...

    This is a great book that stacks the deck so high against one person that despite Ray Stone's history of addiction to heroin and all the heartbreak he caused the people in his life, you cheer for him to not only clear his name but to also beat his addiction. Awesome book. ...

    What?s in a name? A lot if you decide to call your book ??So Nude, So Dead??. This is a title to conjure with, what on Earth is it about? As this is a ??Hard Case?? title it is likely to be hardboiled and not adverse to a little violence and titillation. However, cons...

    SO NUDE, SO DEAD. (1952). Ed McBain. ***. There?s some history here. This novel was first published as, ?The Evil Sleep,? under the pseudonym Evan Hunter. It was then re-issued as ?So Nude, So Dead,? as by Richard Marston. It was, indeed, Ed McBain?s first crime novel, but...

    A wild ride down a dark street. ...

    Ray Stone awakes in a hotel room, his body already craving his next shot of heroine, to find his one night stand dead with two bullets in her gut and sixteen ounces of pure horse stolen. I have read many noir novels from the 50?s and 60?s, most of them courtesy of the Hard Case...

    So Nude, So Dead was first published in 1952 with the title The Evil Sleep! under the name Evan Hunter (two years before he found success with The Blackboard Jungle), then reprinted four years later with its current title under the pseudonym Richard Marsten, and finally re-issued in 20...

    The author of So Nude, So Dead is listed as Richard Marsten on Goodreads but is really Ed McBain of 87th Precinct fame. So Nude, So Dead (McBain obviously belonged to the Bill Davis school of book titling) was a first novel, but it is still entertaining over five decades later. It is a...

    Another Hard Case Crime book, another four stars. This one was the first crime book by "Ed McBain" and the hook is genius...A junkie "hophead" in 1950s New York must solve a murder he's the prime suspect in...while fighting off his own withdrawals! Compellingly readable, dependably...

    Evan Hunter/Ed McBain/Richard Marston's first novel. Very well done for a first novel. A heroin addict is on the run for a murder he didn't commit and has to find the real killer while in withdrawal from his addiction. Published 3 times over the years under his 3 pseudonyms. This is th...

    Great story! This is a real page turner. Not only is Ray a dope fiend with a monkey on his back, but he wakes up next to a dead girl with 16 oz of pure heroin missing. Right from the start, I was hooked and had a hard time putting it down at all. I'd highly recommend it! ...

    So Nude, So Dead, So Dull. There is a reason why this has not been reprinted in 50 years. While McBain went on to produce much better books, this one is boring. Read about 70 pages and quit. Might read last chapter, but probably not. Very little mystery, but way too much about drug add...

  • Severius
    Jun 21, 2017

    This pulp novel from the early 1950s is of interest principally because it was the first crime novel ever published by Ed McBain, who would go on to become one of the masters of crime fiction, best known for his 87th Precinct series. This book first appeared in 1952 as The Evil Sleep!,...

    Ed McBain (writing as Richard Marsten) takes his first 'stab' at crime fiction. Initially, I thought this may be one man's anti-drug campaign in novel form, but it settles out into an adrenaline fuelled finish. After just finishing Lawrence Block's first novel, Sinner Man, I though...

    Evan Hunter, writing under the pseudonym of Ed McBain, penned this book 60 years ago. It was his first of many, and he shows some surprisingly mature chops as a young writer in this one. Former pianist Ray Stone is a heroin addict in the midst of severe withdrawal, and on the run as...

    Ed McBain's debut novel is a fun, quasi PI read. Ray Stone is an addict. A former pianist who has succumbed to his vice. It's while indulging in this deadly habit that he finds himself chief suspect in the murder of young nightclub singer Eileen; the naked blonde who was dead his de...

    Originally published in 1952 under the title THE EVIL SLEEP! by his, at the time, Evan Hunter pseudonym, it was released in 1956 under this title as by Richard Marsten, another pen name. It hasn't been available in more than fifty years. Hard Case Crime is bringing this edition in July...

    So Nude, So Dead was the first crime novel by the writer most famously known as Ed McBain, and was originally published in 1952 as The Evil Sleep! (under the name of Evan Hunter), and again in 1956 as So Nude, So Dead under the pen name of Richard Marsten. Thanks to those wonderful peo...

    "There's a monkey on my back, a fifteen-pound monkey and his name is Horse." Brilliant. ...

    "So Nude, So Dead" and "Unavailable for over 50 Years" screams the cover. How can you NOT read this early Ed McBain novel, and what's with the pseudonym anyway? Good grief, at about the same time, James Baldwin published "Giovanni's Room" under his own name and it was a far more contro...

    Plot is okay and it's development becomes quite enjoyable once you stop paying too much attention to the story holes (like where are the cops?!?), loose ends and coincidences. The final whodunit is decent although far from shocking. All in all, it's a good, honest and unpretentious wri...

    I picked this up in a bookstore the other day because I liked the lurid, 1950s pulp style of the cover, and the opening chapter was good. I hadn't read Ed McBain before, and I was surprised to read a first novel in which the plotting, dialog, and characters are solid throughout. Th...

    This is a great book that stacks the deck so high against one person that despite Ray Stone's history of addiction to heroin and all the heartbreak he caused the people in his life, you cheer for him to not only clear his name but to also beat his addiction. Awesome book. ...

    What?s in a name? A lot if you decide to call your book ??So Nude, So Dead??. This is a title to conjure with, what on Earth is it about? As this is a ??Hard Case?? title it is likely to be hardboiled and not adverse to a little violence and titillation. However, cons...

