The Jewel-Hinged Jaw: Notes on the Language of Science Fiction

The Jewel-Hinged Jaw: Notes on the Language of Science Fiction

An indispensable work of science fiction criticism revised and expanded...

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Title:The Jewel-Hinged Jaw: Notes on the Language of Science Fiction
Author:Samuel R. Delany
Rating:
Genres:Nonfiction
ISBN:Jewel Hinged Jaw: Notes on the Language of Science Fiction
ISBN
Edition Language:English
Format Type:Hardcover
Number of Pages:326 pages pages

The Jewel-Hinged Jaw: Notes on the Language of Science Fiction Reviews

  • Larry-bob Roberts
    May 14, 2009

    Deep, fine thinking. Often hilarious. Any serious writer of science fiction or fantasy or both should read this book, though it is a deeper and more rigorous than most writing about writing, in genre or out, so it may daunt. This is one of the few books to take the entire process serio...

    Well, I think I can say with confidence now that Delany is the closest thing Americans will ever get to having our own Borges (and as a heretofore unknown aside, the first Borges story to appear translated in the USA was 'Death and the Compass,' and it appeared in The Magazine of Fanta...

    (I read the old edition, the new edition is structured slightly different and includes at least one new essay.) Jewel Hinged Jaw is a collection of essays all centered around a discussion of science fiction. The collection was first published in the 70s and has aged quite well, desp...

    I've never read any of Delaney's fiction, but I found much of his critical work absorbing and interesting. There were discussions on such divers topics as the grammar of ASL and the question of (numerically) equal representation of the sexes in stories. I'm told LeGuin denies ever ...

    Delaney is usually intelligent, occasionally profound, and often extremely frustrating. In a way, the essay is his natural habitat - at least, it lets him indulge the didactic tendencies which crop up again and again in his novels. He's relentlessly structuralist, which now reads as da...

    formalist ideas of literature applied, thus sf is ultimately... poetry. myth-making in some ways, this had intelligent artists conscious of what they are doing and how sf is valuable, mature, engaging. this is trying to present possibilities of thought experiments in the essence of poe...

    This book, and in particular the essay opening the collection, ?About 5,750 Words? is famous (I wouldn?t know whether justly or not) for being the first attempt to define Science Fiction not by way of its content (?It takes place in the future?, ?It has robots and starships...

    Having worked my way through most of his fiction and memoir, I've started in on more of Delany's essays. At the end of the day, I do just like his narrative stuff better, and the bits of personal story in these essays were some of my favorite parts. Lots of other good stuff too t...

    This was a bit of a mixed bag for me. I enjoyed several of the essays, skipped a few which pertained to SFF works I haven't read (or read so long ago I remember virtually nothing) and fought my way through some of the more arcane critical language (I don't know the different between di...

    Took me a while to make it through this collection of essays about science fiction as literature. I started on it because I'd finally read Ursula Leguin's The Dispossessed which is the subject of one of the longer essays. Delany offers a lot of critiques of the book, including that the...

  • David
    Apr 26, 2011

    Deep, fine thinking. Often hilarious. Any serious writer of science fiction or fantasy or both should read this book, though it is a deeper and more rigorous than most writing about writing, in genre or out, so it may daunt. This is one of the few books to take the entire process serio...

    Well, I think I can say with confidence now that Delany is the closest thing Americans will ever get to having our own Borges (and as a heretofore unknown aside, the first Borges story to appear translated in the USA was 'Death and the Compass,' and it appeared in The Magazine of Fanta...

    (I read the old edition, the new edition is structured slightly different and includes at least one new essay.) Jewel Hinged Jaw is a collection of essays all centered around a discussion of science fiction. The collection was first published in the 70s and has aged quite well, desp...

    I've never read any of Delaney's fiction, but I found much of his critical work absorbing and interesting. There were discussions on such divers topics as the grammar of ASL and the question of (numerically) equal representation of the sexes in stories. I'm told LeGuin denies ever ...

    Delaney is usually intelligent, occasionally profound, and often extremely frustrating. In a way, the essay is his natural habitat - at least, it lets him indulge the didactic tendencies which crop up again and again in his novels. He's relentlessly structuralist, which now reads as da...

    formalist ideas of literature applied, thus sf is ultimately... poetry. myth-making in some ways, this had intelligent artists conscious of what they are doing and how sf is valuable, mature, engaging. this is trying to present possibilities of thought experiments in the essence of poe...

    This book, and in particular the essay opening the collection, ?About 5,750 Words? is famous (I wouldn?t know whether justly or not) for being the first attempt to define Science Fiction not by way of its content (?It takes place in the future?, ?It has robots and starships...

    Having worked my way through most of his fiction and memoir, I've started in on more of Delany's essays. At the end of the day, I do just like his narrative stuff better, and the bits of personal story in these essays were some of my favorite parts. Lots of other good stuff too t...

    This was a bit of a mixed bag for me. I enjoyed several of the essays, skipped a few which pertained to SFF works I haven't read (or read so long ago I remember virtually nothing) and fought my way through some of the more arcane critical language (I don't know the different between di...

    Took me a while to make it through this collection of essays about science fiction as literature. I started on it because I'd finally read Ursula Leguin's The Dispossessed which is the subject of one of the longer essays. Delany offers a lot of critiques of the book, including that the...

    http://nhw.livejournal.com/521590.html[return][return]This is a collection of a dozen pieces about sf, written between 1966 and 1976. They vary greatly in both length and quality; the longest, an article called "Shadows", is 80 pages, split into 60 sections which really appear just thr...

    I really enjoyed the first half of this book of essays, despite the tendency of several of them to be a bit random. Delany's prose feels very unnecessarily dense at times but when he makes sense he makes lots of it. Perhaps the most interesting parts are his tendency to think about SF ...

    I wish I had read all of the stuff he's talking about, and read it immediately before reading him. I'm so in awe. I imagine getting a job at Temple and being near him. Is he still active? I'd have to work really hard to get there. Maybe it's not quite in my line but I wish it were. It ...

    I didn't read all of this, and what I did read, I certainly didn't completely understand. What I did understand - and what I sort-of-vaguely-got-some-of - was extremely insightful and occasionally mind-blowing. This is a book that I'll have to come back to, probably several times. D...

    A must read for any serious SF writer. Sam Delany is brilliant. That said he's also ridiculously pretentious and this collection of essays indulges itself in the worst excesses of Derrida and the like (the 60 page analysis of Ursula K. Leguin's "the Dispossessed" is unreadable), but it...

  • Michael
    May 26, 2007

    Deep, fine thinking. Often hilarious. Any serious writer of science fiction or fantasy or both should read this book, though it is a deeper and more rigorous than most writing about writing, in genre or out, so it may daunt. This is one of the few books to take the entire process serio...

    Well, I think I can say with confidence now that Delany is the closest thing Americans will ever get to having our own Borges (and as a heretofore unknown aside, the first Borges story to appear translated in the USA was 'Death and the Compass,' and it appeared in The Magazine of Fanta...

    (I read the old edition, the new edition is structured slightly different and includes at least one new essay.) Jewel Hinged Jaw is a collection of essays all centered around a discussion of science fiction. The collection was first published in the 70s and has aged quite well, desp...

    I've never read any of Delaney's fiction, but I found much of his critical work absorbing and interesting. There were discussions on such divers topics as the grammar of ASL and the question of (numerically) equal representation of the sexes in stories. I'm told LeGuin denies ever ...

    Delaney is usually intelligent, occasionally profound, and often extremely frustrating. In a way, the essay is his natural habitat - at least, it lets him indulge the didactic tendencies which crop up again and again in his novels. He's relentlessly structuralist, which now reads as da...

    formalist ideas of literature applied, thus sf is ultimately... poetry. myth-making in some ways, this had intelligent artists conscious of what they are doing and how sf is valuable, mature, engaging. this is trying to present possibilities of thought experiments in the essence of poe...

    This book, and in particular the essay opening the collection, ?About 5,750 Words? is famous (I wouldn?t know whether justly or not) for being the first attempt to define Science Fiction not by way of its content (?It takes place in the future?, ?It has robots and starships...

    Having worked my way through most of his fiction and memoir, I've started in on more of Delany's essays. At the end of the day, I do just like his narrative stuff better, and the bits of personal story in these essays were some of my favorite parts. Lots of other good stuff too t...

    This was a bit of a mixed bag for me. I enjoyed several of the essays, skipped a few which pertained to SFF works I haven't read (or read so long ago I remember virtually nothing) and fought my way through some of the more arcane critical language (I don't know the different between di...

    Took me a while to make it through this collection of essays about science fiction as literature. I started on it because I'd finally read Ursula Leguin's The Dispossessed which is the subject of one of the longer essays. Delany offers a lot of critiques of the book, including that the...

    http://nhw.livejournal.com/521590.html[return][return]This is a collection of a dozen pieces about sf, written between 1966 and 1976. They vary greatly in both length and quality; the longest, an article called "Shadows", is 80 pages, split into 60 sections which really appear just thr...

    I really enjoyed the first half of this book of essays, despite the tendency of several of them to be a bit random. Delany's prose feels very unnecessarily dense at times but when he makes sense he makes lots of it. Perhaps the most interesting parts are his tendency to think about SF ...

    I wish I had read all of the stuff he's talking about, and read it immediately before reading him. I'm so in awe. I imagine getting a job at Temple and being near him. Is he still active? I'd have to work really hard to get there. Maybe it's not quite in my line but I wish it were. It ...

    I didn't read all of this, and what I did read, I certainly didn't completely understand. What I did understand - and what I sort-of-vaguely-got-some-of - was extremely insightful and occasionally mind-blowing. This is a book that I'll have to come back to, probably several times. D...

    A must read for any serious SF writer. Sam Delany is brilliant. That said he's also ridiculously pretentious and this collection of essays indulges itself in the worst excesses of Derrida and the like (the 60 page analysis of Ursula K. Leguin's "the Dispossessed" is unreadable), but it...

    An odd and pleasing collection of essays (mostly) about sci-fi lit (mostly). A few of the morsels in this book: - Proof that everything is science fiction (including Jane Austen and journalistic writing) - A resolution of Godel's incompleteness theorem - Similar to an integral, ho...

    Definitely a lot of material for a potential re-read. However, even at first glance, really well written, with a lot of small explanations in layman's terms which came handy on many occasions. Concise, well-phrased, interesting ideas and valid criticisms which speak not only to science...

    A star for the sheer genius of "A Fictional Architecture ..." (It's truly a one, not a zero). As for a lot of the rest: I see how these essays have been important when they have been written. And they are still interesting in a historical sense. But I've read tumblr entries that were b...

    I admit that there are swathes of this I don't either fully understand or can't quite relate to, but even so, the stuff the works for me really, really works. Definitely a foundational work for the field. And Delany's prose is delightful and maddening as always. ...

    While some of these essays are repeated in Delany?s About Writing: Seven Essays, Four Letters, & Five Interviews, herein the anecdotal tone is more pronounced, reproducing journal entries and critical essays alongside a master author?s indispensable advice. Well worth seeking o...

    One of the best books ever on writing and science fiction. ...

  • Ross Lockhart
    Jun 27, 2007

    Deep, fine thinking. Often hilarious. Any serious writer of science fiction or fantasy or both should read this book, though it is a deeper and more rigorous than most writing about writing, in genre or out, so it may daunt. This is one of the few books to take the entire process serio...

    Well, I think I can say with confidence now that Delany is the closest thing Americans will ever get to having our own Borges (and as a heretofore unknown aside, the first Borges story to appear translated in the USA was 'Death and the Compass,' and it appeared in The Magazine of Fanta...

    (I read the old edition, the new edition is structured slightly different and includes at least one new essay.) Jewel Hinged Jaw is a collection of essays all centered around a discussion of science fiction. The collection was first published in the 70s and has aged quite well, desp...

    I've never read any of Delaney's fiction, but I found much of his critical work absorbing and interesting. There were discussions on such divers topics as the grammar of ASL and the question of (numerically) equal representation of the sexes in stories. I'm told LeGuin denies ever ...

    Delaney is usually intelligent, occasionally profound, and often extremely frustrating. In a way, the essay is his natural habitat - at least, it lets him indulge the didactic tendencies which crop up again and again in his novels. He's relentlessly structuralist, which now reads as da...

    formalist ideas of literature applied, thus sf is ultimately... poetry. myth-making in some ways, this had intelligent artists conscious of what they are doing and how sf is valuable, mature, engaging. this is trying to present possibilities of thought experiments in the essence of poe...

