The Road to Little Dribbling: Adventures of an American in Britain (Notes from a Small Island #2)

The Road to Little Dribbling: Adventures of an American in Britain (Notes from a Small Island #2)

The hilarious and loving sequel to a hilarious and loving classic of travel writing: Notes from a Small Island, Bill Bryson?s valentine to his adopted country of England In 1995 Bill Bryson got into his car and took a weeks-long farewell motoring trip about England before moving his family back to the United States. The book about that trip, Notes from a Small Island, is up The hilarious and loving sequel to a hilarious and loving classic of travel writing: Notes from a Small Island, Bil...

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Title:The Road to Little Dribbling: Adventures of an American in Britain (Notes from a Small Island #2)
Author:Bill Bryson
Rating:
Genres:Travel
ISBN:The Road to Little Dribbling
ISBN
Edition Language:English
Format Type:Hardcover
Number of Pages:380 pages pages

The Road to Little Dribbling: Adventures of an American in Britain (Notes from a Small Island #2) Reviews

  • Kyle
    Nov 09, 2015

    Basically? But swap in the UK for "cloud". I've read all of Bryson's other stuff, far as I recall. I have greatly enjoyed it. I laughed so hard at parts of In a Sunburnt Country that I could scarcely breathe. But this? This is a rambling, crotchety old coot, and not in a...

    Hello, Mr. Bryson! It's been a while. Lovely to hear from you again. I must admit I got overly excited last year when I learned that you were writing your first travel memoir in years, and it was going to be about your adventures in England. I love England! I loved your earlier book ab...

    This was not fun. It was like travelling 'round Great Britain with my rather grumpy father in law who only wants to talk about how good things used to be and how crappy things now are. ...

    3.5 What can I say? Bryson fans know exactly what they are getting when they pick up one of his books. A bit of history, information, Bryson's thoughts and feelings on said information and history. A good bit of humor, self-deprecating, ironic and at times laugh out loud funny. A good ...

    Bill Bryson represents himself in this book as a grumpy old man and it is frequently hilarious although occasionally verging on the very edge of political correctness. He's does write incredibly well and I found myself reading passages out loud to anyone who would listen and share it w...

    By far and away Bill Bryson's worst book. It should be called Notes from Southern England. It takes over half the book to get past Birmingham. Wales gets about a chapter, Scotland gets about 10 pages, most of them on a train. The whole thing reads like a half arsed cash in for the 20th...

    (3.5) Bryson?s funniest book for many years. It meant a lot to me since I am also an American expat in England. I kept recognizing places I?d been and agreeing with the sentiments. Two points of criticism, though: although he moves roughly from southeast to northwest in the country...

    Woodsman Spare That Country Bill Bryson is the stand-up comedian of travel writing. The Road to Little Dribbling is an update on his first act, Notes From a Small Island, of 20 years before. The style of loving sarcasm is the same. With the narrative sense of David Sedaris and the o...

    A Bill Bryson book will rarely let you down. It is a reliable companion if you want to have a jolly time. That said, this book cannot avoid comparison with one of Bryson's best - Notes from a Small Island. According to my calculations, laugh-out-loud moments in More Notes clocks in...

    Bill Bryson's rather peevish follow up to his hugely successful book 'Notes from a Small. Island'. here again he travels around britain (mostly England) visting a variety of places. Some places, he likes, some he has his knife into. For instance, he hasn't a good word to say for Dover,...

    I've been trying to get my American arse over to England for my entire life, and, every time I fail to do so, I embrace a new British travelogue to soften the blow. I figure that, by the time I get there, I'll have read so many books on the subject, I'll be an expert, but it's also ...

    Notes from a Small Island was first published 20, yes 20 years ago. In that book he visited place new and revisited old haunts from when he first came to UK in the seventies. His points of view as an outsider were refreshing, fairly blunt and quite frequently very funny. The book came ...

    I am like a grumpy, old(er) man ... I thought that of myself when listening to The Road to Little Dribbling. Just for a little while. Bill Bryson's grumblings about people, service or lack of service, and the general lack of proper grammar and punctuation are just some of the things we...

    (3.5 stars) I read once that the furthest distance the average American will walk without getting into a car is 600 feet, and I fear the modern British have become much the same, except that on the way back to the car the British will drop some rubbish and get a tattoo. I?ve spent...

    For all its stogy, stoicism and unspoken rules of social etiquette, England is a peculiar place full of strange people doing odd things. Many and more are found here in The Road to Little Dribbling: Adventures of an American in Britain. American-born writer Bill Bryson has been livi...

    An unnecessary follow-up to Notes from a Small Island that, in usual Bryson fashion, is packed with trivia that runs the gamut from intriguing to tiresome, and, unlike his other works, generally lacks excitement, humour and wit. Petty jabs masquerading as humour are, on the other hand,...

    This one kind of broke my heart a little. Bill Bryson is a master of the English language. He wields it not as a sword in fiery rhetoric, and not as a scalpel in poetry. He uses it as a hug with some light tickling. Reading his books is an exercise in warm, comfortable conversat...

  • David
    Apr 22, 2017

    Basically? But swap in the UK for "cloud". I've read all of Bryson's other stuff, far as I recall. I have greatly enjoyed it. I laughed so hard at parts of In a Sunburnt Country that I could scarcely breathe. But this? This is a rambling, crotchety old coot, and not in a...

    Hello, Mr. Bryson! It's been a while. Lovely to hear from you again. I must admit I got overly excited last year when I learned that you were writing your first travel memoir in years, and it was going to be about your adventures in England. I love England! I loved your earlier book ab...

    This was not fun. It was like travelling 'round Great Britain with my rather grumpy father in law who only wants to talk about how good things used to be and how crappy things now are. ...

    3.5 What can I say? Bryson fans know exactly what they are getting when they pick up one of his books. A bit of history, information, Bryson's thoughts and feelings on said information and history. A good bit of humor, self-deprecating, ironic and at times laugh out loud funny. A good ...

    Bill Bryson represents himself in this book as a grumpy old man and it is frequently hilarious although occasionally verging on the very edge of political correctness. He's does write incredibly well and I found myself reading passages out loud to anyone who would listen and share it w...

    By far and away Bill Bryson's worst book. It should be called Notes from Southern England. It takes over half the book to get past Birmingham. Wales gets about a chapter, Scotland gets about 10 pages, most of them on a train. The whole thing reads like a half arsed cash in for the 20th...

    (3.5) Bryson?s funniest book for many years. It meant a lot to me since I am also an American expat in England. I kept recognizing places I?d been and agreeing with the sentiments. Two points of criticism, though: although he moves roughly from southeast to northwest in the country...

    Woodsman Spare That Country Bill Bryson is the stand-up comedian of travel writing. The Road to Little Dribbling is an update on his first act, Notes From a Small Island, of 20 years before. The style of loving sarcasm is the same. With the narrative sense of David Sedaris and the o...

    A Bill Bryson book will rarely let you down. It is a reliable companion if you want to have a jolly time. That said, this book cannot avoid comparison with one of Bryson's best - Notes from a Small Island. According to my calculations, laugh-out-loud moments in More Notes clocks in...

    Bill Bryson's rather peevish follow up to his hugely successful book 'Notes from a Small. Island'. here again he travels around britain (mostly England) visting a variety of places. Some places, he likes, some he has his knife into. For instance, he hasn't a good word to say for Dover,...

    I've been trying to get my American arse over to England for my entire life, and, every time I fail to do so, I embrace a new British travelogue to soften the blow. I figure that, by the time I get there, I'll have read so many books on the subject, I'll be an expert, but it's also ...

    Notes from a Small Island was first published 20, yes 20 years ago. In that book he visited place new and revisited old haunts from when he first came to UK in the seventies. His points of view as an outsider were refreshing, fairly blunt and quite frequently very funny. The book came ...

    I am like a grumpy, old(er) man ... I thought that of myself when listening to The Road to Little Dribbling. Just for a little while. Bill Bryson's grumblings about people, service or lack of service, and the general lack of proper grammar and punctuation are just some of the things we...

    (3.5 stars) I read once that the furthest distance the average American will walk without getting into a car is 600 feet, and I fear the modern British have become much the same, except that on the way back to the car the British will drop some rubbish and get a tattoo. I?ve spent...

    For all its stogy, stoicism and unspoken rules of social etiquette, England is a peculiar place full of strange people doing odd things. Many and more are found here in The Road to Little Dribbling: Adventures of an American in Britain. American-born writer Bill Bryson has been livi...

    An unnecessary follow-up to Notes from a Small Island that, in usual Bryson fashion, is packed with trivia that runs the gamut from intriguing to tiresome, and, unlike his other works, generally lacks excitement, humour and wit. Petty jabs masquerading as humour are, on the other hand,...

    This one kind of broke my heart a little. Bill Bryson is a master of the English language. He wields it not as a sword in fiery rhetoric, and not as a scalpel in poetry. He uses it as a hug with some light tickling. Reading his books is an exercise in warm, comfortable conversat...

    I love Bill Bryson. I'll just state that right up front. I've read other of his books, though not all, and enjoyed them immensely, but I think this is my favorite so far. Maybe because he is honest from the outset that he is 65 years old, and somewhat of a curmudgeon, but has earned th...

    He's become the Paul McCartney of travel writing; once sublime and now pushing out books that we buy because he's given us so much pleasure in the past. Maybe it's very clever writing: the ageing scribe and observer returns to look at England and finds it changed mostly for the worse a...

    Something is wrong with Bill Bryson. Maybe it has been too long since I last checked in with him, but this book is a cry for help, people. He hates everything?public transportation, private transportation, food, non-food. And it seems like he has forgotten the names of his family....

    I've always enjoyed Bill Bryson. I loved A Walk in the Woods and The Mother Tongue and his Shakespeare book, etc. This? Not this. I couldn't manage this. Yes, it was lovely to learn that we've all been pronouncing "Everest" wrong (and that George Everest never went up it). It's goo...

    This is a wonderful, entertaining, and truly funny book about Bill Bryson's return to the United Kingdom. I laughed so many times! It's not just what he writes; it is how he writes his stories, his unexpected phrases, that make his sarcasm endearing rather than irritating. In this b...

  • Melanie Baker
    Oct 17, 2015

    Basically? But swap in the UK for "cloud". I've read all of Bryson's other stuff, far as I recall. I have greatly enjoyed it. I laughed so hard at parts of In a Sunburnt Country that I could scarcely breathe. But this? This is a rambling, crotchety old coot, and not in a...

  • Diane
    Oct 20, 2015

    Basically? But swap in the UK for "cloud". I've read all of Bryson's other stuff, far as I recall. I have greatly enjoyed it. I laughed so hard at parts of In a Sunburnt Country that I could scarcely breathe. But this? This is a rambling, crotchety old coot, and not in a...

    Hello, Mr. Bryson! It's been a while. Lovely to hear from you again. I must admit I got overly excited last year when I learned that you were writing your first travel memoir in years, and it was going to be about your adventures in England. I love England! I loved your earlier book ab...

  • Tracey
    Sep 21, 2016

    Basically? But swap in the UK for "cloud". I've read all of Bryson's other stuff, far as I recall. I have greatly enjoyed it. I laughed so hard at parts of In a Sunburnt Country that I could scarcely breathe. But this? This is a rambling, crotchety old coot, and not in a...

    Hello, Mr. Bryson! It's been a while. Lovely to hear from you again. I must admit I got overly excited last year when I learned that you were writing your first travel memoir in years, and it was going to be about your adventures in England. I love England! I loved your earlier book ab...

    This was not fun. It was like travelling 'round Great Britain with my rather grumpy father in law who only wants to talk about how good things used to be and how crappy things now are. ...

    3.5 What can I say? Bryson fans know exactly what they are getting when they pick up one of his books. A bit of history, information, Bryson's thoughts and feelings on said information and history. A good bit of humor, self-deprecating, ironic and at times laugh out loud funny. A good ...

    Bill Bryson represents himself in this book as a grumpy old man and it is frequently hilarious although occasionally verging on the very edge of political correctness. He's does write incredibly well and I found myself reading passages out loud to anyone who would listen and share it w...

    By far and away Bill Bryson's worst book. It should be called Notes from Southern England. It takes over half the book to get past Birmingham. Wales gets about a chapter, Scotland gets about 10 pages, most of them on a train. The whole thing reads like a half arsed cash in for the 20th...

    (3.5) Bryson?s funniest book for many years. It meant a lot to me since I am also an American expat in England. I kept recognizing places I?d been and agreeing with the sentiments. Two points of criticism, though: although he moves roughly from southeast to northwest in the country...

    Woodsman Spare That Country Bill Bryson is the stand-up comedian of travel writing. The Road to Little Dribbling is an update on his first act, Notes From a Small Island, of 20 years before. The style of loving sarcasm is the same. With the narrative sense of David Sedaris and the o...

    A Bill Bryson book will rarely let you down. It is a reliable companion if you want to have a jolly time. That said, this book cannot avoid comparison with one of Bryson's best - Notes from a Small Island. According to my calculations, laugh-out-loud moments in More Notes clocks in...

    Bill Bryson's rather peevish follow up to his hugely successful book 'Notes from a Small. Island'. here again he travels around britain (mostly England) visting a variety of places. Some places, he likes, some he has his knife into. For instance, he hasn't a good word to say for Dover,...

    I've been trying to get my American arse over to England for my entire life, and, every time I fail to do so, I embrace a new British travelogue to soften the blow. I figure that, by the time I get there, I'll have read so many books on the subject, I'll be an expert, but it's also ...

