Again, Dangerous Visions 1

Again, Dangerous Visions 1

The classic companion to the most essential science fiction anthology ever published. 46 original stories edited with introductions by Harlan Ellison. Contents: ?Again, Dangerous Visions ? (1972) ? interior artwork by Ed Emshwiller ix ? An Assault of New Dreamers ? (1972) ? essay by Harlan Ellison 1 ? The Counterpoint of View ? (1972) ? shortstory by John Heidenry 7 ? Ching Wi The classic companion to the most essential science fiction anthology ever published. 46 ...

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Title:Again, Dangerous Visions 1
Author:Harlan Ellison
Rating:
Genres:Science Fiction
ISBN:Again, Dangerous Visions 1
ISBN
Edition Language:English
Format Type:Paperback
Number of Pages:450 pages pages

Again, Dangerous Visions 1 Reviews

  • David Allen
    Jul 21, 2015

    Again, Dangerous Visions was split into two for its mass market paperback release in 1973. This first half contains a few knockout stories, some pretty good ones, and a lot of mediocre ones. At twice the length of the original Dangerous Visions, I can?t help but think that maybe Elli...

    In 1969 Harlan Ellison edited the ground-breaking anthology Dangerous Visions. It was so successful commercially and in terms of award recognition, that a follow-up anthology known as Again, Dangerous Visions was released in 1972. This time it was so large as to be released in two volu...

    I've never read a short-story collection as uneven in quality as Again, Dangerous Visions 1. The bookend contributions make me feel a dumber, duller person for having read them, but there are real hits among the misses too. The Word for World is Forest is average for an Ursula K. Le Gu...

    A very mixed bag. I wouldn't class all of these as science or sepculative fiction, and there was an element of salaciousness to a few stories which felt unecessary/gratuitous. there are some gems, though - in particular those by Ursula K Le. Guin, Joanna Russ, and Kate Wilhelm. I look ...

    This is a classic anthology--the best of the New Wave that hit science fiction in the late 60s/early 70s. Writers were tasked with producing something "dangerous". Some were dangerous due to content--radical for the day--as in Ursula LeGuinn's fantastic radical environmental work "The ...

    This book is excellent. Fact. While not all of the stories are as punchy as andrew j. offutt's "For Value Received", or as stylistically interesting as Ross Rocklynne's "Ching Witch", everything in here is worthy of reading, even Ray Bradbury's poem. (And coming from a non-fan of po...

    Compared to Dangerous Visions, which struck me as almost uniformly brilliant, this sequel is longer and less impressive. The first half is about evenly split between excellent and ehh. The stories by Hollis, Gerrold, O'Donnell, Nelson and Anthony have the crazy snap of DV, and Le Guin'...

  • Nathalie
    Dec 11, 2007

    Again, Dangerous Visions was split into two for its mass market paperback release in 1973. This first half contains a few knockout stories, some pretty good ones, and a lot of mediocre ones. At twice the length of the original Dangerous Visions, I can?t help but think that maybe Elli...

    In 1969 Harlan Ellison edited the ground-breaking anthology Dangerous Visions. It was so successful commercially and in terms of award recognition, that a follow-up anthology known as Again, Dangerous Visions was released in 1972. This time it was so large as to be released in two volu...

    I've never read a short-story collection as uneven in quality as Again, Dangerous Visions 1. The bookend contributions make me feel a dumber, duller person for having read them, but there are real hits among the misses too. The Word for World is Forest is average for an Ursula K. Le Gu...

    A very mixed bag. I wouldn't class all of these as science or sepculative fiction, and there was an element of salaciousness to a few stories which felt unecessary/gratuitous. there are some gems, though - in particular those by Ursula K Le. Guin, Joanna Russ, and Kate Wilhelm. I look ...

    This is a classic anthology--the best of the New Wave that hit science fiction in the late 60s/early 70s. Writers were tasked with producing something "dangerous". Some were dangerous due to content--radical for the day--as in Ursula LeGuinn's fantastic radical environmental work "The ...

    This book is excellent. Fact. While not all of the stories are as punchy as andrew j. offutt's "For Value Received", or as stylistically interesting as Ross Rocklynne's "Ching Witch", everything in here is worthy of reading, even Ray Bradbury's poem. (And coming from a non-fan of po...

    Compared to Dangerous Visions, which struck me as almost uniformly brilliant, this sequel is longer and less impressive. The first half is about evenly split between excellent and ehh. The stories by Hollis, Gerrold, O'Donnell, Nelson and Anthony have the crazy snap of DV, and Le Guin'...

    Until 20 years or so ago, I would have rated this one a 5-star; I probably read it half a dozen times. But anymore when I browse sections, the times have passed it by, not the ideas so much as the language of the times. Still some incredible stories in there. ...

    It was a 1970s SF compilation. You expect it to be hit and miss. And a bit pretentious. The hits (including the likes of Vonnegut and Le Guin) make up for the misses. ...

    Ellison, enfant terriblé of the New Wave of Science Fiction of the '60s, edited this influential anthology. ...

    Pretty visionary and interesting sci-fi story compilation from the late-60s/early 70s. Sci-fi touched by psychedelia, rather novel stuff and lots of fun. ...

    Seventies sequel to the groundbreaking sixties collection edited by Ellison , and is more of the same really ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

  • Jer
    Apr 04, 2013

    Again, Dangerous Visions was split into two for its mass market paperback release in 1973. This first half contains a few knockout stories, some pretty good ones, and a lot of mediocre ones. At twice the length of the original Dangerous Visions, I can?t help but think that maybe Elli...

    In 1969 Harlan Ellison edited the ground-breaking anthology Dangerous Visions. It was so successful commercially and in terms of award recognition, that a follow-up anthology known as Again, Dangerous Visions was released in 1972. This time it was so large as to be released in two volu...

    I've never read a short-story collection as uneven in quality as Again, Dangerous Visions 1. The bookend contributions make me feel a dumber, duller person for having read them, but there are real hits among the misses too. The Word for World is Forest is average for an Ursula K. Le Gu...

    A very mixed bag. I wouldn't class all of these as science or sepculative fiction, and there was an element of salaciousness to a few stories which felt unecessary/gratuitous. there are some gems, though - in particular those by Ursula K Le. Guin, Joanna Russ, and Kate Wilhelm. I look ...

    This is a classic anthology--the best of the New Wave that hit science fiction in the late 60s/early 70s. Writers were tasked with producing something "dangerous". Some were dangerous due to content--radical for the day--as in Ursula LeGuinn's fantastic radical environmental work "The ...

    This book is excellent. Fact. While not all of the stories are as punchy as andrew j. offutt's "For Value Received", or as stylistically interesting as Ross Rocklynne's "Ching Witch", everything in here is worthy of reading, even Ray Bradbury's poem. (And coming from a non-fan of po...

    Compared to Dangerous Visions, which struck me as almost uniformly brilliant, this sequel is longer and less impressive. The first half is about evenly split between excellent and ehh. The stories by Hollis, Gerrold, O'Donnell, Nelson and Anthony have the crazy snap of DV, and Le Guin'...

    Until 20 years or so ago, I would have rated this one a 5-star; I probably read it half a dozen times. But anymore when I browse sections, the times have passed it by, not the ideas so much as the language of the times. Still some incredible stories in there. ...

    It was a 1970s SF compilation. You expect it to be hit and miss. And a bit pretentious. The hits (including the likes of Vonnegut and Le Guin) make up for the misses. ...

    Ellison, enfant terriblé of the New Wave of Science Fiction of the '60s, edited this influential anthology. ...

    Pretty visionary and interesting sci-fi story compilation from the late-60s/early 70s. Sci-fi touched by psychedelia, rather novel stuff and lots of fun. ...

  • Greg Bossert
    Apr 03, 2013

    Again, Dangerous Visions was split into two for its mass market paperback release in 1973. This first half contains a few knockout stories, some pretty good ones, and a lot of mediocre ones. At twice the length of the original Dangerous Visions, I can?t help but think that maybe Elli...

    In 1969 Harlan Ellison edited the ground-breaking anthology Dangerous Visions. It was so successful commercially and in terms of award recognition, that a follow-up anthology known as Again, Dangerous Visions was released in 1972. This time it was so large as to be released in two volu...

