Dawn of the New Everything: Encounters with Reality and Virtual Reality

Dawn of the New Everything: Encounters with Reality and Virtual Reality

The father of virtual reality explains its dazzling possibilities by reflecting on his own lifelong relationship with technology. Bridging the gap between tech mania and the experience of being inside the human body, Jaron Lanier has written a three-pronged adventure into "virtual reality," by exposing its ability to illuminate and amplify our understanding of our species. The father of virtual reality explains its dazzling possibilities by reflecting on his own lifelong relationship with ...

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Title:Dawn of the New Everything: Encounters with Reality and Virtual Reality
Author:Jaron Lanier
Rating:
Genres:Nonfiction
ISBN:1627794093
Format Type:Hardcover
Number of Pages:304 pages pages

Dawn of the New Everything: Encounters with Reality and Virtual Reality Reviews

  • Anthony
    May 24, 2018

    To many people, Jaron Lanier is the father of virtual reality. He coined the term in its contemporary usage though points to an older, literary use. Lanier is a credit-sharer, not a credit-grabber, so this memoir of his childhood, early work and years at VPL Research, Inc. is full of s...

    A review and interview to consider: http://www.economist.com/news/books-a... http://www.businessinsider.com/jaron-... ...

    I thoroughly enjoyed this read. Having already read Lanier's other two books You Are Not a Gadget and Who Owns the Future, I'm very familiar with his humanist views on technology and the questionable ethics of how technology is being implemented in our current age - But Lanier is also ...

    Excellent. Lanier's one of the smartest people on the planet, and he has one of the biggest hearts on the planet. He understands technology and the culture and history of Silicon Valley more fully than almost everyone in Silicon Valley yet his imagination and intellect breaks completel...

    Informative Read. Usually not my cup of tea - but I do believe if you are interested in Virtual Reality - then this is the book for you. ...

    Well, I learned a lot about VR (e.g., why we'll never have floating holograms, VR programming concerns like latency, and the pros and cons of various interfaces). Lanier has a pretty rosy perspective of how the tech will develop, and why our experience with VR will be much more creativ...

    I really don?t know how to review this book, it is so completely removed from the life I have lived. But I read every word of it, understood some of it, and learned a lot about the world as it is and where it is going. If, like me, you are a boomer who followed the hippie dream and p...

    Che cos?Ŕ la realtÓ? La risposta presuppone la conoscenza dei ?luoghi?, reali e virtuali, nei quali ogni giorno viviamo e che crediamo di conoscere abbastanza. Purtroppo, ahimŔ, alla fine, ci accorgiamo che quella che abbiamo vissuto, non Ŕ quella realtÓ che abbiamo pensato....

    Lanier's book is an autobiography that looks at his life and career, but as the father of VR it also is an explanation about how VR developed. It is a look at a fascinating individual and how his unique way of seeing the world informed the technology that he helped develop. "New Yo...

    If there's such a thing as a gentle, nuanced siren - an electric light show that knocks on your door wanting to sit down for tea - this is that book. Lanier uses both a soft light and a hard light to revisit his time in Silicon Valley pioneering virtual reality, and really walked me th...

    Solid four stars, though I do think I wavered in my rating of the book as I progressed through it. The beginning was kind of interesting, though it kind of slowed down a bit. I then enjoyed reading about the early days of Silicon Valley. I didn't really too much like the sections on VR...

    I think this is a book that will grow on me as I continue to digest the thoughts shared by Mr. Lanier. This book was not what I expected. It is partially autobiographical, partially historical, and partially about the future of technology, VR, social media, and our society. There is a ...

    Jaron's life, AR/VR/MR, Silicon Valley, The 80s and 90s American tech scene, running a startup, what it means to be human, artificial intelligence, French spies, Japanese criminals and a dozen more themes make up the content of this narrative. Jaron constantly shifts from one topic to ...

    Dawn of the New Everything is a mash-up of part-Jaron Lanier memoir, part-history of VR and more specifically VPL, the first VR start-up. Immensely readable, even if you have no interest in the origins of or concepts underpinning VR, especially because Lanier comes across as an approac...

  • Joan
    Dec 30, 2017

    To many people, Jaron Lanier is the father of virtual reality. He coined the term in its contemporary usage though points to an older, literary use. Lanier is a credit-sharer, not a credit-grabber, so this memoir of his childhood, early work and years at VPL Research, Inc. is full of s...

    A review and interview to consider: http://www.economist.com/news/books-a... http://www.businessinsider.com/jaron-... ...

    I thoroughly enjoyed this read. Having already read Lanier's other two books You Are Not a Gadget and Who Owns the Future, I'm very familiar with his humanist views on technology and the questionable ethics of how technology is being implemented in our current age - But Lanier is also ...

    Excellent. Lanier's one of the smartest people on the planet, and he has one of the biggest hearts on the planet. He understands technology and the culture and history of Silicon Valley more fully than almost everyone in Silicon Valley yet his imagination and intellect breaks completel...

    Informative Read. Usually not my cup of tea - but I do believe if you are interested in Virtual Reality - then this is the book for you. ...

    Well, I learned a lot about VR (e.g., why we'll never have floating holograms, VR programming concerns like latency, and the pros and cons of various interfaces). Lanier has a pretty rosy perspective of how the tech will develop, and why our experience with VR will be much more creativ...

    I really don?t know how to review this book, it is so completely removed from the life I have lived. But I read every word of it, understood some of it, and learned a lot about the world as it is and where it is going. If, like me, you are a boomer who followed the hippie dream and p...

    Che cos?Ŕ la realtÓ? La risposta presuppone la conoscenza dei ?luoghi?, reali e virtuali, nei quali ogni giorno viviamo e che crediamo di conoscere abbastanza. Purtroppo, ahimŔ, alla fine, ci accorgiamo che quella che abbiamo vissuto, non Ŕ quella realtÓ che abbiamo pensato....

    Lanier's book is an autobiography that looks at his life and career, but as the father of VR it also is an explanation about how VR developed. It is a look at a fascinating individual and how his unique way of seeing the world informed the technology that he helped develop. "New Yo...

    If there's such a thing as a gentle, nuanced siren - an electric light show that knocks on your door wanting to sit down for tea - this is that book. Lanier uses both a soft light and a hard light to revisit his time in Silicon Valley pioneering virtual reality, and really walked me th...

    Solid four stars, though I do think I wavered in my rating of the book as I progressed through it. The beginning was kind of interesting, though it kind of slowed down a bit. I then enjoyed reading about the early days of Silicon Valley. I didn't really too much like the sections on VR...

    I think this is a book that will grow on me as I continue to digest the thoughts shared by Mr. Lanier. This book was not what I expected. It is partially autobiographical, partially historical, and partially about the future of technology, VR, social media, and our society. There is a ...

    Jaron's life, AR/VR/MR, Silicon Valley, The 80s and 90s American tech scene, running a startup, what it means to be human, artificial intelligence, French spies, Japanese criminals and a dozen more themes make up the content of this narrative. Jaron constantly shifts from one topic to ...

    Dawn of the New Everything is a mash-up of part-Jaron Lanier memoir, part-history of VR and more specifically VPL, the first VR start-up. Immensely readable, even if you have no interest in the origins of or concepts underpinning VR, especially because Lanier comes across as an approac...

    I suspect this will be a fun read for some - it was at times a very intriguing auto-biography of Lanier, but I gave up on it about half way through (too repetitive among other reasons). A somewhat distorted summary of the first half of the book: - Lanier lost his mother at young age a...

    I was very looking forward to reading this book. I have not gotten too much into virtual reality but it is something that intrigues me. Therefore I was very interested in what Mr. Lanier had to say as one of the first to experience virtual reality. What I got was some history about...

    If you're a technologist who can't quite get behind Facebook and doesn't necessarily think AI is going to take over the world, but can't put your finger on exactly why (that's me!), this book may help. Dawn of the New Everything is a memoir about the way the internet didn't turn out. I...

  • Kyle
    Mar 31, 2018

    To many people, Jaron Lanier is the father of virtual reality. He coined the term in its contemporary usage though points to an older, literary use. Lanier is a credit-sharer, not a credit-grabber, so this memoir of his childhood, early work and years at VPL Research, Inc. is full of s...

    A review and interview to consider: http://www.economist.com/news/books-a... http://www.businessinsider.com/jaron-... ...

    I thoroughly enjoyed this read. Having already read Lanier's other two books You Are Not a Gadget and Who Owns the Future, I'm very familiar with his humanist views on technology and the questionable ethics of how technology is being implemented in our current age - But Lanier is also ...

    Excellent. Lanier's one of the smartest people on the planet, and he has one of the biggest hearts on the planet. He understands technology and the culture and history of Silicon Valley more fully than almost everyone in Silicon Valley yet his imagination and intellect breaks completel...

    Informative Read. Usually not my cup of tea - but I do believe if you are interested in Virtual Reality - then this is the book for you. ...

    Well, I learned a lot about VR (e.g., why we'll never have floating holograms, VR programming concerns like latency, and the pros and cons of various interfaces). Lanier has a pretty rosy perspective of how the tech will develop, and why our experience with VR will be much more creativ...

    I really don?t know how to review this book, it is so completely removed from the life I have lived. But I read every word of it, understood some of it, and learned a lot about the world as it is and where it is going. If, like me, you are a boomer who followed the hippie dream and p...

    Che cos?Ŕ la realtÓ? La risposta presuppone la conoscenza dei ?luoghi?, reali e virtuali, nei quali ogni giorno viviamo e che crediamo di conoscere abbastanza. Purtroppo, ahimŔ, alla fine, ci accorgiamo che quella che abbiamo vissuto, non Ŕ quella realtÓ che abbiamo pensato....

    Lanier's book is an autobiography that looks at his life and career, but as the father of VR it also is an explanation about how VR developed. It is a look at a fascinating individual and how his unique way of seeing the world informed the technology that he helped develop. "New Yo...

    If there's such a thing as a gentle, nuanced siren - an electric light show that knocks on your door wanting to sit down for tea - this is that book. Lanier uses both a soft light and a hard light to revisit his time in Silicon Valley pioneering virtual reality, and really walked me th...

    Solid four stars, though I do think I wavered in my rating of the book as I progressed through it. The beginning was kind of interesting, though it kind of slowed down a bit. I then enjoyed reading about the early days of Silicon Valley. I didn't really too much like the sections on VR...

    I think this is a book that will grow on me as I continue to digest the thoughts shared by Mr. Lanier. This book was not what I expected. It is partially autobiographical, partially historical, and partially about the future of technology, VR, social media, and our society. There is a ...

    Jaron's life, AR/VR/MR, Silicon Valley, The 80s and 90s American tech scene, running a startup, what it means to be human, artificial intelligence, French spies, Japanese criminals and a dozen more themes make up the content of this narrative. Jaron constantly shifts from one topic to ...

    Dawn of the New Everything is a mash-up of part-Jaron Lanier memoir, part-history of VR and more specifically VPL, the first VR start-up. Immensely readable, even if you have no interest in the origins of or concepts underpinning VR, especially because Lanier comes across as an approac...

    I suspect this will be a fun read for some - it was at times a very intriguing auto-biography of Lanier, but I gave up on it about half way through (too repetitive among other reasons). A somewhat distorted summary of the first half of the book: - Lanier lost his mother at young age a...

    I was very looking forward to reading this book. I have not gotten too much into virtual reality but it is something that intrigues me. Therefore I was very interested in what Mr. Lanier had to say as one of the first to experience virtual reality. What I got was some history about...

    If you're a technologist who can't quite get behind Facebook and doesn't necessarily think AI is going to take over the world, but can't put your finger on exactly why (that's me!), this book may help. Dawn of the New Everything is a memoir about the way the internet didn't turn out. I...

    A comprehensive explanation of the evolution of virtual reality and its related technologies, there are a few dozen attempts to define what it is Lanier has developed and promoted most of his life. More surprising to find so much autobiographical details from childhood onwards. An unco...

  • Mehrsa
    Feb 25, 2018

    To many people, Jaron Lanier is the father of virtual reality. He coined the term in its contemporary usage though points to an older, literary use. Lanier is a credit-sharer, not a credit-grabber, so this memoir of his childhood, early work and years at VPL Research, Inc. is full of s...

    A review and interview to consider: http://www.economist.com/news/books-a... http://www.businessinsider.com/jaron-... ...

    I thoroughly enjoyed this read. Having already read Lanier's other two books You Are Not a Gadget and Who Owns the Future, I'm very familiar with his humanist views on technology and the questionable ethics of how technology is being implemented in our current age - But Lanier is also ...

    Excellent. Lanier's one of the smartest people on the planet, and he has one of the biggest hearts on the planet. He understands technology and the culture and history of Silicon Valley more fully than almost everyone in Silicon Valley yet his imagination and intellect breaks completel...

    Informative Read. Usually not my cup of tea - but I do believe if you are interested in Virtual Reality - then this is the book for you. ...

    Well, I learned a lot about VR (e.g., why we'll never have floating holograms, VR programming concerns like latency, and the pros and cons of various interfaces). Lanier has a pretty rosy perspective of how the tech will develop, and why our experience with VR will be much more creativ...

