We the Corporations: How American Businesses Won Their Civil Rights

We the Corporations: How American Businesses Won Their Civil Rights

We the Corporations chronicles the astonishing story of one of the most successful yet least well-known ?civil rights movements? in American history. Hardly oppressed like women and minorities, business corporations, too, have fought since the nation?s earliest days to gain equal rights under the Constitution?and today have nearly all the same rights as ordinary people. Exp We the Corporations chronicles the astonishing story of one of the most successful yet least well-known ?...

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Title:We the Corporations: How American Businesses Won Their Civil Rights
Author:Adam Winkler
Rating:
Genres:Nonfiction
ISBN:0871407124
Format Type:Hardcover
Number of Pages:496 pages pages

We the Corporations: How American Businesses Won Their Civil Rights Reviews

  • Joseph
    Aug 18, 2018

    It's hard to write a 400 year history, but this was very well done and admirably focused. At times I wished for more analysis and less of a play by play, but the story that emerges is pretty clear. What I found fascinating is the early American history--We, the people of America, were ...

    I knew law could be arbitrary but I didn't know law could be fun. The author likes to repeat, a good 100 pages could easily have been shaved off. The historical research is on fleek, to borrow a phrase from the kids. ...

    One of my top 2018 reads. _We the Corporations _ traces the history of corporate rights in America, and clearly shows what led up to the landmark decision Citizens United. Apparently, based on research cited in this book- there is nonpartisan disapproval across the board regarding Citi...

    It is endlessly entertaining to examine Supreme Court decisions, to follow the logic and often the prejudice and corruption they comprise. We The Corporations selectively follows the tribulations of the 14th amendment, designed specifically to prevent discrimination among the newly fre...

    This is a book by a law professor at UCLA detailing the history of how US corporate bodies came to increasingly be viewed as legal persons with a widening array of property and liberty rights comparable to those we normally consider as being possessed by individual human beings. The st...

    This is one of the books I always wanted to write (along with Anne Bogel's Reading People book.) I've known that the history of corporation rights began early in our country's history. I just didn't know how early. We the Corporations is an important book about an important topic. Co...

    The content is excellent and informative, but the writing is a little dry and repetitive. It presents the history of corporate law, and the expansion of corporate rights from the founding of the colonies up to Citizens United and Hobby Lobby ? including how the courts swing between t...

    A very worthwhile read, but not an easy one. America has struggled with the personhood of corporations for more than two hundred years, and yet the recent Citizens United and Hobby Lobby decisions are, according to bipartisan agreement, among the worst ever made. I was fascinated but s...

    A fascinating, and highly accessible story of the development of rights for corporations. In spite of the overwhelming public opposition to the SCOTUS decision in "Citizens United" that opened the floodgates for money in politics, Winkler demonstrates that that decision sits on a scaff...

    wait, there's no Kindle edition?? ...

    We the Corporations: How American Businesses Won Their Civil Rights (Hardcover) by Adam Winkler from the library heard au on 1A ( https://the1a.org/) on NPR Feb 26 2018 also On the Media Apr 16 2018 https://www.wnycstudios.org/story/how... listen 4:20 to end--- esp on the 14t...

    I became interested in this book for two reasons: The first reason was spurred by a review I read in ?The Nation? by David Cole on ?Artificial Persons? that discussed the ?Citizen United? Supreme Court decision and recommended Adam Winkler?s book. The second reason ...

    The cry of "Corporations are not people!" after 'Citizens United' was not quite right. The US Supreme Court has tended to restrict corporate rights when it has treated corporations as persons, artificial legal persons; and to grant them rights when it has treated them as bearers of the...

    This important and timely book, published 2/2018, reveals Corporate America's ability to persuade the Supreme Court that corporations qualify for more and more constitutional rights. The author corrects the misunderstanding that SCOTUS thinks corporations are people. To the contrary "r...

    The crescendo of this book is the Citizens United ruling, which to the uninitiated emerged seemingly out of nowhere, from a determined court that re-litigated a case already decided to expand the constitutional rights given to corporations to meddle in our democracy. Adam Winkler shows...

    I expected an uninteresting rant about the plutocracy in America --- valid but nothing we haven't heard a thousand times before. But this book is a lot more interesting than that. It's a legal history describing the cases and arguments that led to the way American law conceptualizes ...

    I had next to zero prior understanding of any of the legal cases or terminology described in the book, and honestly very little background on any Supreme Court justice (other than watching the RBG documentary). This was a fascinating, well-woven, dense, but understandable overview of t...

    Winkler does an admirable job of illustrating the long history of how corporations have functioned in conjunction with the legal system as actors, shielded behind the corporate veil, and in their current state where they have essentially attained personhood. A detailed explanation of o...

    This is a very interesting analysis of the concept of corporate personhood in the United States. The author takes a very close look at the history of corporations starting with colonial America and transitioning through each stage of corporate rights and limitations all the way to the ...

    This is a well written book that puts into perspective the Supreme Court's decisions in "Citizens United" and "Hobby Lobby." Winkler traces the history and expansion of corporate rights from the beginning of the nation to the present day. He also points out that the Supreme Court has s...

    Fascinating overview of the creep of Corporations Really interesting book which is full of facts to remember. Also very interesting to read how Corporate rights have come to be; often either via deception or taking advantage of rulings initially intended to aid individuals or minori...

    An interesting and well researched book about the legal cases that led to a gradual expansion of rights for corporations. I found it especially interesting that a theory of First Amendment Rights centred on the listener, that was pivotal in Citizen?s United, was first advanced by...

    This was a great history of how corporations have gained rights in the Supreme Court pretty much since the beginning of the country. It was particularly interesting to understand how corporate personhood is actually not the culprit, but giving the rights of the corporate owners to the ...

  • Christopher Mitchell
    Mar 25, 2018

    It's hard to write a 400 year history, but this was very well done and admirably focused. At times I wished for more analysis and less of a play by play, but the story that emerges is pretty clear. What I found fascinating is the early American history--We, the people of America, were ...

    I knew law could be arbitrary but I didn't know law could be fun. The author likes to repeat, a good 100 pages could easily have been shaved off. The historical research is on fleek, to borrow a phrase from the kids. ...

    One of my top 2018 reads. _We the Corporations _ traces the history of corporate rights in America, and clearly shows what led up to the landmark decision Citizens United. Apparently, based on research cited in this book- there is nonpartisan disapproval across the board regarding Citi...

    It is endlessly entertaining to examine Supreme Court decisions, to follow the logic and often the prejudice and corruption they comprise. We The Corporations selectively follows the tribulations of the 14th amendment, designed specifically to prevent discrimination among the newly fre...

    This is a book by a law professor at UCLA detailing the history of how US corporate bodies came to increasingly be viewed as legal persons with a widening array of property and liberty rights comparable to those we normally consider as being possessed by individual human beings. The st...

    This is one of the books I always wanted to write (along with Anne Bogel's Reading People book.) I've known that the history of corporation rights began early in our country's history. I just didn't know how early. We the Corporations is an important book about an important topic. Co...

    The content is excellent and informative, but the writing is a little dry and repetitive. It presents the history of corporate law, and the expansion of corporate rights from the founding of the colonies up to Citizens United and Hobby Lobby ? including how the courts swing between t...

    A very worthwhile read, but not an easy one. America has struggled with the personhood of corporations for more than two hundred years, and yet the recent Citizens United and Hobby Lobby decisions are, according to bipartisan agreement, among the worst ever made. I was fascinated but s...

    A fascinating, and highly accessible story of the development of rights for corporations. In spite of the overwhelming public opposition to the SCOTUS decision in "Citizens United" that opened the floodgates for money in politics, Winkler demonstrates that that decision sits on a scaff...

    wait, there's no Kindle edition?? ...

    We the Corporations: How American Businesses Won Their Civil Rights (Hardcover) by Adam Winkler from the library heard au on 1A ( https://the1a.org/) on NPR Feb 26 2018 also On the Media Apr 16 2018 https://www.wnycstudios.org/story/how... listen 4:20 to end--- esp on the 14t...

    I became interested in this book for two reasons: The first reason was spurred by a review I read in ?The Nation? by David Cole on ?Artificial Persons? that discussed the ?Citizen United? Supreme Court decision and recommended Adam Winkler?s book. The second reason ...

    The cry of "Corporations are not people!" after 'Citizens United' was not quite right. The US Supreme Court has tended to restrict corporate rights when it has treated corporations as persons, artificial legal persons; and to grant them rights when it has treated them as bearers of the...

    This important and timely book, published 2/2018, reveals Corporate America's ability to persuade the Supreme Court that corporations qualify for more and more constitutional rights. The author corrects the misunderstanding that SCOTUS thinks corporations are people. To the contrary "r...

    The crescendo of this book is the Citizens United ruling, which to the uninitiated emerged seemingly out of nowhere, from a determined court that re-litigated a case already decided to expand the constitutional rights given to corporations to meddle in our democracy. Adam Winkler shows...

    I expected an uninteresting rant about the plutocracy in America --- valid but nothing we haven't heard a thousand times before. But this book is a lot more interesting than that. It's a legal history describing the cases and arguments that led to the way American law conceptualizes ...

    I had next to zero prior understanding of any of the legal cases or terminology described in the book, and honestly very little background on any Supreme Court justice (other than watching the RBG documentary). This was a fascinating, well-woven, dense, but understandable overview of t...

    Winkler does an admirable job of illustrating the long history of how corporations have functioned in conjunction with the legal system as actors, shielded behind the corporate veil, and in their current state where they have essentially attained personhood. A detailed explanation of o...