    I've never read a short-story collection as uneven in quality as Again, Dangerous Visions 1. The bookend contributions make me feel a dumber, duller person for having read them, but there are real hits among the misses too. The Word for World is Forest is average for an Ursula K. Le Gu...

    A very mixed bag. I wouldn't class all of these as science or sepculative fiction, and there was an element of salaciousness to a few stories which felt unecessary/gratuitous. there are some gems, though - in particular those by Ursula K Le. Guin, Joanna Russ, and Kate Wilhelm. I look ...

    This is a classic anthology--the best of the New Wave that hit science fiction in the late 60s/early 70s. Writers were tasked with producing something "dangerous". Some were dangerous due to content--radical for the day--as in Ursula LeGuinn's fantastic radical environmental work "The ...

    This book is excellent. Fact. While not all of the stories are as punchy as andrew j. offutt's "For Value Received", or as stylistically interesting as Ross Rocklynne's "Ching Witch", everything in here is worthy of reading, even Ray Bradbury's poem. (And coming from a non-fan of po...

    Compared to Dangerous Visions, which struck me as almost uniformly brilliant, this sequel is longer and less impressive. The first half is about evenly split between excellent and ehh. The stories by Hollis, Gerrold, O'Donnell, Nelson and Anthony have the crazy snap of DV, and Le Guin'...

    Until 20 years or so ago, I would have rated this one a 5-star; I probably read it half a dozen times. But anymore when I browse sections, the times have passed it by, not the ideas so much as the language of the times. Still some incredible stories in there. ...

    It was a 1970s SF compilation. You expect it to be hit and miss. And a bit pretentious. The hits (including the likes of Vonnegut and Le Guin) make up for the misses. ...

    Ellison, enfant terriblé of the New Wave of Science Fiction of the '60s, edited this influential anthology. ...

    Pretty visionary and interesting sci-fi story compilation from the late-60s/early 70s. Sci-fi touched by psychedelia, rather novel stuff and lots of fun. ...

    Seventies sequel to the groundbreaking sixties collection edited by Ellison , and is more of the same really ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

  • Christopher Rapcewicz
    Sep 20, 2018

    Again, Dangerous Visions was split into two for its mass market paperback release in 1973. This first half contains a few knockout stories, some pretty good ones, and a lot of mediocre ones. At twice the length of the original Dangerous Visions, I can?t help but think that maybe Elli...

    In 1969 Harlan Ellison edited the ground-breaking anthology Dangerous Visions. It was so successful commercially and in terms of award recognition, that a follow-up anthology known as Again, Dangerous Visions was released in 1972. This time it was so large as to be released in two volu...

    I've never read a short-story collection as uneven in quality as Again, Dangerous Visions 1. The bookend contributions make me feel a dumber, duller person for having read them, but there are real hits among the misses too. The Word for World is Forest is average for an Ursula K. Le Gu...

    A very mixed bag. I wouldn't class all of these as science or sepculative fiction, and there was an element of salaciousness to a few stories which felt unecessary/gratuitous. there are some gems, though - in particular those by Ursula K Le. Guin, Joanna Russ, and Kate Wilhelm. I look ...

    This is a classic anthology--the best of the New Wave that hit science fiction in the late 60s/early 70s. Writers were tasked with producing something "dangerous". Some were dangerous due to content--radical for the day--as in Ursula LeGuinn's fantastic radical environmental work "The ...

    This book is excellent. Fact. While not all of the stories are as punchy as andrew j. offutt's "For Value Received", or as stylistically interesting as Ross Rocklynne's "Ching Witch", everything in here is worthy of reading, even Ray Bradbury's poem. (And coming from a non-fan of po...

    Compared to Dangerous Visions, which struck me as almost uniformly brilliant, this sequel is longer and less impressive. The first half is about evenly split between excellent and ehh. The stories by Hollis, Gerrold, O'Donnell, Nelson and Anthony have the crazy snap of DV, and Le Guin'...

    Until 20 years or so ago, I would have rated this one a 5-star; I probably read it half a dozen times. But anymore when I browse sections, the times have passed it by, not the ideas so much as the language of the times. Still some incredible stories in there. ...

    It was a 1970s SF compilation. You expect it to be hit and miss. And a bit pretentious. The hits (including the likes of Vonnegut and Le Guin) make up for the misses. ...

    Ellison, enfant terriblé of the New Wave of Science Fiction of the '60s, edited this influential anthology. ...

    Pretty visionary and interesting sci-fi story compilation from the late-60s/early 70s. Sci-fi touched by psychedelia, rather novel stuff and lots of fun. ...

    Seventies sequel to the groundbreaking sixties collection edited by Ellison , and is more of the same really ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

  • Tomislav
    Jul 19, 2017

    Again, Dangerous Visions was split into two for its mass market paperback release in 1973. This first half contains a few knockout stories, some pretty good ones, and a lot of mediocre ones. At twice the length of the original Dangerous Visions, I can?t help but think that maybe Elli...

    In 1969 Harlan Ellison edited the ground-breaking anthology Dangerous Visions. It was so successful commercially and in terms of award recognition, that a follow-up anthology known as Again, Dangerous Visions was released in 1972. This time it was so large as to be released in two volu...

  • Elvira Scaff
    May 04, 2013

    Again, Dangerous Visions was split into two for its mass market paperback release in 1973. This first half contains a few knockout stories, some pretty good ones, and a lot of mediocre ones. At twice the length of the original Dangerous Visions, I can?t help but think that maybe Elli...

    In 1969 Harlan Ellison edited the ground-breaking anthology Dangerous Visions. It was so successful commercially and in terms of award recognition, that a follow-up anthology known as Again, Dangerous Visions was released in 1972. This time it was so large as to be released in two volu...

    I've never read a short-story collection as uneven in quality as Again, Dangerous Visions 1. The bookend contributions make me feel a dumber, duller person for having read them, but there are real hits among the misses too. The Word for World is Forest is average for an Ursula K. Le Gu...

    A very mixed bag. I wouldn't class all of these as science or sepculative fiction, and there was an element of salaciousness to a few stories which felt unecessary/gratuitous. there are some gems, though - in particular those by Ursula K Le. Guin, Joanna Russ, and Kate Wilhelm. I look ...

    This is a classic anthology--the best of the New Wave that hit science fiction in the late 60s/early 70s. Writers were tasked with producing something "dangerous". Some were dangerous due to content--radical for the day--as in Ursula LeGuinn's fantastic radical environmental work "The ...

    This book is excellent. Fact. While not all of the stories are as punchy as andrew j. offutt's "For Value Received", or as stylistically interesting as Ross Rocklynne's "Ching Witch", everything in here is worthy of reading, even Ray Bradbury's poem. (And coming from a non-fan of po...

    Compared to Dangerous Visions, which struck me as almost uniformly brilliant, this sequel is longer and less impressive. The first half is about evenly split between excellent and ehh. The stories by Hollis, Gerrold, O'Donnell, Nelson and Anthony have the crazy snap of DV, and Le Guin'...

    Until 20 years or so ago, I would have rated this one a 5-star; I probably read it half a dozen times. But anymore when I browse sections, the times have passed it by, not the ideas so much as the language of the times. Still some incredible stories in there. ...

    It was a 1970s SF compilation. You expect it to be hit and miss. And a bit pretentious. The hits (including the likes of Vonnegut and Le Guin) make up for the misses. ...

    Ellison, enfant terriblé of the New Wave of Science Fiction of the '60s, edited this influential anthology. ...

    Pretty visionary and interesting sci-fi story compilation from the late-60s/early 70s. Sci-fi touched by psychedelia, rather novel stuff and lots of fun. ...

    Seventies sequel to the groundbreaking sixties collection edited by Ellison , and is more of the same really ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

  • Dave
    Aug 26, 2012

    Again, Dangerous Visions was split into two for its mass market paperback release in 1973. This first half contains a few knockout stories, some pretty good ones, and a lot of mediocre ones. At twice the length of the original Dangerous Visions, I can?t help but think that maybe Elli...

    In 1969 Harlan Ellison edited the ground-breaking anthology Dangerous Visions. It was so successful commercially and in terms of award recognition, that a follow-up anthology known as Again, Dangerous Visions was released in 1972. This time it was so large as to be released in two volu...