    Notes from a Small Island was first published 20, yes 20 years ago. In that book he visited place new and revisited old haunts from when he first came to UK in the seventies. His points of view as an outsider were refreshing, fairly blunt and quite frequently very funny. The book came ...

    I am like a grumpy, old(er) man ... I thought that of myself when listening to The Road to Little Dribbling. Just for a little while. Bill Bryson's grumblings about people, service or lack of service, and the general lack of proper grammar and punctuation are just some of the things we...

    (3.5 stars) I read once that the furthest distance the average American will walk without getting into a car is 600 feet, and I fear the modern British have become much the same, except that on the way back to the car the British will drop some rubbish and get a tattoo. I?ve spent...

    For all its stogy, stoicism and unspoken rules of social etiquette, England is a peculiar place full of strange people doing odd things. Many and more are found here in The Road to Little Dribbling: Adventures of an American in Britain. American-born writer Bill Bryson has been livi...

    An unnecessary follow-up to Notes from a Small Island that, in usual Bryson fashion, is packed with trivia that runs the gamut from intriguing to tiresome, and, unlike his other works, generally lacks excitement, humour and wit. Petty jabs masquerading as humour are, on the other hand,...

    This one kind of broke my heart a little. Bill Bryson is a master of the English language. He wields it not as a sword in fiery rhetoric, and not as a scalpel in poetry. He uses it as a hug with some light tickling. Reading his books is an exercise in warm, comfortable conversat...

    I love Bill Bryson. I'll just state that right up front. I've read other of his books, though not all, and enjoyed them immensely, but I think this is my favorite so far. Maybe because he is honest from the outset that he is 65 years old, and somewhat of a curmudgeon, but has earned th...

    He's become the Paul McCartney of travel writing; once sublime and now pushing out books that we buy because he's given us so much pleasure in the past. Maybe it's very clever writing: the ageing scribe and observer returns to look at England and finds it changed mostly for the worse a...

    Something is wrong with Bill Bryson. Maybe it has been too long since I last checked in with him, but this book is a cry for help, people. He hates everything?public transportation, private transportation, food, non-food. And it seems like he has forgotten the names of his family....

    I've always enjoyed Bill Bryson. I loved A Walk in the Woods and The Mother Tongue and his Shakespeare book, etc. This? Not this. I couldn't manage this. Yes, it was lovely to learn that we've all been pronouncing "Everest" wrong (and that George Everest never went up it). It's goo...

  • Turi
    Oct 09, 2015

    Basically? But swap in the UK for "cloud". I've read all of Bryson's other stuff, far as I recall. I have greatly enjoyed it. I laughed so hard at parts of In a Sunburnt Country that I could scarcely breathe. But this? This is a rambling, crotchety old coot, and not in a...

    Hello, Mr. Bryson! It's been a while. Lovely to hear from you again. I must admit I got overly excited last year when I learned that you were writing your first travel memoir in years, and it was going to be about your adventures in England. I love England! I loved your earlier book ab...

    This was not fun. It was like travelling 'round Great Britain with my rather grumpy father in law who only wants to talk about how good things used to be and how crappy things now are. ...

    3.5 What can I say? Bryson fans know exactly what they are getting when they pick up one of his books. A bit of history, information, Bryson's thoughts and feelings on said information and history. A good bit of humor, self-deprecating, ironic and at times laugh out loud funny. A good ...

    Bill Bryson represents himself in this book as a grumpy old man and it is frequently hilarious although occasionally verging on the very edge of political correctness. He's does write incredibly well and I found myself reading passages out loud to anyone who would listen and share it w...

    By far and away Bill Bryson's worst book. It should be called Notes from Southern England. It takes over half the book to get past Birmingham. Wales gets about a chapter, Scotland gets about 10 pages, most of them on a train. The whole thing reads like a half arsed cash in for the 20th...

    (3.5) Bryson?s funniest book for many years. It meant a lot to me since I am also an American expat in England. I kept recognizing places I?d been and agreeing with the sentiments. Two points of criticism, though: although he moves roughly from southeast to northwest in the country...

    Woodsman Spare That Country Bill Bryson is the stand-up comedian of travel writing. The Road to Little Dribbling is an update on his first act, Notes From a Small Island, of 20 years before. The style of loving sarcasm is the same. With the narrative sense of David Sedaris and the o...

    A Bill Bryson book will rarely let you down. It is a reliable companion if you want to have a jolly time. That said, this book cannot avoid comparison with one of Bryson's best - Notes from a Small Island. According to my calculations, laugh-out-loud moments in More Notes clocks in...

    Bill Bryson's rather peevish follow up to his hugely successful book 'Notes from a Small. Island'. here again he travels around britain (mostly England) visting a variety of places. Some places, he likes, some he has his knife into. For instance, he hasn't a good word to say for Dover,...

    I've been trying to get my American arse over to England for my entire life, and, every time I fail to do so, I embrace a new British travelogue to soften the blow. I figure that, by the time I get there, I'll have read so many books on the subject, I'll be an expert, but it's also ...

    Notes from a Small Island was first published 20, yes 20 years ago. In that book he visited place new and revisited old haunts from when he first came to UK in the seventies. His points of view as an outsider were refreshing, fairly blunt and quite frequently very funny. The book came ...

    I am like a grumpy, old(er) man ... I thought that of myself when listening to The Road to Little Dribbling. Just for a little while. Bill Bryson's grumblings about people, service or lack of service, and the general lack of proper grammar and punctuation are just some of the things we...

    (3.5 stars) I read once that the furthest distance the average American will walk without getting into a car is 600 feet, and I fear the modern British have become much the same, except that on the way back to the car the British will drop some rubbish and get a tattoo. I?ve spent...

    For all its stogy, stoicism and unspoken rules of social etiquette, England is a peculiar place full of strange people doing odd things. Many and more are found here in The Road to Little Dribbling: Adventures of an American in Britain. American-born writer Bill Bryson has been livi...

    An unnecessary follow-up to Notes from a Small Island that, in usual Bryson fashion, is packed with trivia that runs the gamut from intriguing to tiresome, and, unlike his other works, generally lacks excitement, humour and wit. Petty jabs masquerading as humour are, on the other hand,...

    This one kind of broke my heart a little. Bill Bryson is a master of the English language. He wields it not as a sword in fiery rhetoric, and not as a scalpel in poetry. He uses it as a hug with some light tickling. Reading his books is an exercise in warm, comfortable conversat...

    I love Bill Bryson. I'll just state that right up front. I've read other of his books, though not all, and enjoyed them immensely, but I think this is my favorite so far. Maybe because he is honest from the outset that he is 65 years old, and somewhat of a curmudgeon, but has earned th...

    He's become the Paul McCartney of travel writing; once sublime and now pushing out books that we buy because he's given us so much pleasure in the past. Maybe it's very clever writing: the ageing scribe and observer returns to look at England and finds it changed mostly for the worse a...

    Something is wrong with Bill Bryson. Maybe it has been too long since I last checked in with him, but this book is a cry for help, people. He hates everything?public transportation, private transportation, food, non-food. And it seems like he has forgotten the names of his family....

    I've always enjoyed Bill Bryson. I loved A Walk in the Woods and The Mother Tongue and his Shakespeare book, etc. This? Not this. I couldn't manage this. Yes, it was lovely to learn that we've all been pronouncing "Everest" wrong (and that George Everest never went up it). It's goo...

    This is a wonderful, entertaining, and truly funny book about Bill Bryson's return to the United Kingdom. I laughed so many times! It's not just what he writes; it is how he writes his stories, his unexpected phrases, that make his sarcasm endearing rather than irritating. In this b...

    Bryson has matured into the curmudgeonly grump that was presaged in hes previous books. And it's wonderful. ...

  • Riku Sayuj
    Sep 03, 2017

    Basically? But swap in the UK for "cloud". I've read all of Bryson's other stuff, far as I recall. I have greatly enjoyed it. I laughed so hard at parts of In a Sunburnt Country that I could scarcely breathe. But this? This is a rambling, crotchety old coot, and not in a...

    Hello, Mr. Bryson! It's been a while. Lovely to hear from you again. I must admit I got overly excited last year when I learned that you were writing your first travel memoir in years, and it was going to be about your adventures in England. I love England! I loved your earlier book ab...

    This was not fun. It was like travelling 'round Great Britain with my rather grumpy father in law who only wants to talk about how good things used to be and how crappy things now are. ...

    3.5 What can I say? Bryson fans know exactly what they are getting when they pick up one of his books. A bit of history, information, Bryson's thoughts and feelings on said information and history. A good bit of humor, self-deprecating, ironic and at times laugh out loud funny. A good ...

    Bill Bryson represents himself in this book as a grumpy old man and it is frequently hilarious although occasionally verging on the very edge of political correctness. He's does write incredibly well and I found myself reading passages out loud to anyone who would listen and share it w...

    By far and away Bill Bryson's worst book. It should be called Notes from Southern England. It takes over half the book to get past Birmingham. Wales gets about a chapter, Scotland gets about 10 pages, most of them on a train. The whole thing reads like a half arsed cash in for the 20th...

    (3.5) Bryson?s funniest book for many years. It meant a lot to me since I am also an American expat in England. I kept recognizing places I?d been and agreeing with the sentiments. Two points of criticism, though: although he moves roughly from southeast to northwest in the country...

    Woodsman Spare That Country Bill Bryson is the stand-up comedian of travel writing. The Road to Little Dribbling is an update on his first act, Notes From a Small Island, of 20 years before. The style of loving sarcasm is the same. With the narrative sense of David Sedaris and the o...

    A Bill Bryson book will rarely let you down. It is a reliable companion if you want to have a jolly time. That said, this book cannot avoid comparison with one of Bryson's best - Notes from a Small Island. According to my calculations, laugh-out-loud moments in More Notes clocks in...

  • Jason Koivu
    Jan 25, 2017

    Basically? But swap in the UK for "cloud". I've read all of Bryson's other stuff, far as I recall. I have greatly enjoyed it. I laughed so hard at parts of In a Sunburnt Country that I could scarcely breathe. But this? This is a rambling, crotchety old coot, and not in a...

    Hello, Mr. Bryson! It's been a while. Lovely to hear from you again. I must admit I got overly excited last year when I learned that you were writing your first travel memoir in years, and it was going to be about your adventures in England. I love England! I loved your earlier book ab...

    This was not fun. It was like travelling 'round Great Britain with my rather grumpy father in law who only wants to talk about how good things used to be and how crappy things now are. ...

    3.5 What can I say? Bryson fans know exactly what they are getting when they pick up one of his books. A bit of history, information, Bryson's thoughts and feelings on said information and history. A good bit of humor, self-deprecating, ironic and at times laugh out loud funny. A good ...

    Bill Bryson represents himself in this book as a grumpy old man and it is frequently hilarious although occasionally verging on the very edge of political correctness. He's does write incredibly well and I found myself reading passages out loud to anyone who would listen and share it w...

    By far and away Bill Bryson's worst book. It should be called Notes from Southern England. It takes over half the book to get past Birmingham. Wales gets about a chapter, Scotland gets about 10 pages, most of them on a train. The whole thing reads like a half arsed cash in for the 20th...

    (3.5) Bryson?s funniest book for many years. It meant a lot to me since I am also an American expat in England. I kept recognizing places I?d been and agreeing with the sentiments. Two points of criticism, though: although he moves roughly from southeast to northwest in the country...

    Woodsman Spare That Country Bill Bryson is the stand-up comedian of travel writing. The Road to Little Dribbling is an update on his first act, Notes From a Small Island, of 20 years before. The style of loving sarcasm is the same. With the narrative sense of David Sedaris and the o...

    A Bill Bryson book will rarely let you down. It is a reliable companion if you want to have a jolly time. That said, this book cannot avoid comparison with one of Bryson's best - Notes from a Small Island. According to my calculations, laugh-out-loud moments in More Notes clocks in...

    Bill Bryson's rather peevish follow up to his hugely successful book 'Notes from a Small. Island'. here again he travels around britain (mostly England) visting a variety of places. Some places, he likes, some he has his knife into. For instance, he hasn't a good word to say for Dover,...

    I've been trying to get my American arse over to England for my entire life, and, every time I fail to do so, I embrace a new British travelogue to soften the blow. I figure that, by the time I get there, I'll have read so many books on the subject, I'll be an expert, but it's also ...

    Notes from a Small Island was first published 20, yes 20 years ago. In that book he visited place new and revisited old haunts from when he first came to UK in the seventies. His points of view as an outsider were refreshing, fairly blunt and quite frequently very funny. The book came ...

    I am like a grumpy, old(er) man ... I thought that of myself when listening to The Road to Little Dribbling. Just for a little while. Bill Bryson's grumblings about people, service or lack of service, and the general lack of proper grammar and punctuation are just some of the things we...

    (3.5 stars) I read once that the furthest distance the average American will walk without getting into a car is 600 feet, and I fear the modern British have become much the same, except that on the way back to the car the British will drop some rubbish and get a tattoo. I?ve spent...

    For all its stogy, stoicism and unspoken rules of social etiquette, England is a peculiar place full of strange people doing odd things. Many and more are found here in The Road to Little Dribbling: Adventures of an American in Britain. American-born writer Bill Bryson has been livi...

  • Louise Culmer
    Oct 19, 2015

    Basically? But swap in the UK for "cloud". I've read all of Bryson's other stuff, far as I recall. I have greatly enjoyed it. I laughed so hard at parts of In a Sunburnt Country that I could scarcely breathe. But this? This is a rambling, crotchety old coot, and not in a...

    Hello, Mr. Bryson! It's been a while. Lovely to hear from you again. I must admit I got overly excited last year when I learned that you were writing your first travel memoir in years, and it was going to be about your adventures in England. I love England! I loved your earlier book ab...