    I really don?t know how to review this book, it is so completely removed from the life I have lived. But I read every word of it, understood some of it, and learned a lot about the world as it is and where it is going. If, like me, you are a boomer who followed the hippie dream and p...

    Che cos?Ŕ la realtÓ? La risposta presuppone la conoscenza dei ?luoghi?, reali e virtuali, nei quali ogni giorno viviamo e che crediamo di conoscere abbastanza. Purtroppo, ahimŔ, alla fine, ci accorgiamo che quella che abbiamo vissuto, non Ŕ quella realtÓ che abbiamo pensato....

    Lanier's book is an autobiography that looks at his life and career, but as the father of VR it also is an explanation about how VR developed. It is a look at a fascinating individual and how his unique way of seeing the world informed the technology that he helped develop. "New Yo...

    If there's such a thing as a gentle, nuanced siren - an electric light show that knocks on your door wanting to sit down for tea - this is that book. Lanier uses both a soft light and a hard light to revisit his time in Silicon Valley pioneering virtual reality, and really walked me th...

    Solid four stars, though I do think I wavered in my rating of the book as I progressed through it. The beginning was kind of interesting, though it kind of slowed down a bit. I then enjoyed reading about the early days of Silicon Valley. I didn't really too much like the sections on VR...

    I think this is a book that will grow on me as I continue to digest the thoughts shared by Mr. Lanier. This book was not what I expected. It is partially autobiographical, partially historical, and partially about the future of technology, VR, social media, and our society. There is a ...

    Jaron's life, AR/VR/MR, Silicon Valley, The 80s and 90s American tech scene, running a startup, what it means to be human, artificial intelligence, French spies, Japanese criminals and a dozen more themes make up the content of this narrative. Jaron constantly shifts from one topic to ...

    Dawn of the New Everything is a mash-up of part-Jaron Lanier memoir, part-history of VR and more specifically VPL, the first VR start-up. Immensely readable, even if you have no interest in the origins of or concepts underpinning VR, especially because Lanier comes across as an approac...

    I suspect this will be a fun read for some - it was at times a very intriguing auto-biography of Lanier, but I gave up on it about half way through (too repetitive among other reasons). A somewhat distorted summary of the first half of the book: - Lanier lost his mother at young age a...

    I was very looking forward to reading this book. I have not gotten too much into virtual reality but it is something that intrigues me. Therefore I was very interested in what Mr. Lanier had to say as one of the first to experience virtual reality. What I got was some history about...

    If you're a technologist who can't quite get behind Facebook and doesn't necessarily think AI is going to take over the world, but can't put your finger on exactly why (that's me!), this book may help. Dawn of the New Everything is a memoir about the way the internet didn't turn out. I...

    A comprehensive explanation of the evolution of virtual reality and its related technologies, there are a few dozen attempts to define what it is Lanier has developed and promoted most of his life. More surprising to find so much autobiographical details from childhood onwards. An unco...

    The first half of the book is fine - a meandering walk down memory lane of VR and the early Technology revolution. But there?s a lot of self congratulation in here, and Appendix 2 is perhaps the worst piece of wannabe computer science I?ve come across. To argue that non-procedural ...

    Alternates between autobiography and the early days of VR and the tech scene, smattered with a lot of differing philosophical and contrarian thinking on the seemingly universally accepted ?utopian? values of tech these days. Some fun nostalgia flashbacks of 90s computer culture too...

    It?s hard to elicit any type of real summary of this book. Perhaps: a mixed concoction of science fiction and science reality, of the better angels and demons of pervasive technologies, and of meandering recollections of past events and how they inevitably lead up to the present. Wor...

    There are moments of wonderful insight in here, but way too few to justify a meandering memoir. I really enjoyed Lanier's interview on Ezra Klein's podcast and bought this book to hear more of that conversation, but the podcast was basically where all the good stuff was. It was fascina...

  • Cheryl
    Mar 13, 2018

    To many people, Jaron Lanier is the father of virtual reality. He coined the term in its contemporary usage though points to an older, literary use. Lanier is a credit-sharer, not a credit-grabber, so this memoir of his childhood, early work and years at VPL Research, Inc. is full of s...

    A review and interview to consider: http://www.economist.com/news/books-a... http://www.businessinsider.com/jaron-... ...

    I thoroughly enjoyed this read. Having already read Lanier's other two books You Are Not a Gadget and Who Owns the Future, I'm very familiar with his humanist views on technology and the questionable ethics of how technology is being implemented in our current age - But Lanier is also ...

    Excellent. Lanier's one of the smartest people on the planet, and he has one of the biggest hearts on the planet. He understands technology and the culture and history of Silicon Valley more fully than almost everyone in Silicon Valley yet his imagination and intellect breaks completel...

    Informative Read. Usually not my cup of tea - but I do believe if you are interested in Virtual Reality - then this is the book for you. ...

    Well, I learned a lot about VR (e.g., why we'll never have floating holograms, VR programming concerns like latency, and the pros and cons of various interfaces). Lanier has a pretty rosy perspective of how the tech will develop, and why our experience with VR will be much more creativ...

    I really don?t know how to review this book, it is so completely removed from the life I have lived. But I read every word of it, understood some of it, and learned a lot about the world as it is and where it is going. If, like me, you are a boomer who followed the hippie dream and p...

    Che cos?Ŕ la realtÓ? La risposta presuppone la conoscenza dei ?luoghi?, reali e virtuali, nei quali ogni giorno viviamo e che crediamo di conoscere abbastanza. Purtroppo, ahimŔ, alla fine, ci accorgiamo che quella che abbiamo vissuto, non Ŕ quella realtÓ che abbiamo pensato....

    Lanier's book is an autobiography that looks at his life and career, but as the father of VR it also is an explanation about how VR developed. It is a look at a fascinating individual and how his unique way of seeing the world informed the technology that he helped develop. "New Yo...

    If there's such a thing as a gentle, nuanced siren - an electric light show that knocks on your door wanting to sit down for tea - this is that book. Lanier uses both a soft light and a hard light to revisit his time in Silicon Valley pioneering virtual reality, and really walked me th...

    Solid four stars, though I do think I wavered in my rating of the book as I progressed through it. The beginning was kind of interesting, though it kind of slowed down a bit. I then enjoyed reading about the early days of Silicon Valley. I didn't really too much like the sections on VR...

    I think this is a book that will grow on me as I continue to digest the thoughts shared by Mr. Lanier. This book was not what I expected. It is partially autobiographical, partially historical, and partially about the future of technology, VR, social media, and our society. There is a ...

    Jaron's life, AR/VR/MR, Silicon Valley, The 80s and 90s American tech scene, running a startup, what it means to be human, artificial intelligence, French spies, Japanese criminals and a dozen more themes make up the content of this narrative. Jaron constantly shifts from one topic to ...

    Dawn of the New Everything is a mash-up of part-Jaron Lanier memoir, part-history of VR and more specifically VPL, the first VR start-up. Immensely readable, even if you have no interest in the origins of or concepts underpinning VR, especially because Lanier comes across as an approac...

    I suspect this will be a fun read for some - it was at times a very intriguing auto-biography of Lanier, but I gave up on it about half way through (too repetitive among other reasons). A somewhat distorted summary of the first half of the book: - Lanier lost his mother at young age a...

    I was very looking forward to reading this book. I have not gotten too much into virtual reality but it is something that intrigues me. Therefore I was very interested in what Mr. Lanier had to say as one of the first to experience virtual reality. What I got was some history about...

  • Antonio Gallo
    Nov 28, 2017

    To many people, Jaron Lanier is the father of virtual reality. He coined the term in its contemporary usage though points to an older, literary use. Lanier is a credit-sharer, not a credit-grabber, so this memoir of his childhood, early work and years at VPL Research, Inc. is full of s...

    A review and interview to consider: http://www.economist.com/news/books-a... http://www.businessinsider.com/jaron-... ...

    I thoroughly enjoyed this read. Having already read Lanier's other two books You Are Not a Gadget and Who Owns the Future, I'm very familiar with his humanist views on technology and the questionable ethics of how technology is being implemented in our current age - But Lanier is also ...

    Excellent. Lanier's one of the smartest people on the planet, and he has one of the biggest hearts on the planet. He understands technology and the culture and history of Silicon Valley more fully than almost everyone in Silicon Valley yet his imagination and intellect breaks completel...

    Informative Read. Usually not my cup of tea - but I do believe if you are interested in Virtual Reality - then this is the book for you. ...

    Well, I learned a lot about VR (e.g., why we'll never have floating holograms, VR programming concerns like latency, and the pros and cons of various interfaces). Lanier has a pretty rosy perspective of how the tech will develop, and why our experience with VR will be much more creativ...

    I really don?t know how to review this book, it is so completely removed from the life I have lived. But I read every word of it, understood some of it, and learned a lot about the world as it is and where it is going. If, like me, you are a boomer who followed the hippie dream and p...

    Che cos?Ŕ la realtÓ? La risposta presuppone la conoscenza dei ?luoghi?, reali e virtuali, nei quali ogni giorno viviamo e che crediamo di conoscere abbastanza. Purtroppo, ahimŔ, alla fine, ci accorgiamo che quella che abbiamo vissuto, non Ŕ quella realtÓ che abbiamo pensato....

  • Tonstant Weader
    Dec 12, 2017

    To many people, Jaron Lanier is the father of virtual reality. He coined the term in its contemporary usage though points to an older, literary use. Lanier is a credit-sharer, not a credit-grabber, so this memoir of his childhood, early work and years at VPL Research, Inc. is full of s...

  • Fraser Kinnear
    Feb 21, 2018

    To many people, Jaron Lanier is the father of virtual reality. He coined the term in its contemporary usage though points to an older, literary use. Lanier is a credit-sharer, not a credit-grabber, so this memoir of his childhood, early work and years at VPL Research, Inc. is full of s...

    A review and interview to consider: http://www.economist.com/news/books-a... http://www.businessinsider.com/jaron-... ...

    I thoroughly enjoyed this read. Having already read Lanier's other two books You Are Not a Gadget and Who Owns the Future, I'm very familiar with his humanist views on technology and the questionable ethics of how technology is being implemented in our current age - But Lanier is also ...

    Excellent. Lanier's one of the smartest people on the planet, and he has one of the biggest hearts on the planet. He understands technology and the culture and history of Silicon Valley more fully than almost everyone in Silicon Valley yet his imagination and intellect breaks completel...

    Informative Read. Usually not my cup of tea - but I do believe if you are interested in Virtual Reality - then this is the book for you. ...

    Well, I learned a lot about VR (e.g., why we'll never have floating holograms, VR programming concerns like latency, and the pros and cons of various interfaces). Lanier has a pretty rosy perspective of how the tech will develop, and why our experience with VR will be much more creativ...

  • Orsayor
    Jan 18, 2018

    To many people, Jaron Lanier is the father of virtual reality. He coined the term in its contemporary usage though points to an older, literary use. Lanier is a credit-sharer, not a credit-grabber, so this memoir of his childhood, early work and years at VPL Research, Inc. is full of s...

    A review and interview to consider: http://www.economist.com/news/books-a... http://www.businessinsider.com/jaron-... ...

    I thoroughly enjoyed this read. Having already read Lanier's other two books You Are Not a Gadget and Who Owns the Future, I'm very familiar with his humanist views on technology and the questionable ethics of how technology is being implemented in our current age - But Lanier is also ...

    Excellent. Lanier's one of the smartest people on the planet, and he has one of the biggest hearts on the planet. He understands technology and the culture and history of Silicon Valley more fully than almost everyone in Silicon Valley yet his imagination and intellect breaks completel...

    Informative Read. Usually not my cup of tea - but I do believe if you are interested in Virtual Reality - then this is the book for you. ...

  • Sean
    Apr 21, 2018

    To many people, Jaron Lanier is the father of virtual reality. He coined the term in its contemporary usage though points to an older, literary use. Lanier is a credit-sharer, not a credit-grabber, so this memoir of his childhood, early work and years at VPL Research, Inc. is full of s...

    A review and interview to consider: http://www.economist.com/news/books-a... http://www.businessinsider.com/jaron-... ...

    I thoroughly enjoyed this read. Having already read Lanier's other two books You Are Not a Gadget and Who Owns the Future, I'm very familiar with his humanist views on technology and the questionable ethics of how technology is being implemented in our current age - But Lanier is also ...

    Excellent. Lanier's one of the smartest people on the planet, and he has one of the biggest hearts on the planet. He understands technology and the culture and history of Silicon Valley more fully than almost everyone in Silicon Valley yet his imagination and intellect breaks completel...

  • Oliver Brackenbury
    Dec 05, 2017

    To many people, Jaron Lanier is the father of virtual reality. He coined the term in its contemporary usage though points to an older, literary use. Lanier is a credit-sharer, not a credit-grabber, so this memoir of his childhood, early work and years at VPL Research, Inc. is full of s...

    A review and interview to consider: http://www.economist.com/news/books-a... http://www.businessinsider.com/jaron-... ...

    I thoroughly enjoyed this read. Having already read Lanier's other two books You Are Not a Gadget and Who Owns the Future, I'm very familiar with his humanist views on technology and the questionable ethics of how technology is being implemented in our current age - But Lanier is also ...