    I've never read a short-story collection as uneven in quality as Again, Dangerous Visions 1. The bookend contributions make me feel a dumber, duller person for having read them, but there are real hits among the misses too. The Word for World is Forest is average for an Ursula K. Le Gu...

    A very mixed bag. I wouldn't class all of these as science or sepculative fiction, and there was an element of salaciousness to a few stories which felt unecessary/gratuitous. there are some gems, though - in particular those by Ursula K Le. Guin, Joanna Russ, and Kate Wilhelm. I look ...

    This is a classic anthology--the best of the New Wave that hit science fiction in the late 60s/early 70s. Writers were tasked with producing something "dangerous". Some were dangerous due to content--radical for the day--as in Ursula LeGuinn's fantastic radical environmental work "The ...

    This book is excellent. Fact. While not all of the stories are as punchy as andrew j. offutt's "For Value Received", or as stylistically interesting as Ross Rocklynne's "Ching Witch", everything in here is worthy of reading, even Ray Bradbury's poem. (And coming from a non-fan of po...

    Compared to Dangerous Visions, which struck me as almost uniformly brilliant, this sequel is longer and less impressive. The first half is about evenly split between excellent and ehh. The stories by Hollis, Gerrold, O'Donnell, Nelson and Anthony have the crazy snap of DV, and Le Guin'...

    Until 20 years or so ago, I would have rated this one a 5-star; I probably read it half a dozen times. But anymore when I browse sections, the times have passed it by, not the ideas so much as the language of the times. Still some incredible stories in there. ...

  • Joan
    Jun 23, 2011

    Again, Dangerous Visions was split into two for its mass market paperback release in 1973. This first half contains a few knockout stories, some pretty good ones, and a lot of mediocre ones. At twice the length of the original Dangerous Visions, I can?t help but think that maybe Elli...

    In 1969 Harlan Ellison edited the ground-breaking anthology Dangerous Visions. It was so successful commercially and in terms of award recognition, that a follow-up anthology known as Again, Dangerous Visions was released in 1972. This time it was so large as to be released in two volu...

    I've never read a short-story collection as uneven in quality as Again, Dangerous Visions 1. The bookend contributions make me feel a dumber, duller person for having read them, but there are real hits among the misses too. The Word for World is Forest is average for an Ursula K. Le Gu...

    A very mixed bag. I wouldn't class all of these as science or sepculative fiction, and there was an element of salaciousness to a few stories which felt unecessary/gratuitous. there are some gems, though - in particular those by Ursula K Le. Guin, Joanna Russ, and Kate Wilhelm. I look ...

    This is a classic anthology--the best of the New Wave that hit science fiction in the late 60s/early 70s. Writers were tasked with producing something "dangerous". Some were dangerous due to content--radical for the day--as in Ursula LeGuinn's fantastic radical environmental work "The ...

    This book is excellent. Fact. While not all of the stories are as punchy as andrew j. offutt's "For Value Received", or as stylistically interesting as Ross Rocklynne's "Ching Witch", everything in here is worthy of reading, even Ray Bradbury's poem. (And coming from a non-fan of po...

    Compared to Dangerous Visions, which struck me as almost uniformly brilliant, this sequel is longer and less impressive. The first half is about evenly split between excellent and ehh. The stories by Hollis, Gerrold, O'Donnell, Nelson and Anthony have the crazy snap of DV, and Le Guin'...

    Until 20 years or so ago, I would have rated this one a 5-star; I probably read it half a dozen times. But anymore when I browse sections, the times have passed it by, not the ideas so much as the language of the times. Still some incredible stories in there. ...

    It was a 1970s SF compilation. You expect it to be hit and miss. And a bit pretentious. The hits (including the likes of Vonnegut and Le Guin) make up for the misses. ...

    Ellison, enfant terriblé of the New Wave of Science Fiction of the '60s, edited this influential anthology. ...

    Pretty visionary and interesting sci-fi story compilation from the late-60s/early 70s. Sci-fi touched by psychedelia, rather novel stuff and lots of fun. ...

    Seventies sequel to the groundbreaking sixties collection edited by Ellison , and is more of the same really ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

  • Gary D.
    Jun 03, 2011

    Again, Dangerous Visions was split into two for its mass market paperback release in 1973. This first half contains a few knockout stories, some pretty good ones, and a lot of mediocre ones. At twice the length of the original Dangerous Visions, I can?t help but think that maybe Elli...

    In 1969 Harlan Ellison edited the ground-breaking anthology Dangerous Visions. It was so successful commercially and in terms of award recognition, that a follow-up anthology known as Again, Dangerous Visions was released in 1972. This time it was so large as to be released in two volu...

    I've never read a short-story collection as uneven in quality as Again, Dangerous Visions 1. The bookend contributions make me feel a dumber, duller person for having read them, but there are real hits among the misses too. The Word for World is Forest is average for an Ursula K. Le Gu...

    A very mixed bag. I wouldn't class all of these as science or sepculative fiction, and there was an element of salaciousness to a few stories which felt unecessary/gratuitous. there are some gems, though - in particular those by Ursula K Le. Guin, Joanna Russ, and Kate Wilhelm. I look ...

    This is a classic anthology--the best of the New Wave that hit science fiction in the late 60s/early 70s. Writers were tasked with producing something "dangerous". Some were dangerous due to content--radical for the day--as in Ursula LeGuinn's fantastic radical environmental work "The ...

    This book is excellent. Fact. While not all of the stories are as punchy as andrew j. offutt's "For Value Received", or as stylistically interesting as Ross Rocklynne's "Ching Witch", everything in here is worthy of reading, even Ray Bradbury's poem. (And coming from a non-fan of po...

    Compared to Dangerous Visions, which struck me as almost uniformly brilliant, this sequel is longer and less impressive. The first half is about evenly split between excellent and ehh. The stories by Hollis, Gerrold, O'Donnell, Nelson and Anthony have the crazy snap of DV, and Le Guin'...

    Until 20 years or so ago, I would have rated this one a 5-star; I probably read it half a dozen times. But anymore when I browse sections, the times have passed it by, not the ideas so much as the language of the times. Still some incredible stories in there. ...

    It was a 1970s SF compilation. You expect it to be hit and miss. And a bit pretentious. The hits (including the likes of Vonnegut and Le Guin) make up for the misses. ...

    Ellison, enfant terriblé of the New Wave of Science Fiction of the '60s, edited this influential anthology. ...

    Pretty visionary and interesting sci-fi story compilation from the late-60s/early 70s. Sci-fi touched by psychedelia, rather novel stuff and lots of fun. ...

    Seventies sequel to the groundbreaking sixties collection edited by Ellison , and is more of the same really ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

  • Randy Wiggins
    Oct 27, 2011

    Again, Dangerous Visions was split into two for its mass market paperback release in 1973. This first half contains a few knockout stories, some pretty good ones, and a lot of mediocre ones. At twice the length of the original Dangerous Visions, I can?t help but think that maybe Elli...

    In 1969 Harlan Ellison edited the ground-breaking anthology Dangerous Visions. It was so successful commercially and in terms of award recognition, that a follow-up anthology known as Again, Dangerous Visions was released in 1972. This time it was so large as to be released in two volu...

    I've never read a short-story collection as uneven in quality as Again, Dangerous Visions 1. The bookend contributions make me feel a dumber, duller person for having read them, but there are real hits among the misses too. The Word for World is Forest is average for an Ursula K. Le Gu...

    A very mixed bag. I wouldn't class all of these as science or sepculative fiction, and there was an element of salaciousness to a few stories which felt unecessary/gratuitous. there are some gems, though - in particular those by Ursula K Le. Guin, Joanna Russ, and Kate Wilhelm. I look ...

    This is a classic anthology--the best of the New Wave that hit science fiction in the late 60s/early 70s. Writers were tasked with producing something "dangerous". Some were dangerous due to content--radical for the day--as in Ursula LeGuinn's fantastic radical environmental work "The ...

    This book is excellent. Fact. While not all of the stories are as punchy as andrew j. offutt's "For Value Received", or as stylistically interesting as Ross Rocklynne's "Ching Witch", everything in here is worthy of reading, even Ray Bradbury's poem. (And coming from a non-fan of po...