    This book, and in particular the essay opening the collection, ?About 5,750 Words? is famous (I wouldn?t know whether justly or not) for being the first attempt to define Science Fiction not by way of its content (?It takes place in the future?, ?It has robots and starships...

    Having worked my way through most of his fiction and memoir, I've started in on more of Delany's essays. At the end of the day, I do just like his narrative stuff better, and the bits of personal story in these essays were some of my favorite parts. Lots of other good stuff too t...

    This was a bit of a mixed bag for me. I enjoyed several of the essays, skipped a few which pertained to SFF works I haven't read (or read so long ago I remember virtually nothing) and fought my way through some of the more arcane critical language (I don't know the different between di...

    Took me a while to make it through this collection of essays about science fiction as literature. I started on it because I'd finally read Ursula Leguin's The Dispossessed which is the subject of one of the longer essays. Delany offers a lot of critiques of the book, including that the...

    http://nhw.livejournal.com/521590.html[return][return]This is a collection of a dozen pieces about sf, written between 1966 and 1976. They vary greatly in both length and quality; the longest, an article called "Shadows", is 80 pages, split into 60 sections which really appear just thr...

    I really enjoyed the first half of this book of essays, despite the tendency of several of them to be a bit random. Delany's prose feels very unnecessarily dense at times but when he makes sense he makes lots of it. Perhaps the most interesting parts are his tendency to think about SF ...

    I wish I had read all of the stuff he's talking about, and read it immediately before reading him. I'm so in awe. I imagine getting a job at Temple and being near him. Is he still active? I'd have to work really hard to get there. Maybe it's not quite in my line but I wish it were. It ...

    I didn't read all of this, and what I did read, I certainly didn't completely understand. What I did understand - and what I sort-of-vaguely-got-some-of - was extremely insightful and occasionally mind-blowing. This is a book that I'll have to come back to, probably several times. D...

    A must read for any serious SF writer. Sam Delany is brilliant. That said he's also ridiculously pretentious and this collection of essays indulges itself in the worst excesses of Derrida and the like (the 60 page analysis of Ursula K. Leguin's "the Dispossessed" is unreadable), but it...

    An odd and pleasing collection of essays (mostly) about sci-fi lit (mostly). A few of the morsels in this book: - Proof that everything is science fiction (including Jane Austen and journalistic writing) - A resolution of Godel's incompleteness theorem - Similar to an integral, ho...

    Definitely a lot of material for a potential re-read. However, even at first glance, really well written, with a lot of small explanations in layman's terms which came handy on many occasions. Concise, well-phrased, interesting ideas and valid criticisms which speak not only to science...

    A star for the sheer genius of "A Fictional Architecture ..." (It's truly a one, not a zero). As for a lot of the rest: I see how these essays have been important when they have been written. And they are still interesting in a historical sense. But I've read tumblr entries that were b...

    I admit that there are swathes of this I don't either fully understand or can't quite relate to, but even so, the stuff the works for me really, really works. Definitely a foundational work for the field. And Delany's prose is delightful and maddening as always. ...

    While some of these essays are repeated in Delany?s About Writing: Seven Essays, Four Letters, & Five Interviews, herein the anecdotal tone is more pronounced, reproducing journal entries and critical essays alongside a master author?s indispensable advice. Well worth seeking o...

  • Wm
    Sep 12, 2013

    Deep, fine thinking. Often hilarious. Any serious writer of science fiction or fantasy or both should read this book, though it is a deeper and more rigorous than most writing about writing, in genre or out, so it may daunt. This is one of the few books to take the entire process serio...

    Well, I think I can say with confidence now that Delany is the closest thing Americans will ever get to having our own Borges (and as a heretofore unknown aside, the first Borges story to appear translated in the USA was 'Death and the Compass,' and it appeared in The Magazine of Fanta...

    (I read the old edition, the new edition is structured slightly different and includes at least one new essay.) Jewel Hinged Jaw is a collection of essays all centered around a discussion of science fiction. The collection was first published in the 70s and has aged quite well, desp...

    I've never read any of Delaney's fiction, but I found much of his critical work absorbing and interesting. There were discussions on such divers topics as the grammar of ASL and the question of (numerically) equal representation of the sexes in stories. I'm told LeGuin denies ever ...

    Delaney is usually intelligent, occasionally profound, and often extremely frustrating. In a way, the essay is his natural habitat - at least, it lets him indulge the didactic tendencies which crop up again and again in his novels. He's relentlessly structuralist, which now reads as da...

    formalist ideas of literature applied, thus sf is ultimately... poetry. myth-making in some ways, this had intelligent artists conscious of what they are doing and how sf is valuable, mature, engaging. this is trying to present possibilities of thought experiments in the essence of poe...

    This book, and in particular the essay opening the collection, ?About 5,750 Words? is famous (I wouldn?t know whether justly or not) for being the first attempt to define Science Fiction not by way of its content (?It takes place in the future?, ?It has robots and starships...

    Having worked my way through most of his fiction and memoir, I've started in on more of Delany's essays. At the end of the day, I do just like his narrative stuff better, and the bits of personal story in these essays were some of my favorite parts. Lots of other good stuff too t...

    This was a bit of a mixed bag for me. I enjoyed several of the essays, skipped a few which pertained to SFF works I haven't read (or read so long ago I remember virtually nothing) and fought my way through some of the more arcane critical language (I don't know the different between di...

    Took me a while to make it through this collection of essays about science fiction as literature. I started on it because I'd finally read Ursula Leguin's The Dispossessed which is the subject of one of the longer essays. Delany offers a lot of critiques of the book, including that the...

    http://nhw.livejournal.com/521590.html[return][return]This is a collection of a dozen pieces about sf, written between 1966 and 1976. They vary greatly in both length and quality; the longest, an article called "Shadows", is 80 pages, split into 60 sections which really appear just thr...

    I really enjoyed the first half of this book of essays, despite the tendency of several of them to be a bit random. Delany's prose feels very unnecessarily dense at times but when he makes sense he makes lots of it. Perhaps the most interesting parts are his tendency to think about SF ...

    I wish I had read all of the stuff he's talking about, and read it immediately before reading him. I'm so in awe. I imagine getting a job at Temple and being near him. Is he still active? I'd have to work really hard to get there. Maybe it's not quite in my line but I wish it were. It ...

    I didn't read all of this, and what I did read, I certainly didn't completely understand. What I did understand - and what I sort-of-vaguely-got-some-of - was extremely insightful and occasionally mind-blowing. This is a book that I'll have to come back to, probably several times. D...

    A must read for any serious SF writer. Sam Delany is brilliant. That said he's also ridiculously pretentious and this collection of essays indulges itself in the worst excesses of Derrida and the like (the 60 page analysis of Ursula K. Leguin's "the Dispossessed" is unreadable), but it...

    An odd and pleasing collection of essays (mostly) about sci-fi lit (mostly). A few of the morsels in this book: - Proof that everything is science fiction (including Jane Austen and journalistic writing) - A resolution of Godel's incompleteness theorem - Similar to an integral, ho...

    Definitely a lot of material for a potential re-read. However, even at first glance, really well written, with a lot of small explanations in layman's terms which came handy on many occasions. Concise, well-phrased, interesting ideas and valid criticisms which speak not only to science...

    A star for the sheer genius of "A Fictional Architecture ..." (It's truly a one, not a zero). As for a lot of the rest: I see how these essays have been important when they have been written. And they are still interesting in a historical sense. But I've read tumblr entries that were b...

    I admit that there are swathes of this I don't either fully understand or can't quite relate to, but even so, the stuff the works for me really, really works. Definitely a foundational work for the field. And Delany's prose is delightful and maddening as always. ...

  • Sessily
    Sep 16, 2009

    Deep, fine thinking. Often hilarious. Any serious writer of science fiction or fantasy or both should read this book, though it is a deeper and more rigorous than most writing about writing, in genre or out, so it may daunt. This is one of the few books to take the entire process serio...

    Well, I think I can say with confidence now that Delany is the closest thing Americans will ever get to having our own Borges (and as a heretofore unknown aside, the first Borges story to appear translated in the USA was 'Death and the Compass,' and it appeared in The Magazine of Fanta...

    (I read the old edition, the new edition is structured slightly different and includes at least one new essay.) Jewel Hinged Jaw is a collection of essays all centered around a discussion of science fiction. The collection was first published in the 70s and has aged quite well, desp...

  • Nicholas Whyte
    Oct 21, 2007

    Deep, fine thinking. Often hilarious. Any serious writer of science fiction or fantasy or both should read this book, though it is a deeper and more rigorous than most writing about writing, in genre or out, so it may daunt. This is one of the few books to take the entire process serio...

    Well, I think I can say with confidence now that Delany is the closest thing Americans will ever get to having our own Borges (and as a heretofore unknown aside, the first Borges story to appear translated in the USA was 'Death and the Compass,' and it appeared in The Magazine of Fanta...

    (I read the old edition, the new edition is structured slightly different and includes at least one new essay.) Jewel Hinged Jaw is a collection of essays all centered around a discussion of science fiction. The collection was first published in the 70s and has aged quite well, desp...

    I've never read any of Delaney's fiction, but I found much of his critical work absorbing and interesting. There were discussions on such divers topics as the grammar of ASL and the question of (numerically) equal representation of the sexes in stories. I'm told LeGuin denies ever ...

    Delaney is usually intelligent, occasionally profound, and often extremely frustrating. In a way, the essay is his natural habitat - at least, it lets him indulge the didactic tendencies which crop up again and again in his novels. He's relentlessly structuralist, which now reads as da...

    formalist ideas of literature applied, thus sf is ultimately... poetry. myth-making in some ways, this had intelligent artists conscious of what they are doing and how sf is valuable, mature, engaging. this is trying to present possibilities of thought experiments in the essence of poe...

    This book, and in particular the essay opening the collection, ?About 5,750 Words? is famous (I wouldn?t know whether justly or not) for being the first attempt to define Science Fiction not by way of its content (?It takes place in the future?, ?It has robots and starships...

    Having worked my way through most of his fiction and memoir, I've started in on more of Delany's essays. At the end of the day, I do just like his narrative stuff better, and the bits of personal story in these essays were some of my favorite parts. Lots of other good stuff too t...

    This was a bit of a mixed bag for me. I enjoyed several of the essays, skipped a few which pertained to SFF works I haven't read (or read so long ago I remember virtually nothing) and fought my way through some of the more arcane critical language (I don't know the different between di...

    Took me a while to make it through this collection of essays about science fiction as literature. I started on it because I'd finally read Ursula Leguin's The Dispossessed which is the subject of one of the longer essays. Delany offers a lot of critiques of the book, including that the...

    http://nhw.livejournal.com/521590.html[return][return]This is a collection of a dozen pieces about sf, written between 1966 and 1976. They vary greatly in both length and quality; the longest, an article called "Shadows", is 80 pages, split into 60 sections which really appear just thr...

  • Gabriel C.
    Dec 18, 2012

    Deep, fine thinking. Often hilarious. Any serious writer of science fiction or fantasy or both should read this book, though it is a deeper and more rigorous than most writing about writing, in genre or out, so it may daunt. This is one of the few books to take the entire process serio...

    Well, I think I can say with confidence now that Delany is the closest thing Americans will ever get to having our own Borges (and as a heretofore unknown aside, the first Borges story to appear translated in the USA was 'Death and the Compass,' and it appeared in The Magazine of Fanta...

    (I read the old edition, the new edition is structured slightly different and includes at least one new essay.) Jewel Hinged Jaw is a collection of essays all centered around a discussion of science fiction. The collection was first published in the 70s and has aged quite well, desp...

    I've never read any of Delaney's fiction, but I found much of his critical work absorbing and interesting. There were discussions on such divers topics as the grammar of ASL and the question of (numerically) equal representation of the sexes in stories. I'm told LeGuin denies ever ...

    Delaney is usually intelligent, occasionally profound, and often extremely frustrating. In a way, the essay is his natural habitat - at least, it lets him indulge the didactic tendencies which crop up again and again in his novels. He's relentlessly structuralist, which now reads as da...

    formalist ideas of literature applied, thus sf is ultimately... poetry. myth-making in some ways, this had intelligent artists conscious of what they are doing and how sf is valuable, mature, engaging. this is trying to present possibilities of thought experiments in the essence of poe...