    This was not fun. It was like travelling 'round Great Britain with my rather grumpy father in law who only wants to talk about how good things used to be and how crappy things now are. ...

    3.5 What can I say? Bryson fans know exactly what they are getting when they pick up one of his books. A bit of history, information, Bryson's thoughts and feelings on said information and history. A good bit of humor, self-deprecating, ironic and at times laugh out loud funny. A good ...

    Bill Bryson represents himself in this book as a grumpy old man and it is frequently hilarious although occasionally verging on the very edge of political correctness. He's does write incredibly well and I found myself reading passages out loud to anyone who would listen and share it w...

    By far and away Bill Bryson's worst book. It should be called Notes from Southern England. It takes over half the book to get past Birmingham. Wales gets about a chapter, Scotland gets about 10 pages, most of them on a train. The whole thing reads like a half arsed cash in for the 20th...

    (3.5) Bryson?s funniest book for many years. It meant a lot to me since I am also an American expat in England. I kept recognizing places I?d been and agreeing with the sentiments. Two points of criticism, though: although he moves roughly from southeast to northwest in the country...

    Woodsman Spare That Country Bill Bryson is the stand-up comedian of travel writing. The Road to Little Dribbling is an update on his first act, Notes From a Small Island, of 20 years before. The style of loving sarcasm is the same. With the narrative sense of David Sedaris and the o...

    A Bill Bryson book will rarely let you down. It is a reliable companion if you want to have a jolly time. That said, this book cannot avoid comparison with one of Bryson's best - Notes from a Small Island. According to my calculations, laugh-out-loud moments in More Notes clocks in...

    Bill Bryson's rather peevish follow up to his hugely successful book 'Notes from a Small. Island'. here again he travels around britain (mostly England) visting a variety of places. Some places, he likes, some he has his knife into. For instance, he hasn't a good word to say for Dover,...

  • beentsy
    Nov 09, 2015

    Basically? But swap in the UK for "cloud". I've read all of Bryson's other stuff, far as I recall. I have greatly enjoyed it. I laughed so hard at parts of In a Sunburnt Country that I could scarcely breathe. But this? This is a rambling, crotchety old coot, and not in a...

    Hello, Mr. Bryson! It's been a while. Lovely to hear from you again. I must admit I got overly excited last year when I learned that you were writing your first travel memoir in years, and it was going to be about your adventures in England. I love England! I loved your earlier book ab...

    This was not fun. It was like travelling 'round Great Britain with my rather grumpy father in law who only wants to talk about how good things used to be and how crappy things now are. ...

  • Scott Nicoll
    Nov 01, 2015

    Basically? But swap in the UK for "cloud". I've read all of Bryson's other stuff, far as I recall. I have greatly enjoyed it. I laughed so hard at parts of In a Sunburnt Country that I could scarcely breathe. But this? This is a rambling, crotchety old coot, and not in a...

    Hello, Mr. Bryson! It's been a while. Lovely to hear from you again. I must admit I got overly excited last year when I learned that you were writing your first travel memoir in years, and it was going to be about your adventures in England. I love England! I loved your earlier book ab...

    This was not fun. It was like travelling 'round Great Britain with my rather grumpy father in law who only wants to talk about how good things used to be and how crappy things now are. ...

    3.5 What can I say? Bryson fans know exactly what they are getting when they pick up one of his books. A bit of history, information, Bryson's thoughts and feelings on said information and history. A good bit of humor, self-deprecating, ironic and at times laugh out loud funny. A good ...

    Bill Bryson represents himself in this book as a grumpy old man and it is frequently hilarious although occasionally verging on the very edge of political correctness. He's does write incredibly well and I found myself reading passages out loud to anyone who would listen and share it w...

    By far and away Bill Bryson's worst book. It should be called Notes from Southern England. It takes over half the book to get past Birmingham. Wales gets about a chapter, Scotland gets about 10 pages, most of them on a train. The whole thing reads like a half arsed cash in for the 20th...

  • Ammar
    Aug 28, 2017

    Basically? But swap in the UK for "cloud". I've read all of Bryson's other stuff, far as I recall. I have greatly enjoyed it. I laughed so hard at parts of In a Sunburnt Country that I could scarcely breathe. But this? This is a rambling, crotchety old coot, and not in a...

    Hello, Mr. Bryson! It's been a while. Lovely to hear from you again. I must admit I got overly excited last year when I learned that you were writing your first travel memoir in years, and it was going to be about your adventures in England. I love England! I loved your earlier book ab...

    This was not fun. It was like travelling 'round Great Britain with my rather grumpy father in law who only wants to talk about how good things used to be and how crappy things now are. ...

    3.5 What can I say? Bryson fans know exactly what they are getting when they pick up one of his books. A bit of history, information, Bryson's thoughts and feelings on said information and history. A good bit of humor, self-deprecating, ironic and at times laugh out loud funny. A good ...

    Bill Bryson represents himself in this book as a grumpy old man and it is frequently hilarious although occasionally verging on the very edge of political correctness. He's does write incredibly well and I found myself reading passages out loud to anyone who would listen and share it w...

    By far and away Bill Bryson's worst book. It should be called Notes from Southern England. It takes over half the book to get past Birmingham. Wales gets about a chapter, Scotland gets about 10 pages, most of them on a train. The whole thing reads like a half arsed cash in for the 20th...

    (3.5) Bryson?s funniest book for many years. It meant a lot to me since I am also an American expat in England. I kept recognizing places I?d been and agreeing with the sentiments. Two points of criticism, though: although he moves roughly from southeast to northwest in the country...

    Woodsman Spare That Country Bill Bryson is the stand-up comedian of travel writing. The Road to Little Dribbling is an update on his first act, Notes From a Small Island, of 20 years before. The style of loving sarcasm is the same. With the narrative sense of David Sedaris and the o...

    A Bill Bryson book will rarely let you down. It is a reliable companion if you want to have a jolly time. That said, this book cannot avoid comparison with one of Bryson's best - Notes from a Small Island. According to my calculations, laugh-out-loud moments in More Notes clocks in...

    Bill Bryson's rather peevish follow up to his hugely successful book 'Notes from a Small. Island'. here again he travels around britain (mostly England) visting a variety of places. Some places, he likes, some he has his knife into. For instance, he hasn't a good word to say for Dover,...

    I've been trying to get my American arse over to England for my entire life, and, every time I fail to do so, I embrace a new British travelogue to soften the blow. I figure that, by the time I get there, I'll have read so many books on the subject, I'll be an expert, but it's also ...

    Notes from a Small Island was first published 20, yes 20 years ago. In that book he visited place new and revisited old haunts from when he first came to UK in the seventies. His points of view as an outsider were refreshing, fairly blunt and quite frequently very funny. The book came ...

    I am like a grumpy, old(er) man ... I thought that of myself when listening to The Road to Little Dribbling. Just for a little while. Bill Bryson's grumblings about people, service or lack of service, and the general lack of proper grammar and punctuation are just some of the things we...

    (3.5 stars) I read once that the furthest distance the average American will walk without getting into a car is 600 feet, and I fear the modern British have become much the same, except that on the way back to the car the British will drop some rubbish and get a tattoo. I?ve spent...

    For all its stogy, stoicism and unspoken rules of social etiquette, England is a peculiar place full of strange people doing odd things. Many and more are found here in The Road to Little Dribbling: Adventures of an American in Britain. American-born writer Bill Bryson has been livi...

    An unnecessary follow-up to Notes from a Small Island that, in usual Bryson fashion, is packed with trivia that runs the gamut from intriguing to tiresome, and, unlike his other works, generally lacks excitement, humour and wit. Petty jabs masquerading as humour are, on the other hand,...

    This one kind of broke my heart a little. Bill Bryson is a master of the English language. He wields it not as a sword in fiery rhetoric, and not as a scalpel in poetry. He uses it as a hug with some light tickling. Reading his books is an exercise in warm, comfortable conversat...

    I love Bill Bryson. I'll just state that right up front. I've read other of his books, though not all, and enjoyed them immensely, but I think this is my favorite so far. Maybe because he is honest from the outset that he is 65 years old, and somewhat of a curmudgeon, but has earned th...

    He's become the Paul McCartney of travel writing; once sublime and now pushing out books that we buy because he's given us so much pleasure in the past. Maybe it's very clever writing: the ageing scribe and observer returns to look at England and finds it changed mostly for the worse a...

    Something is wrong with Bill Bryson. Maybe it has been too long since I last checked in with him, but this book is a cry for help, people. He hates everything?public transportation, private transportation, food, non-food. And it seems like he has forgotten the names of his family....

    I've always enjoyed Bill Bryson. I loved A Walk in the Woods and The Mother Tongue and his Shakespeare book, etc. This? Not this. I couldn't manage this. Yes, it was lovely to learn that we've all been pronouncing "Everest" wrong (and that George Everest never went up it). It's goo...

    This is a wonderful, entertaining, and truly funny book about Bill Bryson's return to the United Kingdom. I laughed so many times! It's not just what he writes; it is how he writes his stories, his unexpected phrases, that make his sarcasm endearing rather than irritating. In this b...

    Bryson has matured into the curmudgeonly grump that was presaged in hes previous books. And it's wonderful. ...

    A lovely book, and one where there are far too many diverse encounters to focus on any particular one, but it had me laughing on almost every page. As part of the 20th anniversary of his first Notes from a Small Island, Bryson set out to travel the ?Bryson Line? ? which he clai...

    I congratulate Mr Bryson for becoming a British citizen, but I think I need to warn him it's not like playing a computer game: i.e., when you conquer the first level, you don't have to progress to a whingeing pom level, then a grumpy old man level. I suspect I'm part of the older re...

    I needed to relax with a quick audible nostalgic trip around UK. Terrible disappointment. Bill Bryson has turned into a patronising, grumpy old man. He bullies a poor kid in Macdonalds, grumbles about a cafe that he remembered now closed, whinges about traffic and I am nearly at th...

    I really enjoyed this! A wonderful mix of historical anecdotes, personal stories, and descriptions of lovely countrysides and beautiful old buildings. Plus, as other reviewers have noted, a generous helping of grousing about idiots. I've read quite a few of Bryson's books, but this may...

    A really fun and informative trip around Britain with Bill. Twenty years on from Notes on a Small Island Bill is now a UK citizen and decides to embark on another trip around Britain from Bognor Regis to Cape Wrath. No town, village or city is spared Bryson's observations; nor is Briti...

    Bill Bryson revisits the places he went to in Notes from a small Island after 20 years and describes Britain of the 21st century where a lot of shops are closed, most high streets look alike .. many towns lost independent stores and mongers and grocers to the like of Sainsbury and Morr...

  • Whitney
    May 16, 2016

    Basically? But swap in the UK for "cloud". I've read all of Bryson's other stuff, far as I recall. I have greatly enjoyed it. I laughed so hard at parts of In a Sunburnt Country that I could scarcely breathe. But this? This is a rambling, crotchety old coot, and not in a...

    Hello, Mr. Bryson! It's been a while. Lovely to hear from you again. I must admit I got overly excited last year when I learned that you were writing your first travel memoir in years, and it was going to be about your adventures in England. I love England! I loved your earlier book ab...

    This was not fun. It was like travelling 'round Great Britain with my rather grumpy father in law who only wants to talk about how good things used to be and how crappy things now are. ...

    3.5 What can I say? Bryson fans know exactly what they are getting when they pick up one of his books. A bit of history, information, Bryson's thoughts and feelings on said information and history. A good bit of humor, self-deprecating, ironic and at times laugh out loud funny. A good ...

    Bill Bryson represents himself in this book as a grumpy old man and it is frequently hilarious although occasionally verging on the very edge of political correctness. He's does write incredibly well and I found myself reading passages out loud to anyone who would listen and share it w...

    By far and away Bill Bryson's worst book. It should be called Notes from Southern England. It takes over half the book to get past Birmingham. Wales gets about a chapter, Scotland gets about 10 pages, most of them on a train. The whole thing reads like a half arsed cash in for the 20th...

    (3.5) Bryson?s funniest book for many years. It meant a lot to me since I am also an American expat in England. I kept recognizing places I?d been and agreeing with the sentiments. Two points of criticism, though: although he moves roughly from southeast to northwest in the country...

    Woodsman Spare That Country Bill Bryson is the stand-up comedian of travel writing. The Road to Little Dribbling is an update on his first act, Notes From a Small Island, of 20 years before. The style of loving sarcasm is the same. With the narrative sense of David Sedaris and the o...

    A Bill Bryson book will rarely let you down. It is a reliable companion if you want to have a jolly time. That said, this book cannot avoid comparison with one of Bryson's best - Notes from a Small Island. According to my calculations, laugh-out-loud moments in More Notes clocks in...

    Bill Bryson's rather peevish follow up to his hugely successful book 'Notes from a Small. Island'. here again he travels around britain (mostly England) visting a variety of places. Some places, he likes, some he has his knife into. For instance, he hasn't a good word to say for Dover,...

    I've been trying to get my American arse over to England for my entire life, and, every time I fail to do so, I embrace a new British travelogue to soften the blow. I figure that, by the time I get there, I'll have read so many books on the subject, I'll be an expert, but it's also ...

    Notes from a Small Island was first published 20, yes 20 years ago. In that book he visited place new and revisited old haunts from when he first came to UK in the seventies. His points of view as an outsider were refreshing, fairly blunt and quite frequently very funny. The book came ...

    I am like a grumpy, old(er) man ... I thought that of myself when listening to The Road to Little Dribbling. Just for a little while. Bill Bryson's grumblings about people, service or lack of service, and the general lack of proper grammar and punctuation are just some of the things we...