    SO NUDE, SO DEAD. (1952). Ed McBain. ***. There?s some history here. This novel was first published as, ?The Evil Sleep,? under the pseudonym Evan Hunter. It was then re-issued as ?So Nude, So Dead,? as by Richard Marston. It was, indeed, Ed McBain?s first crime novel, but...

    A wild ride down a dark street. ...

    Ray Stone awakes in a hotel room, his body already craving his next shot of heroine, to find his one night stand dead with two bullets in her gut and sixteen ounces of pure horse stolen. I have read many noir novels from the 50?s and 60?s, most of them courtesy of the Hard Case...

    So Nude, So Dead was first published in 1952 with the title The Evil Sleep! under the name Evan Hunter (two years before he found success with The Blackboard Jungle), then reprinted four years later with its current title under the pseudonym Richard Marsten, and finally re-issued in 20...

    The author of So Nude, So Dead is listed as Richard Marsten on Goodreads but is really Ed McBain of 87th Precinct fame. So Nude, So Dead (McBain obviously belonged to the Bill Davis school of book titling) was a first novel, but it is still entertaining over five decades later. It is a...

    Another Hard Case Crime book, another four stars. This one was the first crime book by "Ed McBain" and the hook is genius...A junkie "hophead" in 1950s New York must solve a murder he's the prime suspect in...while fighting off his own withdrawals! Compellingly readable, dependably...

    Evan Hunter/Ed McBain/Richard Marston's first novel. Very well done for a first novel. A heroin addict is on the run for a murder he didn't commit and has to find the real killer while in withdrawal from his addiction. Published 3 times over the years under his 3 pseudonyms. This is th...

    Great story! This is a real page turner. Not only is Ray a dope fiend with a monkey on his back, but he wakes up next to a dead girl with 16 oz of pure heroin missing. Right from the start, I was hooked and had a hard time putting it down at all. I'd highly recommend it! ...

    So Nude, So Dead, So Dull. There is a reason why this has not been reprinted in 50 years. While McBain went on to produce much better books, this one is boring. Read about 70 pages and quit. Might read last chapter, but probably not. Very little mystery, but way too much about drug add...

    I enjoyed this pulp novel about an is one framed for murder, who struggles against his addiction while trying to find the real murderer. ...

    Good early read from Ed McBain. I love how his character changes as the book progresses. the first few paragraphs of Chapter Eleven are worth the time in itself, Pure McBain. ...

    Heroin addict wakes up next to a corpse. The frame fits,the police are searching for him. Now he has to solve the murder and get a fix. ...

    A great crime novel about a heroin addict framed for murder and on the run unable to get a fix. The mystery was great and the action was gripping. I didn't want to stop reading. Loved it. ...

  • Edward Smith
    Jul 03, 2017

    This pulp novel from the early 1950s is of interest principally because it was the first crime novel ever published by Ed McBain, who would go on to become one of the masters of crime fiction, best known for his 87th Precinct series. This book first appeared in 1952 as The Evil Sleep!,...

    Ed McBain (writing as Richard Marsten) takes his first 'stab' at crime fiction. Initially, I thought this may be one man's anti-drug campaign in novel form, but it settles out into an adrenaline fuelled finish. After just finishing Lawrence Block's first novel, Sinner Man, I though...

    Evan Hunter, writing under the pseudonym of Ed McBain, penned this book 60 years ago. It was his first of many, and he shows some surprisingly mature chops as a young writer in this one. Former pianist Ray Stone is a heroin addict in the midst of severe withdrawal, and on the run as...

    Ed McBain's debut novel is a fun, quasi PI read. Ray Stone is an addict. A former pianist who has succumbed to his vice. It's while indulging in this deadly habit that he finds himself chief suspect in the murder of young nightclub singer Eileen; the naked blonde who was dead his de...

    Originally published in 1952 under the title THE EVIL SLEEP! by his, at the time, Evan Hunter pseudonym, it was released in 1956 under this title as by Richard Marsten, another pen name. It hasn't been available in more than fifty years. Hard Case Crime is bringing this edition in July...

    So Nude, So Dead was the first crime novel by the writer most famously known as Ed McBain, and was originally published in 1952 as The Evil Sleep! (under the name of Evan Hunter), and again in 1956 as So Nude, So Dead under the pen name of Richard Marsten. Thanks to those wonderful peo...

    "There's a monkey on my back, a fifteen-pound monkey and his name is Horse." Brilliant. ...

    "So Nude, So Dead" and "Unavailable for over 50 Years" screams the cover. How can you NOT read this early Ed McBain novel, and what's with the pseudonym anyway? Good grief, at about the same time, James Baldwin published "Giovanni's Room" under his own name and it was a far more contro...

    Plot is okay and it's development becomes quite enjoyable once you stop paying too much attention to the story holes (like where are the cops?!?), loose ends and coincidences. The final whodunit is decent although far from shocking. All in all, it's a good, honest and unpretentious wri...

    I picked this up in a bookstore the other day because I liked the lurid, 1950s pulp style of the cover, and the opening chapter was good. I hadn't read Ed McBain before, and I was surprised to read a first novel in which the plotting, dialog, and characters are solid throughout. Th...

    This is a great book that stacks the deck so high against one person that despite Ray Stone's history of addiction to heroin and all the heartbreak he caused the people in his life, you cheer for him to not only clear his name but to also beat his addiction. Awesome book. ...

    What?s in a name? A lot if you decide to call your book ??So Nude, So Dead??. This is a title to conjure with, what on Earth is it about? As this is a ??Hard Case?? title it is likely to be hardboiled and not adverse to a little violence and titillation. However, cons...