    This book, and in particular the essay opening the collection, ?About 5,750 Words? is famous (I wouldn?t know whether justly or not) for being the first attempt to define Science Fiction not by way of its content (?It takes place in the future?, ?It has robots and starships...

    Having worked my way through most of his fiction and memoir, I've started in on more of Delany's essays. At the end of the day, I do just like his narrative stuff better, and the bits of personal story in these essays were some of my favorite parts. Lots of other good stuff too t...

    This was a bit of a mixed bag for me. I enjoyed several of the essays, skipped a few which pertained to SFF works I haven't read (or read so long ago I remember virtually nothing) and fought my way through some of the more arcane critical language (I don't know the different between di...

    Took me a while to make it through this collection of essays about science fiction as literature. I started on it because I'd finally read Ursula Leguin's The Dispossessed which is the subject of one of the longer essays. Delany offers a lot of critiques of the book, including that the...

    http://nhw.livejournal.com/521590.html[return][return]This is a collection of a dozen pieces about sf, written between 1966 and 1976. They vary greatly in both length and quality; the longest, an article called "Shadows", is 80 pages, split into 60 sections which really appear just thr...

    I really enjoyed the first half of this book of essays, despite the tendency of several of them to be a bit random. Delany's prose feels very unnecessarily dense at times but when he makes sense he makes lots of it. Perhaps the most interesting parts are his tendency to think about SF ...

    I wish I had read all of the stuff he's talking about, and read it immediately before reading him. I'm so in awe. I imagine getting a job at Temple and being near him. Is he still active? I'd have to work really hard to get there. Maybe it's not quite in my line but I wish it were. It ...

  • Shauna
    Nov 15, 2009

    Deep, fine thinking. Often hilarious. Any serious writer of science fiction or fantasy or both should read this book, though it is a deeper and more rigorous than most writing about writing, in genre or out, so it may daunt. This is one of the few books to take the entire process serio...

    Well, I think I can say with confidence now that Delany is the closest thing Americans will ever get to having our own Borges (and as a heretofore unknown aside, the first Borges story to appear translated in the USA was 'Death and the Compass,' and it appeared in The Magazine of Fanta...

    (I read the old edition, the new edition is structured slightly different and includes at least one new essay.) Jewel Hinged Jaw is a collection of essays all centered around a discussion of science fiction. The collection was first published in the 70s and has aged quite well, desp...

    I've never read any of Delaney's fiction, but I found much of his critical work absorbing and interesting. There were discussions on such divers topics as the grammar of ASL and the question of (numerically) equal representation of the sexes in stories. I'm told LeGuin denies ever ...

    Delaney is usually intelligent, occasionally profound, and often extremely frustrating. In a way, the essay is his natural habitat - at least, it lets him indulge the didactic tendencies which crop up again and again in his novels. He's relentlessly structuralist, which now reads as da...

    formalist ideas of literature applied, thus sf is ultimately... poetry. myth-making in some ways, this had intelligent artists conscious of what they are doing and how sf is valuable, mature, engaging. this is trying to present possibilities of thought experiments in the essence of poe...

    This book, and in particular the essay opening the collection, ?About 5,750 Words? is famous (I wouldn?t know whether justly or not) for being the first attempt to define Science Fiction not by way of its content (?It takes place in the future?, ?It has robots and starships...

    Having worked my way through most of his fiction and memoir, I've started in on more of Delany's essays. At the end of the day, I do just like his narrative stuff better, and the bits of personal story in these essays were some of my favorite parts. Lots of other good stuff too t...

    This was a bit of a mixed bag for me. I enjoyed several of the essays, skipped a few which pertained to SFF works I haven't read (or read so long ago I remember virtually nothing) and fought my way through some of the more arcane critical language (I don't know the different between di...

    Took me a while to make it through this collection of essays about science fiction as literature. I started on it because I'd finally read Ursula Leguin's The Dispossessed which is the subject of one of the longer essays. Delany offers a lot of critiques of the book, including that the...

    http://nhw.livejournal.com/521590.html[return][return]This is a collection of a dozen pieces about sf, written between 1966 and 1976. They vary greatly in both length and quality; the longest, an article called "Shadows", is 80 pages, split into 60 sections which really appear just thr...

    I really enjoyed the first half of this book of essays, despite the tendency of several of them to be a bit random. Delany's prose feels very unnecessarily dense at times but when he makes sense he makes lots of it. Perhaps the most interesting parts are his tendency to think about SF ...

    I wish I had read all of the stuff he's talking about, and read it immediately before reading him. I'm so in awe. I imagine getting a job at Temple and being near him. Is he still active? I'd have to work really hard to get there. Maybe it's not quite in my line but I wish it were. It ...

    I didn't read all of this, and what I did read, I certainly didn't completely understand. What I did understand - and what I sort-of-vaguely-got-some-of - was extremely insightful and occasionally mind-blowing. This is a book that I'll have to come back to, probably several times. D...

    A must read for any serious SF writer. Sam Delany is brilliant. That said he's also ridiculously pretentious and this collection of essays indulges itself in the worst excesses of Derrida and the like (the 60 page analysis of Ursula K. Leguin's "the Dispossessed" is unreadable), but it...

    An odd and pleasing collection of essays (mostly) about sci-fi lit (mostly). A few of the morsels in this book: - Proof that everything is science fiction (including Jane Austen and journalistic writing) - A resolution of Godel's incompleteness theorem - Similar to an integral, ho...

    Definitely a lot of material for a potential re-read. However, even at first glance, really well written, with a lot of small explanations in layman's terms which came handy on many occasions. Concise, well-phrased, interesting ideas and valid criticisms which speak not only to science...

    A star for the sheer genius of "A Fictional Architecture ..." (It's truly a one, not a zero). As for a lot of the rest: I see how these essays have been important when they have been written. And they are still interesting in a historical sense. But I've read tumblr entries that were b...

    I admit that there are swathes of this I don't either fully understand or can't quite relate to, but even so, the stuff the works for me really, really works. Definitely a foundational work for the field. And Delany's prose is delightful and maddening as always. ...

    While some of these essays are repeated in Delany?s About Writing: Seven Essays, Four Letters, & Five Interviews, herein the anecdotal tone is more pronounced, reproducing journal entries and critical essays alongside a master author?s indispensable advice. Well worth seeking o...

    One of the best books ever on writing and science fiction. ...

    I read the first page, and I'm already turned off. He seems really full of himself at that time, and not really interested in communicating. ...

    thumbs up emoji ...

    Dense. worth every headache. ...

    Beautifully written, but dense, literary criticism of science fiction. ...

  • Liz
    Jul 19, 2016

    Deep, fine thinking. Often hilarious. Any serious writer of science fiction or fantasy or both should read this book, though it is a deeper and more rigorous than most writing about writing, in genre or out, so it may daunt. This is one of the few books to take the entire process serio...

    Well, I think I can say with confidence now that Delany is the closest thing Americans will ever get to having our own Borges (and as a heretofore unknown aside, the first Borges story to appear translated in the USA was 'Death and the Compass,' and it appeared in The Magazine of Fanta...

    (I read the old edition, the new edition is structured slightly different and includes at least one new essay.) Jewel Hinged Jaw is a collection of essays all centered around a discussion of science fiction. The collection was first published in the 70s and has aged quite well, desp...

    I've never read any of Delaney's fiction, but I found much of his critical work absorbing and interesting. There were discussions on such divers topics as the grammar of ASL and the question of (numerically) equal representation of the sexes in stories. I'm told LeGuin denies ever ...

    Delaney is usually intelligent, occasionally profound, and often extremely frustrating. In a way, the essay is his natural habitat - at least, it lets him indulge the didactic tendencies which crop up again and again in his novels. He's relentlessly structuralist, which now reads as da...

    formalist ideas of literature applied, thus sf is ultimately... poetry. myth-making in some ways, this had intelligent artists conscious of what they are doing and how sf is valuable, mature, engaging. this is trying to present possibilities of thought experiments in the essence of poe...

    This book, and in particular the essay opening the collection, ?About 5,750 Words? is famous (I wouldn?t know whether justly or not) for being the first attempt to define Science Fiction not by way of its content (?It takes place in the future?, ?It has robots and starships...

    Having worked my way through most of his fiction and memoir, I've started in on more of Delany's essays. At the end of the day, I do just like his narrative stuff better, and the bits of personal story in these essays were some of my favorite parts. Lots of other good stuff too t...

    This was a bit of a mixed bag for me. I enjoyed several of the essays, skipped a few which pertained to SFF works I haven't read (or read so long ago I remember virtually nothing) and fought my way through some of the more arcane critical language (I don't know the different between di...

    Took me a while to make it through this collection of essays about science fiction as literature. I started on it because I'd finally read Ursula Leguin's The Dispossessed which is the subject of one of the longer essays. Delany offers a lot of critiques of the book, including that the...

    http://nhw.livejournal.com/521590.html[return][return]This is a collection of a dozen pieces about sf, written between 1966 and 1976. They vary greatly in both length and quality; the longest, an article called "Shadows", is 80 pages, split into 60 sections which really appear just thr...

    I really enjoyed the first half of this book of essays, despite the tendency of several of them to be a bit random. Delany's prose feels very unnecessarily dense at times but when he makes sense he makes lots of it. Perhaps the most interesting parts are his tendency to think about SF ...

    I wish I had read all of the stuff he's talking about, and read it immediately before reading him. I'm so in awe. I imagine getting a job at Temple and being near him. Is he still active? I'd have to work really hard to get there. Maybe it's not quite in my line but I wish it were. It ...

    I didn't read all of this, and what I did read, I certainly didn't completely understand. What I did understand - and what I sort-of-vaguely-got-some-of - was extremely insightful and occasionally mind-blowing. This is a book that I'll have to come back to, probably several times. D...

    A must read for any serious SF writer. Sam Delany is brilliant. That said he's also ridiculously pretentious and this collection of essays indulges itself in the worst excesses of Derrida and the like (the 60 page analysis of Ursula K. Leguin's "the Dispossessed" is unreadable), but it...

    An odd and pleasing collection of essays (mostly) about sci-fi lit (mostly). A few of the morsels in this book: - Proof that everything is science fiction (including Jane Austen and journalistic writing) - A resolution of Godel's incompleteness theorem - Similar to an integral, ho...

    Definitely a lot of material for a potential re-read. However, even at first glance, really well written, with a lot of small explanations in layman's terms which came handy on many occasions. Concise, well-phrased, interesting ideas and valid criticisms which speak not only to science...

    A star for the sheer genius of "A Fictional Architecture ..." (It's truly a one, not a zero). As for a lot of the rest: I see how these essays have been important when they have been written. And they are still interesting in a historical sense. But I've read tumblr entries that were b...

    I admit that there are swathes of this I don't either fully understand or can't quite relate to, but even so, the stuff the works for me really, really works. Definitely a foundational work for the field. And Delany's prose is delightful and maddening as always. ...

    While some of these essays are repeated in Delany?s About Writing: Seven Essays, Four Letters, & Five Interviews, herein the anecdotal tone is more pronounced, reproducing journal entries and critical essays alongside a master author?s indispensable advice. Well worth seeking o...

    One of the best books ever on writing and science fiction. ...

    I read the first page, and I'm already turned off. He seems really full of himself at that time, and not really interested in communicating. ...

    thumbs up emoji ...

    Dense. worth every headache. ...

    Beautifully written, but dense, literary criticism of science fiction. ...

    All literary criticism should be this good. I wish I'd had this when I was first bashing my head against deconstruction. ...

  • Valerie
    Feb 02, 2010

    Deep, fine thinking. Often hilarious. Any serious writer of science fiction or fantasy or both should read this book, though it is a deeper and more rigorous than most writing about writing, in genre or out, so it may daunt. This is one of the few books to take the entire process serio...

    Well, I think I can say with confidence now that Delany is the closest thing Americans will ever get to having our own Borges (and as a heretofore unknown aside, the first Borges story to appear translated in the USA was 'Death and the Compass,' and it appeared in The Magazine of Fanta...

    (I read the old edition, the new edition is structured slightly different and includes at least one new essay.) Jewel Hinged Jaw is a collection of essays all centered around a discussion of science fiction. The collection was first published in the 70s and has aged quite well, desp...

    I've never read any of Delaney's fiction, but I found much of his critical work absorbing and interesting. There were discussions on such divers topics as the grammar of ASL and the question of (numerically) equal representation of the sexes in stories. I'm told LeGuin denies ever ...