    (3.5 stars) I read once that the furthest distance the average American will walk without getting into a car is 600 feet, and I fear the modern British have become much the same, except that on the way back to the car the British will drop some rubbish and get a tattoo. I?ve spent...

    For all its stogy, stoicism and unspoken rules of social etiquette, England is a peculiar place full of strange people doing odd things. Many and more are found here in The Road to Little Dribbling: Adventures of an American in Britain. American-born writer Bill Bryson has been livi...

    An unnecessary follow-up to Notes from a Small Island that, in usual Bryson fashion, is packed with trivia that runs the gamut from intriguing to tiresome, and, unlike his other works, generally lacks excitement, humour and wit. Petty jabs masquerading as humour are, on the other hand,...

    This one kind of broke my heart a little. Bill Bryson is a master of the English language. He wields it not as a sword in fiery rhetoric, and not as a scalpel in poetry. He uses it as a hug with some light tickling. Reading his books is an exercise in warm, comfortable conversat...

    I love Bill Bryson. I'll just state that right up front. I've read other of his books, though not all, and enjoyed them immensely, but I think this is my favorite so far. Maybe because he is honest from the outset that he is 65 years old, and somewhat of a curmudgeon, but has earned th...

    He's become the Paul McCartney of travel writing; once sublime and now pushing out books that we buy because he's given us so much pleasure in the past. Maybe it's very clever writing: the ageing scribe and observer returns to look at England and finds it changed mostly for the worse a...

    Something is wrong with Bill Bryson. Maybe it has been too long since I last checked in with him, but this book is a cry for help, people. He hates everything?public transportation, private transportation, food, non-food. And it seems like he has forgotten the names of his family....

  • Diane S ☔
    Jul 27, 2015

    Basically? But swap in the UK for "cloud". I've read all of Bryson's other stuff, far as I recall. I have greatly enjoyed it. I laughed so hard at parts of In a Sunburnt Country that I could scarcely breathe. But this? This is a rambling, crotchety old coot, and not in a...

    Hello, Mr. Bryson! It's been a while. Lovely to hear from you again. I must admit I got overly excited last year when I learned that you were writing your first travel memoir in years, and it was going to be about your adventures in England. I love England! I loved your earlier book ab...

    This was not fun. It was like travelling 'round Great Britain with my rather grumpy father in law who only wants to talk about how good things used to be and how crappy things now are. ...

    3.5 What can I say? Bryson fans know exactly what they are getting when they pick up one of his books. A bit of history, information, Bryson's thoughts and feelings on said information and history. A good bit of humor, self-deprecating, ironic and at times laugh out loud funny. A good ...

  • Will
    Nov 18, 2017

    Basically? But swap in the UK for "cloud". I've read all of Bryson's other stuff, far as I recall. I have greatly enjoyed it. I laughed so hard at parts of In a Sunburnt Country that I could scarcely breathe. But this? This is a rambling, crotchety old coot, and not in a...

    Hello, Mr. Bryson! It's been a while. Lovely to hear from you again. I must admit I got overly excited last year when I learned that you were writing your first travel memoir in years, and it was going to be about your adventures in England. I love England! I loved your earlier book ab...

    This was not fun. It was like travelling 'round Great Britain with my rather grumpy father in law who only wants to talk about how good things used to be and how crappy things now are. ...

    3.5 What can I say? Bryson fans know exactly what they are getting when they pick up one of his books. A bit of history, information, Bryson's thoughts and feelings on said information and history. A good bit of humor, self-deprecating, ironic and at times laugh out loud funny. A good ...

    Bill Bryson represents himself in this book as a grumpy old man and it is frequently hilarious although occasionally verging on the very edge of political correctness. He's does write incredibly well and I found myself reading passages out loud to anyone who would listen and share it w...

    By far and away Bill Bryson's worst book. It should be called Notes from Southern England. It takes over half the book to get past Birmingham. Wales gets about a chapter, Scotland gets about 10 pages, most of them on a train. The whole thing reads like a half arsed cash in for the 20th...

    (3.5) Bryson?s funniest book for many years. It meant a lot to me since I am also an American expat in England. I kept recognizing places I?d been and agreeing with the sentiments. Two points of criticism, though: although he moves roughly from southeast to northwest in the country...

    Woodsman Spare That Country Bill Bryson is the stand-up comedian of travel writing. The Road to Little Dribbling is an update on his first act, Notes From a Small Island, of 20 years before. The style of loving sarcasm is the same. With the narrative sense of David Sedaris and the o...

    A Bill Bryson book will rarely let you down. It is a reliable companion if you want to have a jolly time. That said, this book cannot avoid comparison with one of Bryson's best - Notes from a Small Island. According to my calculations, laugh-out-loud moments in More Notes clocks in...

    Bill Bryson's rather peevish follow up to his hugely successful book 'Notes from a Small. Island'. here again he travels around britain (mostly England) visting a variety of places. Some places, he likes, some he has his knife into. For instance, he hasn't a good word to say for Dover,...

    I've been trying to get my American arse over to England for my entire life, and, every time I fail to do so, I embrace a new British travelogue to soften the blow. I figure that, by the time I get there, I'll have read so many books on the subject, I'll be an expert, but it's also ...

    Notes from a Small Island was first published 20, yes 20 years ago. In that book he visited place new and revisited old haunts from when he first came to UK in the seventies. His points of view as an outsider were refreshing, fairly blunt and quite frequently very funny. The book came ...

    I am like a grumpy, old(er) man ... I thought that of myself when listening to The Road to Little Dribbling. Just for a little while. Bill Bryson's grumblings about people, service or lack of service, and the general lack of proper grammar and punctuation are just some of the things we...

    (3.5 stars) I read once that the furthest distance the average American will walk without getting into a car is 600 feet, and I fear the modern British have become much the same, except that on the way back to the car the British will drop some rubbish and get a tattoo. I?ve spent...

    For all its stogy, stoicism and unspoken rules of social etiquette, England is a peculiar place full of strange people doing odd things. Many and more are found here in The Road to Little Dribbling: Adventures of an American in Britain. American-born writer Bill Bryson has been livi...

    An unnecessary follow-up to Notes from a Small Island that, in usual Bryson fashion, is packed with trivia that runs the gamut from intriguing to tiresome, and, unlike his other works, generally lacks excitement, humour and wit. Petty jabs masquerading as humour are, on the other hand,...

    This one kind of broke my heart a little. Bill Bryson is a master of the English language. He wields it not as a sword in fiery rhetoric, and not as a scalpel in poetry. He uses it as a hug with some light tickling. Reading his books is an exercise in warm, comfortable conversat...

    I love Bill Bryson. I'll just state that right up front. I've read other of his books, though not all, and enjoyed them immensely, but I think this is my favorite so far. Maybe because he is honest from the outset that he is 65 years old, and somewhat of a curmudgeon, but has earned th...

    He's become the Paul McCartney of travel writing; once sublime and now pushing out books that we buy because he's given us so much pleasure in the past. Maybe it's very clever writing: the ageing scribe and observer returns to look at England and finds it changed mostly for the worse a...

    Something is wrong with Bill Bryson. Maybe it has been too long since I last checked in with him, but this book is a cry for help, people. He hates everything?public transportation, private transportation, food, non-food. And it seems like he has forgotten the names of his family....

    I've always enjoyed Bill Bryson. I loved A Walk in the Woods and The Mother Tongue and his Shakespeare book, etc. This? Not this. I couldn't manage this. Yes, it was lovely to learn that we've all been pronouncing "Everest" wrong (and that George Everest never went up it). It's goo...

    This is a wonderful, entertaining, and truly funny book about Bill Bryson's return to the United Kingdom. I laughed so many times! It's not just what he writes; it is how he writes his stories, his unexpected phrases, that make his sarcasm endearing rather than irritating. In this b...

    Bryson has matured into the curmudgeonly grump that was presaged in hes previous books. And it's wonderful. ...

    A lovely book, and one where there are far too many diverse encounters to focus on any particular one, but it had me laughing on almost every page. As part of the 20th anniversary of his first Notes from a Small Island, Bryson set out to travel the ?Bryson Line? ? which he clai...

  • Julie
    Jun 27, 2017

    Basically? But swap in the UK for "cloud". I've read all of Bryson's other stuff, far as I recall. I have greatly enjoyed it. I laughed so hard at parts of In a Sunburnt Country that I could scarcely breathe. But this? This is a rambling, crotchety old coot, and not in a...

    Hello, Mr. Bryson! It's been a while. Lovely to hear from you again. I must admit I got overly excited last year when I learned that you were writing your first travel memoir in years, and it was going to be about your adventures in England. I love England! I loved your earlier book ab...

    This was not fun. It was like travelling 'round Great Britain with my rather grumpy father in law who only wants to talk about how good things used to be and how crappy things now are. ...

    3.5 What can I say? Bryson fans know exactly what they are getting when they pick up one of his books. A bit of history, information, Bryson's thoughts and feelings on said information and history. A good bit of humor, self-deprecating, ironic and at times laugh out loud funny. A good ...

    Bill Bryson represents himself in this book as a grumpy old man and it is frequently hilarious although occasionally verging on the very edge of political correctness. He's does write incredibly well and I found myself reading passages out loud to anyone who would listen and share it w...

    By far and away Bill Bryson's worst book. It should be called Notes from Southern England. It takes over half the book to get past Birmingham. Wales gets about a chapter, Scotland gets about 10 pages, most of them on a train. The whole thing reads like a half arsed cash in for the 20th...

    (3.5) Bryson?s funniest book for many years. It meant a lot to me since I am also an American expat in England. I kept recognizing places I?d been and agreeing with the sentiments. Two points of criticism, though: although he moves roughly from southeast to northwest in the country...

    Woodsman Spare That Country Bill Bryson is the stand-up comedian of travel writing. The Road to Little Dribbling is an update on his first act, Notes From a Small Island, of 20 years before. The style of loving sarcasm is the same. With the narrative sense of David Sedaris and the o...

    A Bill Bryson book will rarely let you down. It is a reliable companion if you want to have a jolly time. That said, this book cannot avoid comparison with one of Bryson's best - Notes from a Small Island. According to my calculations, laugh-out-loud moments in More Notes clocks in...

    Bill Bryson's rather peevish follow up to his hugely successful book 'Notes from a Small. Island'. here again he travels around britain (mostly England) visting a variety of places. Some places, he likes, some he has his knife into. For instance, he hasn't a good word to say for Dover,...

    I've been trying to get my American arse over to England for my entire life, and, every time I fail to do so, I embrace a new British travelogue to soften the blow. I figure that, by the time I get there, I'll have read so many books on the subject, I'll be an expert, but it's also ...

  • Melora
    Dec 02, 2015

    Basically? But swap in the UK for "cloud". I've read all of Bryson's other stuff, far as I recall. I have greatly enjoyed it. I laughed so hard at parts of In a Sunburnt Country that I could scarcely breathe. But this? This is a rambling, crotchety old coot, and not in a...

    Hello, Mr. Bryson! It's been a while. Lovely to hear from you again. I must admit I got overly excited last year when I learned that you were writing your first travel memoir in years, and it was going to be about your adventures in England. I love England! I loved your earlier book ab...

    This was not fun. It was like travelling 'round Great Britain with my rather grumpy father in law who only wants to talk about how good things used to be and how crappy things now are. ...

    3.5 What can I say? Bryson fans know exactly what they are getting when they pick up one of his books. A bit of history, information, Bryson's thoughts and feelings on said information and history. A good bit of humor, self-deprecating, ironic and at times laugh out loud funny. A good ...

    Bill Bryson represents himself in this book as a grumpy old man and it is frequently hilarious although occasionally verging on the very edge of political correctness. He's does write incredibly well and I found myself reading passages out loud to anyone who would listen and share it w...

    By far and away Bill Bryson's worst book. It should be called Notes from Southern England. It takes over half the book to get past Birmingham. Wales gets about a chapter, Scotland gets about 10 pages, most of them on a train. The whole thing reads like a half arsed cash in for the 20th...

    (3.5) Bryson?s funniest book for many years. It meant a lot to me since I am also an American expat in England. I kept recognizing places I?d been and agreeing with the sentiments. Two points of criticism, though: although he moves roughly from southeast to northwest in the country...

    Woodsman Spare That Country Bill Bryson is the stand-up comedian of travel writing. The Road to Little Dribbling is an update on his first act, Notes From a Small Island, of 20 years before. The style of loving sarcasm is the same. With the narrative sense of David Sedaris and the o...

    A Bill Bryson book will rarely let you down. It is a reliable companion if you want to have a jolly time. That said, this book cannot avoid comparison with one of Bryson's best - Notes from a Small Island. According to my calculations, laugh-out-loud moments in More Notes clocks in...

    Bill Bryson's rather peevish follow up to his hugely successful book 'Notes from a Small. Island'. here again he travels around britain (mostly England) visting a variety of places. Some places, he likes, some he has his knife into. For instance, he hasn't a good word to say for Dover,...

    I've been trying to get my American arse over to England for my entire life, and, every time I fail to do so, I embrace a new British travelogue to soften the blow. I figure that, by the time I get there, I'll have read so many books on the subject, I'll be an expert, but it's also ...

    Notes from a Small Island was first published 20, yes 20 years ago. In that book he visited place new and revisited old haunts from when he first came to UK in the seventies. His points of view as an outsider were refreshing, fairly blunt and quite frequently very funny. The book came ...

    I am like a grumpy, old(er) man ... I thought that of myself when listening to The Road to Little Dribbling. Just for a little while. Bill Bryson's grumblings about people, service or lack of service, and the general lack of proper grammar and punctuation are just some of the things we...