    This is a very interesting analysis of the concept of corporate personhood in the United States. The author takes a very close look at the history of corporations starting with colonial America and transitioning through each stage of corporate rights and limitations all the way to the ...

    This is a well written book that puts into perspective the Supreme Court's decisions in "Citizens United" and "Hobby Lobby." Winkler traces the history and expansion of corporate rights from the beginning of the nation to the present day. He also points out that the Supreme Court has s...

    Fascinating overview of the creep of Corporations Really interesting book which is full of facts to remember. Also very interesting to read how Corporate rights have come to be; often either via deception or taking advantage of rulings initially intended to aid individuals or minori...

    An interesting and well researched book about the legal cases that led to a gradual expansion of rights for corporations. I found it especially interesting that a theory of First Amendment Rights centred on the listener, that was pivotal in Citizen?s United, was first advanced by...

    This was a great history of how corporations have gained rights in the Supreme Court pretty much since the beginning of the country. It was particularly interesting to understand how corporate personhood is actually not the culprit, but giving the rights of the corporate owners to the ...

    This was a compelling read, very well written for a non-technical audience. It goes quickly, from the founding of our republic to present day, discussing the legal status of corporations and how that status evolved. It should be required reading for anyone who wants to reform the probl...

  • Elizabeth
    Feb 26, 2018

    It's hard to write a 400 year history, but this was very well done and admirably focused. At times I wished for more analysis and less of a play by play, but the story that emerges is pretty clear. What I found fascinating is the early American history--We, the people of America, were ...

    I knew law could be arbitrary but I didn't know law could be fun. The author likes to repeat, a good 100 pages could easily have been shaved off. The historical research is on fleek, to borrow a phrase from the kids. ...

    One of my top 2018 reads. _We the Corporations _ traces the history of corporate rights in America, and clearly shows what led up to the landmark decision Citizens United. Apparently, based on research cited in this book- there is nonpartisan disapproval across the board regarding Citi...

    It is endlessly entertaining to examine Supreme Court decisions, to follow the logic and often the prejudice and corruption they comprise. We The Corporations selectively follows the tribulations of the 14th amendment, designed specifically to prevent discrimination among the newly fre...

    This is a book by a law professor at UCLA detailing the history of how US corporate bodies came to increasingly be viewed as legal persons with a widening array of property and liberty rights comparable to those we normally consider as being possessed by individual human beings. The st...

    This is one of the books I always wanted to write (along with Anne Bogel's Reading People book.) I've known that the history of corporation rights began early in our country's history. I just didn't know how early. We the Corporations is an important book about an important topic. Co...

    The content is excellent and informative, but the writing is a little dry and repetitive. It presents the history of corporate law, and the expansion of corporate rights from the founding of the colonies up to Citizens United and Hobby Lobby ? including how the courts swing between t...

    A very worthwhile read, but not an easy one. America has struggled with the personhood of corporations for more than two hundred years, and yet the recent Citizens United and Hobby Lobby decisions are, according to bipartisan agreement, among the worst ever made. I was fascinated but s...

    A fascinating, and highly accessible story of the development of rights for corporations. In spite of the overwhelming public opposition to the SCOTUS decision in "Citizens United" that opened the floodgates for money in politics, Winkler demonstrates that that decision sits on a scaff...

    wait, there's no Kindle edition?? ...

    We the Corporations: How American Businesses Won Their Civil Rights (Hardcover) by Adam Winkler from the library heard au on 1A ( https://the1a.org/) on NPR Feb 26 2018 also On the Media Apr 16 2018 https://www.wnycstudios.org/story/how... listen 4:20 to end--- esp on the 14t...

  • Mehrsa
    Mar 12, 2018

    It's hard to write a 400 year history, but this was very well done and admirably focused. At times I wished for more analysis and less of a play by play, but the story that emerges is pretty clear. What I found fascinating is the early American history--We, the people of America, were ...

  • Terry Earley
    Jun 04, 2018

    It's hard to write a 400 year history, but this was very well done and admirably focused. At times I wished for more analysis and less of a play by play, but the story that emerges is pretty clear. What I found fascinating is the early American history--We, the people of America, were ...

    I knew law could be arbitrary but I didn't know law could be fun. The author likes to repeat, a good 100 pages could easily have been shaved off. The historical research is on fleek, to borrow a phrase from the kids. ...

    One of my top 2018 reads. _We the Corporations _ traces the history of corporate rights in America, and clearly shows what led up to the landmark decision Citizens United. Apparently, based on research cited in this book- there is nonpartisan disapproval across the board regarding Citi...

    It is endlessly entertaining to examine Supreme Court decisions, to follow the logic and often the prejudice and corruption they comprise. We The Corporations selectively follows the tribulations of the 14th amendment, designed specifically to prevent discrimination among the newly fre...

    This is a book by a law professor at UCLA detailing the history of how US corporate bodies came to increasingly be viewed as legal persons with a widening array of property and liberty rights comparable to those we normally consider as being possessed by individual human beings. The st...

    This is one of the books I always wanted to write (along with Anne Bogel's Reading People book.) I've known that the history of corporation rights began early in our country's history. I just didn't know how early. We the Corporations is an important book about an important topic. Co...

    The content is excellent and informative, but the writing is a little dry and repetitive. It presents the history of corporate law, and the expansion of corporate rights from the founding of the colonies up to Citizens United and Hobby Lobby ? including how the courts swing between t...

    A very worthwhile read, but not an easy one. America has struggled with the personhood of corporations for more than two hundred years, and yet the recent Citizens United and Hobby Lobby decisions are, according to bipartisan agreement, among the worst ever made. I was fascinated but s...

    A fascinating, and highly accessible story of the development of rights for corporations. In spite of the overwhelming public opposition to the SCOTUS decision in "Citizens United" that opened the floodgates for money in politics, Winkler demonstrates that that decision sits on a scaff...

    wait, there's no Kindle edition?? ...

    We the Corporations: How American Businesses Won Their Civil Rights (Hardcover) by Adam Winkler from the library heard au on 1A ( https://the1a.org/) on NPR Feb 26 2018 also On the Media Apr 16 2018 https://www.wnycstudios.org/story/how... listen 4:20 to end--- esp on the 14t...

    I became interested in this book for two reasons: The first reason was spurred by a review I read in ?The Nation? by David Cole on ?Artificial Persons? that discussed the ?Citizen United? Supreme Court decision and recommended Adam Winkler?s book. The second reason ...

    The cry of "Corporations are not people!" after 'Citizens United' was not quite right. The US Supreme Court has tended to restrict corporate rights when it has treated corporations as persons, artificial legal persons; and to grant them rights when it has treated them as bearers of the...

    This important and timely book, published 2/2018, reveals Corporate America's ability to persuade the Supreme Court that corporations qualify for more and more constitutional rights. The author corrects the misunderstanding that SCOTUS thinks corporations are people. To the contrary "r...

    The crescendo of this book is the Citizens United ruling, which to the uninitiated emerged seemingly out of nowhere, from a determined court that re-litigated a case already decided to expand the constitutional rights given to corporations to meddle in our democracy. Adam Winkler shows...

    I expected an uninteresting rant about the plutocracy in America --- valid but nothing we haven't heard a thousand times before. But this book is a lot more interesting than that. It's a legal history describing the cases and arguments that led to the way American law conceptualizes ...

    I had next to zero prior understanding of any of the legal cases or terminology described in the book, and honestly very little background on any Supreme Court justice (other than watching the RBG documentary). This was a fascinating, well-woven, dense, but understandable overview of t...

    Winkler does an admirable job of illustrating the long history of how corporations have functioned in conjunction with the legal system as actors, shielded behind the corporate veil, and in their current state where they have essentially attained personhood. A detailed explanation of o...

    This is a very interesting analysis of the concept of corporate personhood in the United States. The author takes a very close look at the history of corporations starting with colonial America and transitioning through each stage of corporate rights and limitations all the way to the ...

    This is a well written book that puts into perspective the Supreme Court's decisions in "Citizens United" and "Hobby Lobby." Winkler traces the history and expansion of corporate rights from the beginning of the nation to the present day. He also points out that the Supreme Court has s...

    Fascinating overview of the creep of Corporations Really interesting book which is full of facts to remember. Also very interesting to read how Corporate rights have come to be; often either via deception or taking advantage of rulings initially intended to aid individuals or minori...

    An interesting and well researched book about the legal cases that led to a gradual expansion of rights for corporations. I found it especially interesting that a theory of First Amendment Rights centred on the listener, that was pivotal in Citizen?s United, was first advanced by...

    This was a great history of how corporations have gained rights in the Supreme Court pretty much since the beginning of the country. It was particularly interesting to understand how corporate personhood is actually not the culprit, but giving the rights of the corporate owners to the ...

    This was a compelling read, very well written for a non-technical audience. It goes quickly, from the founding of our republic to present day, discussing the legal status of corporations and how that status evolved. It should be required reading for anyone who wants to reform the probl...

    Very detailed history of corporate rights in America, from the East India Company all the way to Citizens United. It's too detailed for me, I got about half way then skipped to the concluding chapter. I would say read this is you're looking for a lot of depth, but a more accessible boo...

    It is not really fair to offer a review without reading most of a book. This one, however could have been an interesting essay, but the exhaustive treatment was good for many readers. For me, I lost interest. ...

  • Debbie
    Jul 10, 2018

    It's hard to write a 400 year history, but this was very well done and admirably focused. At times I wished for more analysis and less of a play by play, but the story that emerges is pretty clear. What I found fascinating is the early American history--We, the people of America, were ...