    SO NUDE, SO DEAD. (1952). Ed McBain. ***. There?s some history here. This novel was first published as, ?The Evil Sleep,? under the pseudonym Evan Hunter. It was then re-issued as ?So Nude, So Dead,? as by Richard Marston. It was, indeed, Ed McBain?s first crime novel, but...

    A wild ride down a dark street. ...

    Ray Stone awakes in a hotel room, his body already craving his next shot of heroine, to find his one night stand dead with two bullets in her gut and sixteen ounces of pure horse stolen. I have read many noir novels from the 50?s and 60?s, most of them courtesy of the Hard Case...

    So Nude, So Dead was first published in 1952 with the title The Evil Sleep! under the name Evan Hunter (two years before he found success with The Blackboard Jungle), then reprinted four years later with its current title under the pseudonym Richard Marsten, and finally re-issued in 20...

    The author of So Nude, So Dead is listed as Richard Marsten on Goodreads but is really Ed McBain of 87th Precinct fame. So Nude, So Dead (McBain obviously belonged to the Bill Davis school of book titling) was a first novel, but it is still entertaining over five decades later. It is a...

    Another Hard Case Crime book, another four stars. This one was the first crime book by "Ed McBain" and the hook is genius...A junkie "hophead" in 1950s New York must solve a murder he's the prime suspect in...while fighting off his own withdrawals! Compellingly readable, dependably...

    Evan Hunter/Ed McBain/Richard Marston's first novel. Very well done for a first novel. A heroin addict is on the run for a murder he didn't commit and has to find the real killer while in withdrawal from his addiction. Published 3 times over the years under his 3 pseudonyms. This is th...

    Great story! This is a real page turner. Not only is Ray a dope fiend with a monkey on his back, but he wakes up next to a dead girl with 16 oz of pure heroin missing. Right from the start, I was hooked and had a hard time putting it down at all. I'd highly recommend it! ...

    So Nude, So Dead, So Dull. There is a reason why this has not been reprinted in 50 years. While McBain went on to produce much better books, this one is boring. Read about 70 pages and quit. Might read last chapter, but probably not. Very little mystery, but way too much about drug add...

    I enjoyed this pulp novel about an is one framed for murder, who struggles against his addiction while trying to find the real murderer. ...

    Good early read from Ed McBain. I love how his character changes as the book progresses. the first few paragraphs of Chapter Eleven are worth the time in itself, Pure McBain. ...

  • Dave
    Jun 16, 2017

    This pulp novel from the early 1950s is of interest principally because it was the first crime novel ever published by Ed McBain, who would go on to become one of the masters of crime fiction, best known for his 87th Precinct series. This book first appeared in 1952 as The Evil Sleep!,...

    Ed McBain (writing as Richard Marsten) takes his first 'stab' at crime fiction. Initially, I thought this may be one man's anti-drug campaign in novel form, but it settles out into an adrenaline fuelled finish. After just finishing Lawrence Block's first novel, Sinner Man, I though...

    Evan Hunter, writing under the pseudonym of Ed McBain, penned this book 60 years ago. It was his first of many, and he shows some surprisingly mature chops as a young writer in this one. Former pianist Ray Stone is a heroin addict in the midst of severe withdrawal, and on the run as...

    Ed McBain's debut novel is a fun, quasi PI read. Ray Stone is an addict. A former pianist who has succumbed to his vice. It's while indulging in this deadly habit that he finds himself chief suspect in the murder of young nightclub singer Eileen; the naked blonde who was dead his de...

    Originally published in 1952 under the title THE EVIL SLEEP! by his, at the time, Evan Hunter pseudonym, it was released in 1956 under this title as by Richard Marsten, another pen name. It hasn't been available in more than fifty years. Hard Case Crime is bringing this edition in July...

    So Nude, So Dead was the first crime novel by the writer most famously known as Ed McBain, and was originally published in 1952 as The Evil Sleep! (under the name of Evan Hunter), and again in 1956 as So Nude, So Dead under the pen name of Richard Marsten. Thanks to those wonderful peo...

    "There's a monkey on my back, a fifteen-pound monkey and his name is Horse." Brilliant. ...

    "So Nude, So Dead" and "Unavailable for over 50 Years" screams the cover. How can you NOT read this early Ed McBain novel, and what's with the pseudonym anyway? Good grief, at about the same time, James Baldwin published "Giovanni's Room" under his own name and it was a far more contro...

    Plot is okay and it's development becomes quite enjoyable once you stop paying too much attention to the story holes (like where are the cops?!?), loose ends and coincidences. The final whodunit is decent although far from shocking. All in all, it's a good, honest and unpretentious wri...

    I picked this up in a bookstore the other day because I liked the lurid, 1950s pulp style of the cover, and the opening chapter was good. I hadn't read Ed McBain before, and I was surprised to read a first novel in which the plotting, dialog, and characters are solid throughout. Th...

    This is a great book that stacks the deck so high against one person that despite Ray Stone's history of addiction to heroin and all the heartbreak he caused the people in his life, you cheer for him to not only clear his name but to also beat his addiction. Awesome book. ...

    What?s in a name? A lot if you decide to call your book ??So Nude, So Dead??. This is a title to conjure with, what on Earth is it about? As this is a ??Hard Case?? title it is likely to be hardboiled and not adverse to a little violence and titillation. However, cons...

    SO NUDE, SO DEAD. (1952). Ed McBain. ***. There?s some history here. This novel was first published as, ?The Evil Sleep,? under the pseudonym Evan Hunter. It was then re-issued as ?So Nude, So Dead,? as by Richard Marston. It was, indeed, Ed McBain?s first crime novel, but...

    A wild ride down a dark street. ...