    (3.5 stars) I read once that the furthest distance the average American will walk without getting into a car is 600 feet, and I fear the modern British have become much the same, except that on the way back to the car the British will drop some rubbish and get a tattoo. I?ve spent...

    For all its stogy, stoicism and unspoken rules of social etiquette, England is a peculiar place full of strange people doing odd things. Many and more are found here in The Road to Little Dribbling: Adventures of an American in Britain. American-born writer Bill Bryson has been livi...

    An unnecessary follow-up to Notes from a Small Island that, in usual Bryson fashion, is packed with trivia that runs the gamut from intriguing to tiresome, and, unlike his other works, generally lacks excitement, humour and wit. Petty jabs masquerading as humour are, on the other hand,...

    This one kind of broke my heart a little. Bill Bryson is a master of the English language. He wields it not as a sword in fiery rhetoric, and not as a scalpel in poetry. He uses it as a hug with some light tickling. Reading his books is an exercise in warm, comfortable conversat...

    I love Bill Bryson. I'll just state that right up front. I've read other of his books, though not all, and enjoyed them immensely, but I think this is my favorite so far. Maybe because he is honest from the outset that he is 65 years old, and somewhat of a curmudgeon, but has earned th...

    He's become the Paul McCartney of travel writing; once sublime and now pushing out books that we buy because he's given us so much pleasure in the past. Maybe it's very clever writing: the ageing scribe and observer returns to look at England and finds it changed mostly for the worse a...

    Something is wrong with Bill Bryson. Maybe it has been too long since I last checked in with him, but this book is a cry for help, people. He hates everything?public transportation, private transportation, food, non-food. And it seems like he has forgotten the names of his family....

    I've always enjoyed Bill Bryson. I loved A Walk in the Woods and The Mother Tongue and his Shakespeare book, etc. This? Not this. I couldn't manage this. Yes, it was lovely to learn that we've all been pronouncing "Everest" wrong (and that George Everest never went up it). It's goo...

    This is a wonderful, entertaining, and truly funny book about Bill Bryson's return to the United Kingdom. I laughed so many times! It's not just what he writes; it is how he writes his stories, his unexpected phrases, that make his sarcasm endearing rather than irritating. In this b...

    Bryson has matured into the curmudgeonly grump that was presaged in hes previous books. And it's wonderful. ...

    A lovely book, and one where there are far too many diverse encounters to focus on any particular one, but it had me laughing on almost every page. As part of the 20th anniversary of his first Notes from a Small Island, Bryson set out to travel the ?Bryson Line? ? which he clai...

    I congratulate Mr Bryson for becoming a British citizen, but I think I need to warn him it's not like playing a computer game: i.e., when you conquer the first level, you don't have to progress to a whingeing pom level, then a grumpy old man level. I suspect I'm part of the older re...

    I needed to relax with a quick audible nostalgic trip around UK. Terrible disappointment. Bill Bryson has turned into a patronising, grumpy old man. He bullies a poor kid in Macdonalds, grumbles about a cafe that he remembered now closed, whinges about traffic and I am nearly at th...

    I really enjoyed this! A wonderful mix of historical anecdotes, personal stories, and descriptions of lovely countrysides and beautiful old buildings. Plus, as other reviewers have noted, a generous helping of grousing about idiots. I've read quite a few of Bryson's books, but this may...

  • Rebecca Foster
    Mar 03, 2015

    Basically? But swap in the UK for "cloud". I've read all of Bryson's other stuff, far as I recall. I have greatly enjoyed it. I laughed so hard at parts of In a Sunburnt Country that I could scarcely breathe. But this? This is a rambling, crotchety old coot, and not in a...

    Hello, Mr. Bryson! It's been a while. Lovely to hear from you again. I must admit I got overly excited last year when I learned that you were writing your first travel memoir in years, and it was going to be about your adventures in England. I love England! I loved your earlier book ab...

    This was not fun. It was like travelling 'round Great Britain with my rather grumpy father in law who only wants to talk about how good things used to be and how crappy things now are. ...

    3.5 What can I say? Bryson fans know exactly what they are getting when they pick up one of his books. A bit of history, information, Bryson's thoughts and feelings on said information and history. A good bit of humor, self-deprecating, ironic and at times laugh out loud funny. A good ...

    Bill Bryson represents himself in this book as a grumpy old man and it is frequently hilarious although occasionally verging on the very edge of political correctness. He's does write incredibly well and I found myself reading passages out loud to anyone who would listen and share it w...

    By far and away Bill Bryson's worst book. It should be called Notes from Southern England. It takes over half the book to get past Birmingham. Wales gets about a chapter, Scotland gets about 10 pages, most of them on a train. The whole thing reads like a half arsed cash in for the 20th...

    (3.5) Bryson?s funniest book for many years. It meant a lot to me since I am also an American expat in England. I kept recognizing places I?d been and agreeing with the sentiments. Two points of criticism, though: although he moves roughly from southeast to northwest in the country...

  • Xandra
    Mar 05, 2015

    Basically? But swap in the UK for "cloud". I've read all of Bryson's other stuff, far as I recall. I have greatly enjoyed it. I laughed so hard at parts of In a Sunburnt Country that I could scarcely breathe. But this? This is a rambling, crotchety old coot, and not in a...

    Hello, Mr. Bryson! It's been a while. Lovely to hear from you again. I must admit I got overly excited last year when I learned that you were writing your first travel memoir in years, and it was going to be about your adventures in England. I love England! I loved your earlier book ab...

    This was not fun. It was like travelling 'round Great Britain with my rather grumpy father in law who only wants to talk about how good things used to be and how crappy things now are. ...

    3.5 What can I say? Bryson fans know exactly what they are getting when they pick up one of his books. A bit of history, information, Bryson's thoughts and feelings on said information and history. A good bit of humor, self-deprecating, ironic and at times laugh out loud funny. A good ...

    Bill Bryson represents himself in this book as a grumpy old man and it is frequently hilarious although occasionally verging on the very edge of political correctness. He's does write incredibly well and I found myself reading passages out loud to anyone who would listen and share it w...

    By far and away Bill Bryson's worst book. It should be called Notes from Southern England. It takes over half the book to get past Birmingham. Wales gets about a chapter, Scotland gets about 10 pages, most of them on a train. The whole thing reads like a half arsed cash in for the 20th...

    (3.5) Bryson?s funniest book for many years. It meant a lot to me since I am also an American expat in England. I kept recognizing places I?d been and agreeing with the sentiments. Two points of criticism, though: although he moves roughly from southeast to northwest in the country...

    Woodsman Spare That Country Bill Bryson is the stand-up comedian of travel writing. The Road to Little Dribbling is an update on his first act, Notes From a Small Island, of 20 years before. The style of loving sarcasm is the same. With the narrative sense of David Sedaris and the o...

    A Bill Bryson book will rarely let you down. It is a reliable companion if you want to have a jolly time. That said, this book cannot avoid comparison with one of Bryson's best - Notes from a Small Island. According to my calculations, laugh-out-loud moments in More Notes clocks in...

    Bill Bryson's rather peevish follow up to his hugely successful book 'Notes from a Small. Island'. here again he travels around britain (mostly England) visting a variety of places. Some places, he likes, some he has his knife into. For instance, he hasn't a good word to say for Dover,...

    I've been trying to get my American arse over to England for my entire life, and, every time I fail to do so, I embrace a new British travelogue to soften the blow. I figure that, by the time I get there, I'll have read so many books on the subject, I'll be an expert, but it's also ...

    Notes from a Small Island was first published 20, yes 20 years ago. In that book he visited place new and revisited old haunts from when he first came to UK in the seventies. His points of view as an outsider were refreshing, fairly blunt and quite frequently very funny. The book came ...

    I am like a grumpy, old(er) man ... I thought that of myself when listening to The Road to Little Dribbling. Just for a little while. Bill Bryson's grumblings about people, service or lack of service, and the general lack of proper grammar and punctuation are just some of the things we...

    (3.5 stars) I read once that the furthest distance the average American will walk without getting into a car is 600 feet, and I fear the modern British have become much the same, except that on the way back to the car the British will drop some rubbish and get a tattoo. I?ve spent...

    For all its stogy, stoicism and unspoken rules of social etiquette, England is a peculiar place full of strange people doing odd things. Many and more are found here in The Road to Little Dribbling: Adventures of an American in Britain. American-born writer Bill Bryson has been livi...

    An unnecessary follow-up to Notes from a Small Island that, in usual Bryson fashion, is packed with trivia that runs the gamut from intriguing to tiresome, and, unlike his other works, generally lacks excitement, humour and wit. Petty jabs masquerading as humour are, on the other hand,...

  • John Martin
    Mar 06, 2016

    Basically? But swap in the UK for "cloud". I've read all of Bryson's other stuff, far as I recall. I have greatly enjoyed it. I laughed so hard at parts of In a Sunburnt Country that I could scarcely breathe. But this? This is a rambling, crotchety old coot, and not in a...

    Hello, Mr. Bryson! It's been a while. Lovely to hear from you again. I must admit I got overly excited last year when I learned that you were writing your first travel memoir in years, and it was going to be about your adventures in England. I love England! I loved your earlier book ab...

    This was not fun. It was like travelling 'round Great Britain with my rather grumpy father in law who only wants to talk about how good things used to be and how crappy things now are. ...

    3.5 What can I say? Bryson fans know exactly what they are getting when they pick up one of his books. A bit of history, information, Bryson's thoughts and feelings on said information and history. A good bit of humor, self-deprecating, ironic and at times laugh out loud funny. A good ...

    Bill Bryson represents himself in this book as a grumpy old man and it is frequently hilarious although occasionally verging on the very edge of political correctness. He's does write incredibly well and I found myself reading passages out loud to anyone who would listen and share it w...

    By far and away Bill Bryson's worst book. It should be called Notes from Southern England. It takes over half the book to get past Birmingham. Wales gets about a chapter, Scotland gets about 10 pages, most of them on a train. The whole thing reads like a half arsed cash in for the 20th...

    (3.5) Bryson?s funniest book for many years. It meant a lot to me since I am also an American expat in England. I kept recognizing places I?d been and agreeing with the sentiments. Two points of criticism, though: although he moves roughly from southeast to northwest in the country...

    Woodsman Spare That Country Bill Bryson is the stand-up comedian of travel writing. The Road to Little Dribbling is an update on his first act, Notes From a Small Island, of 20 years before. The style of loving sarcasm is the same. With the narrative sense of David Sedaris and the o...

    A Bill Bryson book will rarely let you down. It is a reliable companion if you want to have a jolly time. That said, this book cannot avoid comparison with one of Bryson's best - Notes from a Small Island. According to my calculations, laugh-out-loud moments in More Notes clocks in...

    Bill Bryson's rather peevish follow up to his hugely successful book 'Notes from a Small. Island'. here again he travels around britain (mostly England) visting a variety of places. Some places, he likes, some he has his knife into. For instance, he hasn't a good word to say for Dover,...

    I've been trying to get my American arse over to England for my entire life, and, every time I fail to do so, I embrace a new British travelogue to soften the blow. I figure that, by the time I get there, I'll have read so many books on the subject, I'll be an expert, but it's also ...

    Notes from a Small Island was first published 20, yes 20 years ago. In that book he visited place new and revisited old haunts from when he first came to UK in the seventies. His points of view as an outsider were refreshing, fairly blunt and quite frequently very funny. The book came ...

    I am like a grumpy, old(er) man ... I thought that of myself when listening to The Road to Little Dribbling. Just for a little while. Bill Bryson's grumblings about people, service or lack of service, and the general lack of proper grammar and punctuation are just some of the things we...

    (3.5 stars) I read once that the furthest distance the average American will walk without getting into a car is 600 feet, and I fear the modern British have become much the same, except that on the way back to the car the British will drop some rubbish and get a tattoo. I?ve spent...

    For all its stogy, stoicism and unspoken rules of social etiquette, England is a peculiar place full of strange people doing odd things. Many and more are found here in The Road to Little Dribbling: Adventures of an American in Britain. American-born writer Bill Bryson has been livi...

    An unnecessary follow-up to Notes from a Small Island that, in usual Bryson fashion, is packed with trivia that runs the gamut from intriguing to tiresome, and, unlike his other works, generally lacks excitement, humour and wit. Petty jabs masquerading as humour are, on the other hand,...

    This one kind of broke my heart a little. Bill Bryson is a master of the English language. He wields it not as a sword in fiery rhetoric, and not as a scalpel in poetry. He uses it as a hug with some light tickling. Reading his books is an exercise in warm, comfortable conversat...

    I love Bill Bryson. I'll just state that right up front. I've read other of his books, though not all, and enjoyed them immensely, but I think this is my favorite so far. Maybe because he is honest from the outset that he is 65 years old, and somewhat of a curmudgeon, but has earned th...

    He's become the Paul McCartney of travel writing; once sublime and now pushing out books that we buy because he's given us so much pleasure in the past. Maybe it's very clever writing: the ageing scribe and observer returns to look at England and finds it changed mostly for the worse a...

    Something is wrong with Bill Bryson. Maybe it has been too long since I last checked in with him, but this book is a cry for help, people. He hates everything?public transportation, private transportation, food, non-food. And it seems like he has forgotten the names of his family....

    I've always enjoyed Bill Bryson. I loved A Walk in the Woods and The Mother Tongue and his Shakespeare book, etc. This? Not this. I couldn't manage this. Yes, it was lovely to learn that we've all been pronouncing "Everest" wrong (and that George Everest never went up it). It's goo...