    I knew law could be arbitrary but I didn't know law could be fun. The author likes to repeat, a good 100 pages could easily have been shaved off. The historical research is on fleek, to borrow a phrase from the kids. ...

    One of my top 2018 reads. _We the Corporations _ traces the history of corporate rights in America, and clearly shows what led up to the landmark decision Citizens United. Apparently, based on research cited in this book- there is nonpartisan disapproval across the board regarding Citi...

    It is endlessly entertaining to examine Supreme Court decisions, to follow the logic and often the prejudice and corruption they comprise. We The Corporations selectively follows the tribulations of the 14th amendment, designed specifically to prevent discrimination among the newly fre...

    This is a book by a law professor at UCLA detailing the history of how US corporate bodies came to increasingly be viewed as legal persons with a widening array of property and liberty rights comparable to those we normally consider as being possessed by individual human beings. The st...

    This is one of the books I always wanted to write (along with Anne Bogel's Reading People book.) I've known that the history of corporation rights began early in our country's history. I just didn't know how early. We the Corporations is an important book about an important topic. Co...

    The content is excellent and informative, but the writing is a little dry and repetitive. It presents the history of corporate law, and the expansion of corporate rights from the founding of the colonies up to Citizens United and Hobby Lobby ? including how the courts swing between t...

    A very worthwhile read, but not an easy one. America has struggled with the personhood of corporations for more than two hundred years, and yet the recent Citizens United and Hobby Lobby decisions are, according to bipartisan agreement, among the worst ever made. I was fascinated but s...

    A fascinating, and highly accessible story of the development of rights for corporations. In spite of the overwhelming public opposition to the SCOTUS decision in "Citizens United" that opened the floodgates for money in politics, Winkler demonstrates that that decision sits on a scaff...

    wait, there's no Kindle edition?? ...

    We the Corporations: How American Businesses Won Their Civil Rights (Hardcover) by Adam Winkler from the library heard au on 1A ( https://the1a.org/) on NPR Feb 26 2018 also On the Media Apr 16 2018 https://www.wnycstudios.org/story/how... listen 4:20 to end--- esp on the 14t...

    I became interested in this book for two reasons: The first reason was spurred by a review I read in ?The Nation? by David Cole on ?Artificial Persons? that discussed the ?Citizen United? Supreme Court decision and recommended Adam Winkler?s book. The second reason ...

    The cry of "Corporations are not people!" after 'Citizens United' was not quite right. The US Supreme Court has tended to restrict corporate rights when it has treated corporations as persons, artificial legal persons; and to grant them rights when it has treated them as bearers of the...

    This important and timely book, published 2/2018, reveals Corporate America's ability to persuade the Supreme Court that corporations qualify for more and more constitutional rights. The author corrects the misunderstanding that SCOTUS thinks corporations are people. To the contrary "r...

    The crescendo of this book is the Citizens United ruling, which to the uninitiated emerged seemingly out of nowhere, from a determined court that re-litigated a case already decided to expand the constitutional rights given to corporations to meddle in our democracy. Adam Winkler shows...

    I expected an uninteresting rant about the plutocracy in America --- valid but nothing we haven't heard a thousand times before. But this book is a lot more interesting than that. It's a legal history describing the cases and arguments that led to the way American law conceptualizes ...

    I had next to zero prior understanding of any of the legal cases or terminology described in the book, and honestly very little background on any Supreme Court justice (other than watching the RBG documentary). This was a fascinating, well-woven, dense, but understandable overview of t...

    Winkler does an admirable job of illustrating the long history of how corporations have functioned in conjunction with the legal system as actors, shielded behind the corporate veil, and in their current state where they have essentially attained personhood. A detailed explanation of o...

    This is a very interesting analysis of the concept of corporate personhood in the United States. The author takes a very close look at the history of corporations starting with colonial America and transitioning through each stage of corporate rights and limitations all the way to the ...

    This is a well written book that puts into perspective the Supreme Court's decisions in "Citizens United" and "Hobby Lobby." Winkler traces the history and expansion of corporate rights from the beginning of the nation to the present day. He also points out that the Supreme Court has s...

  • Rob
    Apr 18, 2018

    It's hard to write a 400 year history, but this was very well done and admirably focused. At times I wished for more analysis and less of a play by play, but the story that emerges is pretty clear. What I found fascinating is the early American history--We, the people of America, were ...

    I knew law could be arbitrary but I didn't know law could be fun. The author likes to repeat, a good 100 pages could easily have been shaved off. The historical research is on fleek, to borrow a phrase from the kids. ...

    One of my top 2018 reads. _We the Corporations _ traces the history of corporate rights in America, and clearly shows what led up to the landmark decision Citizens United. Apparently, based on research cited in this book- there is nonpartisan disapproval across the board regarding Citi...

    It is endlessly entertaining to examine Supreme Court decisions, to follow the logic and often the prejudice and corruption they comprise. We The Corporations selectively follows the tribulations of the 14th amendment, designed specifically to prevent discrimination among the newly fre...

    This is a book by a law professor at UCLA detailing the history of how US corporate bodies came to increasingly be viewed as legal persons with a widening array of property and liberty rights comparable to those we normally consider as being possessed by individual human beings. The st...

    This is one of the books I always wanted to write (along with Anne Bogel's Reading People book.) I've known that the history of corporation rights began early in our country's history. I just didn't know how early. We the Corporations is an important book about an important topic. Co...

    The content is excellent and informative, but the writing is a little dry and repetitive. It presents the history of corporate law, and the expansion of corporate rights from the founding of the colonies up to Citizens United and Hobby Lobby ? including how the courts swing between t...

    A very worthwhile read, but not an easy one. America has struggled with the personhood of corporations for more than two hundred years, and yet the recent Citizens United and Hobby Lobby decisions are, according to bipartisan agreement, among the worst ever made. I was fascinated but s...

    A fascinating, and highly accessible story of the development of rights for corporations. In spite of the overwhelming public opposition to the SCOTUS decision in "Citizens United" that opened the floodgates for money in politics, Winkler demonstrates that that decision sits on a scaff...

  • Graeme Roberts
    Jul 18, 2018

    It's hard to write a 400 year history, but this was very well done and admirably focused. At times I wished for more analysis and less of a play by play, but the story that emerges is pretty clear. What I found fascinating is the early American history--We, the people of America, were ...

    I knew law could be arbitrary but I didn't know law could be fun. The author likes to repeat, a good 100 pages could easily have been shaved off. The historical research is on fleek, to borrow a phrase from the kids. ...

    One of my top 2018 reads. _We the Corporations _ traces the history of corporate rights in America, and clearly shows what led up to the landmark decision Citizens United. Apparently, based on research cited in this book- there is nonpartisan disapproval across the board regarding Citi...

    It is endlessly entertaining to examine Supreme Court decisions, to follow the logic and often the prejudice and corruption they comprise. We The Corporations selectively follows the tribulations of the 14th amendment, designed specifically to prevent discrimination among the newly fre...

    This is a book by a law professor at UCLA detailing the history of how US corporate bodies came to increasingly be viewed as legal persons with a widening array of property and liberty rights comparable to those we normally consider as being possessed by individual human beings. The st...

    This is one of the books I always wanted to write (along with Anne Bogel's Reading People book.) I've known that the history of corporation rights began early in our country's history. I just didn't know how early. We the Corporations is an important book about an important topic. Co...

    The content is excellent and informative, but the writing is a little dry and repetitive. It presents the history of corporate law, and the expansion of corporate rights from the founding of the colonies up to Citizens United and Hobby Lobby ? including how the courts swing between t...

    A very worthwhile read, but not an easy one. America has struggled with the personhood of corporations for more than two hundred years, and yet the recent Citizens United and Hobby Lobby decisions are, according to bipartisan agreement, among the worst ever made. I was fascinated but s...

  • Rahul  Adusumilli
    Apr 27, 2018

    It's hard to write a 400 year history, but this was very well done and admirably focused. At times I wished for more analysis and less of a play by play, but the story that emerges is pretty clear. What I found fascinating is the early American history--We, the people of America, were ...

    I knew law could be arbitrary but I didn't know law could be fun. The author likes to repeat, a good 100 pages could easily have been shaved off. The historical research is on fleek, to borrow a phrase from the kids. ...

  • Lindy
    May 02, 2018

    It's hard to write a 400 year history, but this was very well done and admirably focused. At times I wished for more analysis and less of a play by play, but the story that emerges is pretty clear. What I found fascinating is the early American history--We, the people of America, were ...

    I knew law could be arbitrary but I didn't know law could be fun. The author likes to repeat, a good 100 pages could easily have been shaved off. The historical research is on fleek, to borrow a phrase from the kids. ...

    One of my top 2018 reads. _We the Corporations _ traces the history of corporate rights in America, and clearly shows what led up to the landmark decision Citizens United. Apparently, based on research cited in this book- there is nonpartisan disapproval across the board regarding Citi...

    It is endlessly entertaining to examine Supreme Court decisions, to follow the logic and often the prejudice and corruption they comprise. We The Corporations selectively follows the tribulations of the 14th amendment, designed specifically to prevent discrimination among the newly fre...

    This is a book by a law professor at UCLA detailing the history of how US corporate bodies came to increasingly be viewed as legal persons with a widening array of property and liberty rights comparable to those we normally consider as being possessed by individual human beings. The st...

    This is one of the books I always wanted to write (along with Anne Bogel's Reading People book.) I've known that the history of corporation rights began early in our country's history. I just didn't know how early. We the Corporations is an important book about an important topic. Co...