    Ray Stone awakes in a hotel room, his body already craving his next shot of heroine, to find his one night stand dead with two bullets in her gut and sixteen ounces of pure horse stolen. I have read many noir novels from the 50?s and 60?s, most of them courtesy of the Hard Case...

    So Nude, So Dead was first published in 1952 with the title The Evil Sleep! under the name Evan Hunter (two years before he found success with The Blackboard Jungle), then reprinted four years later with its current title under the pseudonym Richard Marsten, and finally re-issued in 20...

    The author of So Nude, So Dead is listed as Richard Marsten on Goodreads but is really Ed McBain of 87th Precinct fame. So Nude, So Dead (McBain obviously belonged to the Bill Davis school of book titling) was a first novel, but it is still entertaining over five decades later. It is a...

    Another Hard Case Crime book, another four stars. This one was the first crime book by "Ed McBain" and the hook is genius...A junkie "hophead" in 1950s New York must solve a murder he's the prime suspect in...while fighting off his own withdrawals! Compellingly readable, dependably...

    Evan Hunter/Ed McBain/Richard Marston's first novel. Very well done for a first novel. A heroin addict is on the run for a murder he didn't commit and has to find the real killer while in withdrawal from his addiction. Published 3 times over the years under his 3 pseudonyms. This is th...

    Great story! This is a real page turner. Not only is Ray a dope fiend with a monkey on his back, but he wakes up next to a dead girl with 16 oz of pure heroin missing. Right from the start, I was hooked and had a hard time putting it down at all. I'd highly recommend it! ...

    So Nude, So Dead, So Dull. There is a reason why this has not been reprinted in 50 years. While McBain went on to produce much better books, this one is boring. Read about 70 pages and quit. Might read last chapter, but probably not. Very little mystery, but way too much about drug add...

    I enjoyed this pulp novel about an is one framed for murder, who struggles against his addiction while trying to find the real murderer. ...

    Good early read from Ed McBain. I love how his character changes as the book progresses. the first few paragraphs of Chapter Eleven are worth the time in itself, Pure McBain. ...

    Heroin addict wakes up next to a corpse. The frame fits,the police are searching for him. Now he has to solve the murder and get a fix. ...

    A great crime novel about a heroin addict framed for murder and on the run unable to get a fix. The mystery was great and the action was gripping. I didn't want to stop reading. Loved it. ...

    Published 65 years ago, this classic crime noire was a fun read. It fell slightly below the usually higher standard for HCC. I never liked Ray... ...

    I enjoyed it. Hard to put down. Rush, rush, rushing. ...

    As I go further down the rabbit hole that is the Hard Case Crime imprint, I have become a junky looking for his next fix -- much like the main character in this novel. I am not surprised that McBain went on to have lucrative career as a crime/detective novelist. This being his first no...

    The protagonist waking up next to a dead body and everyone in the city believing he is a crazed killer is a staple of noir fiction. There are hundreds of such novels because it is such a compelling set-up. Here, Ed McBain gives us his take on the man-on-the-run noir thriller and he doe...

  • Samuel Tyler
    Nov 26, 2015

    This pulp novel from the early 1950s is of interest principally because it was the first crime novel ever published by Ed McBain, who would go on to become one of the masters of crime fiction, best known for his 87th Precinct series. This book first appeared in 1952 as The Evil Sleep!,...

    Ed McBain (writing as Richard Marsten) takes his first 'stab' at crime fiction. Initially, I thought this may be one man's anti-drug campaign in novel form, but it settles out into an adrenaline fuelled finish. After just finishing Lawrence Block's first novel, Sinner Man, I though...

    Evan Hunter, writing under the pseudonym of Ed McBain, penned this book 60 years ago. It was his first of many, and he shows some surprisingly mature chops as a young writer in this one. Former pianist Ray Stone is a heroin addict in the midst of severe withdrawal, and on the run as...

    Ed McBain's debut novel is a fun, quasi PI read. Ray Stone is an addict. A former pianist who has succumbed to his vice. It's while indulging in this deadly habit that he finds himself chief suspect in the murder of young nightclub singer Eileen; the naked blonde who was dead his de...

    Originally published in 1952 under the title THE EVIL SLEEP! by his, at the time, Evan Hunter pseudonym, it was released in 1956 under this title as by Richard Marsten, another pen name. It hasn't been available in more than fifty years. Hard Case Crime is bringing this edition in July...

    So Nude, So Dead was the first crime novel by the writer most famously known as Ed McBain, and was originally published in 1952 as The Evil Sleep! (under the name of Evan Hunter), and again in 1956 as So Nude, So Dead under the pen name of Richard Marsten. Thanks to those wonderful peo...

    "There's a monkey on my back, a fifteen-pound monkey and his name is Horse." Brilliant. ...

    "So Nude, So Dead" and "Unavailable for over 50 Years" screams the cover. How can you NOT read this early Ed McBain novel, and what's with the pseudonym anyway? Good grief, at about the same time, James Baldwin published "Giovanni's Room" under his own name and it was a far more contro...

    Plot is okay and it's development becomes quite enjoyable once you stop paying too much attention to the story holes (like where are the cops?!?), loose ends and coincidences. The final whodunit is decent although far from shocking. All in all, it's a good, honest and unpretentious wri...

    I picked this up in a bookstore the other day because I liked the lurid, 1950s pulp style of the cover, and the opening chapter was good. I hadn't read Ed McBain before, and I was surprised to read a first novel in which the plotting, dialog, and characters are solid throughout. Th...

    This is a great book that stacks the deck so high against one person that despite Ray Stone's history of addiction to heroin and all the heartbreak he caused the people in his life, you cheer for him to not only clear his name but to also beat his addiction. Awesome book. ...