    This is a wonderful, entertaining, and truly funny book about Bill Bryson's return to the United Kingdom. I laughed so many times! It's not just what he writes; it is how he writes his stories, his unexpected phrases, that make his sarcasm endearing rather than irritating. In this b...

    Bryson has matured into the curmudgeonly grump that was presaged in hes previous books. And it's wonderful. ...

    A lovely book, and one where there are far too many diverse encounters to focus on any particular one, but it had me laughing on almost every page. As part of the 20th anniversary of his first Notes from a Small Island, Bryson set out to travel the ?Bryson Line? ? which he clai...

    I congratulate Mr Bryson for becoming a British citizen, but I think I need to warn him it's not like playing a computer game: i.e., when you conquer the first level, you don't have to progress to a whingeing pom level, then a grumpy old man level. I suspect I'm part of the older re...

  • Helle
    Mar 03, 2015

    Basically? But swap in the UK for "cloud". I've read all of Bryson's other stuff, far as I recall. I have greatly enjoyed it. I laughed so hard at parts of In a Sunburnt Country that I could scarcely breathe. But this? This is a rambling, crotchety old coot, and not in a...

    Hello, Mr. Bryson! It's been a while. Lovely to hear from you again. I must admit I got overly excited last year when I learned that you were writing your first travel memoir in years, and it was going to be about your adventures in England. I love England! I loved your earlier book ab...

    This was not fun. It was like travelling 'round Great Britain with my rather grumpy father in law who only wants to talk about how good things used to be and how crappy things now are. ...

    3.5 What can I say? Bryson fans know exactly what they are getting when they pick up one of his books. A bit of history, information, Bryson's thoughts and feelings on said information and history. A good bit of humor, self-deprecating, ironic and at times laugh out loud funny. A good ...

    Bill Bryson represents himself in this book as a grumpy old man and it is frequently hilarious although occasionally verging on the very edge of political correctness. He's does write incredibly well and I found myself reading passages out loud to anyone who would listen and share it w...

    By far and away Bill Bryson's worst book. It should be called Notes from Southern England. It takes over half the book to get past Birmingham. Wales gets about a chapter, Scotland gets about 10 pages, most of them on a train. The whole thing reads like a half arsed cash in for the 20th...

    (3.5) Bryson?s funniest book for many years. It meant a lot to me since I am also an American expat in England. I kept recognizing places I?d been and agreeing with the sentiments. Two points of criticism, though: although he moves roughly from southeast to northwest in the country...

    Woodsman Spare That Country Bill Bryson is the stand-up comedian of travel writing. The Road to Little Dribbling is an update on his first act, Notes From a Small Island, of 20 years before. The style of loving sarcasm is the same. With the narrative sense of David Sedaris and the o...

    A Bill Bryson book will rarely let you down. It is a reliable companion if you want to have a jolly time. That said, this book cannot avoid comparison with one of Bryson's best - Notes from a Small Island. According to my calculations, laugh-out-loud moments in More Notes clocks in...

    Bill Bryson's rather peevish follow up to his hugely successful book 'Notes from a Small. Island'. here again he travels around britain (mostly England) visting a variety of places. Some places, he likes, some he has his knife into. For instance, he hasn't a good word to say for Dover,...

    I've been trying to get my American arse over to England for my entire life, and, every time I fail to do so, I embrace a new British travelogue to soften the blow. I figure that, by the time I get there, I'll have read so many books on the subject, I'll be an expert, but it's also ...

    Notes from a Small Island was first published 20, yes 20 years ago. In that book he visited place new and revisited old haunts from when he first came to UK in the seventies. His points of view as an outsider were refreshing, fairly blunt and quite frequently very funny. The book came ...

    I am like a grumpy, old(er) man ... I thought that of myself when listening to The Road to Little Dribbling. Just for a little while. Bill Bryson's grumblings about people, service or lack of service, and the general lack of proper grammar and punctuation are just some of the things we...

    (3.5 stars) I read once that the furthest distance the average American will walk without getting into a car is 600 feet, and I fear the modern British have become much the same, except that on the way back to the car the British will drop some rubbish and get a tattoo. I?ve spent...

  • Diane Barnes
    Nov 21, 2015

    Basically? But swap in the UK for "cloud". I've read all of Bryson's other stuff, far as I recall. I have greatly enjoyed it. I laughed so hard at parts of In a Sunburnt Country that I could scarcely breathe. But this? This is a rambling, crotchety old coot, and not in a...

    Hello, Mr. Bryson! It's been a while. Lovely to hear from you again. I must admit I got overly excited last year when I learned that you were writing your first travel memoir in years, and it was going to be about your adventures in England. I love England! I loved your earlier book ab...

    This was not fun. It was like travelling 'round Great Britain with my rather grumpy father in law who only wants to talk about how good things used to be and how crappy things now are. ...

    3.5 What can I say? Bryson fans know exactly what they are getting when they pick up one of his books. A bit of history, information, Bryson's thoughts and feelings on said information and history. A good bit of humor, self-deprecating, ironic and at times laugh out loud funny. A good ...

    Bill Bryson represents himself in this book as a grumpy old man and it is frequently hilarious although occasionally verging on the very edge of political correctness. He's does write incredibly well and I found myself reading passages out loud to anyone who would listen and share it w...

    By far and away Bill Bryson's worst book. It should be called Notes from Southern England. It takes over half the book to get past Birmingham. Wales gets about a chapter, Scotland gets about 10 pages, most of them on a train. The whole thing reads like a half arsed cash in for the 20th...

    (3.5) Bryson?s funniest book for many years. It meant a lot to me since I am also an American expat in England. I kept recognizing places I?d been and agreeing with the sentiments. Two points of criticism, though: although he moves roughly from southeast to northwest in the country...

    Woodsman Spare That Country Bill Bryson is the stand-up comedian of travel writing. The Road to Little Dribbling is an update on his first act, Notes From a Small Island, of 20 years before. The style of loving sarcasm is the same. With the narrative sense of David Sedaris and the o...

    A Bill Bryson book will rarely let you down. It is a reliable companion if you want to have a jolly time. That said, this book cannot avoid comparison with one of Bryson's best - Notes from a Small Island. According to my calculations, laugh-out-loud moments in More Notes clocks in...

    Bill Bryson's rather peevish follow up to his hugely successful book 'Notes from a Small. Island'. here again he travels around britain (mostly England) visting a variety of places. Some places, he likes, some he has his knife into. For instance, he hasn't a good word to say for Dover,...

    I've been trying to get my American arse over to England for my entire life, and, every time I fail to do so, I embrace a new British travelogue to soften the blow. I figure that, by the time I get there, I'll have read so many books on the subject, I'll be an expert, but it's also ...

    Notes from a Small Island was first published 20, yes 20 years ago. In that book he visited place new and revisited old haunts from when he first came to UK in the seventies. His points of view as an outsider were refreshing, fairly blunt and quite frequently very funny. The book came ...

    I am like a grumpy, old(er) man ... I thought that of myself when listening to The Road to Little Dribbling. Just for a little while. Bill Bryson's grumblings about people, service or lack of service, and the general lack of proper grammar and punctuation are just some of the things we...

    (3.5 stars) I read once that the furthest distance the average American will walk without getting into a car is 600 feet, and I fear the modern British have become much the same, except that on the way back to the car the British will drop some rubbish and get a tattoo. I?ve spent...

    For all its stogy, stoicism and unspoken rules of social etiquette, England is a peculiar place full of strange people doing odd things. Many and more are found here in The Road to Little Dribbling: Adventures of an American in Britain. American-born writer Bill Bryson has been livi...

    An unnecessary follow-up to Notes from a Small Island that, in usual Bryson fashion, is packed with trivia that runs the gamut from intriguing to tiresome, and, unlike his other works, generally lacks excitement, humour and wit. Petty jabs masquerading as humour are, on the other hand,...

    This one kind of broke my heart a little. Bill Bryson is a master of the English language. He wields it not as a sword in fiery rhetoric, and not as a scalpel in poetry. He uses it as a hug with some light tickling. Reading his books is an exercise in warm, comfortable conversat...

    I love Bill Bryson. I'll just state that right up front. I've read other of his books, though not all, and enjoyed them immensely, but I think this is my favorite so far. Maybe because he is honest from the outset that he is 65 years old, and somewhat of a curmudgeon, but has earned th...

  • Phrynne
    Nov 09, 2015

    Basically? But swap in the UK for "cloud". I've read all of Bryson's other stuff, far as I recall. I have greatly enjoyed it. I laughed so hard at parts of In a Sunburnt Country that I could scarcely breathe. But this? This is a rambling, crotchety old coot, and not in a...

    Hello, Mr. Bryson! It's been a while. Lovely to hear from you again. I must admit I got overly excited last year when I learned that you were writing your first travel memoir in years, and it was going to be about your adventures in England. I love England! I loved your earlier book ab...

    This was not fun. It was like travelling 'round Great Britain with my rather grumpy father in law who only wants to talk about how good things used to be and how crappy things now are. ...

    3.5 What can I say? Bryson fans know exactly what they are getting when they pick up one of his books. A bit of history, information, Bryson's thoughts and feelings on said information and history. A good bit of humor, self-deprecating, ironic and at times laugh out loud funny. A good ...

    Bill Bryson represents himself in this book as a grumpy old man and it is frequently hilarious although occasionally verging on the very edge of political correctness. He's does write incredibly well and I found myself reading passages out loud to anyone who would listen and share it w...

  • Paul
    Mar 03, 2015

    Basically? But swap in the UK for "cloud". I've read all of Bryson's other stuff, far as I recall. I have greatly enjoyed it. I laughed so hard at parts of In a Sunburnt Country that I could scarcely breathe. But this? This is a rambling, crotchety old coot, and not in a...

    Hello, Mr. Bryson! It's been a while. Lovely to hear from you again. I must admit I got overly excited last year when I learned that you were writing your first travel memoir in years, and it was going to be about your adventures in England. I love England! I loved your earlier book ab...

    This was not fun. It was like travelling 'round Great Britain with my rather grumpy father in law who only wants to talk about how good things used to be and how crappy things now are. ...

    3.5 What can I say? Bryson fans know exactly what they are getting when they pick up one of his books. A bit of history, information, Bryson's thoughts and feelings on said information and history. A good bit of humor, self-deprecating, ironic and at times laugh out loud funny. A good ...

    Bill Bryson represents himself in this book as a grumpy old man and it is frequently hilarious although occasionally verging on the very edge of political correctness. He's does write incredibly well and I found myself reading passages out loud to anyone who would listen and share it w...

    By far and away Bill Bryson's worst book. It should be called Notes from Southern England. It takes over half the book to get past Birmingham. Wales gets about a chapter, Scotland gets about 10 pages, most of them on a train. The whole thing reads like a half arsed cash in for the 20th...

    (3.5) Bryson?s funniest book for many years. It meant a lot to me since I am also an American expat in England. I kept recognizing places I?d been and agreeing with the sentiments. Two points of criticism, though: although he moves roughly from southeast to northwest in the country...

    Woodsman Spare That Country Bill Bryson is the stand-up comedian of travel writing. The Road to Little Dribbling is an update on his first act, Notes From a Small Island, of 20 years before. The style of loving sarcasm is the same. With the narrative sense of David Sedaris and the o...

    A Bill Bryson book will rarely let you down. It is a reliable companion if you want to have a jolly time. That said, this book cannot avoid comparison with one of Bryson's best - Notes from a Small Island. According to my calculations, laugh-out-loud moments in More Notes clocks in...

    Bill Bryson's rather peevish follow up to his hugely successful book 'Notes from a Small. Island'. here again he travels around britain (mostly England) visting a variety of places. Some places, he likes, some he has his knife into. For instance, he hasn't a good word to say for Dover,...

    I've been trying to get my American arse over to England for my entire life, and, every time I fail to do so, I embrace a new British travelogue to soften the blow. I figure that, by the time I get there, I'll have read so many books on the subject, I'll be an expert, but it's also ...

    Notes from a Small Island was first published 20, yes 20 years ago. In that book he visited place new and revisited old haunts from when he first came to UK in the seventies. His points of view as an outsider were refreshing, fairly blunt and quite frequently very funny. The book came ...

  • Simon
    Oct 16, 2015

    Basically? But swap in the UK for "cloud". I've read all of Bryson's other stuff, far as I recall. I have greatly enjoyed it. I laughed so hard at parts of In a Sunburnt Country that I could scarcely breathe. But this? This is a rambling, crotchety old coot, and not in a...

    Hello, Mr. Bryson! It's been a while. Lovely to hear from you again. I must admit I got overly excited last year when I learned that you were writing your first travel memoir in years, and it was going to be about your adventures in England. I love England! I loved your earlier book ab...

    This was not fun. It was like travelling 'round Great Britain with my rather grumpy father in law who only wants to talk about how good things used to be and how crappy things now are. ...

    3.5 What can I say? Bryson fans know exactly what they are getting when they pick up one of his books. A bit of history, information, Bryson's thoughts and feelings on said information and history. A good bit of humor, self-deprecating, ironic and at times laugh out loud funny. A good ...

    Bill Bryson represents himself in this book as a grumpy old man and it is frequently hilarious although occasionally verging on the very edge of political correctness. He's does write incredibly well and I found myself reading passages out loud to anyone who would listen and share it w...

    By far and away Bill Bryson's worst book. It should be called Notes from Southern England. It takes over half the book to get past Birmingham. Wales gets about a chapter, Scotland gets about 10 pages, most of them on a train. The whole thing reads like a half arsed cash in for the 20th...

    (3.5) Bryson?s funniest book for many years. It meant a lot to me since I am also an American expat in England. I kept recognizing places I?d been and agreeing with the sentiments. Two points of criticism, though: although he moves roughly from southeast to northwest in the country...