    Compared to Dangerous Visions, which struck me as almost uniformly brilliant, this sequel is longer and less impressive. The first half is about evenly split between excellent and ehh. The stories by Hollis, Gerrold, O'Donnell, Nelson and Anthony have the crazy snap of DV, and Le Guin'...

    Until 20 years or so ago, I would have rated this one a 5-star; I probably read it half a dozen times. But anymore when I browse sections, the times have passed it by, not the ideas so much as the language of the times. Still some incredible stories in there. ...

    It was a 1970s SF compilation. You expect it to be hit and miss. And a bit pretentious. The hits (including the likes of Vonnegut and Le Guin) make up for the misses. ...

    Ellison, enfant terriblé of the New Wave of Science Fiction of the '60s, edited this influential anthology. ...

    Pretty visionary and interesting sci-fi story compilation from the late-60s/early 70s. Sci-fi touched by psychedelia, rather novel stuff and lots of fun. ...

    Seventies sequel to the groundbreaking sixties collection edited by Ellison , and is more of the same really ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

  • Allan Dyen-Shapiro
    Mar 15, 2012

    Again, Dangerous Visions was split into two for its mass market paperback release in 1973. This first half contains a few knockout stories, some pretty good ones, and a lot of mediocre ones. At twice the length of the original Dangerous Visions, I can?t help but think that maybe Elli...

    In 1969 Harlan Ellison edited the ground-breaking anthology Dangerous Visions. It was so successful commercially and in terms of award recognition, that a follow-up anthology known as Again, Dangerous Visions was released in 1972. This time it was so large as to be released in two volu...

    I've never read a short-story collection as uneven in quality as Again, Dangerous Visions 1. The bookend contributions make me feel a dumber, duller person for having read them, but there are real hits among the misses too. The Word for World is Forest is average for an Ursula K. Le Gu...

    A very mixed bag. I wouldn't class all of these as science or sepculative fiction, and there was an element of salaciousness to a few stories which felt unecessary/gratuitous. there are some gems, though - in particular those by Ursula K Le. Guin, Joanna Russ, and Kate Wilhelm. I look ...

    This is a classic anthology--the best of the New Wave that hit science fiction in the late 60s/early 70s. Writers were tasked with producing something "dangerous". Some were dangerous due to content--radical for the day--as in Ursula LeGuinn's fantastic radical environmental work "The ...

  • John
    Apr 28, 2012

    Again, Dangerous Visions was split into two for its mass market paperback release in 1973. This first half contains a few knockout stories, some pretty good ones, and a lot of mediocre ones. At twice the length of the original Dangerous Visions, I can?t help but think that maybe Elli...

    In 1969 Harlan Ellison edited the ground-breaking anthology Dangerous Visions. It was so successful commercially and in terms of award recognition, that a follow-up anthology known as Again, Dangerous Visions was released in 1972. This time it was so large as to be released in two volu...

    I've never read a short-story collection as uneven in quality as Again, Dangerous Visions 1. The bookend contributions make me feel a dumber, duller person for having read them, but there are real hits among the misses too. The Word for World is Forest is average for an Ursula K. Le Gu...

    A very mixed bag. I wouldn't class all of these as science or sepculative fiction, and there was an element of salaciousness to a few stories which felt unecessary/gratuitous. there are some gems, though - in particular those by Ursula K Le. Guin, Joanna Russ, and Kate Wilhelm. I look ...

    This is a classic anthology--the best of the New Wave that hit science fiction in the late 60s/early 70s. Writers were tasked with producing something "dangerous". Some were dangerous due to content--radical for the day--as in Ursula LeGuinn's fantastic radical environmental work "The ...

    This book is excellent. Fact. While not all of the stories are as punchy as andrew j. offutt's "For Value Received", or as stylistically interesting as Ross Rocklynne's "Ching Witch", everything in here is worthy of reading, even Ray Bradbury's poem. (And coming from a non-fan of po...

    Compared to Dangerous Visions, which struck me as almost uniformly brilliant, this sequel is longer and less impressive. The first half is about evenly split between excellent and ehh. The stories by Hollis, Gerrold, O'Donnell, Nelson and Anthony have the crazy snap of DV, and Le Guin'...

    Until 20 years or so ago, I would have rated this one a 5-star; I probably read it half a dozen times. But anymore when I browse sections, the times have passed it by, not the ideas so much as the language of the times. Still some incredible stories in there. ...

    It was a 1970s SF compilation. You expect it to be hit and miss. And a bit pretentious. The hits (including the likes of Vonnegut and Le Guin) make up for the misses. ...

    Ellison, enfant terriblé of the New Wave of Science Fiction of the '60s, edited this influential anthology. ...

    Pretty visionary and interesting sci-fi story compilation from the late-60s/early 70s. Sci-fi touched by psychedelia, rather novel stuff and lots of fun. ...

    Seventies sequel to the groundbreaking sixties collection edited by Ellison , and is more of the same really ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

  • Mike
    Jul 20, 2012

    Again, Dangerous Visions was split into two for its mass market paperback release in 1973. This first half contains a few knockout stories, some pretty good ones, and a lot of mediocre ones. At twice the length of the original Dangerous Visions, I can?t help but think that maybe Elli...

    In 1969 Harlan Ellison edited the ground-breaking anthology Dangerous Visions. It was so successful commercially and in terms of award recognition, that a follow-up anthology known as Again, Dangerous Visions was released in 1972. This time it was so large as to be released in two volu...

    I've never read a short-story collection as uneven in quality as Again, Dangerous Visions 1. The bookend contributions make me feel a dumber, duller person for having read them, but there are real hits among the misses too. The Word for World is Forest is average for an Ursula K. Le Gu...

    A very mixed bag. I wouldn't class all of these as science or sepculative fiction, and there was an element of salaciousness to a few stories which felt unecessary/gratuitous. there are some gems, though - in particular those by Ursula K Le. Guin, Joanna Russ, and Kate Wilhelm. I look ...

    This is a classic anthology--the best of the New Wave that hit science fiction in the late 60s/early 70s. Writers were tasked with producing something "dangerous". Some were dangerous due to content--radical for the day--as in Ursula LeGuinn's fantastic radical environmental work "The ...

    This book is excellent. Fact. While not all of the stories are as punchy as andrew j. offutt's "For Value Received", or as stylistically interesting as Ross Rocklynne's "Ching Witch", everything in here is worthy of reading, even Ray Bradbury's poem. (And coming from a non-fan of po...

    Compared to Dangerous Visions, which struck me as almost uniformly brilliant, this sequel is longer and less impressive. The first half is about evenly split between excellent and ehh. The stories by Hollis, Gerrold, O'Donnell, Nelson and Anthony have the crazy snap of DV, and Le Guin'...

    Until 20 years or so ago, I would have rated this one a 5-star; I probably read it half a dozen times. But anymore when I browse sections, the times have passed it by, not the ideas so much as the language of the times. Still some incredible stories in there. ...

    It was a 1970s SF compilation. You expect it to be hit and miss. And a bit pretentious. The hits (including the likes of Vonnegut and Le Guin) make up for the misses. ...

    Ellison, enfant terriblé of the New Wave of Science Fiction of the '60s, edited this influential anthology. ...

    Pretty visionary and interesting sci-fi story compilation from the late-60s/early 70s. Sci-fi touched by psychedelia, rather novel stuff and lots of fun. ...

    Seventies sequel to the groundbreaking sixties collection edited by Ellison , and is more of the same really ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

  • Ken
    Aug 08, 2012

    Again, Dangerous Visions was split into two for its mass market paperback release in 1973. This first half contains a few knockout stories, some pretty good ones, and a lot of mediocre ones. At twice the length of the original Dangerous Visions, I can?t help but think that maybe Elli...

    In 1969 Harlan Ellison edited the ground-breaking anthology Dangerous Visions. It was so successful commercially and in terms of award recognition, that a follow-up anthology known as Again, Dangerous Visions was released in 1972. This time it was so large as to be released in two volu...

    I've never read a short-story collection as uneven in quality as Again, Dangerous Visions 1. The bookend contributions make me feel a dumber, duller person for having read them, but there are real hits among the misses too. The Word for World is Forest is average for an Ursula K. Le Gu...