    Excellent. Lanier's one of the smartest people on the planet, and he has one of the biggest hearts on the planet. He understands technology and the culture and history of Silicon Valley more fully than almost everyone in Silicon Valley yet his imagination and intellect breaks completel...

    Informative Read. Usually not my cup of tea - but I do believe if you are interested in Virtual Reality - then this is the book for you. ...

    Well, I learned a lot about VR (e.g., why we'll never have floating holograms, VR programming concerns like latency, and the pros and cons of various interfaces). Lanier has a pretty rosy perspective of how the tech will develop, and why our experience with VR will be much more creativ...

    I really don?t know how to review this book, it is so completely removed from the life I have lived. But I read every word of it, understood some of it, and learned a lot about the world as it is and where it is going. If, like me, you are a boomer who followed the hippie dream and p...

    Che cos?Ŕ la realtÓ? La risposta presuppone la conoscenza dei ?luoghi?, reali e virtuali, nei quali ogni giorno viviamo e che crediamo di conoscere abbastanza. Purtroppo, ahimŔ, alla fine, ci accorgiamo che quella che abbiamo vissuto, non Ŕ quella realtÓ che abbiamo pensato....

    Lanier's book is an autobiography that looks at his life and career, but as the father of VR it also is an explanation about how VR developed. It is a look at a fascinating individual and how his unique way of seeing the world informed the technology that he helped develop. "New Yo...

    If there's such a thing as a gentle, nuanced siren - an electric light show that knocks on your door wanting to sit down for tea - this is that book. Lanier uses both a soft light and a hard light to revisit his time in Silicon Valley pioneering virtual reality, and really walked me th...

    Solid four stars, though I do think I wavered in my rating of the book as I progressed through it. The beginning was kind of interesting, though it kind of slowed down a bit. I then enjoyed reading about the early days of Silicon Valley. I didn't really too much like the sections on VR...

    I think this is a book that will grow on me as I continue to digest the thoughts shared by Mr. Lanier. This book was not what I expected. It is partially autobiographical, partially historical, and partially about the future of technology, VR, social media, and our society. There is a ...

    Jaron's life, AR/VR/MR, Silicon Valley, The 80s and 90s American tech scene, running a startup, what it means to be human, artificial intelligence, French spies, Japanese criminals and a dozen more themes make up the content of this narrative. Jaron constantly shifts from one topic to ...

    Dawn of the New Everything is a mash-up of part-Jaron Lanier memoir, part-history of VR and more specifically VPL, the first VR start-up. Immensely readable, even if you have no interest in the origins of or concepts underpinning VR, especially because Lanier comes across as an approac...

    I suspect this will be a fun read for some - it was at times a very intriguing auto-biography of Lanier, but I gave up on it about half way through (too repetitive among other reasons). A somewhat distorted summary of the first half of the book: - Lanier lost his mother at young age a...

    I was very looking forward to reading this book. I have not gotten too much into virtual reality but it is something that intrigues me. Therefore I was very interested in what Mr. Lanier had to say as one of the first to experience virtual reality. What I got was some history about...

    If you're a technologist who can't quite get behind Facebook and doesn't necessarily think AI is going to take over the world, but can't put your finger on exactly why (that's me!), this book may help. Dawn of the New Everything is a memoir about the way the internet didn't turn out. I...

    A comprehensive explanation of the evolution of virtual reality and its related technologies, there are a few dozen attempts to define what it is Lanier has developed and promoted most of his life. More surprising to find so much autobiographical details from childhood onwards. An unco...

    The first half of the book is fine - a meandering walk down memory lane of VR and the early Technology revolution. But there?s a lot of self congratulation in here, and Appendix 2 is perhaps the worst piece of wannabe computer science I?ve come across. To argue that non-procedural ...

    Alternates between autobiography and the early days of VR and the tech scene, smattered with a lot of differing philosophical and contrarian thinking on the seemingly universally accepted ?utopian? values of tech these days. Some fun nostalgia flashbacks of 90s computer culture too...

    It?s hard to elicit any type of real summary of this book. Perhaps: a mixed concoction of science fiction and science reality, of the better angels and demons of pervasive technologies, and of meandering recollections of past events and how they inevitably lead up to the present. Wor...

    There are moments of wonderful insight in here, but way too few to justify a meandering memoir. I really enjoyed Lanier's interview on Ezra Klein's podcast and bought this book to hear more of that conversation, but the podcast was basically where all the good stuff was. It was fascina...

    Enjoyable book, but not my favorite from Jaron. His personal memoirs of the early VR scene in Silicon Valley are exciting, and full of memorable anecdotes. But there weren't too many points where I felt the book was awesomely mind-expanding, like I did with his previous ones. "You Are ...

    An interesting history, and cause for re-assessment, of a technology I think a lot of people still dismiss as some clunky fad from the late 80's and early 90's. Mix in Lanier's powerful humanism and interesting ideas for how to re-assess a whole lot more than VR and you have a pretty d...

  • Marcus
    Mar 03, 2018

    To many people, Jaron Lanier is the father of virtual reality. He coined the term in its contemporary usage though points to an older, literary use. Lanier is a credit-sharer, not a credit-grabber, so this memoir of his childhood, early work and years at VPL Research, Inc. is full of s...

    A review and interview to consider: http://www.economist.com/news/books-a... http://www.businessinsider.com/jaron-... ...

    I thoroughly enjoyed this read. Having already read Lanier's other two books You Are Not a Gadget and Who Owns the Future, I'm very familiar with his humanist views on technology and the questionable ethics of how technology is being implemented in our current age - But Lanier is also ...

    Excellent. Lanier's one of the smartest people on the planet, and he has one of the biggest hearts on the planet. He understands technology and the culture and history of Silicon Valley more fully than almost everyone in Silicon Valley yet his imagination and intellect breaks completel...

    Informative Read. Usually not my cup of tea - but I do believe if you are interested in Virtual Reality - then this is the book for you. ...

    Well, I learned a lot about VR (e.g., why we'll never have floating holograms, VR programming concerns like latency, and the pros and cons of various interfaces). Lanier has a pretty rosy perspective of how the tech will develop, and why our experience with VR will be much more creativ...

    I really don?t know how to review this book, it is so completely removed from the life I have lived. But I read every word of it, understood some of it, and learned a lot about the world as it is and where it is going. If, like me, you are a boomer who followed the hippie dream and p...

    Che cos?Ŕ la realtÓ? La risposta presuppone la conoscenza dei ?luoghi?, reali e virtuali, nei quali ogni giorno viviamo e che crediamo di conoscere abbastanza. Purtroppo, ahimŔ, alla fine, ci accorgiamo che quella che abbiamo vissuto, non Ŕ quella realtÓ che abbiamo pensato....

    Lanier's book is an autobiography that looks at his life and career, but as the father of VR it also is an explanation about how VR developed. It is a look at a fascinating individual and how his unique way of seeing the world informed the technology that he helped develop. "New Yo...

    If there's such a thing as a gentle, nuanced siren - an electric light show that knocks on your door wanting to sit down for tea - this is that book. Lanier uses both a soft light and a hard light to revisit his time in Silicon Valley pioneering virtual reality, and really walked me th...

    Solid four stars, though I do think I wavered in my rating of the book as I progressed through it. The beginning was kind of interesting, though it kind of slowed down a bit. I then enjoyed reading about the early days of Silicon Valley. I didn't really too much like the sections on VR...

    I think this is a book that will grow on me as I continue to digest the thoughts shared by Mr. Lanier. This book was not what I expected. It is partially autobiographical, partially historical, and partially about the future of technology, VR, social media, and our society. There is a ...

    Jaron's life, AR/VR/MR, Silicon Valley, The 80s and 90s American tech scene, running a startup, what it means to be human, artificial intelligence, French spies, Japanese criminals and a dozen more themes make up the content of this narrative. Jaron constantly shifts from one topic to ...

    Dawn of the New Everything is a mash-up of part-Jaron Lanier memoir, part-history of VR and more specifically VPL, the first VR start-up. Immensely readable, even if you have no interest in the origins of or concepts underpinning VR, especially because Lanier comes across as an approac...

    I suspect this will be a fun read for some - it was at times a very intriguing auto-biography of Lanier, but I gave up on it about half way through (too repetitive among other reasons). A somewhat distorted summary of the first half of the book: - Lanier lost his mother at young age a...

    I was very looking forward to reading this book. I have not gotten too much into virtual reality but it is something that intrigues me. Therefore I was very interested in what Mr. Lanier had to say as one of the first to experience virtual reality. What I got was some history about...

    If you're a technologist who can't quite get behind Facebook and doesn't necessarily think AI is going to take over the world, but can't put your finger on exactly why (that's me!), this book may help. Dawn of the New Everything is a memoir about the way the internet didn't turn out. I...

    A comprehensive explanation of the evolution of virtual reality and its related technologies, there are a few dozen attempts to define what it is Lanier has developed and promoted most of his life. More surprising to find so much autobiographical details from childhood onwards. An unco...

    The first half of the book is fine - a meandering walk down memory lane of VR and the early Technology revolution. But there?s a lot of self congratulation in here, and Appendix 2 is perhaps the worst piece of wannabe computer science I?ve come across. To argue that non-procedural ...

    Alternates between autobiography and the early days of VR and the tech scene, smattered with a lot of differing philosophical and contrarian thinking on the seemingly universally accepted ?utopian? values of tech these days. Some fun nostalgia flashbacks of 90s computer culture too...

    It?s hard to elicit any type of real summary of this book. Perhaps: a mixed concoction of science fiction and science reality, of the better angels and demons of pervasive technologies, and of meandering recollections of past events and how they inevitably lead up to the present. Wor...

    There are moments of wonderful insight in here, but way too few to justify a meandering memoir. I really enjoyed Lanier's interview on Ezra Klein's podcast and bought this book to hear more of that conversation, but the podcast was basically where all the good stuff was. It was fascina...

    Enjoyable book, but not my favorite from Jaron. His personal memoirs of the early VR scene in Silicon Valley are exciting, and full of memorable anecdotes. But there weren't too many points where I felt the book was awesomely mind-expanding, like I did with his previous ones. "You Are ...

    An interesting history, and cause for re-assessment, of a technology I think a lot of people still dismiss as some clunky fad from the late 80's and early 90's. Mix in Lanier's powerful humanism and interesting ideas for how to re-assess a whole lot more than VR and you have a pretty d...

    Insightful and entertaining This book goes into the origins of virtual reality technology by one of the people who helped usher it along. It?s not a historical piece in that it?s comprehensive, more just observations. The techie bits are just as interesting as the personal expe...

  • Conrad
    Feb 24, 2018

    To many people, Jaron Lanier is the father of virtual reality. He coined the term in its contemporary usage though points to an older, literary use. Lanier is a credit-sharer, not a credit-grabber, so this memoir of his childhood, early work and years at VPL Research, Inc. is full of s...

    A review and interview to consider: http://www.economist.com/news/books-a... http://www.businessinsider.com/jaron-... ...

    I thoroughly enjoyed this read. Having already read Lanier's other two books You Are Not a Gadget and Who Owns the Future, I'm very familiar with his humanist views on technology and the questionable ethics of how technology is being implemented in our current age - But Lanier is also ...

    Excellent. Lanier's one of the smartest people on the planet, and he has one of the biggest hearts on the planet. He understands technology and the culture and history of Silicon Valley more fully than almost everyone in Silicon Valley yet his imagination and intellect breaks completel...

    Informative Read. Usually not my cup of tea - but I do believe if you are interested in Virtual Reality - then this is the book for you. ...

    Well, I learned a lot about VR (e.g., why we'll never have floating holograms, VR programming concerns like latency, and the pros and cons of various interfaces). Lanier has a pretty rosy perspective of how the tech will develop, and why our experience with VR will be much more creativ...

    I really don?t know how to review this book, it is so completely removed from the life I have lived. But I read every word of it, understood some of it, and learned a lot about the world as it is and where it is going. If, like me, you are a boomer who followed the hippie dream and p...

    Che cos?Ŕ la realtÓ? La risposta presuppone la conoscenza dei ?luoghi?, reali e virtuali, nei quali ogni giorno viviamo e che crediamo di conoscere abbastanza. Purtroppo, ahimŔ, alla fine, ci accorgiamo che quella che abbiamo vissuto, non Ŕ quella realtÓ che abbiamo pensato....

    Lanier's book is an autobiography that looks at his life and career, but as the father of VR it also is an explanation about how VR developed. It is a look at a fascinating individual and how his unique way of seeing the world informed the technology that he helped develop. "New Yo...

    If there's such a thing as a gentle, nuanced siren - an electric light show that knocks on your door wanting to sit down for tea - this is that book. Lanier uses both a soft light and a hard light to revisit his time in Silicon Valley pioneering virtual reality, and really walked me th...

    Solid four stars, though I do think I wavered in my rating of the book as I progressed through it. The beginning was kind of interesting, though it kind of slowed down a bit. I then enjoyed reading about the early days of Silicon Valley. I didn't really too much like the sections on VR...

  • Terry
    Jan 23, 2018

    To many people, Jaron Lanier is the father of virtual reality. He coined the term in its contemporary usage though points to an older, literary use. Lanier is a credit-sharer, not a credit-grabber, so this memoir of his childhood, early work and years at VPL Research, Inc. is full of s...