  • Will Shetterly
    Jun 26, 2014

    Deep, fine thinking. Often hilarious. Any serious writer of science fiction or fantasy or both should read this book, though it is a deeper and more rigorous than most writing about writing, in genre or out, so it may daunt. This is one of the few books to take the entire process serio...

    Well, I think I can say with confidence now that Delany is the closest thing Americans will ever get to having our own Borges (and as a heretofore unknown aside, the first Borges story to appear translated in the USA was 'Death and the Compass,' and it appeared in The Magazine of Fanta...

    (I read the old edition, the new edition is structured slightly different and includes at least one new essay.) Jewel Hinged Jaw is a collection of essays all centered around a discussion of science fiction. The collection was first published in the 70s and has aged quite well, desp...

    I've never read any of Delaney's fiction, but I found much of his critical work absorbing and interesting. There were discussions on such divers topics as the grammar of ASL and the question of (numerically) equal representation of the sexes in stories. I'm told LeGuin denies ever ...

    Delaney is usually intelligent, occasionally profound, and often extremely frustrating. In a way, the essay is his natural habitat - at least, it lets him indulge the didactic tendencies which crop up again and again in his novels. He's relentlessly structuralist, which now reads as da...

    formalist ideas of literature applied, thus sf is ultimately... poetry. myth-making in some ways, this had intelligent artists conscious of what they are doing and how sf is valuable, mature, engaging. this is trying to present possibilities of thought experiments in the essence of poe...

    This book, and in particular the essay opening the collection, ?About 5,750 Words? is famous (I wouldn?t know whether justly or not) for being the first attempt to define Science Fiction not by way of its content (?It takes place in the future?, ?It has robots and starships...

    Having worked my way through most of his fiction and memoir, I've started in on more of Delany's essays. At the end of the day, I do just like his narrative stuff better, and the bits of personal story in these essays were some of my favorite parts. Lots of other good stuff too t...

    This was a bit of a mixed bag for me. I enjoyed several of the essays, skipped a few which pertained to SFF works I haven't read (or read so long ago I remember virtually nothing) and fought my way through some of the more arcane critical language (I don't know the different between di...

    Took me a while to make it through this collection of essays about science fiction as literature. I started on it because I'd finally read Ursula Leguin's The Dispossessed which is the subject of one of the longer essays. Delany offers a lot of critiques of the book, including that the...

    http://nhw.livejournal.com/521590.html[return][return]This is a collection of a dozen pieces about sf, written between 1966 and 1976. They vary greatly in both length and quality; the longest, an article called "Shadows", is 80 pages, split into 60 sections which really appear just thr...

    I really enjoyed the first half of this book of essays, despite the tendency of several of them to be a bit random. Delany's prose feels very unnecessarily dense at times but when he makes sense he makes lots of it. Perhaps the most interesting parts are his tendency to think about SF ...

    I wish I had read all of the stuff he's talking about, and read it immediately before reading him. I'm so in awe. I imagine getting a job at Temple and being near him. Is he still active? I'd have to work really hard to get there. Maybe it's not quite in my line but I wish it were. It ...

    I didn't read all of this, and what I did read, I certainly didn't completely understand. What I did understand - and what I sort-of-vaguely-got-some-of - was extremely insightful and occasionally mind-blowing. This is a book that I'll have to come back to, probably several times. D...

    A must read for any serious SF writer. Sam Delany is brilliant. That said he's also ridiculously pretentious and this collection of essays indulges itself in the worst excesses of Derrida and the like (the 60 page analysis of Ursula K. Leguin's "the Dispossessed" is unreadable), but it...

    An odd and pleasing collection of essays (mostly) about sci-fi lit (mostly). A few of the morsels in this book: - Proof that everything is science fiction (including Jane Austen and journalistic writing) - A resolution of Godel's incompleteness theorem - Similar to an integral, ho...

    Definitely a lot of material for a potential re-read. However, even at first glance, really well written, with a lot of small explanations in layman's terms which came handy on many occasions. Concise, well-phrased, interesting ideas and valid criticisms which speak not only to science...

    A star for the sheer genius of "A Fictional Architecture ..." (It's truly a one, not a zero). As for a lot of the rest: I see how these essays have been important when they have been written. And they are still interesting in a historical sense. But I've read tumblr entries that were b...

    I admit that there are swathes of this I don't either fully understand or can't quite relate to, but even so, the stuff the works for me really, really works. Definitely a foundational work for the field. And Delany's prose is delightful and maddening as always. ...

    While some of these essays are repeated in Delany?s About Writing: Seven Essays, Four Letters, & Five Interviews, herein the anecdotal tone is more pronounced, reproducing journal entries and critical essays alongside a master author?s indispensable advice. Well worth seeking o...

    One of the best books ever on writing and science fiction. ...

    I read the first page, and I'm already turned off. He seems really full of himself at that time, and not really interested in communicating. ...

    thumbs up emoji ...

    Dense. worth every headache. ...

    Beautifully written, but dense, literary criticism of science fiction. ...

    All literary criticism should be this good. I wish I'd had this when I was first bashing my head against deconstruction. ...

    I really liked all of these essays, will be returning to them. ...

    Very important collection of essays, essential reading for anyone who takes SF seriously. ...

    ...

  • Tamahome
    Aug 28, 2012

    Deep, fine thinking. Often hilarious. Any serious writer of science fiction or fantasy or both should read this book, though it is a deeper and more rigorous than most writing about writing, in genre or out, so it may daunt. This is one of the few books to take the entire process serio...

    Well, I think I can say with confidence now that Delany is the closest thing Americans will ever get to having our own Borges (and as a heretofore unknown aside, the first Borges story to appear translated in the USA was 'Death and the Compass,' and it appeared in The Magazine of Fanta...

    (I read the old edition, the new edition is structured slightly different and includes at least one new essay.) Jewel Hinged Jaw is a collection of essays all centered around a discussion of science fiction. The collection was first published in the 70s and has aged quite well, desp...

    I've never read any of Delaney's fiction, but I found much of his critical work absorbing and interesting. There were discussions on such divers topics as the grammar of ASL and the question of (numerically) equal representation of the sexes in stories. I'm told LeGuin denies ever ...

    Delaney is usually intelligent, occasionally profound, and often extremely frustrating. In a way, the essay is his natural habitat - at least, it lets him indulge the didactic tendencies which crop up again and again in his novels. He's relentlessly structuralist, which now reads as da...

    formalist ideas of literature applied, thus sf is ultimately... poetry. myth-making in some ways, this had intelligent artists conscious of what they are doing and how sf is valuable, mature, engaging. this is trying to present possibilities of thought experiments in the essence of poe...

    This book, and in particular the essay opening the collection, ?About 5,750 Words? is famous (I wouldn?t know whether justly or not) for being the first attempt to define Science Fiction not by way of its content (?It takes place in the future?, ?It has robots and starships...

    Having worked my way through most of his fiction and memoir, I've started in on more of Delany's essays. At the end of the day, I do just like his narrative stuff better, and the bits of personal story in these essays were some of my favorite parts. Lots of other good stuff too t...

    This was a bit of a mixed bag for me. I enjoyed several of the essays, skipped a few which pertained to SFF works I haven't read (or read so long ago I remember virtually nothing) and fought my way through some of the more arcane critical language (I don't know the different between di...

    Took me a while to make it through this collection of essays about science fiction as literature. I started on it because I'd finally read Ursula Leguin's The Dispossessed which is the subject of one of the longer essays. Delany offers a lot of critiques of the book, including that the...

    http://nhw.livejournal.com/521590.html[return][return]This is a collection of a dozen pieces about sf, written between 1966 and 1976. They vary greatly in both length and quality; the longest, an article called "Shadows", is 80 pages, split into 60 sections which really appear just thr...

    I really enjoyed the first half of this book of essays, despite the tendency of several of them to be a bit random. Delany's prose feels very unnecessarily dense at times but when he makes sense he makes lots of it. Perhaps the most interesting parts are his tendency to think about SF ...

    I wish I had read all of the stuff he's talking about, and read it immediately before reading him. I'm so in awe. I imagine getting a job at Temple and being near him. Is he still active? I'd have to work really hard to get there. Maybe it's not quite in my line but I wish it were. It ...

    I didn't read all of this, and what I did read, I certainly didn't completely understand. What I did understand - and what I sort-of-vaguely-got-some-of - was extremely insightful and occasionally mind-blowing. This is a book that I'll have to come back to, probably several times. D...

    A must read for any serious SF writer. Sam Delany is brilliant. That said he's also ridiculously pretentious and this collection of essays indulges itself in the worst excesses of Derrida and the like (the 60 page analysis of Ursula K. Leguin's "the Dispossessed" is unreadable), but it...

    An odd and pleasing collection of essays (mostly) about sci-fi lit (mostly). A few of the morsels in this book: - Proof that everything is science fiction (including Jane Austen and journalistic writing) - A resolution of Godel's incompleteness theorem - Similar to an integral, ho...

    Definitely a lot of material for a potential re-read. However, even at first glance, really well written, with a lot of small explanations in layman's terms which came handy on many occasions. Concise, well-phrased, interesting ideas and valid criticisms which speak not only to science...

    A star for the sheer genius of "A Fictional Architecture ..." (It's truly a one, not a zero). As for a lot of the rest: I see how these essays have been important when they have been written. And they are still interesting in a historical sense. But I've read tumblr entries that were b...

    I admit that there are swathes of this I don't either fully understand or can't quite relate to, but even so, the stuff the works for me really, really works. Definitely a foundational work for the field. And Delany's prose is delightful and maddening as always. ...

    While some of these essays are repeated in Delany?s About Writing: Seven Essays, Four Letters, & Five Interviews, herein the anecdotal tone is more pronounced, reproducing journal entries and critical essays alongside a master author?s indispensable advice. Well worth seeking o...

    One of the best books ever on writing and science fiction. ...

    I read the first page, and I'm already turned off. He seems really full of himself at that time, and not really interested in communicating. ...

  • the gift
    Mar 24, 2015

    Deep, fine thinking. Often hilarious. Any serious writer of science fiction or fantasy or both should read this book, though it is a deeper and more rigorous than most writing about writing, in genre or out, so it may daunt. This is one of the few books to take the entire process serio...

    Well, I think I can say with confidence now that Delany is the closest thing Americans will ever get to having our own Borges (and as a heretofore unknown aside, the first Borges story to appear translated in the USA was 'Death and the Compass,' and it appeared in The Magazine of Fanta...

    (I read the old edition, the new edition is structured slightly different and includes at least one new essay.) Jewel Hinged Jaw is a collection of essays all centered around a discussion of science fiction. The collection was first published in the 70s and has aged quite well, desp...

    I've never read any of Delaney's fiction, but I found much of his critical work absorbing and interesting. There were discussions on such divers topics as the grammar of ASL and the question of (numerically) equal representation of the sexes in stories. I'm told LeGuin denies ever ...

    Delaney is usually intelligent, occasionally profound, and often extremely frustrating. In a way, the essay is his natural habitat - at least, it lets him indulge the didactic tendencies which crop up again and again in his novels. He's relentlessly structuralist, which now reads as da...

    formalist ideas of literature applied, thus sf is ultimately... poetry. myth-making in some ways, this had intelligent artists conscious of what they are doing and how sf is valuable, mature, engaging. this is trying to present possibilities of thought experiments in the essence of poe...

  • pax
    Jul 02, 2014

    Deep, fine thinking. Often hilarious. Any serious writer of science fiction or fantasy or both should read this book, though it is a deeper and more rigorous than most writing about writing, in genre or out, so it may daunt. This is one of the few books to take the entire process serio...

    Well, I think I can say with confidence now that Delany is the closest thing Americans will ever get to having our own Borges (and as a heretofore unknown aside, the first Borges story to appear translated in the USA was 'Death and the Compass,' and it appeared in The Magazine of Fanta...

    (I read the old edition, the new edition is structured slightly different and includes at least one new essay.) Jewel Hinged Jaw is a collection of essays all centered around a discussion of science fiction. The collection was first published in the 70s and has aged quite well, desp...

    I've never read any of Delaney's fiction, but I found much of his critical work absorbing and interesting. There were discussions on such divers topics as the grammar of ASL and the question of (numerically) equal representation of the sexes in stories. I'm told LeGuin denies ever ...