    A very mixed bag. I wouldn't class all of these as science or sepculative fiction, and there was an element of salaciousness to a few stories which felt unecessary/gratuitous. there are some gems, though - in particular those by Ursula K Le. Guin, Joanna Russ, and Kate Wilhelm. I look ...

    This is a classic anthology--the best of the New Wave that hit science fiction in the late 60s/early 70s. Writers were tasked with producing something "dangerous". Some were dangerous due to content--radical for the day--as in Ursula LeGuinn's fantastic radical environmental work "The ...

    This book is excellent. Fact. While not all of the stories are as punchy as andrew j. offutt's "For Value Received", or as stylistically interesting as Ross Rocklynne's "Ching Witch", everything in here is worthy of reading, even Ray Bradbury's poem. (And coming from a non-fan of po...

    Compared to Dangerous Visions, which struck me as almost uniformly brilliant, this sequel is longer and less impressive. The first half is about evenly split between excellent and ehh. The stories by Hollis, Gerrold, O'Donnell, Nelson and Anthony have the crazy snap of DV, and Le Guin'...

    Until 20 years or so ago, I would have rated this one a 5-star; I probably read it half a dozen times. But anymore when I browse sections, the times have passed it by, not the ideas so much as the language of the times. Still some incredible stories in there. ...

    It was a 1970s SF compilation. You expect it to be hit and miss. And a bit pretentious. The hits (including the likes of Vonnegut and Le Guin) make up for the misses. ...

    Ellison, enfant terriblé of the New Wave of Science Fiction of the '60s, edited this influential anthology. ...

    Pretty visionary and interesting sci-fi story compilation from the late-60s/early 70s. Sci-fi touched by psychedelia, rather novel stuff and lots of fun. ...

    Seventies sequel to the groundbreaking sixties collection edited by Ellison , and is more of the same really ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

  • Kevin Kelsey
    Jun 23, 2015

    Again, Dangerous Visions was split into two for its mass market paperback release in 1973. This first half contains a few knockout stories, some pretty good ones, and a lot of mediocre ones. At twice the length of the original Dangerous Visions, I can?t help but think that maybe Elli...

  • Part
    Jun 12, 2013

    Again, Dangerous Visions was split into two for its mass market paperback release in 1973. This first half contains a few knockout stories, some pretty good ones, and a lot of mediocre ones. At twice the length of the original Dangerous Visions, I can?t help but think that maybe Elli...

    In 1969 Harlan Ellison edited the ground-breaking anthology Dangerous Visions. It was so successful commercially and in terms of award recognition, that a follow-up anthology known as Again, Dangerous Visions was released in 1972. This time it was so large as to be released in two volu...

    I've never read a short-story collection as uneven in quality as Again, Dangerous Visions 1. The bookend contributions make me feel a dumber, duller person for having read them, but there are real hits among the misses too. The Word for World is Forest is average for an Ursula K. Le Gu...

    A very mixed bag. I wouldn't class all of these as science or sepculative fiction, and there was an element of salaciousness to a few stories which felt unecessary/gratuitous. there are some gems, though - in particular those by Ursula K Le. Guin, Joanna Russ, and Kate Wilhelm. I look ...

    This is a classic anthology--the best of the New Wave that hit science fiction in the late 60s/early 70s. Writers were tasked with producing something "dangerous". Some were dangerous due to content--radical for the day--as in Ursula LeGuinn's fantastic radical environmental work "The ...

    This book is excellent. Fact. While not all of the stories are as punchy as andrew j. offutt's "For Value Received", or as stylistically interesting as Ross Rocklynne's "Ching Witch", everything in here is worthy of reading, even Ray Bradbury's poem. (And coming from a non-fan of po...

    Compared to Dangerous Visions, which struck me as almost uniformly brilliant, this sequel is longer and less impressive. The first half is about evenly split between excellent and ehh. The stories by Hollis, Gerrold, O'Donnell, Nelson and Anthony have the crazy snap of DV, and Le Guin'...

    Until 20 years or so ago, I would have rated this one a 5-star; I probably read it half a dozen times. But anymore when I browse sections, the times have passed it by, not the ideas so much as the language of the times. Still some incredible stories in there. ...

    It was a 1970s SF compilation. You expect it to be hit and miss. And a bit pretentious. The hits (including the likes of Vonnegut and Le Guin) make up for the misses. ...

    Ellison, enfant terriblé of the New Wave of Science Fiction of the '60s, edited this influential anthology. ...

    Pretty visionary and interesting sci-fi story compilation from the late-60s/early 70s. Sci-fi touched by psychedelia, rather novel stuff and lots of fun. ...

    Seventies sequel to the groundbreaking sixties collection edited by Ellison , and is more of the same really ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

  • Odhran
    Jul 20, 2012

    Again, Dangerous Visions was split into two for its mass market paperback release in 1973. This first half contains a few knockout stories, some pretty good ones, and a lot of mediocre ones. At twice the length of the original Dangerous Visions, I can?t help but think that maybe Elli...

    In 1969 Harlan Ellison edited the ground-breaking anthology Dangerous Visions. It was so successful commercially and in terms of award recognition, that a follow-up anthology known as Again, Dangerous Visions was released in 1972. This time it was so large as to be released in two volu...

    I've never read a short-story collection as uneven in quality as Again, Dangerous Visions 1. The bookend contributions make me feel a dumber, duller person for having read them, but there are real hits among the misses too. The Word for World is Forest is average for an Ursula K. Le Gu...

    A very mixed bag. I wouldn't class all of these as science or sepculative fiction, and there was an element of salaciousness to a few stories which felt unecessary/gratuitous. there are some gems, though - in particular those by Ursula K Le. Guin, Joanna Russ, and Kate Wilhelm. I look ...

    This is a classic anthology--the best of the New Wave that hit science fiction in the late 60s/early 70s. Writers were tasked with producing something "dangerous". Some were dangerous due to content--radical for the day--as in Ursula LeGuinn's fantastic radical environmental work "The ...

    This book is excellent. Fact. While not all of the stories are as punchy as andrew j. offutt's "For Value Received", or as stylistically interesting as Ross Rocklynne's "Ching Witch", everything in here is worthy of reading, even Ray Bradbury's poem. (And coming from a non-fan of po...

  • Jack van Riel
    Oct 01, 2017

    Again, Dangerous Visions was split into two for its mass market paperback release in 1973. This first half contains a few knockout stories, some pretty good ones, and a lot of mediocre ones. At twice the length of the original Dangerous Visions, I can?t help but think that maybe Elli...

    In 1969 Harlan Ellison edited the ground-breaking anthology Dangerous Visions. It was so successful commercially and in terms of award recognition, that a follow-up anthology known as Again, Dangerous Visions was released in 1972. This time it was so large as to be released in two volu...

    I've never read a short-story collection as uneven in quality as Again, Dangerous Visions 1. The bookend contributions make me feel a dumber, duller person for having read them, but there are real hits among the misses too. The Word for World is Forest is average for an Ursula K. Le Gu...

  • Kurt Rice
    Nov 08, 2012

    Again, Dangerous Visions was split into two for its mass market paperback release in 1973. This first half contains a few knockout stories, some pretty good ones, and a lot of mediocre ones. At twice the length of the original Dangerous Visions, I can?t help but think that maybe Elli...

    In 1969 Harlan Ellison edited the ground-breaking anthology Dangerous Visions. It was so successful commercially and in terms of award recognition, that a follow-up anthology known as Again, Dangerous Visions was released in 1972. This time it was so large as to be released in two volu...

    I've never read a short-story collection as uneven in quality as Again, Dangerous Visions 1. The bookend contributions make me feel a dumber, duller person for having read them, but there are real hits among the misses too. The Word for World is Forest is average for an Ursula K. Le Gu...

    A very mixed bag. I wouldn't class all of these as science or sepculative fiction, and there was an element of salaciousness to a few stories which felt unecessary/gratuitous. there are some gems, though - in particular those by Ursula K Le. Guin, Joanna Russ, and Kate Wilhelm. I look ...

    This is a classic anthology--the best of the New Wave that hit science fiction in the late 60s/early 70s. Writers were tasked with producing something "dangerous". Some were dangerous due to content--radical for the day--as in Ursula LeGuinn's fantastic radical environmental work "The ...