    A review and interview to consider: http://www.economist.com/news/books-a... http://www.businessinsider.com/jaron-... ...

    I thoroughly enjoyed this read. Having already read Lanier's other two books You Are Not a Gadget and Who Owns the Future, I'm very familiar with his humanist views on technology and the questionable ethics of how technology is being implemented in our current age - But Lanier is also ...

    Excellent. Lanier's one of the smartest people on the planet, and he has one of the biggest hearts on the planet. He understands technology and the culture and history of Silicon Valley more fully than almost everyone in Silicon Valley yet his imagination and intellect breaks completel...

    Informative Read. Usually not my cup of tea - but I do believe if you are interested in Virtual Reality - then this is the book for you. ...

    Well, I learned a lot about VR (e.g., why we'll never have floating holograms, VR programming concerns like latency, and the pros and cons of various interfaces). Lanier has a pretty rosy perspective of how the tech will develop, and why our experience with VR will be much more creativ...

    I really don?t know how to review this book, it is so completely removed from the life I have lived. But I read every word of it, understood some of it, and learned a lot about the world as it is and where it is going. If, like me, you are a boomer who followed the hippie dream and p...

    Che cos?Ŕ la realtÓ? La risposta presuppone la conoscenza dei ?luoghi?, reali e virtuali, nei quali ogni giorno viviamo e che crediamo di conoscere abbastanza. Purtroppo, ahimŔ, alla fine, ci accorgiamo che quella che abbiamo vissuto, non Ŕ quella realtÓ che abbiamo pensato....

    Lanier's book is an autobiography that looks at his life and career, but as the father of VR it also is an explanation about how VR developed. It is a look at a fascinating individual and how his unique way of seeing the world informed the technology that he helped develop. "New Yo...

    If there's such a thing as a gentle, nuanced siren - an electric light show that knocks on your door wanting to sit down for tea - this is that book. Lanier uses both a soft light and a hard light to revisit his time in Silicon Valley pioneering virtual reality, and really walked me th...

    Solid four stars, though I do think I wavered in my rating of the book as I progressed through it. The beginning was kind of interesting, though it kind of slowed down a bit. I then enjoyed reading about the early days of Silicon Valley. I didn't really too much like the sections on VR...

    I think this is a book that will grow on me as I continue to digest the thoughts shared by Mr. Lanier. This book was not what I expected. It is partially autobiographical, partially historical, and partially about the future of technology, VR, social media, and our society. There is a ...

    Jaron's life, AR/VR/MR, Silicon Valley, The 80s and 90s American tech scene, running a startup, what it means to be human, artificial intelligence, French spies, Japanese criminals and a dozen more themes make up the content of this narrative. Jaron constantly shifts from one topic to ...

    Dawn of the New Everything is a mash-up of part-Jaron Lanier memoir, part-history of VR and more specifically VPL, the first VR start-up. Immensely readable, even if you have no interest in the origins of or concepts underpinning VR, especially because Lanier comes across as an approac...

    I suspect this will be a fun read for some - it was at times a very intriguing auto-biography of Lanier, but I gave up on it about half way through (too repetitive among other reasons). A somewhat distorted summary of the first half of the book: - Lanier lost his mother at young age a...

  • Dhruv
    May 13, 2018

    To many people, Jaron Lanier is the father of virtual reality. He coined the term in its contemporary usage though points to an older, literary use. Lanier is a credit-sharer, not a credit-grabber, so this memoir of his childhood, early work and years at VPL Research, Inc. is full of s...

    A review and interview to consider: http://www.economist.com/news/books-a... http://www.businessinsider.com/jaron-... ...

    I thoroughly enjoyed this read. Having already read Lanier's other two books You Are Not a Gadget and Who Owns the Future, I'm very familiar with his humanist views on technology and the questionable ethics of how technology is being implemented in our current age - But Lanier is also ...

    Excellent. Lanier's one of the smartest people on the planet, and he has one of the biggest hearts on the planet. He understands technology and the culture and history of Silicon Valley more fully than almost everyone in Silicon Valley yet his imagination and intellect breaks completel...

    Informative Read. Usually not my cup of tea - but I do believe if you are interested in Virtual Reality - then this is the book for you. ...

    Well, I learned a lot about VR (e.g., why we'll never have floating holograms, VR programming concerns like latency, and the pros and cons of various interfaces). Lanier has a pretty rosy perspective of how the tech will develop, and why our experience with VR will be much more creativ...

    I really don?t know how to review this book, it is so completely removed from the life I have lived. But I read every word of it, understood some of it, and learned a lot about the world as it is and where it is going. If, like me, you are a boomer who followed the hippie dream and p...

    Che cos?Ŕ la realtÓ? La risposta presuppone la conoscenza dei ?luoghi?, reali e virtuali, nei quali ogni giorno viviamo e che crediamo di conoscere abbastanza. Purtroppo, ahimŔ, alla fine, ci accorgiamo che quella che abbiamo vissuto, non Ŕ quella realtÓ che abbiamo pensato....

    Lanier's book is an autobiography that looks at his life and career, but as the father of VR it also is an explanation about how VR developed. It is a look at a fascinating individual and how his unique way of seeing the world informed the technology that he helped develop. "New Yo...

    If there's such a thing as a gentle, nuanced siren - an electric light show that knocks on your door wanting to sit down for tea - this is that book. Lanier uses both a soft light and a hard light to revisit his time in Silicon Valley pioneering virtual reality, and really walked me th...

    Solid four stars, though I do think I wavered in my rating of the book as I progressed through it. The beginning was kind of interesting, though it kind of slowed down a bit. I then enjoyed reading about the early days of Silicon Valley. I didn't really too much like the sections on VR...

    I think this is a book that will grow on me as I continue to digest the thoughts shared by Mr. Lanier. This book was not what I expected. It is partially autobiographical, partially historical, and partially about the future of technology, VR, social media, and our society. There is a ...

    Jaron's life, AR/VR/MR, Silicon Valley, The 80s and 90s American tech scene, running a startup, what it means to be human, artificial intelligence, French spies, Japanese criminals and a dozen more themes make up the content of this narrative. Jaron constantly shifts from one topic to ...

  • Adam Vaughn
    Apr 10, 2018

    To many people, Jaron Lanier is the father of virtual reality. He coined the term in its contemporary usage though points to an older, literary use. Lanier is a credit-sharer, not a credit-grabber, so this memoir of his childhood, early work and years at VPL Research, Inc. is full of s...

    A review and interview to consider: http://www.economist.com/news/books-a... http://www.businessinsider.com/jaron-... ...

    I thoroughly enjoyed this read. Having already read Lanier's other two books You Are Not a Gadget and Who Owns the Future, I'm very familiar with his humanist views on technology and the questionable ethics of how technology is being implemented in our current age - But Lanier is also ...

    Excellent. Lanier's one of the smartest people on the planet, and he has one of the biggest hearts on the planet. He understands technology and the culture and history of Silicon Valley more fully than almost everyone in Silicon Valley yet his imagination and intellect breaks completel...

    Informative Read. Usually not my cup of tea - but I do believe if you are interested in Virtual Reality - then this is the book for you. ...

    Well, I learned a lot about VR (e.g., why we'll never have floating holograms, VR programming concerns like latency, and the pros and cons of various interfaces). Lanier has a pretty rosy perspective of how the tech will develop, and why our experience with VR will be much more creativ...

    I really don?t know how to review this book, it is so completely removed from the life I have lived. But I read every word of it, understood some of it, and learned a lot about the world as it is and where it is going. If, like me, you are a boomer who followed the hippie dream and p...

    Che cos?Ŕ la realtÓ? La risposta presuppone la conoscenza dei ?luoghi?, reali e virtuali, nei quali ogni giorno viviamo e che crediamo di conoscere abbastanza. Purtroppo, ahimŔ, alla fine, ci accorgiamo che quella che abbiamo vissuto, non Ŕ quella realtÓ che abbiamo pensato....

    Lanier's book is an autobiography that looks at his life and career, but as the father of VR it also is an explanation about how VR developed. It is a look at a fascinating individual and how his unique way of seeing the world informed the technology that he helped develop. "New Yo...

    If there's such a thing as a gentle, nuanced siren - an electric light show that knocks on your door wanting to sit down for tea - this is that book. Lanier uses both a soft light and a hard light to revisit his time in Silicon Valley pioneering virtual reality, and really walked me th...

    Solid four stars, though I do think I wavered in my rating of the book as I progressed through it. The beginning was kind of interesting, though it kind of slowed down a bit. I then enjoyed reading about the early days of Silicon Valley. I didn't really too much like the sections on VR...

    I think this is a book that will grow on me as I continue to digest the thoughts shared by Mr. Lanier. This book was not what I expected. It is partially autobiographical, partially historical, and partially about the future of technology, VR, social media, and our society. There is a ...

  • Stacey
    Mar 14, 2018

    To many people, Jaron Lanier is the father of virtual reality. He coined the term in its contemporary usage though points to an older, literary use. Lanier is a credit-sharer, not a credit-grabber, so this memoir of his childhood, early work and years at VPL Research, Inc. is full of s...

    A review and interview to consider: http://www.economist.com/news/books-a... http://www.businessinsider.com/jaron-... ...

    I thoroughly enjoyed this read. Having already read Lanier's other two books You Are Not a Gadget and Who Owns the Future, I'm very familiar with his humanist views on technology and the questionable ethics of how technology is being implemented in our current age - But Lanier is also ...

    Excellent. Lanier's one of the smartest people on the planet, and he has one of the biggest hearts on the planet. He understands technology and the culture and history of Silicon Valley more fully than almost everyone in Silicon Valley yet his imagination and intellect breaks completel...

    Informative Read. Usually not my cup of tea - but I do believe if you are interested in Virtual Reality - then this is the book for you. ...

    Well, I learned a lot about VR (e.g., why we'll never have floating holograms, VR programming concerns like latency, and the pros and cons of various interfaces). Lanier has a pretty rosy perspective of how the tech will develop, and why our experience with VR will be much more creativ...

    I really don?t know how to review this book, it is so completely removed from the life I have lived. But I read every word of it, understood some of it, and learned a lot about the world as it is and where it is going. If, like me, you are a boomer who followed the hippie dream and p...

    Che cos?Ŕ la realtÓ? La risposta presuppone la conoscenza dei ?luoghi?, reali e virtuali, nei quali ogni giorno viviamo e che crediamo di conoscere abbastanza. Purtroppo, ahimŔ, alla fine, ci accorgiamo che quella che abbiamo vissuto, non Ŕ quella realtÓ che abbiamo pensato....

    Lanier's book is an autobiography that looks at his life and career, but as the father of VR it also is an explanation about how VR developed. It is a look at a fascinating individual and how his unique way of seeing the world informed the technology that he helped develop. "New Yo...

    If there's such a thing as a gentle, nuanced siren - an electric light show that knocks on your door wanting to sit down for tea - this is that book. Lanier uses both a soft light and a hard light to revisit his time in Silicon Valley pioneering virtual reality, and really walked me th...

    Solid four stars, though I do think I wavered in my rating of the book as I progressed through it. The beginning was kind of interesting, though it kind of slowed down a bit. I then enjoyed reading about the early days of Silicon Valley. I didn't really too much like the sections on VR...

    I think this is a book that will grow on me as I continue to digest the thoughts shared by Mr. Lanier. This book was not what I expected. It is partially autobiographical, partially historical, and partially about the future of technology, VR, social media, and our society. There is a ...

    Jaron's life, AR/VR/MR, Silicon Valley, The 80s and 90s American tech scene, running a startup, what it means to be human, artificial intelligence, French spies, Japanese criminals and a dozen more themes make up the content of this narrative. Jaron constantly shifts from one topic to ...

    Dawn of the New Everything is a mash-up of part-Jaron Lanier memoir, part-history of VR and more specifically VPL, the first VR start-up. Immensely readable, even if you have no interest in the origins of or concepts underpinning VR, especially because Lanier comes across as an approac...

    I suspect this will be a fun read for some - it was at times a very intriguing auto-biography of Lanier, but I gave up on it about half way through (too repetitive among other reasons). A somewhat distorted summary of the first half of the book: - Lanier lost his mother at young age a...

    I was very looking forward to reading this book. I have not gotten too much into virtual reality but it is something that intrigues me. Therefore I was very interested in what Mr. Lanier had to say as one of the first to experience virtual reality. What I got was some history about...

    If you're a technologist who can't quite get behind Facebook and doesn't necessarily think AI is going to take over the world, but can't put your finger on exactly why (that's me!), this book may help. Dawn of the New Everything is a memoir about the way the internet didn't turn out. I...

    A comprehensive explanation of the evolution of virtual reality and its related technologies, there are a few dozen attempts to define what it is Lanier has developed and promoted most of his life. More surprising to find so much autobiographical details from childhood onwards. An unco...

    The first half of the book is fine - a meandering walk down memory lane of VR and the early Technology revolution. But there?s a lot of self congratulation in here, and Appendix 2 is perhaps the worst piece of wannabe computer science I?ve come across. To argue that non-procedural ...

    Alternates between autobiography and the early days of VR and the tech scene, smattered with a lot of differing philosophical and contrarian thinking on the seemingly universally accepted ?utopian? values of tech these days. Some fun nostalgia flashbacks of 90s computer culture too...