    The content is excellent and informative, but the writing is a little dry and repetitive. It presents the history of corporate law, and the expansion of corporate rights from the founding of the colonies up to Citizens United and Hobby Lobby ? including how the courts swing between t...

    A very worthwhile read, but not an easy one. America has struggled with the personhood of corporations for more than two hundred years, and yet the recent Citizens United and Hobby Lobby decisions are, according to bipartisan agreement, among the worst ever made. I was fascinated but s...

    A fascinating, and highly accessible story of the development of rights for corporations. In spite of the overwhelming public opposition to the SCOTUS decision in "Citizens United" that opened the floodgates for money in politics, Winkler demonstrates that that decision sits on a scaff...

    wait, there's no Kindle edition?? ...

    We the Corporations: How American Businesses Won Their Civil Rights (Hardcover) by Adam Winkler from the library heard au on 1A ( https://the1a.org/) on NPR Feb 26 2018 also On the Media Apr 16 2018 https://www.wnycstudios.org/story/how... listen 4:20 to end--- esp on the 14t...

    I became interested in this book for two reasons: The first reason was spurred by a review I read in ?The Nation? by David Cole on ?Artificial Persons? that discussed the ?Citizen United? Supreme Court decision and recommended Adam Winkler?s book. The second reason ...

    The cry of "Corporations are not people!" after 'Citizens United' was not quite right. The US Supreme Court has tended to restrict corporate rights when it has treated corporations as persons, artificial legal persons; and to grant them rights when it has treated them as bearers of the...

    This important and timely book, published 2/2018, reveals Corporate America's ability to persuade the Supreme Court that corporations qualify for more and more constitutional rights. The author corrects the misunderstanding that SCOTUS thinks corporations are people. To the contrary "r...

    The crescendo of this book is the Citizens United ruling, which to the uninitiated emerged seemingly out of nowhere, from a determined court that re-litigated a case already decided to expand the constitutional rights given to corporations to meddle in our democracy. Adam Winkler shows...

    I expected an uninteresting rant about the plutocracy in America --- valid but nothing we haven't heard a thousand times before. But this book is a lot more interesting than that. It's a legal history describing the cases and arguments that led to the way American law conceptualizes ...

    I had next to zero prior understanding of any of the legal cases or terminology described in the book, and honestly very little background on any Supreme Court justice (other than watching the RBG documentary). This was a fascinating, well-woven, dense, but understandable overview of t...

    Winkler does an admirable job of illustrating the long history of how corporations have functioned in conjunction with the legal system as actors, shielded behind the corporate veil, and in their current state where they have essentially attained personhood. A detailed explanation of o...

    This is a very interesting analysis of the concept of corporate personhood in the United States. The author takes a very close look at the history of corporations starting with colonial America and transitioning through each stage of corporate rights and limitations all the way to the ...

    This is a well written book that puts into perspective the Supreme Court's decisions in "Citizens United" and "Hobby Lobby." Winkler traces the history and expansion of corporate rights from the beginning of the nation to the present day. He also points out that the Supreme Court has s...

    Fascinating overview of the creep of Corporations Really interesting book which is full of facts to remember. Also very interesting to read how Corporate rights have come to be; often either via deception or taking advantage of rulings initially intended to aid individuals or minori...

    An interesting and well researched book about the legal cases that led to a gradual expansion of rights for corporations. I found it especially interesting that a theory of First Amendment Rights centred on the listener, that was pivotal in Citizen?s United, was first advanced by...

    This was a great history of how corporations have gained rights in the Supreme Court pretty much since the beginning of the country. It was particularly interesting to understand how corporate personhood is actually not the culprit, but giving the rights of the corporate owners to the ...

    This was a compelling read, very well written for a non-technical audience. It goes quickly, from the founding of our republic to present day, discussing the legal status of corporations and how that status evolved. It should be required reading for anyone who wants to reform the probl...

    Very detailed history of corporate rights in America, from the East India Company all the way to Citizens United. It's too detailed for me, I got about half way then skipped to the concluding chapter. I would say read this is you're looking for a lot of depth, but a more accessible boo...

    It is not really fair to offer a review without reading most of a book. This one, however could have been an interesting essay, but the exhaustive treatment was good for many readers. For me, I lost interest. ...

    This was a well researched and written book. I learned quite a bit and it could be helpful if more people read it and understood how corporations have gained constitutional rights. It can be a bit dry, though no fault of the author. It?s just the nature of the subject and evidence. ...

  • Connor Stack
    Jul 26, 2018

    It's hard to write a 400 year history, but this was very well done and admirably focused. At times I wished for more analysis and less of a play by play, but the story that emerges is pretty clear. What I found fascinating is the early American history--We, the people of America, were ...

    I knew law could be arbitrary but I didn't know law could be fun. The author likes to repeat, a good 100 pages could easily have been shaved off. The historical research is on fleek, to borrow a phrase from the kids. ...

    One of my top 2018 reads. _We the Corporations _ traces the history of corporate rights in America, and clearly shows what led up to the landmark decision Citizens United. Apparently, based on research cited in this book- there is nonpartisan disapproval across the board regarding Citi...

    It is endlessly entertaining to examine Supreme Court decisions, to follow the logic and often the prejudice and corruption they comprise. We The Corporations selectively follows the tribulations of the 14th amendment, designed specifically to prevent discrimination among the newly fre...

    This is a book by a law professor at UCLA detailing the history of how US corporate bodies came to increasingly be viewed as legal persons with a widening array of property and liberty rights comparable to those we normally consider as being possessed by individual human beings. The st...

    This is one of the books I always wanted to write (along with Anne Bogel's Reading People book.) I've known that the history of corporation rights began early in our country's history. I just didn't know how early. We the Corporations is an important book about an important topic. Co...

    The content is excellent and informative, but the writing is a little dry and repetitive. It presents the history of corporate law, and the expansion of corporate rights from the founding of the colonies up to Citizens United and Hobby Lobby ? including how the courts swing between t...

    A very worthwhile read, but not an easy one. America has struggled with the personhood of corporations for more than two hundred years, and yet the recent Citizens United and Hobby Lobby decisions are, according to bipartisan agreement, among the worst ever made. I was fascinated but s...

    A fascinating, and highly accessible story of the development of rights for corporations. In spite of the overwhelming public opposition to the SCOTUS decision in "Citizens United" that opened the floodgates for money in politics, Winkler demonstrates that that decision sits on a scaff...

    wait, there's no Kindle edition?? ...

    We the Corporations: How American Businesses Won Their Civil Rights (Hardcover) by Adam Winkler from the library heard au on 1A ( https://the1a.org/) on NPR Feb 26 2018 also On the Media Apr 16 2018 https://www.wnycstudios.org/story/how... listen 4:20 to end--- esp on the 14t...

    I became interested in this book for two reasons: The first reason was spurred by a review I read in ?The Nation? by David Cole on ?Artificial Persons? that discussed the ?Citizen United? Supreme Court decision and recommended Adam Winkler?s book. The second reason ...

    The cry of "Corporations are not people!" after 'Citizens United' was not quite right. The US Supreme Court has tended to restrict corporate rights when it has treated corporations as persons, artificial legal persons; and to grant them rights when it has treated them as bearers of the...

    This important and timely book, published 2/2018, reveals Corporate America's ability to persuade the Supreme Court that corporations qualify for more and more constitutional rights. The author corrects the misunderstanding that SCOTUS thinks corporations are people. To the contrary "r...

    The crescendo of this book is the Citizens United ruling, which to the uninitiated emerged seemingly out of nowhere, from a determined court that re-litigated a case already decided to expand the constitutional rights given to corporations to meddle in our democracy. Adam Winkler shows...

    I expected an uninteresting rant about the plutocracy in America --- valid but nothing we haven't heard a thousand times before. But this book is a lot more interesting than that. It's a legal history describing the cases and arguments that led to the way American law conceptualizes ...

    I had next to zero prior understanding of any of the legal cases or terminology described in the book, and honestly very little background on any Supreme Court justice (other than watching the RBG documentary). This was a fascinating, well-woven, dense, but understandable overview of t...

    Winkler does an admirable job of illustrating the long history of how corporations have functioned in conjunction with the legal system as actors, shielded behind the corporate veil, and in their current state where they have essentially attained personhood. A detailed explanation of o...

    This is a very interesting analysis of the concept of corporate personhood in the United States. The author takes a very close look at the history of corporations starting with colonial America and transitioning through each stage of corporate rights and limitations all the way to the ...

    This is a well written book that puts into perspective the Supreme Court's decisions in "Citizens United" and "Hobby Lobby." Winkler traces the history and expansion of corporate rights from the beginning of the nation to the present day. He also points out that the Supreme Court has s...

    Fascinating overview of the creep of Corporations Really interesting book which is full of facts to remember. Also very interesting to read how Corporate rights have come to be; often either via deception or taking advantage of rulings initially intended to aid individuals or minori...

    An interesting and well researched book about the legal cases that led to a gradual expansion of rights for corporations. I found it especially interesting that a theory of First Amendment Rights centred on the listener, that was pivotal in Citizen?s United, was first advanced by...

    This was a great history of how corporations have gained rights in the Supreme Court pretty much since the beginning of the country. It was particularly interesting to understand how corporate personhood is actually not the culprit, but giving the rights of the corporate owners to the ...

    This was a compelling read, very well written for a non-technical audience. It goes quickly, from the founding of our republic to present day, discussing the legal status of corporations and how that status evolved. It should be required reading for anyone who wants to reform the probl...