    Delaney is usually intelligent, occasionally profound, and often extremely frustrating. In a way, the essay is his natural habitat - at least, it lets him indulge the didactic tendencies which crop up again and again in his novels. He's relentlessly structuralist, which now reads as da...

    formalist ideas of literature applied, thus sf is ultimately... poetry. myth-making in some ways, this had intelligent artists conscious of what they are doing and how sf is valuable, mature, engaging. this is trying to present possibilities of thought experiments in the essence of poe...

    This book, and in particular the essay opening the collection, ?About 5,750 Words? is famous (I wouldn?t know whether justly or not) for being the first attempt to define Science Fiction not by way of its content (?It takes place in the future?, ?It has robots and starships...

    Having worked my way through most of his fiction and memoir, I've started in on more of Delany's essays. At the end of the day, I do just like his narrative stuff better, and the bits of personal story in these essays were some of my favorite parts. Lots of other good stuff too t...

    This was a bit of a mixed bag for me. I enjoyed several of the essays, skipped a few which pertained to SFF works I haven't read (or read so long ago I remember virtually nothing) and fought my way through some of the more arcane critical language (I don't know the different between di...

    Took me a while to make it through this collection of essays about science fiction as literature. I started on it because I'd finally read Ursula Leguin's The Dispossessed which is the subject of one of the longer essays. Delany offers a lot of critiques of the book, including that the...

    http://nhw.livejournal.com/521590.html[return][return]This is a collection of a dozen pieces about sf, written between 1966 and 1976. They vary greatly in both length and quality; the longest, an article called "Shadows", is 80 pages, split into 60 sections which really appear just thr...

    I really enjoyed the first half of this book of essays, despite the tendency of several of them to be a bit random. Delany's prose feels very unnecessarily dense at times but when he makes sense he makes lots of it. Perhaps the most interesting parts are his tendency to think about SF ...

    I wish I had read all of the stuff he's talking about, and read it immediately before reading him. I'm so in awe. I imagine getting a job at Temple and being near him. Is he still active? I'd have to work really hard to get there. Maybe it's not quite in my line but I wish it were. It ...

    I didn't read all of this, and what I did read, I certainly didn't completely understand. What I did understand - and what I sort-of-vaguely-got-some-of - was extremely insightful and occasionally mind-blowing. This is a book that I'll have to come back to, probably several times. D...

    A must read for any serious SF writer. Sam Delany is brilliant. That said he's also ridiculously pretentious and this collection of essays indulges itself in the worst excesses of Derrida and the like (the 60 page analysis of Ursula K. Leguin's "the Dispossessed" is unreadable), but it...

    An odd and pleasing collection of essays (mostly) about sci-fi lit (mostly). A few of the morsels in this book: - Proof that everything is science fiction (including Jane Austen and journalistic writing) - A resolution of Godel's incompleteness theorem - Similar to an integral, ho...

    Definitely a lot of material for a potential re-read. However, even at first glance, really well written, with a lot of small explanations in layman's terms which came handy on many occasions. Concise, well-phrased, interesting ideas and valid criticisms which speak not only to science...

    A star for the sheer genius of "A Fictional Architecture ..." (It's truly a one, not a zero). As for a lot of the rest: I see how these essays have been important when they have been written. And they are still interesting in a historical sense. But I've read tumblr entries that were b...

  • Max
    Dec 31, 2017

    Deep, fine thinking. Often hilarious. Any serious writer of science fiction or fantasy or both should read this book, though it is a deeper and more rigorous than most writing about writing, in genre or out, so it may daunt. This is one of the few books to take the entire process serio...

  • Vladimir
    Jul 09, 2014

    Deep, fine thinking. Often hilarious. Any serious writer of science fiction or fantasy or both should read this book, though it is a deeper and more rigorous than most writing about writing, in genre or out, so it may daunt. This is one of the few books to take the entire process serio...

    Well, I think I can say with confidence now that Delany is the closest thing Americans will ever get to having our own Borges (and as a heretofore unknown aside, the first Borges story to appear translated in the USA was 'Death and the Compass,' and it appeared in The Magazine of Fanta...

    (I read the old edition, the new edition is structured slightly different and includes at least one new essay.) Jewel Hinged Jaw is a collection of essays all centered around a discussion of science fiction. The collection was first published in the 70s and has aged quite well, desp...

    I've never read any of Delaney's fiction, but I found much of his critical work absorbing and interesting. There were discussions on such divers topics as the grammar of ASL and the question of (numerically) equal representation of the sexes in stories. I'm told LeGuin denies ever ...

    Delaney is usually intelligent, occasionally profound, and often extremely frustrating. In a way, the essay is his natural habitat - at least, it lets him indulge the didactic tendencies which crop up again and again in his novels. He's relentlessly structuralist, which now reads as da...

    formalist ideas of literature applied, thus sf is ultimately... poetry. myth-making in some ways, this had intelligent artists conscious of what they are doing and how sf is valuable, mature, engaging. this is trying to present possibilities of thought experiments in the essence of poe...

    This book, and in particular the essay opening the collection, ?About 5,750 Words? is famous (I wouldn?t know whether justly or not) for being the first attempt to define Science Fiction not by way of its content (?It takes place in the future?, ?It has robots and starships...

    Having worked my way through most of his fiction and memoir, I've started in on more of Delany's essays. At the end of the day, I do just like his narrative stuff better, and the bits of personal story in these essays were some of my favorite parts. Lots of other good stuff too t...

    This was a bit of a mixed bag for me. I enjoyed several of the essays, skipped a few which pertained to SFF works I haven't read (or read so long ago I remember virtually nothing) and fought my way through some of the more arcane critical language (I don't know the different between di...

    Took me a while to make it through this collection of essays about science fiction as literature. I started on it because I'd finally read Ursula Leguin's The Dispossessed which is the subject of one of the longer essays. Delany offers a lot of critiques of the book, including that the...

    http://nhw.livejournal.com/521590.html[return][return]This is a collection of a dozen pieces about sf, written between 1966 and 1976. They vary greatly in both length and quality; the longest, an article called "Shadows", is 80 pages, split into 60 sections which really appear just thr...

    I really enjoyed the first half of this book of essays, despite the tendency of several of them to be a bit random. Delany's prose feels very unnecessarily dense at times but when he makes sense he makes lots of it. Perhaps the most interesting parts are his tendency to think about SF ...

    I wish I had read all of the stuff he's talking about, and read it immediately before reading him. I'm so in awe. I imagine getting a job at Temple and being near him. Is he still active? I'd have to work really hard to get there. Maybe it's not quite in my line but I wish it were. It ...

    I didn't read all of this, and what I did read, I certainly didn't completely understand. What I did understand - and what I sort-of-vaguely-got-some-of - was extremely insightful and occasionally mind-blowing. This is a book that I'll have to come back to, probably several times. D...

    A must read for any serious SF writer. Sam Delany is brilliant. That said he's also ridiculously pretentious and this collection of essays indulges itself in the worst excesses of Derrida and the like (the 60 page analysis of Ursula K. Leguin's "the Dispossessed" is unreadable), but it...

    An odd and pleasing collection of essays (mostly) about sci-fi lit (mostly). A few of the morsels in this book: - Proof that everything is science fiction (including Jane Austen and journalistic writing) - A resolution of Godel's incompleteness theorem - Similar to an integral, ho...

    Definitely a lot of material for a potential re-read. However, even at first glance, really well written, with a lot of small explanations in layman's terms which came handy on many occasions. Concise, well-phrased, interesting ideas and valid criticisms which speak not only to science...

  • Dan
    Dec 19, 2017

    Deep, fine thinking. Often hilarious. Any serious writer of science fiction or fantasy or both should read this book, though it is a deeper and more rigorous than most writing about writing, in genre or out, so it may daunt. This is one of the few books to take the entire process serio...

    Well, I think I can say with confidence now that Delany is the closest thing Americans will ever get to having our own Borges (and as a heretofore unknown aside, the first Borges story to appear translated in the USA was 'Death and the Compass,' and it appeared in The Magazine of Fanta...

    (I read the old edition, the new edition is structured slightly different and includes at least one new essay.) Jewel Hinged Jaw is a collection of essays all centered around a discussion of science fiction. The collection was first published in the 70s and has aged quite well, desp...

    I've never read any of Delaney's fiction, but I found much of his critical work absorbing and interesting. There were discussions on such divers topics as the grammar of ASL and the question of (numerically) equal representation of the sexes in stories. I'm told LeGuin denies ever ...

    Delaney is usually intelligent, occasionally profound, and often extremely frustrating. In a way, the essay is his natural habitat - at least, it lets him indulge the didactic tendencies which crop up again and again in his novels. He's relentlessly structuralist, which now reads as da...

    formalist ideas of literature applied, thus sf is ultimately... poetry. myth-making in some ways, this had intelligent artists conscious of what they are doing and how sf is valuable, mature, engaging. this is trying to present possibilities of thought experiments in the essence of poe...

    This book, and in particular the essay opening the collection, ?About 5,750 Words? is famous (I wouldn?t know whether justly or not) for being the first attempt to define Science Fiction not by way of its content (?It takes place in the future?, ?It has robots and starships...

    Having worked my way through most of his fiction and memoir, I've started in on more of Delany's essays. At the end of the day, I do just like his narrative stuff better, and the bits of personal story in these essays were some of my favorite parts. Lots of other good stuff too t...

  • Nicole Luiken
    Sep 29, 2018

    Deep, fine thinking. Often hilarious. Any serious writer of science fiction or fantasy or both should read this book, though it is a deeper and more rigorous than most writing about writing, in genre or out, so it may daunt. This is one of the few books to take the entire process serio...

    Well, I think I can say with confidence now that Delany is the closest thing Americans will ever get to having our own Borges (and as a heretofore unknown aside, the first Borges story to appear translated in the USA was 'Death and the Compass,' and it appeared in The Magazine of Fanta...

    (I read the old edition, the new edition is structured slightly different and includes at least one new essay.) Jewel Hinged Jaw is a collection of essays all centered around a discussion of science fiction. The collection was first published in the 70s and has aged quite well, desp...

    I've never read any of Delaney's fiction, but I found much of his critical work absorbing and interesting. There were discussions on such divers topics as the grammar of ASL and the question of (numerically) equal representation of the sexes in stories. I'm told LeGuin denies ever ...

    Delaney is usually intelligent, occasionally profound, and often extremely frustrating. In a way, the essay is his natural habitat - at least, it lets him indulge the didactic tendencies which crop up again and again in his novels. He's relentlessly structuralist, which now reads as da...

    formalist ideas of literature applied, thus sf is ultimately... poetry. myth-making in some ways, this had intelligent artists conscious of what they are doing and how sf is valuable, mature, engaging. this is trying to present possibilities of thought experiments in the essence of poe...

    This book, and in particular the essay opening the collection, ?About 5,750 Words? is famous (I wouldn?t know whether justly or not) for being the first attempt to define Science Fiction not by way of its content (?It takes place in the future?, ?It has robots and starships...

    Having worked my way through most of his fiction and memoir, I've started in on more of Delany's essays. At the end of the day, I do just like his narrative stuff better, and the bits of personal story in these essays were some of my favorite parts. Lots of other good stuff too t...

    This was a bit of a mixed bag for me. I enjoyed several of the essays, skipped a few which pertained to SFF works I haven't read (or read so long ago I remember virtually nothing) and fought my way through some of the more arcane critical language (I don't know the different between di...

  • Sean
    Nov 29, 2012

    Deep, fine thinking. Often hilarious. Any serious writer of science fiction or fantasy or both should read this book, though it is a deeper and more rigorous than most writing about writing, in genre or out, so it may daunt. This is one of the few books to take the entire process serio...

    Well, I think I can say with confidence now that Delany is the closest thing Americans will ever get to having our own Borges (and as a heretofore unknown aside, the first Borges story to appear translated in the USA was 'Death and the Compass,' and it appeared in The Magazine of Fanta...

    (I read the old edition, the new edition is structured slightly different and includes at least one new essay.) Jewel Hinged Jaw is a collection of essays all centered around a discussion of science fiction. The collection was first published in the 70s and has aged quite well, desp...

    I've never read any of Delaney's fiction, but I found much of his critical work absorbing and interesting. There were discussions on such divers topics as the grammar of ASL and the question of (numerically) equal representation of the sexes in stories. I'm told LeGuin denies ever ...