    It?s hard to elicit any type of real summary of this book. Perhaps: a mixed concoction of science fiction and science reality, of the better angels and demons of pervasive technologies, and of meandering recollections of past events and how they inevitably lead up to the present. Wor...

    There are moments of wonderful insight in here, but way too few to justify a meandering memoir. I really enjoyed Lanier's interview on Ezra Klein's podcast and bought this book to hear more of that conversation, but the podcast was basically where all the good stuff was. It was fascina...

    Enjoyable book, but not my favorite from Jaron. His personal memoirs of the early VR scene in Silicon Valley are exciting, and full of memorable anecdotes. But there weren't too many points where I felt the book was awesomely mind-expanding, like I did with his previous ones. "You Are ...

    An interesting history, and cause for re-assessment, of a technology I think a lot of people still dismiss as some clunky fad from the late 80's and early 90's. Mix in Lanier's powerful humanism and interesting ideas for how to re-assess a whole lot more than VR and you have a pretty d...

    Insightful and entertaining This book goes into the origins of virtual reality technology by one of the people who helped usher it along. It?s not a historical piece in that it?s comprehensive, more just observations. The techie bits are just as interesting as the personal expe...

    Lanier is still a sane and humane voice of reason in an increasingly giddy tech world distanced from and disinterested in embodied, subjective reality. "Most technology reinforces the feeling that reality is just a sea of gadgets... VR is the technology that instead highlights the exis...

    Jaron opens saying his books has two parts: his personal story and a second one about VR. In reality (if you excuse my pun) VR is discussed in the last few chapters and appendixes 1 and 3. It?s mostly a loosely narrated autobiography everywhere else. I didn?t mind it that much,...

    Refreshing views on VR, AI, humanity, philosophy, and our future (phenotropic computing??), expressed in a playful style and interspersed with most excellent anecdotes about the iconic personalities of the 60s. Really enjoyed! ...

  • Phil Oliver
    Dec 26, 2017

    To many people, Jaron Lanier is the father of virtual reality. He coined the term in its contemporary usage though points to an older, literary use. Lanier is a credit-sharer, not a credit-grabber, so this memoir of his childhood, early work and years at VPL Research, Inc. is full of s...

    A review and interview to consider: http://www.economist.com/news/books-a... http://www.businessinsider.com/jaron-... ...

    I thoroughly enjoyed this read. Having already read Lanier's other two books You Are Not a Gadget and Who Owns the Future, I'm very familiar with his humanist views on technology and the questionable ethics of how technology is being implemented in our current age - But Lanier is also ...

    Excellent. Lanier's one of the smartest people on the planet, and he has one of the biggest hearts on the planet. He understands technology and the culture and history of Silicon Valley more fully than almost everyone in Silicon Valley yet his imagination and intellect breaks completel...

    Informative Read. Usually not my cup of tea - but I do believe if you are interested in Virtual Reality - then this is the book for you. ...

    Well, I learned a lot about VR (e.g., why we'll never have floating holograms, VR programming concerns like latency, and the pros and cons of various interfaces). Lanier has a pretty rosy perspective of how the tech will develop, and why our experience with VR will be much more creativ...

    I really don?t know how to review this book, it is so completely removed from the life I have lived. But I read every word of it, understood some of it, and learned a lot about the world as it is and where it is going. If, like me, you are a boomer who followed the hippie dream and p...

    Che cos?Ŕ la realtÓ? La risposta presuppone la conoscenza dei ?luoghi?, reali e virtuali, nei quali ogni giorno viviamo e che crediamo di conoscere abbastanza. Purtroppo, ahimŔ, alla fine, ci accorgiamo che quella che abbiamo vissuto, non Ŕ quella realtÓ che abbiamo pensato....

    Lanier's book is an autobiography that looks at his life and career, but as the father of VR it also is an explanation about how VR developed. It is a look at a fascinating individual and how his unique way of seeing the world informed the technology that he helped develop. "New Yo...

    If there's such a thing as a gentle, nuanced siren - an electric light show that knocks on your door wanting to sit down for tea - this is that book. Lanier uses both a soft light and a hard light to revisit his time in Silicon Valley pioneering virtual reality, and really walked me th...

    Solid four stars, though I do think I wavered in my rating of the book as I progressed through it. The beginning was kind of interesting, though it kind of slowed down a bit. I then enjoyed reading about the early days of Silicon Valley. I didn't really too much like the sections on VR...

    I think this is a book that will grow on me as I continue to digest the thoughts shared by Mr. Lanier. This book was not what I expected. It is partially autobiographical, partially historical, and partially about the future of technology, VR, social media, and our society. There is a ...

    Jaron's life, AR/VR/MR, Silicon Valley, The 80s and 90s American tech scene, running a startup, what it means to be human, artificial intelligence, French spies, Japanese criminals and a dozen more themes make up the content of this narrative. Jaron constantly shifts from one topic to ...

    Dawn of the New Everything is a mash-up of part-Jaron Lanier memoir, part-history of VR and more specifically VPL, the first VR start-up. Immensely readable, even if you have no interest in the origins of or concepts underpinning VR, especially because Lanier comes across as an approac...

    I suspect this will be a fun read for some - it was at times a very intriguing auto-biography of Lanier, but I gave up on it about half way through (too repetitive among other reasons). A somewhat distorted summary of the first half of the book: - Lanier lost his mother at young age a...

    I was very looking forward to reading this book. I have not gotten too much into virtual reality but it is something that intrigues me. Therefore I was very interested in what Mr. Lanier had to say as one of the first to experience virtual reality. What I got was some history about...

    If you're a technologist who can't quite get behind Facebook and doesn't necessarily think AI is going to take over the world, but can't put your finger on exactly why (that's me!), this book may help. Dawn of the New Everything is a memoir about the way the internet didn't turn out. I...

    A comprehensive explanation of the evolution of virtual reality and its related technologies, there are a few dozen attempts to define what it is Lanier has developed and promoted most of his life. More surprising to find so much autobiographical details from childhood onwards. An unco...

    The first half of the book is fine - a meandering walk down memory lane of VR and the early Technology revolution. But there?s a lot of self congratulation in here, and Appendix 2 is perhaps the worst piece of wannabe computer science I?ve come across. To argue that non-procedural ...

    Alternates between autobiography and the early days of VR and the tech scene, smattered with a lot of differing philosophical and contrarian thinking on the seemingly universally accepted ?utopian? values of tech these days. Some fun nostalgia flashbacks of 90s computer culture too...

    It?s hard to elicit any type of real summary of this book. Perhaps: a mixed concoction of science fiction and science reality, of the better angels and demons of pervasive technologies, and of meandering recollections of past events and how they inevitably lead up to the present. Wor...

    There are moments of wonderful insight in here, but way too few to justify a meandering memoir. I really enjoyed Lanier's interview on Ezra Klein's podcast and bought this book to hear more of that conversation, but the podcast was basically where all the good stuff was. It was fascina...

    Enjoyable book, but not my favorite from Jaron. His personal memoirs of the early VR scene in Silicon Valley are exciting, and full of memorable anecdotes. But there weren't too many points where I felt the book was awesomely mind-expanding, like I did with his previous ones. "You Are ...

    An interesting history, and cause for re-assessment, of a technology I think a lot of people still dismiss as some clunky fad from the late 80's and early 90's. Mix in Lanier's powerful humanism and interesting ideas for how to re-assess a whole lot more than VR and you have a pretty d...

    Insightful and entertaining This book goes into the origins of virtual reality technology by one of the people who helped usher it along. It?s not a historical piece in that it?s comprehensive, more just observations. The techie bits are just as interesting as the personal expe...

    Lanier is still a sane and humane voice of reason in an increasingly giddy tech world distanced from and disinterested in embodied, subjective reality. "Most technology reinforces the feeling that reality is just a sea of gadgets... VR is the technology that instead highlights the exis...

  • Patrick Pilz
    Jan 16, 2018

    To many people, Jaron Lanier is the father of virtual reality. He coined the term in its contemporary usage though points to an older, literary use. Lanier is a credit-sharer, not a credit-grabber, so this memoir of his childhood, early work and years at VPL Research, Inc. is full of s...

    A review and interview to consider: http://www.economist.com/news/books-a... http://www.businessinsider.com/jaron-... ...

    I thoroughly enjoyed this read. Having already read Lanier's other two books You Are Not a Gadget and Who Owns the Future, I'm very familiar with his humanist views on technology and the questionable ethics of how technology is being implemented in our current age - But Lanier is also ...

    Excellent. Lanier's one of the smartest people on the planet, and he has one of the biggest hearts on the planet. He understands technology and the culture and history of Silicon Valley more fully than almost everyone in Silicon Valley yet his imagination and intellect breaks completel...

    Informative Read. Usually not my cup of tea - but I do believe if you are interested in Virtual Reality - then this is the book for you. ...

    Well, I learned a lot about VR (e.g., why we'll never have floating holograms, VR programming concerns like latency, and the pros and cons of various interfaces). Lanier has a pretty rosy perspective of how the tech will develop, and why our experience with VR will be much more creativ...

    I really don?t know how to review this book, it is so completely removed from the life I have lived. But I read every word of it, understood some of it, and learned a lot about the world as it is and where it is going. If, like me, you are a boomer who followed the hippie dream and p...

    Che cos?Ŕ la realtÓ? La risposta presuppone la conoscenza dei ?luoghi?, reali e virtuali, nei quali ogni giorno viviamo e che crediamo di conoscere abbastanza. Purtroppo, ahimŔ, alla fine, ci accorgiamo che quella che abbiamo vissuto, non Ŕ quella realtÓ che abbiamo pensato....

    Lanier's book is an autobiography that looks at his life and career, but as the father of VR it also is an explanation about how VR developed. It is a look at a fascinating individual and how his unique way of seeing the world informed the technology that he helped develop. "New Yo...

    If there's such a thing as a gentle, nuanced siren - an electric light show that knocks on your door wanting to sit down for tea - this is that book. Lanier uses both a soft light and a hard light to revisit his time in Silicon Valley pioneering virtual reality, and really walked me th...

    Solid four stars, though I do think I wavered in my rating of the book as I progressed through it. The beginning was kind of interesting, though it kind of slowed down a bit. I then enjoyed reading about the early days of Silicon Valley. I didn't really too much like the sections on VR...

    I think this is a book that will grow on me as I continue to digest the thoughts shared by Mr. Lanier. This book was not what I expected. It is partially autobiographical, partially historical, and partially about the future of technology, VR, social media, and our society. There is a ...

    Jaron's life, AR/VR/MR, Silicon Valley, The 80s and 90s American tech scene, running a startup, what it means to be human, artificial intelligence, French spies, Japanese criminals and a dozen more themes make up the content of this narrative. Jaron constantly shifts from one topic to ...

    Dawn of the New Everything is a mash-up of part-Jaron Lanier memoir, part-history of VR and more specifically VPL, the first VR start-up. Immensely readable, even if you have no interest in the origins of or concepts underpinning VR, especially because Lanier comes across as an approac...

    I suspect this will be a fun read for some - it was at times a very intriguing auto-biography of Lanier, but I gave up on it about half way through (too repetitive among other reasons). A somewhat distorted summary of the first half of the book: - Lanier lost his mother at young age a...

    I was very looking forward to reading this book. I have not gotten too much into virtual reality but it is something that intrigues me. Therefore I was very interested in what Mr. Lanier had to say as one of the first to experience virtual reality. What I got was some history about...

    If you're a technologist who can't quite get behind Facebook and doesn't necessarily think AI is going to take over the world, but can't put your finger on exactly why (that's me!), this book may help. Dawn of the New Everything is a memoir about the way the internet didn't turn out. I...

    A comprehensive explanation of the evolution of virtual reality and its related technologies, there are a few dozen attempts to define what it is Lanier has developed and promoted most of his life. More surprising to find so much autobiographical details from childhood onwards. An unco...

    The first half of the book is fine - a meandering walk down memory lane of VR and the early Technology revolution. But there?s a lot of self congratulation in here, and Appendix 2 is perhaps the worst piece of wannabe computer science I?ve come across. To argue that non-procedural ...

    Alternates between autobiography and the early days of VR and the tech scene, smattered with a lot of differing philosophical and contrarian thinking on the seemingly universally accepted ?utopian? values of tech these days. Some fun nostalgia flashbacks of 90s computer culture too...

    It?s hard to elicit any type of real summary of this book. Perhaps: a mixed concoction of science fiction and science reality, of the better angels and demons of pervasive technologies, and of meandering recollections of past events and how they inevitably lead up to the present. Wor...

    There are moments of wonderful insight in here, but way too few to justify a meandering memoir. I really enjoyed Lanier's interview on Ezra Klein's podcast and bought this book to hear more of that conversation, but the podcast was basically where all the good stuff was. It was fascina...

    Enjoyable book, but not my favorite from Jaron. His personal memoirs of the early VR scene in Silicon Valley are exciting, and full of memorable anecdotes. But there weren't too many points where I felt the book was awesomely mind-expanding, like I did with his previous ones. "You Are ...