    Woodsman Spare That Country Bill Bryson is the stand-up comedian of travel writing. The Road to Little Dribbling is an update on his first act, Notes From a Small Island, of 20 years before. The style of loving sarcasm is the same. With the narrative sense of David Sedaris and the o...

    A Bill Bryson book will rarely let you down. It is a reliable companion if you want to have a jolly time. That said, this book cannot avoid comparison with one of Bryson's best - Notes from a Small Island. According to my calculations, laugh-out-loud moments in More Notes clocks in...

    Bill Bryson's rather peevish follow up to his hugely successful book 'Notes from a Small. Island'. here again he travels around britain (mostly England) visting a variety of places. Some places, he likes, some he has his knife into. For instance, he hasn't a good word to say for Dover,...

    I've been trying to get my American arse over to England for my entire life, and, every time I fail to do so, I embrace a new British travelogue to soften the blow. I figure that, by the time I get there, I'll have read so many books on the subject, I'll be an expert, but it's also ...

    Notes from a Small Island was first published 20, yes 20 years ago. In that book he visited place new and revisited old haunts from when he first came to UK in the seventies. His points of view as an outsider were refreshing, fairly blunt and quite frequently very funny. The book came ...

    I am like a grumpy, old(er) man ... I thought that of myself when listening to The Road to Little Dribbling. Just for a little while. Bill Bryson's grumblings about people, service or lack of service, and the general lack of proper grammar and punctuation are just some of the things we...

    (3.5 stars) I read once that the furthest distance the average American will walk without getting into a car is 600 feet, and I fear the modern British have become much the same, except that on the way back to the car the British will drop some rubbish and get a tattoo. I?ve spent...

    For all its stogy, stoicism and unspoken rules of social etiquette, England is a peculiar place full of strange people doing odd things. Many and more are found here in The Road to Little Dribbling: Adventures of an American in Britain. American-born writer Bill Bryson has been livi...

    An unnecessary follow-up to Notes from a Small Island that, in usual Bryson fashion, is packed with trivia that runs the gamut from intriguing to tiresome, and, unlike his other works, generally lacks excitement, humour and wit. Petty jabs masquerading as humour are, on the other hand,...

    This one kind of broke my heart a little. Bill Bryson is a master of the English language. He wields it not as a sword in fiery rhetoric, and not as a scalpel in poetry. He uses it as a hug with some light tickling. Reading his books is an exercise in warm, comfortable conversat...

    I love Bill Bryson. I'll just state that right up front. I've read other of his books, though not all, and enjoyed them immensely, but I think this is my favorite so far. Maybe because he is honest from the outset that he is 65 years old, and somewhat of a curmudgeon, but has earned th...

    He's become the Paul McCartney of travel writing; once sublime and now pushing out books that we buy because he's given us so much pleasure in the past. Maybe it's very clever writing: the ageing scribe and observer returns to look at England and finds it changed mostly for the worse a...

  • BlackOxford
    Jul 24, 2016

    Basically? But swap in the UK for "cloud". I've read all of Bryson's other stuff, far as I recall. I have greatly enjoyed it. I laughed so hard at parts of In a Sunburnt Country that I could scarcely breathe. But this? This is a rambling, crotchety old coot, and not in a...

    Hello, Mr. Bryson! It's been a while. Lovely to hear from you again. I must admit I got overly excited last year when I learned that you were writing your first travel memoir in years, and it was going to be about your adventures in England. I love England! I loved your earlier book ab...

    This was not fun. It was like travelling 'round Great Britain with my rather grumpy father in law who only wants to talk about how good things used to be and how crappy things now are. ...

    3.5 What can I say? Bryson fans know exactly what they are getting when they pick up one of his books. A bit of history, information, Bryson's thoughts and feelings on said information and history. A good bit of humor, self-deprecating, ironic and at times laugh out loud funny. A good ...

    Bill Bryson represents himself in this book as a grumpy old man and it is frequently hilarious although occasionally verging on the very edge of political correctness. He's does write incredibly well and I found myself reading passages out loud to anyone who would listen and share it w...

    By far and away Bill Bryson's worst book. It should be called Notes from Southern England. It takes over half the book to get past Birmingham. Wales gets about a chapter, Scotland gets about 10 pages, most of them on a train. The whole thing reads like a half arsed cash in for the 20th...

    (3.5) Bryson?s funniest book for many years. It meant a lot to me since I am also an American expat in England. I kept recognizing places I?d been and agreeing with the sentiments. Two points of criticism, though: although he moves roughly from southeast to northwest in the country...

    Woodsman Spare That Country Bill Bryson is the stand-up comedian of travel writing. The Road to Little Dribbling is an update on his first act, Notes From a Small Island, of 20 years before. The style of loving sarcasm is the same. With the narrative sense of David Sedaris and the o...

  • Lyubov
    Feb 01, 2016

    Basically? But swap in the UK for "cloud". I've read all of Bryson's other stuff, far as I recall. I have greatly enjoyed it. I laughed so hard at parts of In a Sunburnt Country that I could scarcely breathe. But this? This is a rambling, crotchety old coot, and not in a...

    Hello, Mr. Bryson! It's been a while. Lovely to hear from you again. I must admit I got overly excited last year when I learned that you were writing your first travel memoir in years, and it was going to be about your adventures in England. I love England! I loved your earlier book ab...

    This was not fun. It was like travelling 'round Great Britain with my rather grumpy father in law who only wants to talk about how good things used to be and how crappy things now are. ...

    3.5 What can I say? Bryson fans know exactly what they are getting when they pick up one of his books. A bit of history, information, Bryson's thoughts and feelings on said information and history. A good bit of humor, self-deprecating, ironic and at times laugh out loud funny. A good ...

    Bill Bryson represents himself in this book as a grumpy old man and it is frequently hilarious although occasionally verging on the very edge of political correctness. He's does write incredibly well and I found myself reading passages out loud to anyone who would listen and share it w...

    By far and away Bill Bryson's worst book. It should be called Notes from Southern England. It takes over half the book to get past Birmingham. Wales gets about a chapter, Scotland gets about 10 pages, most of them on a train. The whole thing reads like a half arsed cash in for the 20th...

    (3.5) Bryson?s funniest book for many years. It meant a lot to me since I am also an American expat in England. I kept recognizing places I?d been and agreeing with the sentiments. Two points of criticism, though: although he moves roughly from southeast to northwest in the country...

    Woodsman Spare That Country Bill Bryson is the stand-up comedian of travel writing. The Road to Little Dribbling is an update on his first act, Notes From a Small Island, of 20 years before. The style of loving sarcasm is the same. With the narrative sense of David Sedaris and the o...

    A Bill Bryson book will rarely let you down. It is a reliable companion if you want to have a jolly time. That said, this book cannot avoid comparison with one of Bryson's best - Notes from a Small Island. According to my calculations, laugh-out-loud moments in More Notes clocks in...

    Bill Bryson's rather peevish follow up to his hugely successful book 'Notes from a Small. Island'. here again he travels around britain (mostly England) visting a variety of places. Some places, he likes, some he has his knife into. For instance, he hasn't a good word to say for Dover,...

    I've been trying to get my American arse over to England for my entire life, and, every time I fail to do so, I embrace a new British travelogue to soften the blow. I figure that, by the time I get there, I'll have read so many books on the subject, I'll be an expert, but it's also ...

    Notes from a Small Island was first published 20, yes 20 years ago. In that book he visited place new and revisited old haunts from when he first came to UK in the seventies. His points of view as an outsider were refreshing, fairly blunt and quite frequently very funny. The book came ...

    I am like a grumpy, old(er) man ... I thought that of myself when listening to The Road to Little Dribbling. Just for a little while. Bill Bryson's grumblings about people, service or lack of service, and the general lack of proper grammar and punctuation are just some of the things we...

    (3.5 stars) I read once that the furthest distance the average American will walk without getting into a car is 600 feet, and I fear the modern British have become much the same, except that on the way back to the car the British will drop some rubbish and get a tattoo. I?ve spent...

    For all its stogy, stoicism and unspoken rules of social etiquette, England is a peculiar place full of strange people doing odd things. Many and more are found here in The Road to Little Dribbling: Adventures of an American in Britain. American-born writer Bill Bryson has been livi...

    An unnecessary follow-up to Notes from a Small Island that, in usual Bryson fashion, is packed with trivia that runs the gamut from intriguing to tiresome, and, unlike his other works, generally lacks excitement, humour and wit. Petty jabs masquerading as humour are, on the other hand,...

    This one kind of broke my heart a little. Bill Bryson is a master of the English language. He wields it not as a sword in fiery rhetoric, and not as a scalpel in poetry. He uses it as a hug with some light tickling. Reading his books is an exercise in warm, comfortable conversat...

    I love Bill Bryson. I'll just state that right up front. I've read other of his books, though not all, and enjoyed them immensely, but I think this is my favorite so far. Maybe because he is honest from the outset that he is 65 years old, and somewhat of a curmudgeon, but has earned th...

    He's become the Paul McCartney of travel writing; once sublime and now pushing out books that we buy because he's given us so much pleasure in the past. Maybe it's very clever writing: the ageing scribe and observer returns to look at England and finds it changed mostly for the worse a...

    Something is wrong with Bill Bryson. Maybe it has been too long since I last checked in with him, but this book is a cry for help, people. He hates everything?public transportation, private transportation, food, non-food. And it seems like he has forgotten the names of his family....

    I've always enjoyed Bill Bryson. I loved A Walk in the Woods and The Mother Tongue and his Shakespeare book, etc. This? Not this. I couldn't manage this. Yes, it was lovely to learn that we've all been pronouncing "Everest" wrong (and that George Everest never went up it). It's goo...

    This is a wonderful, entertaining, and truly funny book about Bill Bryson's return to the United Kingdom. I laughed so many times! It's not just what he writes; it is how he writes his stories, his unexpected phrases, that make his sarcasm endearing rather than irritating. In this b...

    Bryson has matured into the curmudgeonly grump that was presaged in hes previous books. And it's wonderful. ...

    A lovely book, and one where there are far too many diverse encounters to focus on any particular one, but it had me laughing on almost every page. As part of the 20th anniversary of his first Notes from a Small Island, Bryson set out to travel the ?Bryson Line? ? which he clai...

    I congratulate Mr Bryson for becoming a British citizen, but I think I need to warn him it's not like playing a computer game: i.e., when you conquer the first level, you don't have to progress to a whingeing pom level, then a grumpy old man level. I suspect I'm part of the older re...

    I needed to relax with a quick audible nostalgic trip around UK. Terrible disappointment. Bill Bryson has turned into a patronising, grumpy old man. He bullies a poor kid in Macdonalds, grumbles about a cafe that he remembered now closed, whinges about traffic and I am nearly at th...

    I really enjoyed this! A wonderful mix of historical anecdotes, personal stories, and descriptions of lovely countrysides and beautiful old buildings. Plus, as other reviewers have noted, a generous helping of grousing about idiots. I've read quite a few of Bryson's books, but this may...

    A really fun and informative trip around Britain with Bill. Twenty years on from Notes on a Small Island Bill is now a UK citizen and decides to embark on another trip around Britain from Bognor Regis to Cape Wrath. No town, village or city is spared Bryson's observations; nor is Briti...

    Bill Bryson revisits the places he went to in Notes from a small Island after 20 years and describes Britain of the 21st century where a lot of shops are closed, most high streets look alike .. many towns lost independent stores and mongers and grocers to the like of Sainsbury and Morr...

    ????? ????? ?? ??? ? ??? ???????, ?? ??? ???????. ???? ????? ?????????? ?? ???? ?? ?? ????? ?? ???? ?????????? ???? ?? ???, ??? ????? ?? ?????????? ????? (?? ??...

  • Trelawn
    Oct 28, 2015

    Basically? But swap in the UK for "cloud". I've read all of Bryson's other stuff, far as I recall. I have greatly enjoyed it. I laughed so hard at parts of In a Sunburnt Country that I could scarcely breathe. But this? This is a rambling, crotchety old coot, and not in a...

    Hello, Mr. Bryson! It's been a while. Lovely to hear from you again. I must admit I got overly excited last year when I learned that you were writing your first travel memoir in years, and it was going to be about your adventures in England. I love England! I loved your earlier book ab...

    This was not fun. It was like travelling 'round Great Britain with my rather grumpy father in law who only wants to talk about how good things used to be and how crappy things now are. ...

    3.5 What can I say? Bryson fans know exactly what they are getting when they pick up one of his books. A bit of history, information, Bryson's thoughts and feelings on said information and history. A good bit of humor, self-deprecating, ironic and at times laugh out loud funny. A good ...

    Bill Bryson represents himself in this book as a grumpy old man and it is frequently hilarious although occasionally verging on the very edge of political correctness. He's does write incredibly well and I found myself reading passages out loud to anyone who would listen and share it w...

    By far and away Bill Bryson's worst book. It should be called Notes from Southern England. It takes over half the book to get past Birmingham. Wales gets about a chapter, Scotland gets about 10 pages, most of them on a train. The whole thing reads like a half arsed cash in for the 20th...

    (3.5) Bryson?s funniest book for many years. It meant a lot to me since I am also an American expat in England. I kept recognizing places I?d been and agreeing with the sentiments. Two points of criticism, though: although he moves roughly from southeast to northwest in the country...

    Woodsman Spare That Country Bill Bryson is the stand-up comedian of travel writing. The Road to Little Dribbling is an update on his first act, Notes From a Small Island, of 20 years before. The style of loving sarcasm is the same. With the narrative sense of David Sedaris and the o...