    This book is excellent. Fact. While not all of the stories are as punchy as andrew j. offutt's "For Value Received", or as stylistically interesting as Ross Rocklynne's "Ching Witch", everything in here is worthy of reading, even Ray Bradbury's poem. (And coming from a non-fan of po...

    Compared to Dangerous Visions, which struck me as almost uniformly brilliant, this sequel is longer and less impressive. The first half is about evenly split between excellent and ehh. The stories by Hollis, Gerrold, O'Donnell, Nelson and Anthony have the crazy snap of DV, and Le Guin'...

    Until 20 years or so ago, I would have rated this one a 5-star; I probably read it half a dozen times. But anymore when I browse sections, the times have passed it by, not the ideas so much as the language of the times. Still some incredible stories in there. ...

    It was a 1970s SF compilation. You expect it to be hit and miss. And a bit pretentious. The hits (including the likes of Vonnegut and Le Guin) make up for the misses. ...

    Ellison, enfant terriblé of the New Wave of Science Fiction of the '60s, edited this influential anthology. ...

    Pretty visionary and interesting sci-fi story compilation from the late-60s/early 70s. Sci-fi touched by psychedelia, rather novel stuff and lots of fun. ...

    Seventies sequel to the groundbreaking sixties collection edited by Ellison , and is more of the same really ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

  • John Staats
    Nov 14, 2012

    Again, Dangerous Visions was split into two for its mass market paperback release in 1973. This first half contains a few knockout stories, some pretty good ones, and a lot of mediocre ones. At twice the length of the original Dangerous Visions, I can?t help but think that maybe Elli...

    In 1969 Harlan Ellison edited the ground-breaking anthology Dangerous Visions. It was so successful commercially and in terms of award recognition, that a follow-up anthology known as Again, Dangerous Visions was released in 1972. This time it was so large as to be released in two volu...

    I've never read a short-story collection as uneven in quality as Again, Dangerous Visions 1. The bookend contributions make me feel a dumber, duller person for having read them, but there are real hits among the misses too. The Word for World is Forest is average for an Ursula K. Le Gu...

    A very mixed bag. I wouldn't class all of these as science or sepculative fiction, and there was an element of salaciousness to a few stories which felt unecessary/gratuitous. there are some gems, though - in particular those by Ursula K Le. Guin, Joanna Russ, and Kate Wilhelm. I look ...

    This is a classic anthology--the best of the New Wave that hit science fiction in the late 60s/early 70s. Writers were tasked with producing something "dangerous". Some were dangerous due to content--radical for the day--as in Ursula LeGuinn's fantastic radical environmental work "The ...

    This book is excellent. Fact. While not all of the stories are as punchy as andrew j. offutt's "For Value Received", or as stylistically interesting as Ross Rocklynne's "Ching Witch", everything in here is worthy of reading, even Ray Bradbury's poem. (And coming from a non-fan of po...

    Compared to Dangerous Visions, which struck me as almost uniformly brilliant, this sequel is longer and less impressive. The first half is about evenly split between excellent and ehh. The stories by Hollis, Gerrold, O'Donnell, Nelson and Anthony have the crazy snap of DV, and Le Guin'...

    Until 20 years or so ago, I would have rated this one a 5-star; I probably read it half a dozen times. But anymore when I browse sections, the times have passed it by, not the ideas so much as the language of the times. Still some incredible stories in there. ...

    It was a 1970s SF compilation. You expect it to be hit and miss. And a bit pretentious. The hits (including the likes of Vonnegut and Le Guin) make up for the misses. ...

    Ellison, enfant terriblé of the New Wave of Science Fiction of the '60s, edited this influential anthology. ...

    Pretty visionary and interesting sci-fi story compilation from the late-60s/early 70s. Sci-fi touched by psychedelia, rather novel stuff and lots of fun. ...

    Seventies sequel to the groundbreaking sixties collection edited by Ellison , and is more of the same really ...

    ...

    ...

  • J.D.
    Dec 25, 2012

    Again, Dangerous Visions was split into two for its mass market paperback release in 1973. This first half contains a few knockout stories, some pretty good ones, and a lot of mediocre ones. At twice the length of the original Dangerous Visions, I can?t help but think that maybe Elli...

    In 1969 Harlan Ellison edited the ground-breaking anthology Dangerous Visions. It was so successful commercially and in terms of award recognition, that a follow-up anthology known as Again, Dangerous Visions was released in 1972. This time it was so large as to be released in two volu...

    I've never read a short-story collection as uneven in quality as Again, Dangerous Visions 1. The bookend contributions make me feel a dumber, duller person for having read them, but there are real hits among the misses too. The Word for World is Forest is average for an Ursula K. Le Gu...

    A very mixed bag. I wouldn't class all of these as science or sepculative fiction, and there was an element of salaciousness to a few stories which felt unecessary/gratuitous. there are some gems, though - in particular those by Ursula K Le. Guin, Joanna Russ, and Kate Wilhelm. I look ...

    This is a classic anthology--the best of the New Wave that hit science fiction in the late 60s/early 70s. Writers were tasked with producing something "dangerous". Some were dangerous due to content--radical for the day--as in Ursula LeGuinn's fantastic radical environmental work "The ...

    This book is excellent. Fact. While not all of the stories are as punchy as andrew j. offutt's "For Value Received", or as stylistically interesting as Ross Rocklynne's "Ching Witch", everything in here is worthy of reading, even Ray Bradbury's poem. (And coming from a non-fan of po...

    Compared to Dangerous Visions, which struck me as almost uniformly brilliant, this sequel is longer and less impressive. The first half is about evenly split between excellent and ehh. The stories by Hollis, Gerrold, O'Donnell, Nelson and Anthony have the crazy snap of DV, and Le Guin'...

    Until 20 years or so ago, I would have rated this one a 5-star; I probably read it half a dozen times. But anymore when I browse sections, the times have passed it by, not the ideas so much as the language of the times. Still some incredible stories in there. ...

    It was a 1970s SF compilation. You expect it to be hit and miss. And a bit pretentious. The hits (including the likes of Vonnegut and Le Guin) make up for the misses. ...

    Ellison, enfant terriblé of the New Wave of Science Fiction of the '60s, edited this influential anthology. ...

    Pretty visionary and interesting sci-fi story compilation from the late-60s/early 70s. Sci-fi touched by psychedelia, rather novel stuff and lots of fun. ...

    Seventies sequel to the groundbreaking sixties collection edited by Ellison , and is more of the same really ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

  • Stephen Laidlaw
    Mar 20, 2016

    Again, Dangerous Visions was split into two for its mass market paperback release in 1973. This first half contains a few knockout stories, some pretty good ones, and a lot of mediocre ones. At twice the length of the original Dangerous Visions, I can?t help but think that maybe Elli...

    In 1969 Harlan Ellison edited the ground-breaking anthology Dangerous Visions. It was so successful commercially and in terms of award recognition, that a follow-up anthology known as Again, Dangerous Visions was released in 1972. This time it was so large as to be released in two volu...

    I've never read a short-story collection as uneven in quality as Again, Dangerous Visions 1. The bookend contributions make me feel a dumber, duller person for having read them, but there are real hits among the misses too. The Word for World is Forest is average for an Ursula K. Le Gu...

    A very mixed bag. I wouldn't class all of these as science or sepculative fiction, and there was an element of salaciousness to a few stories which felt unecessary/gratuitous. there are some gems, though - in particular those by Ursula K Le. Guin, Joanna Russ, and Kate Wilhelm. I look ...

    This is a classic anthology--the best of the New Wave that hit science fiction in the late 60s/early 70s. Writers were tasked with producing something "dangerous". Some were dangerous due to content--radical for the day--as in Ursula LeGuinn's fantastic radical environmental work "The ...

    This book is excellent. Fact. While not all of the stories are as punchy as andrew j. offutt's "For Value Received", or as stylistically interesting as Ross Rocklynne's "Ching Witch", everything in here is worthy of reading, even Ray Bradbury's poem. (And coming from a non-fan of po...

    Compared to Dangerous Visions, which struck me as almost uniformly brilliant, this sequel is longer and less impressive. The first half is about evenly split between excellent and ehh. The stories by Hollis, Gerrold, O'Donnell, Nelson and Anthony have the crazy snap of DV, and Le Guin'...