    Delaney is usually intelligent, occasionally profound, and often extremely frustrating. In a way, the essay is his natural habitat - at least, it lets him indulge the didactic tendencies which crop up again and again in his novels. He's relentlessly structuralist, which now reads as da...

    formalist ideas of literature applied, thus sf is ultimately... poetry. myth-making in some ways, this had intelligent artists conscious of what they are doing and how sf is valuable, mature, engaging. this is trying to present possibilities of thought experiments in the essence of poe...

    This book, and in particular the essay opening the collection, ?About 5,750 Words? is famous (I wouldn?t know whether justly or not) for being the first attempt to define Science Fiction not by way of its content (?It takes place in the future?, ?It has robots and starships...

    Having worked my way through most of his fiction and memoir, I've started in on more of Delany's essays. At the end of the day, I do just like his narrative stuff better, and the bits of personal story in these essays were some of my favorite parts. Lots of other good stuff too t...

    This was a bit of a mixed bag for me. I enjoyed several of the essays, skipped a few which pertained to SFF works I haven't read (or read so long ago I remember virtually nothing) and fought my way through some of the more arcane critical language (I don't know the different between di...

    Took me a while to make it through this collection of essays about science fiction as literature. I started on it because I'd finally read Ursula Leguin's The Dispossessed which is the subject of one of the longer essays. Delany offers a lot of critiques of the book, including that the...

    http://nhw.livejournal.com/521590.html[return][return]This is a collection of a dozen pieces about sf, written between 1966 and 1976. They vary greatly in both length and quality; the longest, an article called "Shadows", is 80 pages, split into 60 sections which really appear just thr...

    I really enjoyed the first half of this book of essays, despite the tendency of several of them to be a bit random. Delany's prose feels very unnecessarily dense at times but when he makes sense he makes lots of it. Perhaps the most interesting parts are his tendency to think about SF ...

    I wish I had read all of the stuff he's talking about, and read it immediately before reading him. I'm so in awe. I imagine getting a job at Temple and being near him. Is he still active? I'd have to work really hard to get there. Maybe it's not quite in my line but I wish it were. It ...

    I didn't read all of this, and what I did read, I certainly didn't completely understand. What I did understand - and what I sort-of-vaguely-got-some-of - was extremely insightful and occasionally mind-blowing. This is a book that I'll have to come back to, probably several times. D...

  • Larou
    Sep 20, 2012

    Deep, fine thinking. Often hilarious. Any serious writer of science fiction or fantasy or both should read this book, though it is a deeper and more rigorous than most writing about writing, in genre or out, so it may daunt. This is one of the few books to take the entire process serio...

    Well, I think I can say with confidence now that Delany is the closest thing Americans will ever get to having our own Borges (and as a heretofore unknown aside, the first Borges story to appear translated in the USA was 'Death and the Compass,' and it appeared in The Magazine of Fanta...

    (I read the old edition, the new edition is structured slightly different and includes at least one new essay.) Jewel Hinged Jaw is a collection of essays all centered around a discussion of science fiction. The collection was first published in the 70s and has aged quite well, desp...

    I've never read any of Delaney's fiction, but I found much of his critical work absorbing and interesting. There were discussions on such divers topics as the grammar of ASL and the question of (numerically) equal representation of the sexes in stories. I'm told LeGuin denies ever ...

    Delaney is usually intelligent, occasionally profound, and often extremely frustrating. In a way, the essay is his natural habitat - at least, it lets him indulge the didactic tendencies which crop up again and again in his novels. He's relentlessly structuralist, which now reads as da...

    formalist ideas of literature applied, thus sf is ultimately... poetry. myth-making in some ways, this had intelligent artists conscious of what they are doing and how sf is valuable, mature, engaging. this is trying to present possibilities of thought experiments in the essence of poe...

    This book, and in particular the essay opening the collection, ?About 5,750 Words? is famous (I wouldn?t know whether justly or not) for being the first attempt to define Science Fiction not by way of its content (?It takes place in the future?, ?It has robots and starships...

  • Paige
    Jun 21, 2016

    Deep, fine thinking. Often hilarious. Any serious writer of science fiction or fantasy or both should read this book, though it is a deeper and more rigorous than most writing about writing, in genre or out, so it may daunt. This is one of the few books to take the entire process serio...

    Well, I think I can say with confidence now that Delany is the closest thing Americans will ever get to having our own Borges (and as a heretofore unknown aside, the first Borges story to appear translated in the USA was 'Death and the Compass,' and it appeared in The Magazine of Fanta...

    (I read the old edition, the new edition is structured slightly different and includes at least one new essay.) Jewel Hinged Jaw is a collection of essays all centered around a discussion of science fiction. The collection was first published in the 70s and has aged quite well, desp...

    I've never read any of Delaney's fiction, but I found much of his critical work absorbing and interesting. There were discussions on such divers topics as the grammar of ASL and the question of (numerically) equal representation of the sexes in stories. I'm told LeGuin denies ever ...

    Delaney is usually intelligent, occasionally profound, and often extremely frustrating. In a way, the essay is his natural habitat - at least, it lets him indulge the didactic tendencies which crop up again and again in his novels. He's relentlessly structuralist, which now reads as da...

    formalist ideas of literature applied, thus sf is ultimately... poetry. myth-making in some ways, this had intelligent artists conscious of what they are doing and how sf is valuable, mature, engaging. this is trying to present possibilities of thought experiments in the essence of poe...

    This book, and in particular the essay opening the collection, ?About 5,750 Words? is famous (I wouldn?t know whether justly or not) for being the first attempt to define Science Fiction not by way of its content (?It takes place in the future?, ?It has robots and starships...

    Having worked my way through most of his fiction and memoir, I've started in on more of Delany's essays. At the end of the day, I do just like his narrative stuff better, and the bits of personal story in these essays were some of my favorite parts. Lots of other good stuff too t...

    This was a bit of a mixed bag for me. I enjoyed several of the essays, skipped a few which pertained to SFF works I haven't read (or read so long ago I remember virtually nothing) and fought my way through some of the more arcane critical language (I don't know the different between di...

    Took me a while to make it through this collection of essays about science fiction as literature. I started on it because I'd finally read Ursula Leguin's The Dispossessed which is the subject of one of the longer essays. Delany offers a lot of critiques of the book, including that the...

    http://nhw.livejournal.com/521590.html[return][return]This is a collection of a dozen pieces about sf, written between 1966 and 1976. They vary greatly in both length and quality; the longest, an article called "Shadows", is 80 pages, split into 60 sections which really appear just thr...

    I really enjoyed the first half of this book of essays, despite the tendency of several of them to be a bit random. Delany's prose feels very unnecessarily dense at times but when he makes sense he makes lots of it. Perhaps the most interesting parts are his tendency to think about SF ...

    I wish I had read all of the stuff he's talking about, and read it immediately before reading him. I'm so in awe. I imagine getting a job at Temple and being near him. Is he still active? I'd have to work really hard to get there. Maybe it's not quite in my line but I wish it were. It ...

    I didn't read all of this, and what I did read, I certainly didn't completely understand. What I did understand - and what I sort-of-vaguely-got-some-of - was extremely insightful and occasionally mind-blowing. This is a book that I'll have to come back to, probably several times. D...

    A must read for any serious SF writer. Sam Delany is brilliant. That said he's also ridiculously pretentious and this collection of essays indulges itself in the worst excesses of Derrida and the like (the 60 page analysis of Ursula K. Leguin's "the Dispossessed" is unreadable), but it...

    An odd and pleasing collection of essays (mostly) about sci-fi lit (mostly). A few of the morsels in this book: - Proof that everything is science fiction (including Jane Austen and journalistic writing) - A resolution of Godel's incompleteness theorem - Similar to an integral, ho...

    Definitely a lot of material for a potential re-read. However, even at first glance, really well written, with a lot of small explanations in layman's terms which came handy on many occasions. Concise, well-phrased, interesting ideas and valid criticisms which speak not only to science...

    A star for the sheer genius of "A Fictional Architecture ..." (It's truly a one, not a zero). As for a lot of the rest: I see how these essays have been important when they have been written. And they are still interesting in a historical sense. But I've read tumblr entries that were b...

    I admit that there are swathes of this I don't either fully understand or can't quite relate to, but even so, the stuff the works for me really, really works. Definitely a foundational work for the field. And Delany's prose is delightful and maddening as always. ...

    While some of these essays are repeated in Delany?s About Writing: Seven Essays, Four Letters, & Five Interviews, herein the anecdotal tone is more pronounced, reproducing journal entries and critical essays alongside a master author?s indispensable advice. Well worth seeking o...

    One of the best books ever on writing and science fiction. ...

    I read the first page, and I'm already turned off. He seems really full of himself at that time, and not really interested in communicating. ...

    thumbs up emoji ...

    Dense. worth every headache. ...

    Beautifully written, but dense, literary criticism of science fiction. ...

    All literary criticism should be this good. I wish I'd had this when I was first bashing my head against deconstruction. ...

    I really liked all of these essays, will be returning to them. ...

  • Reuvenc
    Nov 27, 2012

    Deep, fine thinking. Often hilarious. Any serious writer of science fiction or fantasy or both should read this book, though it is a deeper and more rigorous than most writing about writing, in genre or out, so it may daunt. This is one of the few books to take the entire process serio...

    Well, I think I can say with confidence now that Delany is the closest thing Americans will ever get to having our own Borges (and as a heretofore unknown aside, the first Borges story to appear translated in the USA was 'Death and the Compass,' and it appeared in The Magazine of Fanta...

    (I read the old edition, the new edition is structured slightly different and includes at least one new essay.) Jewel Hinged Jaw is a collection of essays all centered around a discussion of science fiction. The collection was first published in the 70s and has aged quite well, desp...

    I've never read any of Delaney's fiction, but I found much of his critical work absorbing and interesting. There were discussions on such divers topics as the grammar of ASL and the question of (numerically) equal representation of the sexes in stories. I'm told LeGuin denies ever ...

    Delaney is usually intelligent, occasionally profound, and often extremely frustrating. In a way, the essay is his natural habitat - at least, it lets him indulge the didactic tendencies which crop up again and again in his novels. He's relentlessly structuralist, which now reads as da...

    formalist ideas of literature applied, thus sf is ultimately... poetry. myth-making in some ways, this had intelligent artists conscious of what they are doing and how sf is valuable, mature, engaging. this is trying to present possibilities of thought experiments in the essence of poe...

    This book, and in particular the essay opening the collection, ?About 5,750 Words? is famous (I wouldn?t know whether justly or not) for being the first attempt to define Science Fiction not by way of its content (?It takes place in the future?, ?It has robots and starships...

    Having worked my way through most of his fiction and memoir, I've started in on more of Delany's essays. At the end of the day, I do just like his narrative stuff better, and the bits of personal story in these essays were some of my favorite parts. Lots of other good stuff too t...

    This was a bit of a mixed bag for me. I enjoyed several of the essays, skipped a few which pertained to SFF works I haven't read (or read so long ago I remember virtually nothing) and fought my way through some of the more arcane critical language (I don't know the different between di...

    Took me a while to make it through this collection of essays about science fiction as literature. I started on it because I'd finally read Ursula Leguin's The Dispossessed which is the subject of one of the longer essays. Delany offers a lot of critiques of the book, including that the...

    http://nhw.livejournal.com/521590.html[return][return]This is a collection of a dozen pieces about sf, written between 1966 and 1976. They vary greatly in both length and quality; the longest, an article called "Shadows", is 80 pages, split into 60 sections which really appear just thr...

    I really enjoyed the first half of this book of essays, despite the tendency of several of them to be a bit random. Delany's prose feels very unnecessarily dense at times but when he makes sense he makes lots of it. Perhaps the most interesting parts are his tendency to think about SF ...

    I wish I had read all of the stuff he's talking about, and read it immediately before reading him. I'm so in awe. I imagine getting a job at Temple and being near him. Is he still active? I'd have to work really hard to get there. Maybe it's not quite in my line but I wish it were. It ...

    I didn't read all of this, and what I did read, I certainly didn't completely understand. What I did understand - and what I sort-of-vaguely-got-some-of - was extremely insightful and occasionally mind-blowing. This is a book that I'll have to come back to, probably several times. D...

    A must read for any serious SF writer. Sam Delany is brilliant. That said he's also ridiculously pretentious and this collection of essays indulges itself in the worst excesses of Derrida and the like (the 60 page analysis of Ursula K. Leguin's "the Dispossessed" is unreadable), but it...