    A Bill Bryson book will rarely let you down. It is a reliable companion if you want to have a jolly time. That said, this book cannot avoid comparison with one of Bryson's best - Notes from a Small Island. According to my calculations, laugh-out-loud moments in More Notes clocks in...

    Bill Bryson's rather peevish follow up to his hugely successful book 'Notes from a Small. Island'. here again he travels around britain (mostly England) visting a variety of places. Some places, he likes, some he has his knife into. For instance, he hasn't a good word to say for Dover,...

    I've been trying to get my American arse over to England for my entire life, and, every time I fail to do so, I embrace a new British travelogue to soften the blow. I figure that, by the time I get there, I'll have read so many books on the subject, I'll be an expert, but it's also ...

    Notes from a Small Island was first published 20, yes 20 years ago. In that book he visited place new and revisited old haunts from when he first came to UK in the seventies. His points of view as an outsider were refreshing, fairly blunt and quite frequently very funny. The book came ...

    I am like a grumpy, old(er) man ... I thought that of myself when listening to The Road to Little Dribbling. Just for a little while. Bill Bryson's grumblings about people, service or lack of service, and the general lack of proper grammar and punctuation are just some of the things we...

    (3.5 stars) I read once that the furthest distance the average American will walk without getting into a car is 600 feet, and I fear the modern British have become much the same, except that on the way back to the car the British will drop some rubbish and get a tattoo. I?ve spent...

    For all its stogy, stoicism and unspoken rules of social etiquette, England is a peculiar place full of strange people doing odd things. Many and more are found here in The Road to Little Dribbling: Adventures of an American in Britain. American-born writer Bill Bryson has been livi...

    An unnecessary follow-up to Notes from a Small Island that, in usual Bryson fashion, is packed with trivia that runs the gamut from intriguing to tiresome, and, unlike his other works, generally lacks excitement, humour and wit. Petty jabs masquerading as humour are, on the other hand,...

    This one kind of broke my heart a little. Bill Bryson is a master of the English language. He wields it not as a sword in fiery rhetoric, and not as a scalpel in poetry. He uses it as a hug with some light tickling. Reading his books is an exercise in warm, comfortable conversat...

    I love Bill Bryson. I'll just state that right up front. I've read other of his books, though not all, and enjoyed them immensely, but I think this is my favorite so far. Maybe because he is honest from the outset that he is 65 years old, and somewhat of a curmudgeon, but has earned th...

    He's become the Paul McCartney of travel writing; once sublime and now pushing out books that we buy because he's given us so much pleasure in the past. Maybe it's very clever writing: the ageing scribe and observer returns to look at England and finds it changed mostly for the worse a...

    Something is wrong with Bill Bryson. Maybe it has been too long since I last checked in with him, but this book is a cry for help, people. He hates everything?public transportation, private transportation, food, non-food. And it seems like he has forgotten the names of his family....

    I've always enjoyed Bill Bryson. I loved A Walk in the Woods and The Mother Tongue and his Shakespeare book, etc. This? Not this. I couldn't manage this. Yes, it was lovely to learn that we've all been pronouncing "Everest" wrong (and that George Everest never went up it). It's goo...

    This is a wonderful, entertaining, and truly funny book about Bill Bryson's return to the United Kingdom. I laughed so many times! It's not just what he writes; it is how he writes his stories, his unexpected phrases, that make his sarcasm endearing rather than irritating. In this b...

    Bryson has matured into the curmudgeonly grump that was presaged in hes previous books. And it's wonderful. ...

    A lovely book, and one where there are far too many diverse encounters to focus on any particular one, but it had me laughing on almost every page. As part of the 20th anniversary of his first Notes from a Small Island, Bryson set out to travel the ?Bryson Line? ? which he clai...

    I congratulate Mr Bryson for becoming a British citizen, but I think I need to warn him it's not like playing a computer game: i.e., when you conquer the first level, you don't have to progress to a whingeing pom level, then a grumpy old man level. I suspect I'm part of the older re...

    I needed to relax with a quick audible nostalgic trip around UK. Terrible disappointment. Bill Bryson has turned into a patronising, grumpy old man. He bullies a poor kid in Macdonalds, grumbles about a cafe that he remembered now closed, whinges about traffic and I am nearly at th...

    I really enjoyed this! A wonderful mix of historical anecdotes, personal stories, and descriptions of lovely countrysides and beautiful old buildings. Plus, as other reviewers have noted, a generous helping of grousing about idiots. I've read quite a few of Bryson's books, but this may...

    A really fun and informative trip around Britain with Bill. Twenty years on from Notes on a Small Island Bill is now a UK citizen and decides to embark on another trip around Britain from Bognor Regis to Cape Wrath. No town, village or city is spared Bryson's observations; nor is Briti...

  • Bianca
    Mar 19, 2017

    Basically? But swap in the UK for "cloud". I've read all of Bryson's other stuff, far as I recall. I have greatly enjoyed it. I laughed so hard at parts of In a Sunburnt Country that I could scarcely breathe. But this? This is a rambling, crotchety old coot, and not in a...

    Hello, Mr. Bryson! It's been a while. Lovely to hear from you again. I must admit I got overly excited last year when I learned that you were writing your first travel memoir in years, and it was going to be about your adventures in England. I love England! I loved your earlier book ab...

    This was not fun. It was like travelling 'round Great Britain with my rather grumpy father in law who only wants to talk about how good things used to be and how crappy things now are. ...

    3.5 What can I say? Bryson fans know exactly what they are getting when they pick up one of his books. A bit of history, information, Bryson's thoughts and feelings on said information and history. A good bit of humor, self-deprecating, ironic and at times laugh out loud funny. A good ...

    Bill Bryson represents himself in this book as a grumpy old man and it is frequently hilarious although occasionally verging on the very edge of political correctness. He's does write incredibly well and I found myself reading passages out loud to anyone who would listen and share it w...

    By far and away Bill Bryson's worst book. It should be called Notes from Southern England. It takes over half the book to get past Birmingham. Wales gets about a chapter, Scotland gets about 10 pages, most of them on a train. The whole thing reads like a half arsed cash in for the 20th...

    (3.5) Bryson?s funniest book for many years. It meant a lot to me since I am also an American expat in England. I kept recognizing places I?d been and agreeing with the sentiments. Two points of criticism, though: although he moves roughly from southeast to northwest in the country...

    Woodsman Spare That Country Bill Bryson is the stand-up comedian of travel writing. The Road to Little Dribbling is an update on his first act, Notes From a Small Island, of 20 years before. The style of loving sarcasm is the same. With the narrative sense of David Sedaris and the o...

    A Bill Bryson book will rarely let you down. It is a reliable companion if you want to have a jolly time. That said, this book cannot avoid comparison with one of Bryson's best - Notes from a Small Island. According to my calculations, laugh-out-loud moments in More Notes clocks in...

    Bill Bryson's rather peevish follow up to his hugely successful book 'Notes from a Small. Island'. here again he travels around britain (mostly England) visting a variety of places. Some places, he likes, some he has his knife into. For instance, he hasn't a good word to say for Dover,...

    I've been trying to get my American arse over to England for my entire life, and, every time I fail to do so, I embrace a new British travelogue to soften the blow. I figure that, by the time I get there, I'll have read so many books on the subject, I'll be an expert, but it's also ...

    Notes from a Small Island was first published 20, yes 20 years ago. In that book he visited place new and revisited old haunts from when he first came to UK in the seventies. His points of view as an outsider were refreshing, fairly blunt and quite frequently very funny. The book came ...

    I am like a grumpy, old(er) man ... I thought that of myself when listening to The Road to Little Dribbling. Just for a little while. Bill Bryson's grumblings about people, service or lack of service, and the general lack of proper grammar and punctuation are just some of the things we...

  • Hilary
    Jan 22, 2016

    Basically? But swap in the UK for "cloud". I've read all of Bryson's other stuff, far as I recall. I have greatly enjoyed it. I laughed so hard at parts of In a Sunburnt Country that I could scarcely breathe. But this? This is a rambling, crotchety old coot, and not in a...

    Hello, Mr. Bryson! It's been a while. Lovely to hear from you again. I must admit I got overly excited last year when I learned that you were writing your first travel memoir in years, and it was going to be about your adventures in England. I love England! I loved your earlier book ab...

    This was not fun. It was like travelling 'round Great Britain with my rather grumpy father in law who only wants to talk about how good things used to be and how crappy things now are. ...

    3.5 What can I say? Bryson fans know exactly what they are getting when they pick up one of his books. A bit of history, information, Bryson's thoughts and feelings on said information and history. A good bit of humor, self-deprecating, ironic and at times laugh out loud funny. A good ...

    Bill Bryson represents himself in this book as a grumpy old man and it is frequently hilarious although occasionally verging on the very edge of political correctness. He's does write incredibly well and I found myself reading passages out loud to anyone who would listen and share it w...

    By far and away Bill Bryson's worst book. It should be called Notes from Southern England. It takes over half the book to get past Birmingham. Wales gets about a chapter, Scotland gets about 10 pages, most of them on a train. The whole thing reads like a half arsed cash in for the 20th...

    (3.5) Bryson?s funniest book for many years. It meant a lot to me since I am also an American expat in England. I kept recognizing places I?d been and agreeing with the sentiments. Two points of criticism, though: although he moves roughly from southeast to northwest in the country...

    Woodsman Spare That Country Bill Bryson is the stand-up comedian of travel writing. The Road to Little Dribbling is an update on his first act, Notes From a Small Island, of 20 years before. The style of loving sarcasm is the same. With the narrative sense of David Sedaris and the o...

    A Bill Bryson book will rarely let you down. It is a reliable companion if you want to have a jolly time. That said, this book cannot avoid comparison with one of Bryson's best - Notes from a Small Island. According to my calculations, laugh-out-loud moments in More Notes clocks in...

    Bill Bryson's rather peevish follow up to his hugely successful book 'Notes from a Small. Island'. here again he travels around britain (mostly England) visting a variety of places. Some places, he likes, some he has his knife into. For instance, he hasn't a good word to say for Dover,...

    I've been trying to get my American arse over to England for my entire life, and, every time I fail to do so, I embrace a new British travelogue to soften the blow. I figure that, by the time I get there, I'll have read so many books on the subject, I'll be an expert, but it's also ...

    Notes from a Small Island was first published 20, yes 20 years ago. In that book he visited place new and revisited old haunts from when he first came to UK in the seventies. His points of view as an outsider were refreshing, fairly blunt and quite frequently very funny. The book came ...

    I am like a grumpy, old(er) man ... I thought that of myself when listening to The Road to Little Dribbling. Just for a little while. Bill Bryson's grumblings about people, service or lack of service, and the general lack of proper grammar and punctuation are just some of the things we...

    (3.5 stars) I read once that the furthest distance the average American will walk without getting into a car is 600 feet, and I fear the modern British have become much the same, except that on the way back to the car the British will drop some rubbish and get a tattoo. I?ve spent...

    For all its stogy, stoicism and unspoken rules of social etiquette, England is a peculiar place full of strange people doing odd things. Many and more are found here in The Road to Little Dribbling: Adventures of an American in Britain. American-born writer Bill Bryson has been livi...

    An unnecessary follow-up to Notes from a Small Island that, in usual Bryson fashion, is packed with trivia that runs the gamut from intriguing to tiresome, and, unlike his other works, generally lacks excitement, humour and wit. Petty jabs masquerading as humour are, on the other hand,...

    This one kind of broke my heart a little. Bill Bryson is a master of the English language. He wields it not as a sword in fiery rhetoric, and not as a scalpel in poetry. He uses it as a hug with some light tickling. Reading his books is an exercise in warm, comfortable conversat...

    I love Bill Bryson. I'll just state that right up front. I've read other of his books, though not all, and enjoyed them immensely, but I think this is my favorite so far. Maybe because he is honest from the outset that he is 65 years old, and somewhat of a curmudgeon, but has earned th...

    He's become the Paul McCartney of travel writing; once sublime and now pushing out books that we buy because he's given us so much pleasure in the past. Maybe it's very clever writing: the ageing scribe and observer returns to look at England and finds it changed mostly for the worse a...

    Something is wrong with Bill Bryson. Maybe it has been too long since I last checked in with him, but this book is a cry for help, people. He hates everything?public transportation, private transportation, food, non-food. And it seems like he has forgotten the names of his family....

    I've always enjoyed Bill Bryson. I loved A Walk in the Woods and The Mother Tongue and his Shakespeare book, etc. This? Not this. I couldn't manage this. Yes, it was lovely to learn that we've all been pronouncing "Everest" wrong (and that George Everest never went up it). It's goo...

    This is a wonderful, entertaining, and truly funny book about Bill Bryson's return to the United Kingdom. I laughed so many times! It's not just what he writes; it is how he writes his stories, his unexpected phrases, that make his sarcasm endearing rather than irritating. In this b...

    Bryson has matured into the curmudgeonly grump that was presaged in hes previous books. And it's wonderful. ...

    A lovely book, and one where there are far too many diverse encounters to focus on any particular one, but it had me laughing on almost every page. As part of the 20th anniversary of his first Notes from a Small Island, Bryson set out to travel the ?Bryson Line? ? which he clai...

    I congratulate Mr Bryson for becoming a British citizen, but I think I need to warn him it's not like playing a computer game: i.e., when you conquer the first level, you don't have to progress to a whingeing pom level, then a grumpy old man level. I suspect I'm part of the older re...

    I needed to relax with a quick audible nostalgic trip around UK. Terrible disappointment. Bill Bryson has turned into a patronising, grumpy old man. He bullies a poor kid in Macdonalds, grumbles about a cafe that he remembered now closed, whinges about traffic and I am nearly at th...