    An interesting history, and cause for re-assessment, of a technology I think a lot of people still dismiss as some clunky fad from the late 80's and early 90's. Mix in Lanier's powerful humanism and interesting ideas for how to re-assess a whole lot more than VR and you have a pretty d...

    Insightful and entertaining This book goes into the origins of virtual reality technology by one of the people who helped usher it along. It?s not a historical piece in that it?s comprehensive, more just observations. The techie bits are just as interesting as the personal expe...

    Lanier is still a sane and humane voice of reason in an increasingly giddy tech world distanced from and disinterested in embodied, subjective reality. "Most technology reinforces the feeling that reality is just a sea of gadgets... VR is the technology that instead highlights the exis...

    Jaron opens saying his books has two parts: his personal story and a second one about VR. In reality (if you excuse my pun) VR is discussed in the last few chapters and appendixes 1 and 3. It?s mostly a loosely narrated autobiography everywhere else. I didn?t mind it that much,...

    Refreshing views on VR, AI, humanity, philosophy, and our future (phenotropic computing??), expressed in a playful style and interspersed with most excellent anecdotes about the iconic personalities of the 60s. Really enjoyed! ...

    This book contains nothing that the title suggests. This is the intellectual brain fart of a borderline crazy though apparently successful person. It reads like a Jason Pollock painting, gave up after about 25% ...

  • Peter O'Kelly
    Dec 18, 2017

    To many people, Jaron Lanier is the father of virtual reality. He coined the term in its contemporary usage though points to an older, literary use. Lanier is a credit-sharer, not a credit-grabber, so this memoir of his childhood, early work and years at VPL Research, Inc. is full of s...

    A review and interview to consider: http://www.economist.com/news/books-a... http://www.businessinsider.com/jaron-... ...

  • Scott
    Apr 26, 2018

    To many people, Jaron Lanier is the father of virtual reality. He coined the term in its contemporary usage though points to an older, literary use. Lanier is a credit-sharer, not a credit-grabber, so this memoir of his childhood, early work and years at VPL Research, Inc. is full of s...

    A review and interview to consider: http://www.economist.com/news/books-a... http://www.businessinsider.com/jaron-... ...

    I thoroughly enjoyed this read. Having already read Lanier's other two books You Are Not a Gadget and Who Owns the Future, I'm very familiar with his humanist views on technology and the questionable ethics of how technology is being implemented in our current age - But Lanier is also ...

    Excellent. Lanier's one of the smartest people on the planet, and he has one of the biggest hearts on the planet. He understands technology and the culture and history of Silicon Valley more fully than almost everyone in Silicon Valley yet his imagination and intellect breaks completel...

    Informative Read. Usually not my cup of tea - but I do believe if you are interested in Virtual Reality - then this is the book for you. ...

    Well, I learned a lot about VR (e.g., why we'll never have floating holograms, VR programming concerns like latency, and the pros and cons of various interfaces). Lanier has a pretty rosy perspective of how the tech will develop, and why our experience with VR will be much more creativ...

    I really don?t know how to review this book, it is so completely removed from the life I have lived. But I read every word of it, understood some of it, and learned a lot about the world as it is and where it is going. If, like me, you are a boomer who followed the hippie dream and p...

    Che cos?Ŕ la realtÓ? La risposta presuppone la conoscenza dei ?luoghi?, reali e virtuali, nei quali ogni giorno viviamo e che crediamo di conoscere abbastanza. Purtroppo, ahimŔ, alla fine, ci accorgiamo che quella che abbiamo vissuto, non Ŕ quella realtÓ che abbiamo pensato....

    Lanier's book is an autobiography that looks at his life and career, but as the father of VR it also is an explanation about how VR developed. It is a look at a fascinating individual and how his unique way of seeing the world informed the technology that he helped develop. "New Yo...

    If there's such a thing as a gentle, nuanced siren - an electric light show that knocks on your door wanting to sit down for tea - this is that book. Lanier uses both a soft light and a hard light to revisit his time in Silicon Valley pioneering virtual reality, and really walked me th...

    Solid four stars, though I do think I wavered in my rating of the book as I progressed through it. The beginning was kind of interesting, though it kind of slowed down a bit. I then enjoyed reading about the early days of Silicon Valley. I didn't really too much like the sections on VR...

    I think this is a book that will grow on me as I continue to digest the thoughts shared by Mr. Lanier. This book was not what I expected. It is partially autobiographical, partially historical, and partially about the future of technology, VR, social media, and our society. There is a ...

    Jaron's life, AR/VR/MR, Silicon Valley, The 80s and 90s American tech scene, running a startup, what it means to be human, artificial intelligence, French spies, Japanese criminals and a dozen more themes make up the content of this narrative. Jaron constantly shifts from one topic to ...

    Dawn of the New Everything is a mash-up of part-Jaron Lanier memoir, part-history of VR and more specifically VPL, the first VR start-up. Immensely readable, even if you have no interest in the origins of or concepts underpinning VR, especially because Lanier comes across as an approac...

    I suspect this will be a fun read for some - it was at times a very intriguing auto-biography of Lanier, but I gave up on it about half way through (too repetitive among other reasons). A somewhat distorted summary of the first half of the book: - Lanier lost his mother at young age a...

    I was very looking forward to reading this book. I have not gotten too much into virtual reality but it is something that intrigues me. Therefore I was very interested in what Mr. Lanier had to say as one of the first to experience virtual reality. What I got was some history about...

    If you're a technologist who can't quite get behind Facebook and doesn't necessarily think AI is going to take over the world, but can't put your finger on exactly why (that's me!), this book may help. Dawn of the New Everything is a memoir about the way the internet didn't turn out. I...

    A comprehensive explanation of the evolution of virtual reality and its related technologies, there are a few dozen attempts to define what it is Lanier has developed and promoted most of his life. More surprising to find so much autobiographical details from childhood onwards. An unco...

    The first half of the book is fine - a meandering walk down memory lane of VR and the early Technology revolution. But there?s a lot of self congratulation in here, and Appendix 2 is perhaps the worst piece of wannabe computer science I?ve come across. To argue that non-procedural ...

    Alternates between autobiography and the early days of VR and the tech scene, smattered with a lot of differing philosophical and contrarian thinking on the seemingly universally accepted ?utopian? values of tech these days. Some fun nostalgia flashbacks of 90s computer culture too...

  • Justin Martin
    Jan 28, 2018

    To many people, Jaron Lanier is the father of virtual reality. He coined the term in its contemporary usage though points to an older, literary use. Lanier is a credit-sharer, not a credit-grabber, so this memoir of his childhood, early work and years at VPL Research, Inc. is full of s...

    A review and interview to consider: http://www.economist.com/news/books-a... http://www.businessinsider.com/jaron-... ...

    I thoroughly enjoyed this read. Having already read Lanier's other two books You Are Not a Gadget and Who Owns the Future, I'm very familiar with his humanist views on technology and the questionable ethics of how technology is being implemented in our current age - But Lanier is also ...

    Excellent. Lanier's one of the smartest people on the planet, and he has one of the biggest hearts on the planet. He understands technology and the culture and history of Silicon Valley more fully than almost everyone in Silicon Valley yet his imagination and intellect breaks completel...

    Informative Read. Usually not my cup of tea - but I do believe if you are interested in Virtual Reality - then this is the book for you. ...

    Well, I learned a lot about VR (e.g., why we'll never have floating holograms, VR programming concerns like latency, and the pros and cons of various interfaces). Lanier has a pretty rosy perspective of how the tech will develop, and why our experience with VR will be much more creativ...

    I really don?t know how to review this book, it is so completely removed from the life I have lived. But I read every word of it, understood some of it, and learned a lot about the world as it is and where it is going. If, like me, you are a boomer who followed the hippie dream and p...

    Che cos?Ŕ la realtÓ? La risposta presuppone la conoscenza dei ?luoghi?, reali e virtuali, nei quali ogni giorno viviamo e che crediamo di conoscere abbastanza. Purtroppo, ahimŔ, alla fine, ci accorgiamo che quella che abbiamo vissuto, non Ŕ quella realtÓ che abbiamo pensato....

    Lanier's book is an autobiography that looks at his life and career, but as the father of VR it also is an explanation about how VR developed. It is a look at a fascinating individual and how his unique way of seeing the world informed the technology that he helped develop. "New Yo...

    If there's such a thing as a gentle, nuanced siren - an electric light show that knocks on your door wanting to sit down for tea - this is that book. Lanier uses both a soft light and a hard light to revisit his time in Silicon Valley pioneering virtual reality, and really walked me th...

  • Rj
    Mar 13, 2018

    To many people, Jaron Lanier is the father of virtual reality. He coined the term in its contemporary usage though points to an older, literary use. Lanier is a credit-sharer, not a credit-grabber, so this memoir of his childhood, early work and years at VPL Research, Inc. is full of s...

    A review and interview to consider: http://www.economist.com/news/books-a... http://www.businessinsider.com/jaron-... ...

    I thoroughly enjoyed this read. Having already read Lanier's other two books You Are Not a Gadget and Who Owns the Future, I'm very familiar with his humanist views on technology and the questionable ethics of how technology is being implemented in our current age - But Lanier is also ...

    Excellent. Lanier's one of the smartest people on the planet, and he has one of the biggest hearts on the planet. He understands technology and the culture and history of Silicon Valley more fully than almost everyone in Silicon Valley yet his imagination and intellect breaks completel...

    Informative Read. Usually not my cup of tea - but I do believe if you are interested in Virtual Reality - then this is the book for you. ...

    Well, I learned a lot about VR (e.g., why we'll never have floating holograms, VR programming concerns like latency, and the pros and cons of various interfaces). Lanier has a pretty rosy perspective of how the tech will develop, and why our experience with VR will be much more creativ...

    I really don?t know how to review this book, it is so completely removed from the life I have lived. But I read every word of it, understood some of it, and learned a lot about the world as it is and where it is going. If, like me, you are a boomer who followed the hippie dream and p...

    Che cos?Ŕ la realtÓ? La risposta presuppone la conoscenza dei ?luoghi?, reali e virtuali, nei quali ogni giorno viviamo e che crediamo di conoscere abbastanza. Purtroppo, ahimŔ, alla fine, ci accorgiamo che quella che abbiamo vissuto, non Ŕ quella realtÓ che abbiamo pensato....

    Lanier's book is an autobiography that looks at his life and career, but as the father of VR it also is an explanation about how VR developed. It is a look at a fascinating individual and how his unique way of seeing the world informed the technology that he helped develop. "New Yo...

  • Blake Williford
    Mar 19, 2018

    To many people, Jaron Lanier is the father of virtual reality. He coined the term in its contemporary usage though points to an older, literary use. Lanier is a credit-sharer, not a credit-grabber, so this memoir of his childhood, early work and years at VPL Research, Inc. is full of s...

    A review and interview to consider: http://www.economist.com/news/books-a... http://www.businessinsider.com/jaron-... ...

    I thoroughly enjoyed this read. Having already read Lanier's other two books You Are Not a Gadget and Who Owns the Future, I'm very familiar with his humanist views on technology and the questionable ethics of how technology is being implemented in our current age - But Lanier is also ...

  • Tony Poerio
    Apr 21, 2018

    To many people, Jaron Lanier is the father of virtual reality. He coined the term in its contemporary usage though points to an older, literary use. Lanier is a credit-sharer, not a credit-grabber, so this memoir of his childhood, early work and years at VPL Research, Inc. is full of s...

    A review and interview to consider: http://www.economist.com/news/books-a... http://www.businessinsider.com/jaron-... ...

    I thoroughly enjoyed this read. Having already read Lanier's other two books You Are Not a Gadget and Who Owns the Future, I'm very familiar with his humanist views on technology and the questionable ethics of how technology is being implemented in our current age - But Lanier is also ...

    Excellent. Lanier's one of the smartest people on the planet, and he has one of the biggest hearts on the planet. He understands technology and the culture and history of Silicon Valley more fully than almost everyone in Silicon Valley yet his imagination and intellect breaks completel...

    Informative Read. Usually not my cup of tea - but I do believe if you are interested in Virtual Reality - then this is the book for you. ...

    Well, I learned a lot about VR (e.g., why we'll never have floating holograms, VR programming concerns like latency, and the pros and cons of various interfaces). Lanier has a pretty rosy perspective of how the tech will develop, and why our experience with VR will be much more creativ...

    I really don?t know how to review this book, it is so completely removed from the life I have lived. But I read every word of it, understood some of it, and learned a lot about the world as it is and where it is going. If, like me, you are a boomer who followed the hippie dream and p...

    Che cos?Ŕ la realtÓ? La risposta presuppone la conoscenza dei ?luoghi?, reali e virtuali, nei quali ogni giorno viviamo e che crediamo di conoscere abbastanza. Purtroppo, ahimŔ, alla fine, ci accorgiamo che quella che abbiamo vissuto, non Ŕ quella realtÓ che abbiamo pensato....

    Lanier's book is an autobiography that looks at his life and career, but as the father of VR it also is an explanation about how VR developed. It is a look at a fascinating individual and how his unique way of seeing the world informed the technology that he helped develop. "New Yo...

    If there's such a thing as a gentle, nuanced siren - an electric light show that knocks on your door wanting to sit down for tea - this is that book. Lanier uses both a soft light and a hard light to revisit his time in Silicon Valley pioneering virtual reality, and really walked me th...