    An odd and pleasing collection of essays (mostly) about sci-fi lit (mostly). A few of the morsels in this book: - Proof that everything is science fiction (including Jane Austen and journalistic writing) - A resolution of Godel's incompleteness theorem - Similar to an integral, ho...

    Definitely a lot of material for a potential re-read. However, even at first glance, really well written, with a lot of small explanations in layman's terms which came handy on many occasions. Concise, well-phrased, interesting ideas and valid criticisms which speak not only to science...

    A star for the sheer genius of "A Fictional Architecture ..." (It's truly a one, not a zero). As for a lot of the rest: I see how these essays have been important when they have been written. And they are still interesting in a historical sense. But I've read tumblr entries that were b...

    I admit that there are swathes of this I don't either fully understand or can't quite relate to, but even so, the stuff the works for me really, really works. Definitely a foundational work for the field. And Delany's prose is delightful and maddening as always. ...

    While some of these essays are repeated in Delany?s About Writing: Seven Essays, Four Letters, & Five Interviews, herein the anecdotal tone is more pronounced, reproducing journal entries and critical essays alongside a master author?s indispensable advice. Well worth seeking o...

    One of the best books ever on writing and science fiction. ...

    I read the first page, and I'm already turned off. He seems really full of himself at that time, and not really interested in communicating. ...

    thumbs up emoji ...

    Dense. worth every headache. ...

    Beautifully written, but dense, literary criticism of science fiction. ...

    All literary criticism should be this good. I wish I'd had this when I was first bashing my head against deconstruction. ...

    I really liked all of these essays, will be returning to them. ...

    Very important collection of essays, essential reading for anyone who takes SF seriously. ...

    ...

    ...

  • Don Naggie
    Jan 20, 2014

    Deep, fine thinking. Often hilarious. Any serious writer of science fiction or fantasy or both should read this book, though it is a deeper and more rigorous than most writing about writing, in genre or out, so it may daunt. This is one of the few books to take the entire process serio...

    Well, I think I can say with confidence now that Delany is the closest thing Americans will ever get to having our own Borges (and as a heretofore unknown aside, the first Borges story to appear translated in the USA was 'Death and the Compass,' and it appeared in The Magazine of Fanta...

    (I read the old edition, the new edition is structured slightly different and includes at least one new essay.) Jewel Hinged Jaw is a collection of essays all centered around a discussion of science fiction. The collection was first published in the 70s and has aged quite well, desp...

    I've never read any of Delaney's fiction, but I found much of his critical work absorbing and interesting. There were discussions on such divers topics as the grammar of ASL and the question of (numerically) equal representation of the sexes in stories. I'm told LeGuin denies ever ...

    Delaney is usually intelligent, occasionally profound, and often extremely frustrating. In a way, the essay is his natural habitat - at least, it lets him indulge the didactic tendencies which crop up again and again in his novels. He's relentlessly structuralist, which now reads as da...

    formalist ideas of literature applied, thus sf is ultimately... poetry. myth-making in some ways, this had intelligent artists conscious of what they are doing and how sf is valuable, mature, engaging. this is trying to present possibilities of thought experiments in the essence of poe...

    This book, and in particular the essay opening the collection, ?About 5,750 Words? is famous (I wouldn?t know whether justly or not) for being the first attempt to define Science Fiction not by way of its content (?It takes place in the future?, ?It has robots and starships...

    Having worked my way through most of his fiction and memoir, I've started in on more of Delany's essays. At the end of the day, I do just like his narrative stuff better, and the bits of personal story in these essays were some of my favorite parts. Lots of other good stuff too t...

    This was a bit of a mixed bag for me. I enjoyed several of the essays, skipped a few which pertained to SFF works I haven't read (or read so long ago I remember virtually nothing) and fought my way through some of the more arcane critical language (I don't know the different between di...

    Took me a while to make it through this collection of essays about science fiction as literature. I started on it because I'd finally read Ursula Leguin's The Dispossessed which is the subject of one of the longer essays. Delany offers a lot of critiques of the book, including that the...

    http://nhw.livejournal.com/521590.html[return][return]This is a collection of a dozen pieces about sf, written between 1966 and 1976. They vary greatly in both length and quality; the longest, an article called "Shadows", is 80 pages, split into 60 sections which really appear just thr...

    I really enjoyed the first half of this book of essays, despite the tendency of several of them to be a bit random. Delany's prose feels very unnecessarily dense at times but when he makes sense he makes lots of it. Perhaps the most interesting parts are his tendency to think about SF ...

    I wish I had read all of the stuff he's talking about, and read it immediately before reading him. I'm so in awe. I imagine getting a job at Temple and being near him. Is he still active? I'd have to work really hard to get there. Maybe it's not quite in my line but I wish it were. It ...

    I didn't read all of this, and what I did read, I certainly didn't completely understand. What I did understand - and what I sort-of-vaguely-got-some-of - was extremely insightful and occasionally mind-blowing. This is a book that I'll have to come back to, probably several times. D...

    A must read for any serious SF writer. Sam Delany is brilliant. That said he's also ridiculously pretentious and this collection of essays indulges itself in the worst excesses of Derrida and the like (the 60 page analysis of Ursula K. Leguin's "the Dispossessed" is unreadable), but it...

    An odd and pleasing collection of essays (mostly) about sci-fi lit (mostly). A few of the morsels in this book: - Proof that everything is science fiction (including Jane Austen and journalistic writing) - A resolution of Godel's incompleteness theorem - Similar to an integral, ho...

    Definitely a lot of material for a potential re-read. However, even at first glance, really well written, with a lot of small explanations in layman's terms which came handy on many occasions. Concise, well-phrased, interesting ideas and valid criticisms which speak not only to science...

    A star for the sheer genius of "A Fictional Architecture ..." (It's truly a one, not a zero). As for a lot of the rest: I see how these essays have been important when they have been written. And they are still interesting in a historical sense. But I've read tumblr entries that were b...

    I admit that there are swathes of this I don't either fully understand or can't quite relate to, but even so, the stuff the works for me really, really works. Definitely a foundational work for the field. And Delany's prose is delightful and maddening as always. ...

    While some of these essays are repeated in Delany?s About Writing: Seven Essays, Four Letters, & Five Interviews, herein the anecdotal tone is more pronounced, reproducing journal entries and critical essays alongside a master author?s indispensable advice. Well worth seeking o...

    One of the best books ever on writing and science fiction. ...

    I read the first page, and I'm already turned off. He seems really full of himself at that time, and not really interested in communicating. ...

    thumbs up emoji ...

    Dense. worth every headache. ...

    Beautifully written, but dense, literary criticism of science fiction. ...

    All literary criticism should be this good. I wish I'd had this when I was first bashing my head against deconstruction. ...

    I really liked all of these essays, will be returning to them. ...

    Very important collection of essays, essential reading for anyone who takes SF seriously. ...

  • Griffin Alexander
    Oct 30, 2017

    Deep, fine thinking. Often hilarious. Any serious writer of science fiction or fantasy or both should read this book, though it is a deeper and more rigorous than most writing about writing, in genre or out, so it may daunt. This is one of the few books to take the entire process serio...

    Well, I think I can say with confidence now that Delany is the closest thing Americans will ever get to having our own Borges (and as a heretofore unknown aside, the first Borges story to appear translated in the USA was 'Death and the Compass,' and it appeared in The Magazine of Fanta...

  • Anfenwick
    Jul 10, 2014

    Deep, fine thinking. Often hilarious. Any serious writer of science fiction or fantasy or both should read this book, though it is a deeper and more rigorous than most writing about writing, in genre or out, so it may daunt. This is one of the few books to take the entire process serio...

    Well, I think I can say with confidence now that Delany is the closest thing Americans will ever get to having our own Borges (and as a heretofore unknown aside, the first Borges story to appear translated in the USA was 'Death and the Compass,' and it appeared in The Magazine of Fanta...

    (I read the old edition, the new edition is structured slightly different and includes at least one new essay.) Jewel Hinged Jaw is a collection of essays all centered around a discussion of science fiction. The collection was first published in the 70s and has aged quite well, desp...

    I've never read any of Delaney's fiction, but I found much of his critical work absorbing and interesting. There were discussions on such divers topics as the grammar of ASL and the question of (numerically) equal representation of the sexes in stories. I'm told LeGuin denies ever ...

    Delaney is usually intelligent, occasionally profound, and often extremely frustrating. In a way, the essay is his natural habitat - at least, it lets him indulge the didactic tendencies which crop up again and again in his novels. He's relentlessly structuralist, which now reads as da...

    formalist ideas of literature applied, thus sf is ultimately... poetry. myth-making in some ways, this had intelligent artists conscious of what they are doing and how sf is valuable, mature, engaging. this is trying to present possibilities of thought experiments in the essence of poe...

    This book, and in particular the essay opening the collection, ?About 5,750 Words? is famous (I wouldn?t know whether justly or not) for being the first attempt to define Science Fiction not by way of its content (?It takes place in the future?, ?It has robots and starships...

    Having worked my way through most of his fiction and memoir, I've started in on more of Delany's essays. At the end of the day, I do just like his narrative stuff better, and the bits of personal story in these essays were some of my favorite parts. Lots of other good stuff too t...

    This was a bit of a mixed bag for me. I enjoyed several of the essays, skipped a few which pertained to SFF works I haven't read (or read so long ago I remember virtually nothing) and fought my way through some of the more arcane critical language (I don't know the different between di...

    Took me a while to make it through this collection of essays about science fiction as literature. I started on it because I'd finally read Ursula Leguin's The Dispossessed which is the subject of one of the longer essays. Delany offers a lot of critiques of the book, including that the...

    http://nhw.livejournal.com/521590.html[return][return]This is a collection of a dozen pieces about sf, written between 1966 and 1976. They vary greatly in both length and quality; the longest, an article called "Shadows", is 80 pages, split into 60 sections which really appear just thr...

    I really enjoyed the first half of this book of essays, despite the tendency of several of them to be a bit random. Delany's prose feels very unnecessarily dense at times but when he makes sense he makes lots of it. Perhaps the most interesting parts are his tendency to think about SF ...

  • Charlie
    Jun 11, 2015

    Deep, fine thinking. Often hilarious. Any serious writer of science fiction or fantasy or both should read this book, though it is a deeper and more rigorous than most writing about writing, in genre or out, so it may daunt. This is one of the few books to take the entire process serio...

    Well, I think I can say with confidence now that Delany is the closest thing Americans will ever get to having our own Borges (and as a heretofore unknown aside, the first Borges story to appear translated in the USA was 'Death and the Compass,' and it appeared in The Magazine of Fanta...

    (I read the old edition, the new edition is structured slightly different and includes at least one new essay.) Jewel Hinged Jaw is a collection of essays all centered around a discussion of science fiction. The collection was first published in the 70s and has aged quite well, desp...

    I've never read any of Delaney's fiction, but I found much of his critical work absorbing and interesting. There were discussions on such divers topics as the grammar of ASL and the question of (numerically) equal representation of the sexes in stories. I'm told LeGuin denies ever ...

    Delaney is usually intelligent, occasionally profound, and often extremely frustrating. In a way, the essay is his natural habitat - at least, it lets him indulge the didactic tendencies which crop up again and again in his novels. He's relentlessly structuralist, which now reads as da...

    formalist ideas of literature applied, thus sf is ultimately... poetry. myth-making in some ways, this had intelligent artists conscious of what they are doing and how sf is valuable, mature, engaging. this is trying to present possibilities of thought experiments in the essence of poe...

    This book, and in particular the essay opening the collection, ?About 5,750 Words? is famous (I wouldn?t know whether justly or not) for being the first attempt to define Science Fiction not by way of its content (?It takes place in the future?, ?It has robots and starships...

    Having worked my way through most of his fiction and memoir, I've started in on more of Delany's essays. At the end of the day, I do just like his narrative stuff better, and the bits of personal story in these essays were some of my favorite parts. Lots of other good stuff too t...

    This was a bit of a mixed bag for me. I enjoyed several of the essays, skipped a few which pertained to SFF works I haven't read (or read so long ago I remember virtually nothing) and fought my way through some of the more arcane critical language (I don't know the different between di...