    Very detailed history of corporate rights in America, from the East India Company all the way to Citizens United. It's too detailed for me, I got about half way then skipped to the concluding chapter. I would say read this is you're looking for a lot of depth, but a more accessible boo...

  • Emma Sea
    Mar 17, 2018

    It's hard to write a 400 year history, but this was very well done and admirably focused. At times I wished for more analysis and less of a play by play, but the story that emerges is pretty clear. What I found fascinating is the early American history--We, the people of America, were ...

    I knew law could be arbitrary but I didn't know law could be fun. The author likes to repeat, a good 100 pages could easily have been shaved off. The historical research is on fleek, to borrow a phrase from the kids. ...

    One of my top 2018 reads. _We the Corporations _ traces the history of corporate rights in America, and clearly shows what led up to the landmark decision Citizens United. Apparently, based on research cited in this book- there is nonpartisan disapproval across the board regarding Citi...

    It is endlessly entertaining to examine Supreme Court decisions, to follow the logic and often the prejudice and corruption they comprise. We The Corporations selectively follows the tribulations of the 14th amendment, designed specifically to prevent discrimination among the newly fre...

    This is a book by a law professor at UCLA detailing the history of how US corporate bodies came to increasingly be viewed as legal persons with a widening array of property and liberty rights comparable to those we normally consider as being possessed by individual human beings. The st...

    This is one of the books I always wanted to write (along with Anne Bogel's Reading People book.) I've known that the history of corporation rights began early in our country's history. I just didn't know how early. We the Corporations is an important book about an important topic. Co...

    The content is excellent and informative, but the writing is a little dry and repetitive. It presents the history of corporate law, and the expansion of corporate rights from the founding of the colonies up to Citizens United and Hobby Lobby ? including how the courts swing between t...

    A very worthwhile read, but not an easy one. America has struggled with the personhood of corporations for more than two hundred years, and yet the recent Citizens United and Hobby Lobby decisions are, according to bipartisan agreement, among the worst ever made. I was fascinated but s...

    A fascinating, and highly accessible story of the development of rights for corporations. In spite of the overwhelming public opposition to the SCOTUS decision in "Citizens United" that opened the floodgates for money in politics, Winkler demonstrates that that decision sits on a scaff...

    wait, there's no Kindle edition?? ...

  • Bruce
    Aug 15, 2018

    It's hard to write a 400 year history, but this was very well done and admirably focused. At times I wished for more analysis and less of a play by play, but the story that emerges is pretty clear. What I found fascinating is the early American history--We, the people of America, were ...

    I knew law could be arbitrary but I didn't know law could be fun. The author likes to repeat, a good 100 pages could easily have been shaved off. The historical research is on fleek, to borrow a phrase from the kids. ...

    One of my top 2018 reads. _We the Corporations _ traces the history of corporate rights in America, and clearly shows what led up to the landmark decision Citizens United. Apparently, based on research cited in this book- there is nonpartisan disapproval across the board regarding Citi...

    It is endlessly entertaining to examine Supreme Court decisions, to follow the logic and often the prejudice and corruption they comprise. We The Corporations selectively follows the tribulations of the 14th amendment, designed specifically to prevent discrimination among the newly fre...

    This is a book by a law professor at UCLA detailing the history of how US corporate bodies came to increasingly be viewed as legal persons with a widening array of property and liberty rights comparable to those we normally consider as being possessed by individual human beings. The st...

    This is one of the books I always wanted to write (along with Anne Bogel's Reading People book.) I've known that the history of corporation rights began early in our country's history. I just didn't know how early. We the Corporations is an important book about an important topic. Co...

    The content is excellent and informative, but the writing is a little dry and repetitive. It presents the history of corporate law, and the expansion of corporate rights from the founding of the colonies up to Citizens United and Hobby Lobby ? including how the courts swing between t...

    A very worthwhile read, but not an easy one. America has struggled with the personhood of corporations for more than two hundred years, and yet the recent Citizens United and Hobby Lobby decisions are, according to bipartisan agreement, among the worst ever made. I was fascinated but s...

    A fascinating, and highly accessible story of the development of rights for corporations. In spite of the overwhelming public opposition to the SCOTUS decision in "Citizens United" that opened the floodgates for money in politics, Winkler demonstrates that that decision sits on a scaff...

    wait, there's no Kindle edition?? ...

    We the Corporations: How American Businesses Won Their Civil Rights (Hardcover) by Adam Winkler from the library heard au on 1A ( https://the1a.org/) on NPR Feb 26 2018 also On the Media Apr 16 2018 https://www.wnycstudios.org/story/how... listen 4:20 to end--- esp on the 14t...

    I became interested in this book for two reasons: The first reason was spurred by a review I read in ?The Nation? by David Cole on ?Artificial Persons? that discussed the ?Citizen United? Supreme Court decision and recommended Adam Winkler?s book. The second reason ...

    The cry of "Corporations are not people!" after 'Citizens United' was not quite right. The US Supreme Court has tended to restrict corporate rights when it has treated corporations as persons, artificial legal persons; and to grant them rights when it has treated them as bearers of the...

    This important and timely book, published 2/2018, reveals Corporate America's ability to persuade the Supreme Court that corporations qualify for more and more constitutional rights. The author corrects the misunderstanding that SCOTUS thinks corporations are people. To the contrary "r...

    The crescendo of this book is the Citizens United ruling, which to the uninitiated emerged seemingly out of nowhere, from a determined court that re-litigated a case already decided to expand the constitutional rights given to corporations to meddle in our democracy. Adam Winkler shows...

    I expected an uninteresting rant about the plutocracy in America --- valid but nothing we haven't heard a thousand times before. But this book is a lot more interesting than that. It's a legal history describing the cases and arguments that led to the way American law conceptualizes ...

    I had next to zero prior understanding of any of the legal cases or terminology described in the book, and honestly very little background on any Supreme Court justice (other than watching the RBG documentary). This was a fascinating, well-woven, dense, but understandable overview of t...

    Winkler does an admirable job of illustrating the long history of how corporations have functioned in conjunction with the legal system as actors, shielded behind the corporate veil, and in their current state where they have essentially attained personhood. A detailed explanation of o...

    This is a very interesting analysis of the concept of corporate personhood in the United States. The author takes a very close look at the history of corporations starting with colonial America and transitioning through each stage of corporate rights and limitations all the way to the ...

    This is a well written book that puts into perspective the Supreme Court's decisions in "Citizens United" and "Hobby Lobby." Winkler traces the history and expansion of corporate rights from the beginning of the nation to the present day. He also points out that the Supreme Court has s...

    Fascinating overview of the creep of Corporations Really interesting book which is full of facts to remember. Also very interesting to read how Corporate rights have come to be; often either via deception or taking advantage of rulings initially intended to aid individuals or minori...

    An interesting and well researched book about the legal cases that led to a gradual expansion of rights for corporations. I found it especially interesting that a theory of First Amendment Rights centred on the listener, that was pivotal in Citizen?s United, was first advanced by...

  • Maynard Handley
    May 15, 2018

    It's hard to write a 400 year history, but this was very well done and admirably focused. At times I wished for more analysis and less of a play by play, but the story that emerges is pretty clear. What I found fascinating is the early American history--We, the people of America, were ...

    I knew law could be arbitrary but I didn't know law could be fun. The author likes to repeat, a good 100 pages could easily have been shaved off. The historical research is on fleek, to borrow a phrase from the kids. ...

    One of my top 2018 reads. _We the Corporations _ traces the history of corporate rights in America, and clearly shows what led up to the landmark decision Citizens United. Apparently, based on research cited in this book- there is nonpartisan disapproval across the board regarding Citi...

    It is endlessly entertaining to examine Supreme Court decisions, to follow the logic and often the prejudice and corruption they comprise. We The Corporations selectively follows the tribulations of the 14th amendment, designed specifically to prevent discrimination among the newly fre...

    This is a book by a law professor at UCLA detailing the history of how US corporate bodies came to increasingly be viewed as legal persons with a widening array of property and liberty rights comparable to those we normally consider as being possessed by individual human beings. The st...

    This is one of the books I always wanted to write (along with Anne Bogel's Reading People book.) I've known that the history of corporation rights began early in our country's history. I just didn't know how early. We the Corporations is an important book about an important topic. Co...

    The content is excellent and informative, but the writing is a little dry and repetitive. It presents the history of corporate law, and the expansion of corporate rights from the founding of the colonies up to Citizens United and Hobby Lobby ? including how the courts swing between t...

    A very worthwhile read, but not an easy one. America has struggled with the personhood of corporations for more than two hundred years, and yet the recent Citizens United and Hobby Lobby decisions are, according to bipartisan agreement, among the worst ever made. I was fascinated but s...

    A fascinating, and highly accessible story of the development of rights for corporations. In spite of the overwhelming public opposition to the SCOTUS decision in "Citizens United" that opened the floodgates for money in politics, Winkler demonstrates that that decision sits on a scaff...

    wait, there's no Kindle edition?? ...

    We the Corporations: How American Businesses Won Their Civil Rights (Hardcover) by Adam Winkler from the library heard au on 1A ( https://the1a.org/) on NPR Feb 26 2018 also On the Media Apr 16 2018 https://www.wnycstudios.org/story/how... listen 4:20 to end--- esp on the 14t...

    I became interested in this book for two reasons: The first reason was spurred by a review I read in ?The Nation? by David Cole on ?Artificial Persons? that discussed the ?Citizen United? Supreme Court decision and recommended Adam Winkler?s book. The second reason ...