    What?s in a name? A lot if you decide to call your book ??So Nude, So Dead??. This is a title to conjure with, what on Earth is it about? As this is a ??Hard Case?? title it is likely to be hardboiled and not adverse to a little violence and titillation. However, cons...

  • Andrew Diamond
    Mar 31, 2017

    This pulp novel from the early 1950s is of interest principally because it was the first crime novel ever published by Ed McBain, who would go on to become one of the masters of crime fiction, best known for his 87th Precinct series. This book first appeared in 1952 as The Evil Sleep!,...

    Ed McBain (writing as Richard Marsten) takes his first 'stab' at crime fiction. Initially, I thought this may be one man's anti-drug campaign in novel form, but it settles out into an adrenaline fuelled finish. After just finishing Lawrence Block's first novel, Sinner Man, I though...

    Evan Hunter, writing under the pseudonym of Ed McBain, penned this book 60 years ago. It was his first of many, and he shows some surprisingly mature chops as a young writer in this one. Former pianist Ray Stone is a heroin addict in the midst of severe withdrawal, and on the run as...

    Ed McBain's debut novel is a fun, quasi PI read. Ray Stone is an addict. A former pianist who has succumbed to his vice. It's while indulging in this deadly habit that he finds himself chief suspect in the murder of young nightclub singer Eileen; the naked blonde who was dead his de...

    Originally published in 1952 under the title THE EVIL SLEEP! by his, at the time, Evan Hunter pseudonym, it was released in 1956 under this title as by Richard Marsten, another pen name. It hasn't been available in more than fifty years. Hard Case Crime is bringing this edition in July...

    So Nude, So Dead was the first crime novel by the writer most famously known as Ed McBain, and was originally published in 1952 as The Evil Sleep! (under the name of Evan Hunter), and again in 1956 as So Nude, So Dead under the pen name of Richard Marsten. Thanks to those wonderful peo...

    "There's a monkey on my back, a fifteen-pound monkey and his name is Horse." Brilliant. ...

    "So Nude, So Dead" and "Unavailable for over 50 Years" screams the cover. How can you NOT read this early Ed McBain novel, and what's with the pseudonym anyway? Good grief, at about the same time, James Baldwin published "Giovanni's Room" under his own name and it was a far more contro...

    Plot is okay and it's development becomes quite enjoyable once you stop paying too much attention to the story holes (like where are the cops?!?), loose ends and coincidences. The final whodunit is decent although far from shocking. All in all, it's a good, honest and unpretentious wri...

    I picked this up in a bookstore the other day because I liked the lurid, 1950s pulp style of the cover, and the opening chapter was good. I hadn't read Ed McBain before, and I was surprised to read a first novel in which the plotting, dialog, and characters are solid throughout. Th...

  • Greg
    Jan 02, 2018

    This pulp novel from the early 1950s is of interest principally because it was the first crime novel ever published by Ed McBain, who would go on to become one of the masters of crime fiction, best known for his 87th Precinct series. This book first appeared in 1952 as The Evil Sleep!,...

    Ed McBain (writing as Richard Marsten) takes his first 'stab' at crime fiction. Initially, I thought this may be one man's anti-drug campaign in novel form, but it settles out into an adrenaline fuelled finish. After just finishing Lawrence Block's first novel, Sinner Man, I though...

    Evan Hunter, writing under the pseudonym of Ed McBain, penned this book 60 years ago. It was his first of many, and he shows some surprisingly mature chops as a young writer in this one. Former pianist Ray Stone is a heroin addict in the midst of severe withdrawal, and on the run as...

    Ed McBain's debut novel is a fun, quasi PI read. Ray Stone is an addict. A former pianist who has succumbed to his vice. It's while indulging in this deadly habit that he finds himself chief suspect in the murder of young nightclub singer Eileen; the naked blonde who was dead his de...

    Originally published in 1952 under the title THE EVIL SLEEP! by his, at the time, Evan Hunter pseudonym, it was released in 1956 under this title as by Richard Marsten, another pen name. It hasn't been available in more than fifty years. Hard Case Crime is bringing this edition in July...

    So Nude, So Dead was the first crime novel by the writer most famously known as Ed McBain, and was originally published in 1952 as The Evil Sleep! (under the name of Evan Hunter), and again in 1956 as So Nude, So Dead under the pen name of Richard Marsten. Thanks to those wonderful peo...

    "There's a monkey on my back, a fifteen-pound monkey and his name is Horse." Brilliant. ...

    "So Nude, So Dead" and "Unavailable for over 50 Years" screams the cover. How can you NOT read this early Ed McBain novel, and what's with the pseudonym anyway? Good grief, at about the same time, James Baldwin published "Giovanni's Room" under his own name and it was a far more contro...

  • William
    Jul 04, 2018

    This pulp novel from the early 1950s is of interest principally because it was the first crime novel ever published by Ed McBain, who would go on to become one of the masters of crime fiction, best known for his 87th Precinct series. This book first appeared in 1952 as The Evil Sleep!,...

    Ed McBain (writing as Richard Marsten) takes his first 'stab' at crime fiction. Initially, I thought this may be one man's anti-drug campaign in novel form, but it settles out into an adrenaline fuelled finish. After just finishing Lawrence Block's first novel, Sinner Man, I though...

    Evan Hunter, writing under the pseudonym of Ed McBain, penned this book 60 years ago. It was his first of many, and he shows some surprisingly mature chops as a young writer in this one. Former pianist Ray Stone is a heroin addict in the midst of severe withdrawal, and on the run as...

    Ed McBain's debut novel is a fun, quasi PI read. Ray Stone is an addict. A former pianist who has succumbed to his vice. It's while indulging in this deadly habit that he finds himself chief suspect in the murder of young nightclub singer Eileen; the naked blonde who was dead his de...