    Took me a while to make it through this collection of essays about science fiction as literature. I started on it because I'd finally read Ursula Leguin's The Dispossessed which is the subject of one of the longer essays. Delany offers a lot of critiques of the book, including that the...

    http://nhw.livejournal.com/521590.html[return][return]This is a collection of a dozen pieces about sf, written between 1966 and 1976. They vary greatly in both length and quality; the longest, an article called "Shadows", is 80 pages, split into 60 sections which really appear just thr...

    I really enjoyed the first half of this book of essays, despite the tendency of several of them to be a bit random. Delany's prose feels very unnecessarily dense at times but when he makes sense he makes lots of it. Perhaps the most interesting parts are his tendency to think about SF ...

    I wish I had read all of the stuff he's talking about, and read it immediately before reading him. I'm so in awe. I imagine getting a job at Temple and being near him. Is he still active? I'd have to work really hard to get there. Maybe it's not quite in my line but I wish it were. It ...

    I didn't read all of this, and what I did read, I certainly didn't completely understand. What I did understand - and what I sort-of-vaguely-got-some-of - was extremely insightful and occasionally mind-blowing. This is a book that I'll have to come back to, probably several times. D...

    A must read for any serious SF writer. Sam Delany is brilliant. That said he's also ridiculously pretentious and this collection of essays indulges itself in the worst excesses of Derrida and the like (the 60 page analysis of Ursula K. Leguin's "the Dispossessed" is unreadable), but it...

    An odd and pleasing collection of essays (mostly) about sci-fi lit (mostly). A few of the morsels in this book: - Proof that everything is science fiction (including Jane Austen and journalistic writing) - A resolution of Godel's incompleteness theorem - Similar to an integral, ho...

    Definitely a lot of material for a potential re-read. However, even at first glance, really well written, with a lot of small explanations in layman's terms which came handy on many occasions. Concise, well-phrased, interesting ideas and valid criticisms which speak not only to science...

    A star for the sheer genius of "A Fictional Architecture ..." (It's truly a one, not a zero). As for a lot of the rest: I see how these essays have been important when they have been written. And they are still interesting in a historical sense. But I've read tumblr entries that were b...

    I admit that there are swathes of this I don't either fully understand or can't quite relate to, but even so, the stuff the works for me really, really works. Definitely a foundational work for the field. And Delany's prose is delightful and maddening as always. ...

    While some of these essays are repeated in Delany?s About Writing: Seven Essays, Four Letters, & Five Interviews, herein the anecdotal tone is more pronounced, reproducing journal entries and critical essays alongside a master author?s indispensable advice. Well worth seeking o...

    One of the best books ever on writing and science fiction. ...

    I read the first page, and I'm already turned off. He seems really full of himself at that time, and not really interested in communicating. ...

    thumbs up emoji ...

  • Jonathan Compton
    Jan 06, 2017

    Deep, fine thinking. Often hilarious. Any serious writer of science fiction or fantasy or both should read this book, though it is a deeper and more rigorous than most writing about writing, in genre or out, so it may daunt. This is one of the few books to take the entire process serio...

    Well, I think I can say with confidence now that Delany is the closest thing Americans will ever get to having our own Borges (and as a heretofore unknown aside, the first Borges story to appear translated in the USA was 'Death and the Compass,' and it appeared in The Magazine of Fanta...

    (I read the old edition, the new edition is structured slightly different and includes at least one new essay.) Jewel Hinged Jaw is a collection of essays all centered around a discussion of science fiction. The collection was first published in the 70s and has aged quite well, desp...

    I've never read any of Delaney's fiction, but I found much of his critical work absorbing and interesting. There were discussions on such divers topics as the grammar of ASL and the question of (numerically) equal representation of the sexes in stories. I'm told LeGuin denies ever ...

    Delaney is usually intelligent, occasionally profound, and often extremely frustrating. In a way, the essay is his natural habitat - at least, it lets him indulge the didactic tendencies which crop up again and again in his novels. He's relentlessly structuralist, which now reads as da...

    formalist ideas of literature applied, thus sf is ultimately... poetry. myth-making in some ways, this had intelligent artists conscious of what they are doing and how sf is valuable, mature, engaging. this is trying to present possibilities of thought experiments in the essence of poe...

    This book, and in particular the essay opening the collection, ?About 5,750 Words? is famous (I wouldn?t know whether justly or not) for being the first attempt to define Science Fiction not by way of its content (?It takes place in the future?, ?It has robots and starships...

    Having worked my way through most of his fiction and memoir, I've started in on more of Delany's essays. At the end of the day, I do just like his narrative stuff better, and the bits of personal story in these essays were some of my favorite parts. Lots of other good stuff too t...

    This was a bit of a mixed bag for me. I enjoyed several of the essays, skipped a few which pertained to SFF works I haven't read (or read so long ago I remember virtually nothing) and fought my way through some of the more arcane critical language (I don't know the different between di...

    Took me a while to make it through this collection of essays about science fiction as literature. I started on it because I'd finally read Ursula Leguin's The Dispossessed which is the subject of one of the longer essays. Delany offers a lot of critiques of the book, including that the...

    http://nhw.livejournal.com/521590.html[return][return]This is a collection of a dozen pieces about sf, written between 1966 and 1976. They vary greatly in both length and quality; the longest, an article called "Shadows", is 80 pages, split into 60 sections which really appear just thr...

    I really enjoyed the first half of this book of essays, despite the tendency of several of them to be a bit random. Delany's prose feels very unnecessarily dense at times but when he makes sense he makes lots of it. Perhaps the most interesting parts are his tendency to think about SF ...

    I wish I had read all of the stuff he's talking about, and read it immediately before reading him. I'm so in awe. I imagine getting a job at Temple and being near him. Is he still active? I'd have to work really hard to get there. Maybe it's not quite in my line but I wish it were. It ...

    I didn't read all of this, and what I did read, I certainly didn't completely understand. What I did understand - and what I sort-of-vaguely-got-some-of - was extremely insightful and occasionally mind-blowing. This is a book that I'll have to come back to, probably several times. D...

    A must read for any serious SF writer. Sam Delany is brilliant. That said he's also ridiculously pretentious and this collection of essays indulges itself in the worst excesses of Derrida and the like (the 60 page analysis of Ursula K. Leguin's "the Dispossessed" is unreadable), but it...

    An odd and pleasing collection of essays (mostly) about sci-fi lit (mostly). A few of the morsels in this book: - Proof that everything is science fiction (including Jane Austen and journalistic writing) - A resolution of Godel's incompleteness theorem - Similar to an integral, ho...

  • Clara
    Jul 18, 2018

    Deep, fine thinking. Often hilarious. Any serious writer of science fiction or fantasy or both should read this book, though it is a deeper and more rigorous than most writing about writing, in genre or out, so it may daunt. This is one of the few books to take the entire process serio...

    Well, I think I can say with confidence now that Delany is the closest thing Americans will ever get to having our own Borges (and as a heretofore unknown aside, the first Borges story to appear translated in the USA was 'Death and the Compass,' and it appeared in The Magazine of Fanta...

    (I read the old edition, the new edition is structured slightly different and includes at least one new essay.) Jewel Hinged Jaw is a collection of essays all centered around a discussion of science fiction. The collection was first published in the 70s and has aged quite well, desp...

    I've never read any of Delaney's fiction, but I found much of his critical work absorbing and interesting. There were discussions on such divers topics as the grammar of ASL and the question of (numerically) equal representation of the sexes in stories. I'm told LeGuin denies ever ...

    Delaney is usually intelligent, occasionally profound, and often extremely frustrating. In a way, the essay is his natural habitat - at least, it lets him indulge the didactic tendencies which crop up again and again in his novels. He's relentlessly structuralist, which now reads as da...

  • prince 420
    Aug 09, 2015

    Deep, fine thinking. Often hilarious. Any serious writer of science fiction or fantasy or both should read this book, though it is a deeper and more rigorous than most writing about writing, in genre or out, so it may daunt. This is one of the few books to take the entire process serio...

    Well, I think I can say with confidence now that Delany is the closest thing Americans will ever get to having our own Borges (and as a heretofore unknown aside, the first Borges story to appear translated in the USA was 'Death and the Compass,' and it appeared in The Magazine of Fanta...

    (I read the old edition, the new edition is structured slightly different and includes at least one new essay.) Jewel Hinged Jaw is a collection of essays all centered around a discussion of science fiction. The collection was first published in the 70s and has aged quite well, desp...

    I've never read any of Delaney's fiction, but I found much of his critical work absorbing and interesting. There were discussions on such divers topics as the grammar of ASL and the question of (numerically) equal representation of the sexes in stories. I'm told LeGuin denies ever ...

    Delaney is usually intelligent, occasionally profound, and often extremely frustrating. In a way, the essay is his natural habitat - at least, it lets him indulge the didactic tendencies which crop up again and again in his novels. He's relentlessly structuralist, which now reads as da...

    formalist ideas of literature applied, thus sf is ultimately... poetry. myth-making in some ways, this had intelligent artists conscious of what they are doing and how sf is valuable, mature, engaging. this is trying to present possibilities of thought experiments in the essence of poe...

    This book, and in particular the essay opening the collection, ?About 5,750 Words? is famous (I wouldn?t know whether justly or not) for being the first attempt to define Science Fiction not by way of its content (?It takes place in the future?, ?It has robots and starships...

    Having worked my way through most of his fiction and memoir, I've started in on more of Delany's essays. At the end of the day, I do just like his narrative stuff better, and the bits of personal story in these essays were some of my favorite parts. Lots of other good stuff too t...

    This was a bit of a mixed bag for me. I enjoyed several of the essays, skipped a few which pertained to SFF works I haven't read (or read so long ago I remember virtually nothing) and fought my way through some of the more arcane critical language (I don't know the different between di...

    Took me a while to make it through this collection of essays about science fiction as literature. I started on it because I'd finally read Ursula Leguin's The Dispossessed which is the subject of one of the longer essays. Delany offers a lot of critiques of the book, including that the...

    http://nhw.livejournal.com/521590.html[return][return]This is a collection of a dozen pieces about sf, written between 1966 and 1976. They vary greatly in both length and quality; the longest, an article called "Shadows", is 80 pages, split into 60 sections which really appear just thr...

    I really enjoyed the first half of this book of essays, despite the tendency of several of them to be a bit random. Delany's prose feels very unnecessarily dense at times but when he makes sense he makes lots of it. Perhaps the most interesting parts are his tendency to think about SF ...

    I wish I had read all of the stuff he's talking about, and read it immediately before reading him. I'm so in awe. I imagine getting a job at Temple and being near him. Is he still active? I'd have to work really hard to get there. Maybe it's not quite in my line but I wish it were. It ...

    I didn't read all of this, and what I did read, I certainly didn't completely understand. What I did understand - and what I sort-of-vaguely-got-some-of - was extremely insightful and occasionally mind-blowing. This is a book that I'll have to come back to, probably several times. D...

    A must read for any serious SF writer. Sam Delany is brilliant. That said he's also ridiculously pretentious and this collection of essays indulges itself in the worst excesses of Derrida and the like (the 60 page analysis of Ursula K. Leguin's "the Dispossessed" is unreadable), but it...

    An odd and pleasing collection of essays (mostly) about sci-fi lit (mostly). A few of the morsels in this book: - Proof that everything is science fiction (including Jane Austen and journalistic writing) - A resolution of Godel's incompleteness theorem - Similar to an integral, ho...

    Definitely a lot of material for a potential re-read. However, even at first glance, really well written, with a lot of small explanations in layman's terms which came handy on many occasions. Concise, well-phrased, interesting ideas and valid criticisms which speak not only to science...

    A star for the sheer genius of "A Fictional Architecture ..." (It's truly a one, not a zero). As for a lot of the rest: I see how these essays have been important when they have been written. And they are still interesting in a historical sense. But I've read tumblr entries that were b...

    I admit that there are swathes of this I don't either fully understand or can't quite relate to, but even so, the stuff the works for me really, really works. Definitely a foundational work for the field. And Delany's prose is delightful and maddening as always. ...

    While some of these essays are repeated in Delany?s About Writing: Seven Essays, Four Letters, & Five Interviews, herein the anecdotal tone is more pronounced, reproducing journal entries and critical essays alongside a master author?s indispensable advice. Well worth seeking o...

    One of the best books ever on writing and science fiction. ...

    I read the first page, and I'm already turned off. He seems really full of himself at that time, and not really interested in communicating. ...

    thumbs up emoji ...

    Dense. worth every headache. ...