    The cry of "Corporations are not people!" after 'Citizens United' was not quite right. The US Supreme Court has tended to restrict corporate rights when it has treated corporations as persons, artificial legal persons; and to grant them rights when it has treated them as bearers of the...

    This important and timely book, published 2/2018, reveals Corporate America's ability to persuade the Supreme Court that corporations qualify for more and more constitutional rights. The author corrects the misunderstanding that SCOTUS thinks corporations are people. To the contrary "r...

    The crescendo of this book is the Citizens United ruling, which to the uninitiated emerged seemingly out of nowhere, from a determined court that re-litigated a case already decided to expand the constitutional rights given to corporations to meddle in our democracy. Adam Winkler shows...

    I expected an uninteresting rant about the plutocracy in America --- valid but nothing we haven't heard a thousand times before. But this book is a lot more interesting than that. It's a legal history describing the cases and arguments that led to the way American law conceptualizes ...

  • Sher
    Aug 11, 2018

    It's hard to write a 400 year history, but this was very well done and admirably focused. At times I wished for more analysis and less of a play by play, but the story that emerges is pretty clear. What I found fascinating is the early American history--We, the people of America, were ...

    I knew law could be arbitrary but I didn't know law could be fun. The author likes to repeat, a good 100 pages could easily have been shaved off. The historical research is on fleek, to borrow a phrase from the kids. ...

    One of my top 2018 reads. _We the Corporations _ traces the history of corporate rights in America, and clearly shows what led up to the landmark decision Citizens United. Apparently, based on research cited in this book- there is nonpartisan disapproval across the board regarding Citi...

  • Chris
    Jun 02, 2018

    It's hard to write a 400 year history, but this was very well done and admirably focused. At times I wished for more analysis and less of a play by play, but the story that emerges is pretty clear. What I found fascinating is the early American history--We, the people of America, were ...

    I knew law could be arbitrary but I didn't know law could be fun. The author likes to repeat, a good 100 pages could easily have been shaved off. The historical research is on fleek, to borrow a phrase from the kids. ...

    One of my top 2018 reads. _We the Corporations _ traces the history of corporate rights in America, and clearly shows what led up to the landmark decision Citizens United. Apparently, based on research cited in this book- there is nonpartisan disapproval across the board regarding Citi...

    It is endlessly entertaining to examine Supreme Court decisions, to follow the logic and often the prejudice and corruption they comprise. We The Corporations selectively follows the tribulations of the 14th amendment, designed specifically to prevent discrimination among the newly fre...

    This is a book by a law professor at UCLA detailing the history of how US corporate bodies came to increasingly be viewed as legal persons with a widening array of property and liberty rights comparable to those we normally consider as being possessed by individual human beings. The st...

    This is one of the books I always wanted to write (along with Anne Bogel's Reading People book.) I've known that the history of corporation rights began early in our country's history. I just didn't know how early. We the Corporations is an important book about an important topic. Co...

    The content is excellent and informative, but the writing is a little dry and repetitive. It presents the history of corporate law, and the expansion of corporate rights from the founding of the colonies up to Citizens United and Hobby Lobby ? including how the courts swing between t...

    A very worthwhile read, but not an easy one. America has struggled with the personhood of corporations for more than two hundred years, and yet the recent Citizens United and Hobby Lobby decisions are, according to bipartisan agreement, among the worst ever made. I was fascinated but s...

    A fascinating, and highly accessible story of the development of rights for corporations. In spite of the overwhelming public opposition to the SCOTUS decision in "Citizens United" that opened the floodgates for money in politics, Winkler demonstrates that that decision sits on a scaff...

    wait, there's no Kindle edition?? ...

    We the Corporations: How American Businesses Won Their Civil Rights (Hardcover) by Adam Winkler from the library heard au on 1A ( https://the1a.org/) on NPR Feb 26 2018 also On the Media Apr 16 2018 https://www.wnycstudios.org/story/how... listen 4:20 to end--- esp on the 14t...

    I became interested in this book for two reasons: The first reason was spurred by a review I read in ?The Nation? by David Cole on ?Artificial Persons? that discussed the ?Citizen United? Supreme Court decision and recommended Adam Winkler?s book. The second reason ...

    The cry of "Corporations are not people!" after 'Citizens United' was not quite right. The US Supreme Court has tended to restrict corporate rights when it has treated corporations as persons, artificial legal persons; and to grant them rights when it has treated them as bearers of the...

    This important and timely book, published 2/2018, reveals Corporate America's ability to persuade the Supreme Court that corporations qualify for more and more constitutional rights. The author corrects the misunderstanding that SCOTUS thinks corporations are people. To the contrary "r...

    The crescendo of this book is the Citizens United ruling, which to the uninitiated emerged seemingly out of nowhere, from a determined court that re-litigated a case already decided to expand the constitutional rights given to corporations to meddle in our democracy. Adam Winkler shows...

    I expected an uninteresting rant about the plutocracy in America --- valid but nothing we haven't heard a thousand times before. But this book is a lot more interesting than that. It's a legal history describing the cases and arguments that led to the way American law conceptualizes ...

    I had next to zero prior understanding of any of the legal cases or terminology described in the book, and honestly very little background on any Supreme Court justice (other than watching the RBG documentary). This was a fascinating, well-woven, dense, but understandable overview of t...

    Winkler does an admirable job of illustrating the long history of how corporations have functioned in conjunction with the legal system as actors, shielded behind the corporate veil, and in their current state where they have essentially attained personhood. A detailed explanation of o...

    This is a very interesting analysis of the concept of corporate personhood in the United States. The author takes a very close look at the history of corporations starting with colonial America and transitioning through each stage of corporate rights and limitations all the way to the ...

  • Kathleen
    Jul 21, 2018

    It's hard to write a 400 year history, but this was very well done and admirably focused. At times I wished for more analysis and less of a play by play, but the story that emerges is pretty clear. What I found fascinating is the early American history--We, the people of America, were ...

    I knew law could be arbitrary but I didn't know law could be fun. The author likes to repeat, a good 100 pages could easily have been shaved off. The historical research is on fleek, to borrow a phrase from the kids. ...

    One of my top 2018 reads. _We the Corporations _ traces the history of corporate rights in America, and clearly shows what led up to the landmark decision Citizens United. Apparently, based on research cited in this book- there is nonpartisan disapproval across the board regarding Citi...

    It is endlessly entertaining to examine Supreme Court decisions, to follow the logic and often the prejudice and corruption they comprise. We The Corporations selectively follows the tribulations of the 14th amendment, designed specifically to prevent discrimination among the newly fre...

    This is a book by a law professor at UCLA detailing the history of how US corporate bodies came to increasingly be viewed as legal persons with a widening array of property and liberty rights comparable to those we normally consider as being possessed by individual human beings. The st...

    This is one of the books I always wanted to write (along with Anne Bogel's Reading People book.) I've known that the history of corporation rights began early in our country's history. I just didn't know how early. We the Corporations is an important book about an important topic. Co...

    The content is excellent and informative, but the writing is a little dry and repetitive. It presents the history of corporate law, and the expansion of corporate rights from the founding of the colonies up to Citizens United and Hobby Lobby ? including how the courts swing between t...

    A very worthwhile read, but not an easy one. America has struggled with the personhood of corporations for more than two hundred years, and yet the recent Citizens United and Hobby Lobby decisions are, according to bipartisan agreement, among the worst ever made. I was fascinated but s...

    A fascinating, and highly accessible story of the development of rights for corporations. In spite of the overwhelming public opposition to the SCOTUS decision in "Citizens United" that opened the floodgates for money in politics, Winkler demonstrates that that decision sits on a scaff...

    wait, there's no Kindle edition?? ...

    We the Corporations: How American Businesses Won Their Civil Rights (Hardcover) by Adam Winkler from the library heard au on 1A ( https://the1a.org/) on NPR Feb 26 2018 also On the Media Apr 16 2018 https://www.wnycstudios.org/story/how... listen 4:20 to end--- esp on the 14t...

    I became interested in this book for two reasons: The first reason was spurred by a review I read in ?The Nation? by David Cole on ?Artificial Persons? that discussed the ?Citizen United? Supreme Court decision and recommended Adam Winkler?s book. The second reason ...

    The cry of "Corporations are not people!" after 'Citizens United' was not quite right. The US Supreme Court has tended to restrict corporate rights when it has treated corporations as persons, artificial legal persons; and to grant them rights when it has treated them as bearers of the...

    This important and timely book, published 2/2018, reveals Corporate America's ability to persuade the Supreme Court that corporations qualify for more and more constitutional rights. The author corrects the misunderstanding that SCOTUS thinks corporations are people. To the contrary "r...

    The crescendo of this book is the Citizens United ruling, which to the uninitiated emerged seemingly out of nowhere, from a determined court that re-litigated a case already decided to expand the constitutional rights given to corporations to meddle in our democracy. Adam Winkler shows...

    I expected an uninteresting rant about the plutocracy in America --- valid but nothing we haven't heard a thousand times before. But this book is a lot more interesting than that. It's a legal history describing the cases and arguments that led to the way American law conceptualizes ...

    I had next to zero prior understanding of any of the legal cases or terminology described in the book, and honestly very little background on any Supreme Court justice (other than watching the RBG documentary). This was a fascinating, well-woven, dense, but understandable overview of t...

    Winkler does an admirable job of illustrating the long history of how corporations have functioned in conjunction with the legal system as actors, shielded behind the corporate veil, and in their current state where they have essentially attained personhood. A detailed explanation of o...