    Originally published in 1952 under the title THE EVIL SLEEP! by his, at the time, Evan Hunter pseudonym, it was released in 1956 under this title as by Richard Marsten, another pen name. It hasn't been available in more than fifty years. Hard Case Crime is bringing this edition in July...

    So Nude, So Dead was the first crime novel by the writer most famously known as Ed McBain, and was originally published in 1952 as The Evil Sleep! (under the name of Evan Hunter), and again in 1956 as So Nude, So Dead under the pen name of Richard Marsten. Thanks to those wonderful peo...

    "There's a monkey on my back, a fifteen-pound monkey and his name is Horse." Brilliant. ...

    "So Nude, So Dead" and "Unavailable for over 50 Years" screams the cover. How can you NOT read this early Ed McBain novel, and what's with the pseudonym anyway? Good grief, at about the same time, James Baldwin published "Giovanni's Room" under his own name and it was a far more contro...

    Plot is okay and it's development becomes quite enjoyable once you stop paying too much attention to the story holes (like where are the cops?!?), loose ends and coincidences. The final whodunit is decent although far from shocking. All in all, it's a good, honest and unpretentious wri...

    I picked this up in a bookstore the other day because I liked the lurid, 1950s pulp style of the cover, and the opening chapter was good. I hadn't read Ed McBain before, and I was surprised to read a first novel in which the plotting, dialog, and characters are solid throughout. Th...

    This is a great book that stacks the deck so high against one person that despite Ray Stone's history of addiction to heroin and all the heartbreak he caused the people in his life, you cheer for him to not only clear his name but to also beat his addiction. Awesome book. ...

    What?s in a name? A lot if you decide to call your book ??So Nude, So Dead??. This is a title to conjure with, what on Earth is it about? As this is a ??Hard Case?? title it is likely to be hardboiled and not adverse to a little violence and titillation. However, cons...

    SO NUDE, SO DEAD. (1952). Ed McBain. ***. There?s some history here. This novel was first published as, ?The Evil Sleep,? under the pseudonym Evan Hunter. It was then re-issued as ?So Nude, So Dead,? as by Richard Marston. It was, indeed, Ed McBain?s first crime novel, but...

    A wild ride down a dark street. ...

    Ray Stone awakes in a hotel room, his body already craving his next shot of heroine, to find his one night stand dead with two bullets in her gut and sixteen ounces of pure horse stolen. I have read many noir novels from the 50?s and 60?s, most of them courtesy of the Hard Case...

    So Nude, So Dead was first published in 1952 with the title The Evil Sleep! under the name Evan Hunter (two years before he found success with The Blackboard Jungle), then reprinted four years later with its current title under the pseudonym Richard Marsten, and finally re-issued in 20...

    The author of So Nude, So Dead is listed as Richard Marsten on Goodreads but is really Ed McBain of 87th Precinct fame. So Nude, So Dead (McBain obviously belonged to the Bill Davis school of book titling) was a first novel, but it is still entertaining over five decades later. It is a...

    Another Hard Case Crime book, another four stars. This one was the first crime book by "Ed McBain" and the hook is genius...A junkie "hophead" in 1950s New York must solve a murder he's the prime suspect in...while fighting off his own withdrawals! Compellingly readable, dependably...

    Evan Hunter/Ed McBain/Richard Marston's first novel. Very well done for a first novel. A heroin addict is on the run for a murder he didn't commit and has to find the real killer while in withdrawal from his addiction. Published 3 times over the years under his 3 pseudonyms. This is th...

    Great story! This is a real page turner. Not only is Ray a dope fiend with a monkey on his back, but he wakes up next to a dead girl with 16 oz of pure heroin missing. Right from the start, I was hooked and had a hard time putting it down at all. I'd highly recommend it! ...

  • Mark Kosobucki
    Mar 01, 2018

    This pulp novel from the early 1950s is of interest principally because it was the first crime novel ever published by Ed McBain, who would go on to become one of the masters of crime fiction, best known for his 87th Precinct series. This book first appeared in 1952 as The Evil Sleep!,...

    Ed McBain (writing as Richard Marsten) takes his first 'stab' at crime fiction. Initially, I thought this may be one man's anti-drug campaign in novel form, but it settles out into an adrenaline fuelled finish. After just finishing Lawrence Block's first novel, Sinner Man, I though...

    Evan Hunter, writing under the pseudonym of Ed McBain, penned this book 60 years ago. It was his first of many, and he shows some surprisingly mature chops as a young writer in this one. Former pianist Ray Stone is a heroin addict in the midst of severe withdrawal, and on the run as...

    Ed McBain's debut novel is a fun, quasi PI read. Ray Stone is an addict. A former pianist who has succumbed to his vice. It's while indulging in this deadly habit that he finds himself chief suspect in the murder of young nightclub singer Eileen; the naked blonde who was dead his de...

    Originally published in 1952 under the title THE EVIL SLEEP! by his, at the time, Evan Hunter pseudonym, it was released in 1956 under this title as by Richard Marsten, another pen name. It hasn't been available in more than fifty years. Hard Case Crime is bringing this edition in July...

    So Nude, So Dead was the first crime novel by the writer most famously known as Ed McBain, and was originally published in 1952 as The Evil Sleep! (under the name of Evan Hunter), and again in 1956 as So Nude, So Dead under the pen name of Richard Marsten. Thanks to those wonderful peo...

    "There's a monkey on my back, a fifteen-pound monkey and his name is Horse." Brilliant. ...