    Until 20 years or so ago, I would have rated this one a 5-star; I probably read it half a dozen times. But anymore when I browse sections, the times have passed it by, not the ideas so much as the language of the times. Still some incredible stories in there. ...

    It was a 1970s SF compilation. You expect it to be hit and miss. And a bit pretentious. The hits (including the likes of Vonnegut and Le Guin) make up for the misses. ...

  • Spencer Whetstone
    Sep 13, 2013

    Again, Dangerous Visions was split into two for its mass market paperback release in 1973. This first half contains a few knockout stories, some pretty good ones, and a lot of mediocre ones. At twice the length of the original Dangerous Visions, I can?t help but think that maybe Elli...

    In 1969 Harlan Ellison edited the ground-breaking anthology Dangerous Visions. It was so successful commercially and in terms of award recognition, that a follow-up anthology known as Again, Dangerous Visions was released in 1972. This time it was so large as to be released in two volu...

    I've never read a short-story collection as uneven in quality as Again, Dangerous Visions 1. The bookend contributions make me feel a dumber, duller person for having read them, but there are real hits among the misses too. The Word for World is Forest is average for an Ursula K. Le Gu...

    A very mixed bag. I wouldn't class all of these as science or sepculative fiction, and there was an element of salaciousness to a few stories which felt unecessary/gratuitous. there are some gems, though - in particular those by Ursula K Le. Guin, Joanna Russ, and Kate Wilhelm. I look ...

    This is a classic anthology--the best of the New Wave that hit science fiction in the late 60s/early 70s. Writers were tasked with producing something "dangerous". Some were dangerous due to content--radical for the day--as in Ursula LeGuinn's fantastic radical environmental work "The ...

    This book is excellent. Fact. While not all of the stories are as punchy as andrew j. offutt's "For Value Received", or as stylistically interesting as Ross Rocklynne's "Ching Witch", everything in here is worthy of reading, even Ray Bradbury's poem. (And coming from a non-fan of po...

    Compared to Dangerous Visions, which struck me as almost uniformly brilliant, this sequel is longer and less impressive. The first half is about evenly split between excellent and ehh. The stories by Hollis, Gerrold, O'Donnell, Nelson and Anthony have the crazy snap of DV, and Le Guin'...

    Until 20 years or so ago, I would have rated this one a 5-star; I probably read it half a dozen times. But anymore when I browse sections, the times have passed it by, not the ideas so much as the language of the times. Still some incredible stories in there. ...

    It was a 1970s SF compilation. You expect it to be hit and miss. And a bit pretentious. The hits (including the likes of Vonnegut and Le Guin) make up for the misses. ...

    Ellison, enfant terriblé of the New Wave of Science Fiction of the '60s, edited this influential anthology. ...

  • Robert Hepple
    Apr 29, 2014

    Again, Dangerous Visions was split into two for its mass market paperback release in 1973. This first half contains a few knockout stories, some pretty good ones, and a lot of mediocre ones. At twice the length of the original Dangerous Visions, I can?t help but think that maybe Elli...

    In 1969 Harlan Ellison edited the ground-breaking anthology Dangerous Visions. It was so successful commercially and in terms of award recognition, that a follow-up anthology known as Again, Dangerous Visions was released in 1972. This time it was so large as to be released in two volu...

    I've never read a short-story collection as uneven in quality as Again, Dangerous Visions 1. The bookend contributions make me feel a dumber, duller person for having read them, but there are real hits among the misses too. The Word for World is Forest is average for an Ursula K. Le Gu...

    A very mixed bag. I wouldn't class all of these as science or sepculative fiction, and there was an element of salaciousness to a few stories which felt unecessary/gratuitous. there are some gems, though - in particular those by Ursula K Le. Guin, Joanna Russ, and Kate Wilhelm. I look ...

    This is a classic anthology--the best of the New Wave that hit science fiction in the late 60s/early 70s. Writers were tasked with producing something "dangerous". Some were dangerous due to content--radical for the day--as in Ursula LeGuinn's fantastic radical environmental work "The ...

    This book is excellent. Fact. While not all of the stories are as punchy as andrew j. offutt's "For Value Received", or as stylistically interesting as Ross Rocklynne's "Ching Witch", everything in here is worthy of reading, even Ray Bradbury's poem. (And coming from a non-fan of po...

    Compared to Dangerous Visions, which struck me as almost uniformly brilliant, this sequel is longer and less impressive. The first half is about evenly split between excellent and ehh. The stories by Hollis, Gerrold, O'Donnell, Nelson and Anthony have the crazy snap of DV, and Le Guin'...

    Until 20 years or so ago, I would have rated this one a 5-star; I probably read it half a dozen times. But anymore when I browse sections, the times have passed it by, not the ideas so much as the language of the times. Still some incredible stories in there. ...

    It was a 1970s SF compilation. You expect it to be hit and miss. And a bit pretentious. The hits (including the likes of Vonnegut and Le Guin) make up for the misses. ...

    Ellison, enfant terriblé of the New Wave of Science Fiction of the '60s, edited this influential anthology. ...

    Pretty visionary and interesting sci-fi story compilation from the late-60s/early 70s. Sci-fi touched by psychedelia, rather novel stuff and lots of fun. ...

    Seventies sequel to the groundbreaking sixties collection edited by Ellison , and is more of the same really ...

    ...

  • Liam
    Apr 24, 2015

    Again, Dangerous Visions was split into two for its mass market paperback release in 1973. This first half contains a few knockout stories, some pretty good ones, and a lot of mediocre ones. At twice the length of the original Dangerous Visions, I can?t help but think that maybe Elli...

    In 1969 Harlan Ellison edited the ground-breaking anthology Dangerous Visions. It was so successful commercially and in terms of award recognition, that a follow-up anthology known as Again, Dangerous Visions was released in 1972. This time it was so large as to be released in two volu...

    I've never read a short-story collection as uneven in quality as Again, Dangerous Visions 1. The bookend contributions make me feel a dumber, duller person for having read them, but there are real hits among the misses too. The Word for World is Forest is average for an Ursula K. Le Gu...

    A very mixed bag. I wouldn't class all of these as science or sepculative fiction, and there was an element of salaciousness to a few stories which felt unecessary/gratuitous. there are some gems, though - in particular those by Ursula K Le. Guin, Joanna Russ, and Kate Wilhelm. I look ...

    This is a classic anthology--the best of the New Wave that hit science fiction in the late 60s/early 70s. Writers were tasked with producing something "dangerous". Some were dangerous due to content--radical for the day--as in Ursula LeGuinn's fantastic radical environmental work "The ...

    This book is excellent. Fact. While not all of the stories are as punchy as andrew j. offutt's "For Value Received", or as stylistically interesting as Ross Rocklynne's "Ching Witch", everything in here is worthy of reading, even Ray Bradbury's poem. (And coming from a non-fan of po...

    Compared to Dangerous Visions, which struck me as almost uniformly brilliant, this sequel is longer and less impressive. The first half is about evenly split between excellent and ehh. The stories by Hollis, Gerrold, O'Donnell, Nelson and Anthony have the crazy snap of DV, and Le Guin'...

    Until 20 years or so ago, I would have rated this one a 5-star; I probably read it half a dozen times. But anymore when I browse sections, the times have passed it by, not the ideas so much as the language of the times. Still some incredible stories in there. ...

    It was a 1970s SF compilation. You expect it to be hit and miss. And a bit pretentious. The hits (including the likes of Vonnegut and Le Guin) make up for the misses. ...

    Ellison, enfant terriblé of the New Wave of Science Fiction of the '60s, edited this influential anthology. ...

    Pretty visionary and interesting sci-fi story compilation from the late-60s/early 70s. Sci-fi touched by psychedelia, rather novel stuff and lots of fun. ...

    Seventies sequel to the groundbreaking sixties collection edited by Ellison , and is more of the same really ...

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  • Andy Seiler
    Jan 11, 2015

    Again, Dangerous Visions was split into two for its mass market paperback release in 1973. This first half contains a few knockout stories, some pretty good ones, and a lot of mediocre ones. At twice the length of the original Dangerous Visions, I can?t help but think that maybe Elli...

    In 1969 Harlan Ellison edited the ground-breaking anthology Dangerous Visions. It was so successful commercially and in terms of award recognition, that a follow-up anthology known as Again, Dangerous Visions was released in 1972. This time it was so large as to be released in two volu...