    This is a very interesting analysis of the concept of corporate personhood in the United States. The author takes a very close look at the history of corporations starting with colonial America and transitioning through each stage of corporate rights and limitations all the way to the ...

    This is a well written book that puts into perspective the Supreme Court's decisions in "Citizens United" and "Hobby Lobby." Winkler traces the history and expansion of corporate rights from the beginning of the nation to the present day. He also points out that the Supreme Court has s...

    Fascinating overview of the creep of Corporations Really interesting book which is full of facts to remember. Also very interesting to read how Corporate rights have come to be; often either via deception or taking advantage of rulings initially intended to aid individuals or minori...

    An interesting and well researched book about the legal cases that led to a gradual expansion of rights for corporations. I found it especially interesting that a theory of First Amendment Rights centred on the listener, that was pivotal in Citizen?s United, was first advanced by...

    This was a great history of how corporations have gained rights in the Supreme Court pretty much since the beginning of the country. It was particularly interesting to understand how corporate personhood is actually not the culprit, but giving the rights of the corporate owners to the ...

    This was a compelling read, very well written for a non-technical audience. It goes quickly, from the founding of our republic to present day, discussing the legal status of corporations and how that status evolved. It should be required reading for anyone who wants to reform the probl...

    Very detailed history of corporate rights in America, from the East India Company all the way to Citizens United. It's too detailed for me, I got about half way then skipped to the concluding chapter. I would say read this is you're looking for a lot of depth, but a more accessible boo...

    It is not really fair to offer a review without reading most of a book. This one, however could have been an interesting essay, but the exhaustive treatment was good for many readers. For me, I lost interest. ...

    This was a well researched and written book. I learned quite a bit and it could be helpful if more people read it and understood how corporations have gained constitutional rights. It can be a bit dry, though no fault of the author. It?s just the nature of the subject and evidence. ...

    The most stunning book I've read all year. I plan to buy a copy and use it like a reference book. Really need to read slowly if you have no legal training (which I don't). The only drawback is that it's dry, but what do you expect from a book about corporate constitutional law? ...

    This very interesting and well written book gave me a much better understanding of what corporate rights now are and how they evolved to this point. I never would have believed I would find this subject so interesting. I want to read the author's other book on gun control. ...

    Honestly, nonfiction is maybe not my thing. This was interesting, but too dry and boring for me -- with no offense to the author. It was incredibly factual and if I tried to space out reading it, may have liked it better. And I enjoyed learning! But manohman was it dry. 2.5. ...

  • Maggie Holmes
    Dec 12, 2017

    It's hard to write a 400 year history, but this was very well done and admirably focused. At times I wished for more analysis and less of a play by play, but the story that emerges is pretty clear. What I found fascinating is the early American history--We, the people of America, were ...

    I knew law could be arbitrary but I didn't know law could be fun. The author likes to repeat, a good 100 pages could easily have been shaved off. The historical research is on fleek, to borrow a phrase from the kids. ...

    One of my top 2018 reads. _We the Corporations _ traces the history of corporate rights in America, and clearly shows what led up to the landmark decision Citizens United. Apparently, based on research cited in this book- there is nonpartisan disapproval across the board regarding Citi...

    It is endlessly entertaining to examine Supreme Court decisions, to follow the logic and often the prejudice and corruption they comprise. We The Corporations selectively follows the tribulations of the 14th amendment, designed specifically to prevent discrimination among the newly fre...

    This is a book by a law professor at UCLA detailing the history of how US corporate bodies came to increasingly be viewed as legal persons with a widening array of property and liberty rights comparable to those we normally consider as being possessed by individual human beings. The st...

    This is one of the books I always wanted to write (along with Anne Bogel's Reading People book.) I've known that the history of corporation rights began early in our country's history. I just didn't know how early. We the Corporations is an important book about an important topic. Co...

  • Robert Gustavo
    Jul 01, 2018

    It's hard to write a 400 year history, but this was very well done and admirably focused. At times I wished for more analysis and less of a play by play, but the story that emerges is pretty clear. What I found fascinating is the early American history--We, the people of America, were ...

    I knew law could be arbitrary but I didn't know law could be fun. The author likes to repeat, a good 100 pages could easily have been shaved off. The historical research is on fleek, to borrow a phrase from the kids. ...

    One of my top 2018 reads. _We the Corporations _ traces the history of corporate rights in America, and clearly shows what led up to the landmark decision Citizens United. Apparently, based on research cited in this book- there is nonpartisan disapproval across the board regarding Citi...

    It is endlessly entertaining to examine Supreme Court decisions, to follow the logic and often the prejudice and corruption they comprise. We The Corporations selectively follows the tribulations of the 14th amendment, designed specifically to prevent discrimination among the newly fre...

    This is a book by a law professor at UCLA detailing the history of how US corporate bodies came to increasingly be viewed as legal persons with a widening array of property and liberty rights comparable to those we normally consider as being possessed by individual human beings. The st...

    This is one of the books I always wanted to write (along with Anne Bogel's Reading People book.) I've known that the history of corporation rights began early in our country's history. I just didn't know how early. We the Corporations is an important book about an important topic. Co...

    The content is excellent and informative, but the writing is a little dry and repetitive. It presents the history of corporate law, and the expansion of corporate rights from the founding of the colonies up to Citizens United and Hobby Lobby ? including how the courts swing between t...

  • Melissa
    Sep 08, 2018

    It's hard to write a 400 year history, but this was very well done and admirably focused. At times I wished for more analysis and less of a play by play, but the story that emerges is pretty clear. What I found fascinating is the early American history--We, the people of America, were ...

    I knew law could be arbitrary but I didn't know law could be fun. The author likes to repeat, a good 100 pages could easily have been shaved off. The historical research is on fleek, to borrow a phrase from the kids. ...

    One of my top 2018 reads. _We the Corporations _ traces the history of corporate rights in America, and clearly shows what led up to the landmark decision Citizens United. Apparently, based on research cited in this book- there is nonpartisan disapproval across the board regarding Citi...

    It is endlessly entertaining to examine Supreme Court decisions, to follow the logic and often the prejudice and corruption they comprise. We The Corporations selectively follows the tribulations of the 14th amendment, designed specifically to prevent discrimination among the newly fre...

    This is a book by a law professor at UCLA detailing the history of how US corporate bodies came to increasingly be viewed as legal persons with a widening array of property and liberty rights comparable to those we normally consider as being possessed by individual human beings. The st...

    This is one of the books I always wanted to write (along with Anne Bogel's Reading People book.) I've known that the history of corporation rights began early in our country's history. I just didn't know how early. We the Corporations is an important book about an important topic. Co...

    The content is excellent and informative, but the writing is a little dry and repetitive. It presents the history of corporate law, and the expansion of corporate rights from the founding of the colonies up to Citizens United and Hobby Lobby ? including how the courts swing between t...

    A very worthwhile read, but not an easy one. America has struggled with the personhood of corporations for more than two hundred years, and yet the recent Citizens United and Hobby Lobby decisions are, according to bipartisan agreement, among the worst ever made. I was fascinated but s...

    A fascinating, and highly accessible story of the development of rights for corporations. In spite of the overwhelming public opposition to the SCOTUS decision in "Citizens United" that opened the floodgates for money in politics, Winkler demonstrates that that decision sits on a scaff...

    wait, there's no Kindle edition?? ...

    We the Corporations: How American Businesses Won Their Civil Rights (Hardcover) by Adam Winkler from the library heard au on 1A ( https://the1a.org/) on NPR Feb 26 2018 also On the Media Apr 16 2018 https://www.wnycstudios.org/story/how... listen 4:20 to end--- esp on the 14t...

    I became interested in this book for two reasons: The first reason was spurred by a review I read in ?The Nation? by David Cole on ?Artificial Persons? that discussed the ?Citizen United? Supreme Court decision and recommended Adam Winkler?s book. The second reason ...

    The cry of "Corporations are not people!" after 'Citizens United' was not quite right. The US Supreme Court has tended to restrict corporate rights when it has treated corporations as persons, artificial legal persons; and to grant them rights when it has treated them as bearers of the...

    This important and timely book, published 2/2018, reveals Corporate America's ability to persuade the Supreme Court that corporations qualify for more and more constitutional rights. The author corrects the misunderstanding that SCOTUS thinks corporations are people. To the contrary "r...

    The crescendo of this book is the Citizens United ruling, which to the uninitiated emerged seemingly out of nowhere, from a determined court that re-litigated a case already decided to expand the constitutional rights given to corporations to meddle in our democracy. Adam Winkler shows...

    I expected an uninteresting rant about the plutocracy in America --- valid but nothing we haven't heard a thousand times before. But this book is a lot more interesting than that. It's a legal history describing the cases and arguments that led to the way American law conceptualizes ...

    I had next to zero prior understanding of any of the legal cases or terminology described in the book, and honestly very little background on any Supreme Court justice (other than watching the RBG documentary). This was a fascinating, well-woven, dense, but understandable overview of t...

  • Armand
    Apr 23, 2018

    It's hard to write a 400 year history, but this was very well done and admirably focused. At times I wished for more analysis and less of a play by play, but the story that emerges is pretty clear. What I found fascinating is the early American history--We, the people of America, were ...

    I knew law could be arbitrary but I didn't know law could be fun. The author likes to repeat, a good 100 pages could easily have been shaved off. The historical research is on fleek, to borrow a phrase from the kids. ...