    Solid four stars, though I do think I wavered in my rating of the book as I progressed through it. The beginning was kind of interesting, though it kind of slowed down a bit. I then enjoyed reading about the early days of Silicon Valley. I didn't really too much like the sections on VR...

    I think this is a book that will grow on me as I continue to digest the thoughts shared by Mr. Lanier. This book was not what I expected. It is partially autobiographical, partially historical, and partially about the future of technology, VR, social media, and our society. There is a ...

    Jaron's life, AR/VR/MR, Silicon Valley, The 80s and 90s American tech scene, running a startup, what it means to be human, artificial intelligence, French spies, Japanese criminals and a dozen more themes make up the content of this narrative. Jaron constantly shifts from one topic to ...

    Dawn of the New Everything is a mash-up of part-Jaron Lanier memoir, part-history of VR and more specifically VPL, the first VR start-up. Immensely readable, even if you have no interest in the origins of or concepts underpinning VR, especially because Lanier comes across as an approac...

    I suspect this will be a fun read for some - it was at times a very intriguing auto-biography of Lanier, but I gave up on it about half way through (too repetitive among other reasons). A somewhat distorted summary of the first half of the book: - Lanier lost his mother at young age a...

    I was very looking forward to reading this book. I have not gotten too much into virtual reality but it is something that intrigues me. Therefore I was very interested in what Mr. Lanier had to say as one of the first to experience virtual reality. What I got was some history about...

    If you're a technologist who can't quite get behind Facebook and doesn't necessarily think AI is going to take over the world, but can't put your finger on exactly why (that's me!), this book may help. Dawn of the New Everything is a memoir about the way the internet didn't turn out. I...

    A comprehensive explanation of the evolution of virtual reality and its related technologies, there are a few dozen attempts to define what it is Lanier has developed and promoted most of his life. More surprising to find so much autobiographical details from childhood onwards. An unco...

    The first half of the book is fine - a meandering walk down memory lane of VR and the early Technology revolution. But there?s a lot of self congratulation in here, and Appendix 2 is perhaps the worst piece of wannabe computer science I?ve come across. To argue that non-procedural ...

    Alternates between autobiography and the early days of VR and the tech scene, smattered with a lot of differing philosophical and contrarian thinking on the seemingly universally accepted ?utopian? values of tech these days. Some fun nostalgia flashbacks of 90s computer culture too...

    It?s hard to elicit any type of real summary of this book. Perhaps: a mixed concoction of science fiction and science reality, of the better angels and demons of pervasive technologies, and of meandering recollections of past events and how they inevitably lead up to the present. Wor...

    There are moments of wonderful insight in here, but way too few to justify a meandering memoir. I really enjoyed Lanier's interview on Ezra Klein's podcast and bought this book to hear more of that conversation, but the podcast was basically where all the good stuff was. It was fascina...

    Enjoyable book, but not my favorite from Jaron. His personal memoirs of the early VR scene in Silicon Valley are exciting, and full of memorable anecdotes. But there weren't too many points where I felt the book was awesomely mind-expanding, like I did with his previous ones. "You Are ...

  • Ron
    Feb 27, 2018

    To many people, Jaron Lanier is the father of virtual reality. He coined the term in its contemporary usage though points to an older, literary use. Lanier is a credit-sharer, not a credit-grabber, so this memoir of his childhood, early work and years at VPL Research, Inc. is full of s...

    A review and interview to consider: http://www.economist.com/news/books-a... http://www.businessinsider.com/jaron-... ...

    I thoroughly enjoyed this read. Having already read Lanier's other two books You Are Not a Gadget and Who Owns the Future, I'm very familiar with his humanist views on technology and the questionable ethics of how technology is being implemented in our current age - But Lanier is also ...

    Excellent. Lanier's one of the smartest people on the planet, and he has one of the biggest hearts on the planet. He understands technology and the culture and history of Silicon Valley more fully than almost everyone in Silicon Valley yet his imagination and intellect breaks completel...

    Informative Read. Usually not my cup of tea - but I do believe if you are interested in Virtual Reality - then this is the book for you. ...

    Well, I learned a lot about VR (e.g., why we'll never have floating holograms, VR programming concerns like latency, and the pros and cons of various interfaces). Lanier has a pretty rosy perspective of how the tech will develop, and why our experience with VR will be much more creativ...

    I really don?t know how to review this book, it is so completely removed from the life I have lived. But I read every word of it, understood some of it, and learned a lot about the world as it is and where it is going. If, like me, you are a boomer who followed the hippie dream and p...

    Che cos?Ŕ la realtÓ? La risposta presuppone la conoscenza dei ?luoghi?, reali e virtuali, nei quali ogni giorno viviamo e che crediamo di conoscere abbastanza. Purtroppo, ahimŔ, alla fine, ci accorgiamo che quella che abbiamo vissuto, non Ŕ quella realtÓ che abbiamo pensato....

    Lanier's book is an autobiography that looks at his life and career, but as the father of VR it also is an explanation about how VR developed. It is a look at a fascinating individual and how his unique way of seeing the world informed the technology that he helped develop. "New Yo...

    If there's such a thing as a gentle, nuanced siren - an electric light show that knocks on your door wanting to sit down for tea - this is that book. Lanier uses both a soft light and a hard light to revisit his time in Silicon Valley pioneering virtual reality, and really walked me th...

    Solid four stars, though I do think I wavered in my rating of the book as I progressed through it. The beginning was kind of interesting, though it kind of slowed down a bit. I then enjoyed reading about the early days of Silicon Valley. I didn't really too much like the sections on VR...

    I think this is a book that will grow on me as I continue to digest the thoughts shared by Mr. Lanier. This book was not what I expected. It is partially autobiographical, partially historical, and partially about the future of technology, VR, social media, and our society. There is a ...

    Jaron's life, AR/VR/MR, Silicon Valley, The 80s and 90s American tech scene, running a startup, what it means to be human, artificial intelligence, French spies, Japanese criminals and a dozen more themes make up the content of this narrative. Jaron constantly shifts from one topic to ...

    Dawn of the New Everything is a mash-up of part-Jaron Lanier memoir, part-history of VR and more specifically VPL, the first VR start-up. Immensely readable, even if you have no interest in the origins of or concepts underpinning VR, especially because Lanier comes across as an approac...

    I suspect this will be a fun read for some - it was at times a very intriguing auto-biography of Lanier, but I gave up on it about half way through (too repetitive among other reasons). A somewhat distorted summary of the first half of the book: - Lanier lost his mother at young age a...

    I was very looking forward to reading this book. I have not gotten too much into virtual reality but it is something that intrigues me. Therefore I was very interested in what Mr. Lanier had to say as one of the first to experience virtual reality. What I got was some history about...

    If you're a technologist who can't quite get behind Facebook and doesn't necessarily think AI is going to take over the world, but can't put your finger on exactly why (that's me!), this book may help. Dawn of the New Everything is a memoir about the way the internet didn't turn out. I...

    A comprehensive explanation of the evolution of virtual reality and its related technologies, there are a few dozen attempts to define what it is Lanier has developed and promoted most of his life. More surprising to find so much autobiographical details from childhood onwards. An unco...

    The first half of the book is fine - a meandering walk down memory lane of VR and the early Technology revolution. But there?s a lot of self congratulation in here, and Appendix 2 is perhaps the worst piece of wannabe computer science I?ve come across. To argue that non-procedural ...

    Alternates between autobiography and the early days of VR and the tech scene, smattered with a lot of differing philosophical and contrarian thinking on the seemingly universally accepted ?utopian? values of tech these days. Some fun nostalgia flashbacks of 90s computer culture too...

    It?s hard to elicit any type of real summary of this book. Perhaps: a mixed concoction of science fiction and science reality, of the better angels and demons of pervasive technologies, and of meandering recollections of past events and how they inevitably lead up to the present. Wor...

    There are moments of wonderful insight in here, but way too few to justify a meandering memoir. I really enjoyed Lanier's interview on Ezra Klein's podcast and bought this book to hear more of that conversation, but the podcast was basically where all the good stuff was. It was fascina...

    Enjoyable book, but not my favorite from Jaron. His personal memoirs of the early VR scene in Silicon Valley are exciting, and full of memorable anecdotes. But there weren't too many points where I felt the book was awesomely mind-expanding, like I did with his previous ones. "You Are ...

    An interesting history, and cause for re-assessment, of a technology I think a lot of people still dismiss as some clunky fad from the late 80's and early 90's. Mix in Lanier's powerful humanism and interesting ideas for how to re-assess a whole lot more than VR and you have a pretty d...

    Insightful and entertaining This book goes into the origins of virtual reality technology by one of the people who helped usher it along. It?s not a historical piece in that it?s comprehensive, more just observations. The techie bits are just as interesting as the personal expe...

    Lanier is still a sane and humane voice of reason in an increasingly giddy tech world distanced from and disinterested in embodied, subjective reality. "Most technology reinforces the feeling that reality is just a sea of gadgets... VR is the technology that instead highlights the exis...

    Jaron opens saying his books has two parts: his personal story and a second one about VR. In reality (if you excuse my pun) VR is discussed in the last few chapters and appendixes 1 and 3. It?s mostly a loosely narrated autobiography everywhere else. I didn?t mind it that much,...

    Refreshing views on VR, AI, humanity, philosophy, and our future (phenotropic computing??), expressed in a playful style and interspersed with most excellent anecdotes about the iconic personalities of the 60s. Really enjoyed! ...

    This book contains nothing that the title suggests. This is the intellectual brain fart of a borderline crazy though apparently successful person. It reads like a Jason Pollock painting, gave up after about 25% ...

    Jaron is one of the original VR inventors nd has been involved in progressing it to the present day. this is sort of an autobiography with his explanations of the way VR needs to work. I would give it 3.5 stars. ...

  • Max Metral
    Jan 20, 2018

    To many people, Jaron Lanier is the father of virtual reality. He coined the term in its contemporary usage though points to an older, literary use. Lanier is a credit-sharer, not a credit-grabber, so this memoir of his childhood, early work and years at VPL Research, Inc. is full of s...

    A review and interview to consider: http://www.economist.com/news/books-a... http://www.businessinsider.com/jaron-... ...

    I thoroughly enjoyed this read. Having already read Lanier's other two books You Are Not a Gadget and Who Owns the Future, I'm very familiar with his humanist views on technology and the questionable ethics of how technology is being implemented in our current age - But Lanier is also ...

    Excellent. Lanier's one of the smartest people on the planet, and he has one of the biggest hearts on the planet. He understands technology and the culture and history of Silicon Valley more fully than almost everyone in Silicon Valley yet his imagination and intellect breaks completel...

    Informative Read. Usually not my cup of tea - but I do believe if you are interested in Virtual Reality - then this is the book for you. ...

    Well, I learned a lot about VR (e.g., why we'll never have floating holograms, VR programming concerns like latency, and the pros and cons of various interfaces). Lanier has a pretty rosy perspective of how the tech will develop, and why our experience with VR will be much more creativ...

    I really don?t know how to review this book, it is so completely removed from the life I have lived. But I read every word of it, understood some of it, and learned a lot about the world as it is and where it is going. If, like me, you are a boomer who followed the hippie dream and p...

    Che cos?Ŕ la realtÓ? La risposta presuppone la conoscenza dei ?luoghi?, reali e virtuali, nei quali ogni giorno viviamo e che crediamo di conoscere abbastanza. Purtroppo, ahimŔ, alla fine, ci accorgiamo che quella che abbiamo vissuto, non Ŕ quella realtÓ che abbiamo pensato....

    Lanier's book is an autobiography that looks at his life and career, but as the father of VR it also is an explanation about how VR developed. It is a look at a fascinating individual and how his unique way of seeing the world informed the technology that he helped develop. "New Yo...

    If there's such a thing as a gentle, nuanced siren - an electric light show that knocks on your door wanting to sit down for tea - this is that book. Lanier uses both a soft light and a hard light to revisit his time in Silicon Valley pioneering virtual reality, and really walked me th...

    Solid four stars, though I do think I wavered in my rating of the book as I progressed through it. The beginning was kind of interesting, though it kind of slowed down a bit. I then enjoyed reading about the early days of Silicon Valley. I didn't really too much like the sections on VR...

    I think this is a book that will grow on me as I continue to digest the thoughts shared by Mr. Lanier. This book was not what I expected. It is partially autobiographical, partially historical, and partially about the future of technology, VR, social media, and our society. There is a ...

    Jaron's life, AR/VR/MR, Silicon Valley, The 80s and 90s American tech scene, running a startup, what it means to be human, artificial intelligence, French spies, Japanese criminals and a dozen more themes make up the content of this narrative. Jaron constantly shifts from one topic to ...

    Dawn of the New Everything is a mash-up of part-Jaron Lanier memoir, part-history of VR and more specifically VPL, the first VR start-up. Immensely readable, even if you have no interest in the origins of or concepts underpinning VR, especially because Lanier comes across as an approac...

    I suspect this will be a fun read for some - it was at times a very intriguing auto-biography of Lanier, but I gave up on it about half way through (too repetitive among other reasons). A somewhat distorted summary of the first half of the book: - Lanier lost his mother at young age a...