    "So Nude, So Dead" and "Unavailable for over 50 Years" screams the cover. How can you NOT read this early Ed McBain novel, and what's with the pseudonym anyway? Good grief, at about the same time, James Baldwin published "Giovanni's Room" under his own name and it was a far more contro...

    Plot is okay and it's development becomes quite enjoyable once you stop paying too much attention to the story holes (like where are the cops?!?), loose ends and coincidences. The final whodunit is decent although far from shocking. All in all, it's a good, honest and unpretentious wri...

    I picked this up in a bookstore the other day because I liked the lurid, 1950s pulp style of the cover, and the opening chapter was good. I hadn't read Ed McBain before, and I was surprised to read a first novel in which the plotting, dialog, and characters are solid throughout. Th...

    This is a great book that stacks the deck so high against one person that despite Ray Stone's history of addiction to heroin and all the heartbreak he caused the people in his life, you cheer for him to not only clear his name but to also beat his addiction. Awesome book. ...

  • Matthew Lipson
    Mar 01, 2017

    This pulp novel from the early 1950s is of interest principally because it was the first crime novel ever published by Ed McBain, who would go on to become one of the masters of crime fiction, best known for his 87th Precinct series. This book first appeared in 1952 as The Evil Sleep!,...

    Ed McBain (writing as Richard Marsten) takes his first 'stab' at crime fiction. Initially, I thought this may be one man's anti-drug campaign in novel form, but it settles out into an adrenaline fuelled finish. After just finishing Lawrence Block's first novel, Sinner Man, I though...

    Evan Hunter, writing under the pseudonym of Ed McBain, penned this book 60 years ago. It was his first of many, and he shows some surprisingly mature chops as a young writer in this one. Former pianist Ray Stone is a heroin addict in the midst of severe withdrawal, and on the run as...

    Ed McBain's debut novel is a fun, quasi PI read. Ray Stone is an addict. A former pianist who has succumbed to his vice. It's while indulging in this deadly habit that he finds himself chief suspect in the murder of young nightclub singer Eileen; the naked blonde who was dead his de...

    Originally published in 1952 under the title THE EVIL SLEEP! by his, at the time, Evan Hunter pseudonym, it was released in 1956 under this title as by Richard Marsten, another pen name. It hasn't been available in more than fifty years. Hard Case Crime is bringing this edition in July...

    So Nude, So Dead was the first crime novel by the writer most famously known as Ed McBain, and was originally published in 1952 as The Evil Sleep! (under the name of Evan Hunter), and again in 1956 as So Nude, So Dead under the pen name of Richard Marsten. Thanks to those wonderful peo...

    "There's a monkey on my back, a fifteen-pound monkey and his name is Horse." Brilliant. ...

    "So Nude, So Dead" and "Unavailable for over 50 Years" screams the cover. How can you NOT read this early Ed McBain novel, and what's with the pseudonym anyway? Good grief, at about the same time, James Baldwin published "Giovanni's Room" under his own name and it was a far more contro...

    Plot is okay and it's development becomes quite enjoyable once you stop paying too much attention to the story holes (like where are the cops?!?), loose ends and coincidences. The final whodunit is decent although far from shocking. All in all, it's a good, honest and unpretentious wri...

    I picked this up in a bookstore the other day because I liked the lurid, 1950s pulp style of the cover, and the opening chapter was good. I hadn't read Ed McBain before, and I was surprised to read a first novel in which the plotting, dialog, and characters are solid throughout. Th...

    This is a great book that stacks the deck so high against one person that despite Ray Stone's history of addiction to heroin and all the heartbreak he caused the people in his life, you cheer for him to not only clear his name but to also beat his addiction. Awesome book. ...

    What?s in a name? A lot if you decide to call your book ??So Nude, So Dead??. This is a title to conjure with, what on Earth is it about? As this is a ??Hard Case?? title it is likely to be hardboiled and not adverse to a little violence and titillation. However, cons...

    SO NUDE, SO DEAD. (1952). Ed McBain. ***. There?s some history here. This novel was first published as, ?The Evil Sleep,? under the pseudonym Evan Hunter. It was then re-issued as ?So Nude, So Dead,? as by Richard Marston. It was, indeed, Ed McBain?s first crime novel, but...

    A wild ride down a dark street. ...

    Ray Stone awakes in a hotel room, his body already craving his next shot of heroine, to find his one night stand dead with two bullets in her gut and sixteen ounces of pure horse stolen. I have read many noir novels from the 50?s and 60?s, most of them courtesy of the Hard Case...

    So Nude, So Dead was first published in 1952 with the title The Evil Sleep! under the name Evan Hunter (two years before he found success with The Blackboard Jungle), then reprinted four years later with its current title under the pseudonym Richard Marsten, and finally re-issued in 20...

    The author of So Nude, So Dead is listed as Richard Marsten on Goodreads but is really Ed McBain of 87th Precinct fame. So Nude, So Dead (McBain obviously belonged to the Bill Davis school of book titling) was a first novel, but it is still entertaining over five decades later. It is a...

    Another Hard Case Crime book, another four stars. This one was the first crime book by "Ed McBain" and the hook is genius...A junkie "hophead" in 1950s New York must solve a murder he's the prime suspect in...while fighting off his own withdrawals! Compellingly readable, dependably...

    Evan Hunter/Ed McBain/Richard Marston's first novel. Very well done for a first novel. A heroin addict is on the run for a murder he didn't commit and has to find the real killer while in withdrawal from his addiction. Published 3 times over the years under his 3 pseudonyms. This is th...

    Great story! This is a real page turner. Not only is Ray a dope fiend with a monkey on his back, but he wakes up next to a dead girl with 16 oz of pure heroin missing. Right from the start, I was hooked and had a hard time putting it down at all. I'd highly recommend it! ...