    I've never read a short-story collection as uneven in quality as Again, Dangerous Visions 1. The bookend contributions make me feel a dumber, duller person for having read them, but there are real hits among the misses too. The Word for World is Forest is average for an Ursula K. Le Gu...

    A very mixed bag. I wouldn't class all of these as science or sepculative fiction, and there was an element of salaciousness to a few stories which felt unecessary/gratuitous. there are some gems, though - in particular those by Ursula K Le. Guin, Joanna Russ, and Kate Wilhelm. I look ...

    This is a classic anthology--the best of the New Wave that hit science fiction in the late 60s/early 70s. Writers were tasked with producing something "dangerous". Some were dangerous due to content--radical for the day--as in Ursula LeGuinn's fantastic radical environmental work "The ...

    This book is excellent. Fact. While not all of the stories are as punchy as andrew j. offutt's "For Value Received", or as stylistically interesting as Ross Rocklynne's "Ching Witch", everything in here is worthy of reading, even Ray Bradbury's poem. (And coming from a non-fan of po...

    Compared to Dangerous Visions, which struck me as almost uniformly brilliant, this sequel is longer and less impressive. The first half is about evenly split between excellent and ehh. The stories by Hollis, Gerrold, O'Donnell, Nelson and Anthony have the crazy snap of DV, and Le Guin'...

    Until 20 years or so ago, I would have rated this one a 5-star; I probably read it half a dozen times. But anymore when I browse sections, the times have passed it by, not the ideas so much as the language of the times. Still some incredible stories in there. ...

    It was a 1970s SF compilation. You expect it to be hit and miss. And a bit pretentious. The hits (including the likes of Vonnegut and Le Guin) make up for the misses. ...

    Ellison, enfant terriblé of the New Wave of Science Fiction of the '60s, edited this influential anthology. ...

    Pretty visionary and interesting sci-fi story compilation from the late-60s/early 70s. Sci-fi touched by psychedelia, rather novel stuff and lots of fun. ...

    Seventies sequel to the groundbreaking sixties collection edited by Ellison , and is more of the same really ...

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  • Vaughn Zeller
    Jan 15, 2017

    Again, Dangerous Visions was split into two for its mass market paperback release in 1973. This first half contains a few knockout stories, some pretty good ones, and a lot of mediocre ones. At twice the length of the original Dangerous Visions, I can?t help but think that maybe Elli...

    In 1969 Harlan Ellison edited the ground-breaking anthology Dangerous Visions. It was so successful commercially and in terms of award recognition, that a follow-up anthology known as Again, Dangerous Visions was released in 1972. This time it was so large as to be released in two volu...

    I've never read a short-story collection as uneven in quality as Again, Dangerous Visions 1. The bookend contributions make me feel a dumber, duller person for having read them, but there are real hits among the misses too. The Word for World is Forest is average for an Ursula K. Le Gu...

    A very mixed bag. I wouldn't class all of these as science or sepculative fiction, and there was an element of salaciousness to a few stories which felt unecessary/gratuitous. there are some gems, though - in particular those by Ursula K Le. Guin, Joanna Russ, and Kate Wilhelm. I look ...

    This is a classic anthology--the best of the New Wave that hit science fiction in the late 60s/early 70s. Writers were tasked with producing something "dangerous". Some were dangerous due to content--radical for the day--as in Ursula LeGuinn's fantastic radical environmental work "The ...

    This book is excellent. Fact. While not all of the stories are as punchy as andrew j. offutt's "For Value Received", or as stylistically interesting as Ross Rocklynne's "Ching Witch", everything in here is worthy of reading, even Ray Bradbury's poem. (And coming from a non-fan of po...

    Compared to Dangerous Visions, which struck me as almost uniformly brilliant, this sequel is longer and less impressive. The first half is about evenly split between excellent and ehh. The stories by Hollis, Gerrold, O'Donnell, Nelson and Anthony have the crazy snap of DV, and Le Guin'...

    Until 20 years or so ago, I would have rated this one a 5-star; I probably read it half a dozen times. But anymore when I browse sections, the times have passed it by, not the ideas so much as the language of the times. Still some incredible stories in there. ...

    It was a 1970s SF compilation. You expect it to be hit and miss. And a bit pretentious. The hits (including the likes of Vonnegut and Le Guin) make up for the misses. ...

    Ellison, enfant terriblé of the New Wave of Science Fiction of the '60s, edited this influential anthology. ...

    Pretty visionary and interesting sci-fi story compilation from the late-60s/early 70s. Sci-fi touched by psychedelia, rather novel stuff and lots of fun. ...

    Seventies sequel to the groundbreaking sixties collection edited by Ellison , and is more of the same really ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

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  • Roy
    Aug 06, 2016

    Again, Dangerous Visions was split into two for its mass market paperback release in 1973. This first half contains a few knockout stories, some pretty good ones, and a lot of mediocre ones. At twice the length of the original Dangerous Visions, I can?t help but think that maybe Elli...

    In 1969 Harlan Ellison edited the ground-breaking anthology Dangerous Visions. It was so successful commercially and in terms of award recognition, that a follow-up anthology known as Again, Dangerous Visions was released in 1972. This time it was so large as to be released in two volu...

    I've never read a short-story collection as uneven in quality as Again, Dangerous Visions 1. The bookend contributions make me feel a dumber, duller person for having read them, but there are real hits among the misses too. The Word for World is Forest is average for an Ursula K. Le Gu...

    A very mixed bag. I wouldn't class all of these as science or sepculative fiction, and there was an element of salaciousness to a few stories which felt unecessary/gratuitous. there are some gems, though - in particular those by Ursula K Le. Guin, Joanna Russ, and Kate Wilhelm. I look ...

    This is a classic anthology--the best of the New Wave that hit science fiction in the late 60s/early 70s. Writers were tasked with producing something "dangerous". Some were dangerous due to content--radical for the day--as in Ursula LeGuinn's fantastic radical environmental work "The ...

    This book is excellent. Fact. While not all of the stories are as punchy as andrew j. offutt's "For Value Received", or as stylistically interesting as Ross Rocklynne's "Ching Witch", everything in here is worthy of reading, even Ray Bradbury's poem. (And coming from a non-fan of po...

    Compared to Dangerous Visions, which struck me as almost uniformly brilliant, this sequel is longer and less impressive. The first half is about evenly split between excellent and ehh. The stories by Hollis, Gerrold, O'Donnell, Nelson and Anthony have the crazy snap of DV, and Le Guin'...

    Until 20 years or so ago, I would have rated this one a 5-star; I probably read it half a dozen times. But anymore when I browse sections, the times have passed it by, not the ideas so much as the language of the times. Still some incredible stories in there. ...

    It was a 1970s SF compilation. You expect it to be hit and miss. And a bit pretentious. The hits (including the likes of Vonnegut and Le Guin) make up for the misses. ...

    Ellison, enfant terriblé of the New Wave of Science Fiction of the '60s, edited this influential anthology. ...

    Pretty visionary and interesting sci-fi story compilation from the late-60s/early 70s. Sci-fi touched by psychedelia, rather novel stuff and lots of fun. ...

    Seventies sequel to the groundbreaking sixties collection edited by Ellison , and is more of the same really ...

  • Emma Norman
    Mar 05, 2018

    Again, Dangerous Visions was split into two for its mass market paperback release in 1973. This first half contains a few knockout stories, some pretty good ones, and a lot of mediocre ones. At twice the length of the original Dangerous Visions, I can?t help but think that maybe Elli...

    In 1969 Harlan Ellison edited the ground-breaking anthology Dangerous Visions. It was so successful commercially and in terms of award recognition, that a follow-up anthology known as Again, Dangerous Visions was released in 1972. This time it was so large as to be released in two volu...

    I've never read a short-story collection as uneven in quality as Again, Dangerous Visions 1. The bookend contributions make me feel a dumber, duller person for having read them, but there are real hits among the misses too. The Word for World is Forest is average for an Ursula K. Le Gu...

    A very mixed bag. I wouldn't class all of these as science or sepculative fiction, and there was an element of salaciousness to a few stories which felt unecessary/gratuitous. there are some gems, though - in particular those by Ursula K Le. Guin, Joanna Russ, and Kate Wilhelm. I look ...