    I was very looking forward to reading this book. I have not gotten too much into virtual reality but it is something that intrigues me. Therefore I was very interested in what Mr. Lanier had to say as one of the first to experience virtual reality. What I got was some history about...

    If you're a technologist who can't quite get behind Facebook and doesn't necessarily think AI is going to take over the world, but can't put your finger on exactly why (that's me!), this book may help. Dawn of the New Everything is a memoir about the way the internet didn't turn out. I...

    A comprehensive explanation of the evolution of virtual reality and its related technologies, there are a few dozen attempts to define what it is Lanier has developed and promoted most of his life. More surprising to find so much autobiographical details from childhood onwards. An unco...

    The first half of the book is fine - a meandering walk down memory lane of VR and the early Technology revolution. But there?s a lot of self congratulation in here, and Appendix 2 is perhaps the worst piece of wannabe computer science I?ve come across. To argue that non-procedural ...

  • Jim Nail
    Oct 25, 2017

    To many people, Jaron Lanier is the father of virtual reality. He coined the term in its contemporary usage though points to an older, literary use. Lanier is a credit-sharer, not a credit-grabber, so this memoir of his childhood, early work and years at VPL Research, Inc. is full of s...

    A review and interview to consider: http://www.economist.com/news/books-a... http://www.businessinsider.com/jaron-... ...

    I thoroughly enjoyed this read. Having already read Lanier's other two books You Are Not a Gadget and Who Owns the Future, I'm very familiar with his humanist views on technology and the questionable ethics of how technology is being implemented in our current age - But Lanier is also ...

    Excellent. Lanier's one of the smartest people on the planet, and he has one of the biggest hearts on the planet. He understands technology and the culture and history of Silicon Valley more fully than almost everyone in Silicon Valley yet his imagination and intellect breaks completel...

    Informative Read. Usually not my cup of tea - but I do believe if you are interested in Virtual Reality - then this is the book for you. ...

    Well, I learned a lot about VR (e.g., why we'll never have floating holograms, VR programming concerns like latency, and the pros and cons of various interfaces). Lanier has a pretty rosy perspective of how the tech will develop, and why our experience with VR will be much more creativ...

    I really don?t know how to review this book, it is so completely removed from the life I have lived. But I read every word of it, understood some of it, and learned a lot about the world as it is and where it is going. If, like me, you are a boomer who followed the hippie dream and p...

  • Pawel
    Apr 13, 2018

    To many people, Jaron Lanier is the father of virtual reality. He coined the term in its contemporary usage though points to an older, literary use. Lanier is a credit-sharer, not a credit-grabber, so this memoir of his childhood, early work and years at VPL Research, Inc. is full of s...

    A review and interview to consider: http://www.economist.com/news/books-a... http://www.businessinsider.com/jaron-... ...

    I thoroughly enjoyed this read. Having already read Lanier's other two books You Are Not a Gadget and Who Owns the Future, I'm very familiar with his humanist views on technology and the questionable ethics of how technology is being implemented in our current age - But Lanier is also ...

    Excellent. Lanier's one of the smartest people on the planet, and he has one of the biggest hearts on the planet. He understands technology and the culture and history of Silicon Valley more fully than almost everyone in Silicon Valley yet his imagination and intellect breaks completel...

    Informative Read. Usually not my cup of tea - but I do believe if you are interested in Virtual Reality - then this is the book for you. ...

    Well, I learned a lot about VR (e.g., why we'll never have floating holograms, VR programming concerns like latency, and the pros and cons of various interfaces). Lanier has a pretty rosy perspective of how the tech will develop, and why our experience with VR will be much more creativ...

    I really don?t know how to review this book, it is so completely removed from the life I have lived. But I read every word of it, understood some of it, and learned a lot about the world as it is and where it is going. If, like me, you are a boomer who followed the hippie dream and p...

    Che cos?Ŕ la realtÓ? La risposta presuppone la conoscenza dei ?luoghi?, reali e virtuali, nei quali ogni giorno viviamo e che crediamo di conoscere abbastanza. Purtroppo, ahimŔ, alla fine, ci accorgiamo che quella che abbiamo vissuto, non Ŕ quella realtÓ che abbiamo pensato....

    Lanier's book is an autobiography that looks at his life and career, but as the father of VR it also is an explanation about how VR developed. It is a look at a fascinating individual and how his unique way of seeing the world informed the technology that he helped develop. "New Yo...

    If there's such a thing as a gentle, nuanced siren - an electric light show that knocks on your door wanting to sit down for tea - this is that book. Lanier uses both a soft light and a hard light to revisit his time in Silicon Valley pioneering virtual reality, and really walked me th...

    Solid four stars, though I do think I wavered in my rating of the book as I progressed through it. The beginning was kind of interesting, though it kind of slowed down a bit. I then enjoyed reading about the early days of Silicon Valley. I didn't really too much like the sections on VR...

    I think this is a book that will grow on me as I continue to digest the thoughts shared by Mr. Lanier. This book was not what I expected. It is partially autobiographical, partially historical, and partially about the future of technology, VR, social media, and our society. There is a ...

    Jaron's life, AR/VR/MR, Silicon Valley, The 80s and 90s American tech scene, running a startup, what it means to be human, artificial intelligence, French spies, Japanese criminals and a dozen more themes make up the content of this narrative. Jaron constantly shifts from one topic to ...

    Dawn of the New Everything is a mash-up of part-Jaron Lanier memoir, part-history of VR and more specifically VPL, the first VR start-up. Immensely readable, even if you have no interest in the origins of or concepts underpinning VR, especially because Lanier comes across as an approac...

    I suspect this will be a fun read for some - it was at times a very intriguing auto-biography of Lanier, but I gave up on it about half way through (too repetitive among other reasons). A somewhat distorted summary of the first half of the book: - Lanier lost his mother at young age a...

    I was very looking forward to reading this book. I have not gotten too much into virtual reality but it is something that intrigues me. Therefore I was very interested in what Mr. Lanier had to say as one of the first to experience virtual reality. What I got was some history about...

    If you're a technologist who can't quite get behind Facebook and doesn't necessarily think AI is going to take over the world, but can't put your finger on exactly why (that's me!), this book may help. Dawn of the New Everything is a memoir about the way the internet didn't turn out. I...

    A comprehensive explanation of the evolution of virtual reality and its related technologies, there are a few dozen attempts to define what it is Lanier has developed and promoted most of his life. More surprising to find so much autobiographical details from childhood onwards. An unco...

    The first half of the book is fine - a meandering walk down memory lane of VR and the early Technology revolution. But there?s a lot of self congratulation in here, and Appendix 2 is perhaps the worst piece of wannabe computer science I?ve come across. To argue that non-procedural ...

    Alternates between autobiography and the early days of VR and the tech scene, smattered with a lot of differing philosophical and contrarian thinking on the seemingly universally accepted ?utopian? values of tech these days. Some fun nostalgia flashbacks of 90s computer culture too...

    It?s hard to elicit any type of real summary of this book. Perhaps: a mixed concoction of science fiction and science reality, of the better angels and demons of pervasive technologies, and of meandering recollections of past events and how they inevitably lead up to the present. Wor...

    There are moments of wonderful insight in here, but way too few to justify a meandering memoir. I really enjoyed Lanier's interview on Ezra Klein's podcast and bought this book to hear more of that conversation, but the podcast was basically where all the good stuff was. It was fascina...

    Enjoyable book, but not my favorite from Jaron. His personal memoirs of the early VR scene in Silicon Valley are exciting, and full of memorable anecdotes. But there weren't too many points where I felt the book was awesomely mind-expanding, like I did with his previous ones. "You Are ...

    An interesting history, and cause for re-assessment, of a technology I think a lot of people still dismiss as some clunky fad from the late 80's and early 90's. Mix in Lanier's powerful humanism and interesting ideas for how to re-assess a whole lot more than VR and you have a pretty d...

    Insightful and entertaining This book goes into the origins of virtual reality technology by one of the people who helped usher it along. It?s not a historical piece in that it?s comprehensive, more just observations. The techie bits are just as interesting as the personal expe...

    Lanier is still a sane and humane voice of reason in an increasingly giddy tech world distanced from and disinterested in embodied, subjective reality. "Most technology reinforces the feeling that reality is just a sea of gadgets... VR is the technology that instead highlights the exis...

    Jaron opens saying his books has two parts: his personal story and a second one about VR. In reality (if you excuse my pun) VR is discussed in the last few chapters and appendixes 1 and 3. It?s mostly a loosely narrated autobiography everywhere else. I didn?t mind it that much,...

  • Daniel Huck
    Mar 29, 2018

    To many people, Jaron Lanier is the father of virtual reality. He coined the term in its contemporary usage though points to an older, literary use. Lanier is a credit-sharer, not a credit-grabber, so this memoir of his childhood, early work and years at VPL Research, Inc. is full of s...

    A review and interview to consider: http://www.economist.com/news/books-a... http://www.businessinsider.com/jaron-... ...

    I thoroughly enjoyed this read. Having already read Lanier's other two books You Are Not a Gadget and Who Owns the Future, I'm very familiar with his humanist views on technology and the questionable ethics of how technology is being implemented in our current age - But Lanier is also ...

    Excellent. Lanier's one of the smartest people on the planet, and he has one of the biggest hearts on the planet. He understands technology and the culture and history of Silicon Valley more fully than almost everyone in Silicon Valley yet his imagination and intellect breaks completel...

    Informative Read. Usually not my cup of tea - but I do believe if you are interested in Virtual Reality - then this is the book for you. ...

    Well, I learned a lot about VR (e.g., why we'll never have floating holograms, VR programming concerns like latency, and the pros and cons of various interfaces). Lanier has a pretty rosy perspective of how the tech will develop, and why our experience with VR will be much more creativ...

    I really don?t know how to review this book, it is so completely removed from the life I have lived. But I read every word of it, understood some of it, and learned a lot about the world as it is and where it is going. If, like me, you are a boomer who followed the hippie dream and p...

    Che cos?Ŕ la realtÓ? La risposta presuppone la conoscenza dei ?luoghi?, reali e virtuali, nei quali ogni giorno viviamo e che crediamo di conoscere abbastanza. Purtroppo, ahimŔ, alla fine, ci accorgiamo che quella che abbiamo vissuto, non Ŕ quella realtÓ che abbiamo pensato....

    Lanier's book is an autobiography that looks at his life and career, but as the father of VR it also is an explanation about how VR developed. It is a look at a fascinating individual and how his unique way of seeing the world informed the technology that he helped develop. "New Yo...

    If there's such a thing as a gentle, nuanced siren - an electric light show that knocks on your door wanting to sit down for tea - this is that book. Lanier uses both a soft light and a hard light to revisit his time in Silicon Valley pioneering virtual reality, and really walked me th...

    Solid four stars, though I do think I wavered in my rating of the book as I progressed through it. The beginning was kind of interesting, though it kind of slowed down a bit. I then enjoyed reading about the early days of Silicon Valley. I didn't really too much like the sections on VR...

    I think this is a book that will grow on me as I continue to digest the thoughts shared by Mr. Lanier. This book was not what I expected. It is partially autobiographical, partially historical, and partially about the future of technology, VR, social media, and our society. There is a ...

    Jaron's life, AR/VR/MR, Silicon Valley, The 80s and 90s American tech scene, running a startup, what it means to be human, artificial intelligence, French spies, Japanese criminals and a dozen more themes make up the content of this narrative. Jaron constantly shifts from one topic to ...

    Dawn of the New Everything is a mash-up of part-Jaron Lanier memoir, part-history of VR and more specifically VPL, the first VR start-up. Immensely readable, even if you have no interest in the origins of or concepts underpinning VR, especially because Lanier comes across as an approac...

    I suspect this will be a fun read for some - it was at times a very intriguing auto-biography of Lanier, but I gave up on it about half way through (too repetitive among other reasons). A somewhat distorted summary of the first half of the book: - Lanier lost his mother at young age a...

    I was very looking forward to reading this book. I have not gotten too much into virtual reality but it is something that intrigues me. Therefore I was very interested in what Mr. Lanier had to say as one of the first to experience virtual reality. What I got was some history about...

    If you're a technologist who can't quite get behind Facebook and doesn't necessarily think AI is going to take over the world, but can't put your finger on exactly why (that's me!), this book may help. Dawn of the New Everything is a memoir about the way the internet didn't turn out. I...

    A comprehensive explanation of the evolution of virtual reality and its related technologies, there are a few dozen attempts to define what it is Lanier has developed and promoted most of his life. More surprising to find so much autobiographical details from childhood onwards. An unco...

    The first half of the book is fine - a meandering walk down memory lane of VR and the early Technology revolution. But there?s a lot of self congratulation in here, and Appendix 2 is perhaps the worst piece of wannabe computer science I?ve come across. To argue that non-procedural ...

    Alternates between autobiography and the early days of VR and the tech scene, smattered with a lot of differing philosophical and contrarian thinking on the seemingly universally accepted ?utopian? values of tech these days. Some fun nostalgia flashbacks of 90s computer culture too...

    It?s hard to elicit any type of real summary of this book. Perhaps: a mixed concoction of science fiction and science reality, of the better angels and demons of pervasive technologies, and of meandering recollections of past events and how they inevitably lead up to the present. Wor...