    So Nude, So Dead, So Dull. There is a reason why this has not been reprinted in 50 years. While McBain went on to produce much better books, this one is boring. Read about 70 pages and quit. Might read last chapter, but probably not. Very little mystery, but way too much about drug add...

    I enjoyed this pulp novel about an is one framed for murder, who struggles against his addiction while trying to find the real murderer. ...

    Good early read from Ed McBain. I love how his character changes as the book progresses. the first few paragraphs of Chapter Eleven are worth the time in itself, Pure McBain. ...

    Heroin addict wakes up next to a corpse. The frame fits,the police are searching for him. Now he has to solve the murder and get a fix. ...

    A great crime novel about a heroin addict framed for murder and on the run unable to get a fix. The mystery was great and the action was gripping. I didn't want to stop reading. Loved it. ...

    Published 65 years ago, this classic crime noire was a fun read. It fell slightly below the usually higher standard for HCC. I never liked Ray... ...

    I enjoyed it. Hard to put down. Rush, rush, rushing. ...

    As I go further down the rabbit hole that is the Hard Case Crime imprint, I have become a junky looking for his next fix -- much like the main character in this novel. I am not surprised that McBain went on to have lucrative career as a crime/detective novelist. This being his first no...

  • Andrew F
    Dec 08, 2017

    This pulp novel from the early 1950s is of interest principally because it was the first crime novel ever published by Ed McBain, who would go on to become one of the masters of crime fiction, best known for his 87th Precinct series. This book first appeared in 1952 as The Evil Sleep!,...

    Ed McBain (writing as Richard Marsten) takes his first 'stab' at crime fiction. Initially, I thought this may be one man's anti-drug campaign in novel form, but it settles out into an adrenaline fuelled finish. After just finishing Lawrence Block's first novel, Sinner Man, I though...

    Evan Hunter, writing under the pseudonym of Ed McBain, penned this book 60 years ago. It was his first of many, and he shows some surprisingly mature chops as a young writer in this one. Former pianist Ray Stone is a heroin addict in the midst of severe withdrawal, and on the run as...

    Ed McBain's debut novel is a fun, quasi PI read. Ray Stone is an addict. A former pianist who has succumbed to his vice. It's while indulging in this deadly habit that he finds himself chief suspect in the murder of young nightclub singer Eileen; the naked blonde who was dead his de...

    Originally published in 1952 under the title THE EVIL SLEEP! by his, at the time, Evan Hunter pseudonym, it was released in 1956 under this title as by Richard Marsten, another pen name. It hasn't been available in more than fifty years. Hard Case Crime is bringing this edition in July...

    So Nude, So Dead was the first crime novel by the writer most famously known as Ed McBain, and was originally published in 1952 as The Evil Sleep! (under the name of Evan Hunter), and again in 1956 as So Nude, So Dead under the pen name of Richard Marsten. Thanks to those wonderful peo...

    "There's a monkey on my back, a fifteen-pound monkey and his name is Horse." Brilliant. ...

    "So Nude, So Dead" and "Unavailable for over 50 Years" screams the cover. How can you NOT read this early Ed McBain novel, and what's with the pseudonym anyway? Good grief, at about the same time, James Baldwin published "Giovanni's Room" under his own name and it was a far more contro...

    Plot is okay and it's development becomes quite enjoyable once you stop paying too much attention to the story holes (like where are the cops?!?), loose ends and coincidences. The final whodunit is decent although far from shocking. All in all, it's a good, honest and unpretentious wri...

    I picked this up in a bookstore the other day because I liked the lurid, 1950s pulp style of the cover, and the opening chapter was good. I hadn't read Ed McBain before, and I was surprised to read a first novel in which the plotting, dialog, and characters are solid throughout. Th...

    This is a great book that stacks the deck so high against one person that despite Ray Stone's history of addiction to heroin and all the heartbreak he caused the people in his life, you cheer for him to not only clear his name but to also beat his addiction. Awesome book. ...

    What?s in a name? A lot if you decide to call your book ??So Nude, So Dead??. This is a title to conjure with, what on Earth is it about? As this is a ??Hard Case?? title it is likely to be hardboiled and not adverse to a little violence and titillation. However, cons...

    SO NUDE, SO DEAD. (1952). Ed McBain. ***. There?s some history here. This novel was first published as, ?The Evil Sleep,? under the pseudonym Evan Hunter. It was then re-issued as ?So Nude, So Dead,? as by Richard Marston. It was, indeed, Ed McBain?s first crime novel, but...

    A wild ride down a dark street. ...

    Ray Stone awakes in a hotel room, his body already craving his next shot of heroine, to find his one night stand dead with two bullets in her gut and sixteen ounces of pure horse stolen. I have read many noir novels from the 50?s and 60?s, most of them courtesy of the Hard Case...

    So Nude, So Dead was first published in 1952 with the title The Evil Sleep! under the name Evan Hunter (two years before he found success with The Blackboard Jungle), then reprinted four years later with its current title under the pseudonym Richard Marsten, and finally re-issued in 20...

    The author of So Nude, So Dead is listed as Richard Marsten on Goodreads but is really Ed McBain of 87th Precinct fame. So Nude, So Dead (McBain obviously belonged to the Bill Davis school of book titling) was a first novel, but it is still entertaining over five decades later. It is a...

    Another Hard Case Crime book, another four stars. This one was the first crime book by "Ed McBain" and the hook is genius...A junkie "hophead" in 1950s New York must solve a murder he's the prime suspect in...while fighting off his own withdrawals! Compellingly readable, dependably...