    One of my top 2018 reads. _We the Corporations _ traces the history of corporate rights in America, and clearly shows what led up to the landmark decision Citizens United. Apparently, based on research cited in this book- there is nonpartisan disapproval across the board regarding Citi...

    It is endlessly entertaining to examine Supreme Court decisions, to follow the logic and often the prejudice and corruption they comprise. We The Corporations selectively follows the tribulations of the 14th amendment, designed specifically to prevent discrimination among the newly fre...

    This is a book by a law professor at UCLA detailing the history of how US corporate bodies came to increasingly be viewed as legal persons with a widening array of property and liberty rights comparable to those we normally consider as being possessed by individual human beings. The st...

    This is one of the books I always wanted to write (along with Anne Bogel's Reading People book.) I've known that the history of corporation rights began early in our country's history. I just didn't know how early. We the Corporations is an important book about an important topic. Co...

    The content is excellent and informative, but the writing is a little dry and repetitive. It presents the history of corporate law, and the expansion of corporate rights from the founding of the colonies up to Citizens United and Hobby Lobby ? including how the courts swing between t...

    A very worthwhile read, but not an easy one. America has struggled with the personhood of corporations for more than two hundred years, and yet the recent Citizens United and Hobby Lobby decisions are, according to bipartisan agreement, among the worst ever made. I was fascinated but s...

    A fascinating, and highly accessible story of the development of rights for corporations. In spite of the overwhelming public opposition to the SCOTUS decision in "Citizens United" that opened the floodgates for money in politics, Winkler demonstrates that that decision sits on a scaff...

    wait, there's no Kindle edition?? ...

    We the Corporations: How American Businesses Won Their Civil Rights (Hardcover) by Adam Winkler from the library heard au on 1A ( https://the1a.org/) on NPR Feb 26 2018 also On the Media Apr 16 2018 https://www.wnycstudios.org/story/how... listen 4:20 to end--- esp on the 14t...

    I became interested in this book for two reasons: The first reason was spurred by a review I read in ?The Nation? by David Cole on ?Artificial Persons? that discussed the ?Citizen United? Supreme Court decision and recommended Adam Winkler?s book. The second reason ...

    The cry of "Corporations are not people!" after 'Citizens United' was not quite right. The US Supreme Court has tended to restrict corporate rights when it has treated corporations as persons, artificial legal persons; and to grant them rights when it has treated them as bearers of the...

    This important and timely book, published 2/2018, reveals Corporate America's ability to persuade the Supreme Court that corporations qualify for more and more constitutional rights. The author corrects the misunderstanding that SCOTUS thinks corporations are people. To the contrary "r...

    The crescendo of this book is the Citizens United ruling, which to the uninitiated emerged seemingly out of nowhere, from a determined court that re-litigated a case already decided to expand the constitutional rights given to corporations to meddle in our democracy. Adam Winkler shows...

    I expected an uninteresting rant about the plutocracy in America --- valid but nothing we haven't heard a thousand times before. But this book is a lot more interesting than that. It's a legal history describing the cases and arguments that led to the way American law conceptualizes ...

    I had next to zero prior understanding of any of the legal cases or terminology described in the book, and honestly very little background on any Supreme Court justice (other than watching the RBG documentary). This was a fascinating, well-woven, dense, but understandable overview of t...

    Winkler does an admirable job of illustrating the long history of how corporations have functioned in conjunction with the legal system as actors, shielded behind the corporate veil, and in their current state where they have essentially attained personhood. A detailed explanation of o...

    This is a very interesting analysis of the concept of corporate personhood in the United States. The author takes a very close look at the history of corporations starting with colonial America and transitioning through each stage of corporate rights and limitations all the way to the ...

    This is a well written book that puts into perspective the Supreme Court's decisions in "Citizens United" and "Hobby Lobby." Winkler traces the history and expansion of corporate rights from the beginning of the nation to the present day. He also points out that the Supreme Court has s...

    Fascinating overview of the creep of Corporations Really interesting book which is full of facts to remember. Also very interesting to read how Corporate rights have come to be; often either via deception or taking advantage of rulings initially intended to aid individuals or minori...

    An interesting and well researched book about the legal cases that led to a gradual expansion of rights for corporations. I found it especially interesting that a theory of First Amendment Rights centred on the listener, that was pivotal in Citizen?s United, was first advanced by...

    This was a great history of how corporations have gained rights in the Supreme Court pretty much since the beginning of the country. It was particularly interesting to understand how corporate personhood is actually not the culprit, but giving the rights of the corporate owners to the ...

    This was a compelling read, very well written for a non-technical audience. It goes quickly, from the founding of our republic to present day, discussing the legal status of corporations and how that status evolved. It should be required reading for anyone who wants to reform the probl...

    Very detailed history of corporate rights in America, from the East India Company all the way to Citizens United. It's too detailed for me, I got about half way then skipped to the concluding chapter. I would say read this is you're looking for a lot of depth, but a more accessible boo...

    It is not really fair to offer a review without reading most of a book. This one, however could have been an interesting essay, but the exhaustive treatment was good for many readers. For me, I lost interest. ...

    This was a well researched and written book. I learned quite a bit and it could be helpful if more people read it and understood how corporations have gained constitutional rights. It can be a bit dry, though no fault of the author. It?s just the nature of the subject and evidence. ...

    The most stunning book I've read all year. I plan to buy a copy and use it like a reference book. Really need to read slowly if you have no legal training (which I don't). The only drawback is that it's dry, but what do you expect from a book about corporate constitutional law? ...

    This very interesting and well written book gave me a much better understanding of what corporate rights now are and how they evolved to this point. I never would have believed I would find this subject so interesting. I want to read the author's other book on gun control. ...

  • Christopher Febles
    Jul 11, 2018

    It's hard to write a 400 year history, but this was very well done and admirably focused. At times I wished for more analysis and less of a play by play, but the story that emerges is pretty clear. What I found fascinating is the early American history--We, the people of America, were ...

    I knew law could be arbitrary but I didn't know law could be fun. The author likes to repeat, a good 100 pages could easily have been shaved off. The historical research is on fleek, to borrow a phrase from the kids. ...

    One of my top 2018 reads. _We the Corporations _ traces the history of corporate rights in America, and clearly shows what led up to the landmark decision Citizens United. Apparently, based on research cited in this book- there is nonpartisan disapproval across the board regarding Citi...

    It is endlessly entertaining to examine Supreme Court decisions, to follow the logic and often the prejudice and corruption they comprise. We The Corporations selectively follows the tribulations of the 14th amendment, designed specifically to prevent discrimination among the newly fre...

    This is a book by a law professor at UCLA detailing the history of how US corporate bodies came to increasingly be viewed as legal persons with a widening array of property and liberty rights comparable to those we normally consider as being possessed by individual human beings. The st...

    This is one of the books I always wanted to write (along with Anne Bogel's Reading People book.) I've known that the history of corporation rights began early in our country's history. I just didn't know how early. We the Corporations is an important book about an important topic. Co...

    The content is excellent and informative, but the writing is a little dry and repetitive. It presents the history of corporate law, and the expansion of corporate rights from the founding of the colonies up to Citizens United and Hobby Lobby ? including how the courts swing between t...

    A very worthwhile read, but not an easy one. America has struggled with the personhood of corporations for more than two hundred years, and yet the recent Citizens United and Hobby Lobby decisions are, according to bipartisan agreement, among the worst ever made. I was fascinated but s...

    A fascinating, and highly accessible story of the development of rights for corporations. In spite of the overwhelming public opposition to the SCOTUS decision in "Citizens United" that opened the floodgates for money in politics, Winkler demonstrates that that decision sits on a scaff...

    wait, there's no Kindle edition?? ...

    We the Corporations: How American Businesses Won Their Civil Rights (Hardcover) by Adam Winkler from the library heard au on 1A ( https://the1a.org/) on NPR Feb 26 2018 also On the Media Apr 16 2018 https://www.wnycstudios.org/story/how... listen 4:20 to end--- esp on the 14t...

    I became interested in this book for two reasons: The first reason was spurred by a review I read in ?The Nation? by David Cole on ?Artificial Persons? that discussed the ?Citizen United? Supreme Court decision and recommended Adam Winkler?s book. The second reason ...

    The cry of "Corporations are not people!" after 'Citizens United' was not quite right. The US Supreme Court has tended to restrict corporate rights when it has treated corporations as persons, artificial legal persons; and to grant them rights when it has treated them as bearers of the...

    This important and timely book, published 2/2018, reveals Corporate America's ability to persuade the Supreme Court that corporations qualify for more and more constitutional rights. The author corrects the misunderstanding that SCOTUS thinks corporations are people. To the contrary "r...

    The crescendo of this book is the Citizens United ruling, which to the uninitiated emerged seemingly out of nowhere, from a determined court that re-litigated a case already decided to expand the constitutional rights given to corporations to meddle in our democracy. Adam Winkler shows...

    I expected an uninteresting rant about the plutocracy in America --- valid but nothing we haven't heard a thousand times before. But this book is a lot more interesting than that. It's a legal history describing the cases and arguments that led to the way American law conceptualizes ...

    I had next to zero prior understanding of any of the legal cases or terminology described in the book, and honestly very little background on any Supreme Court justice (other than watching the RBG documentary). This was a fascinating, well-woven, dense, but understandable overview of t...

    Winkler does an admirable job of illustrating the long history of how corporations have functioned in conjunction with the legal system as actors, shielded behind the corporate veil, and in their current state where they have essentially attained personhood. A detailed explanation of o...

    This is a very interesting analysis of the concept of corporate personhood in the United States. The author takes a very close look at the history of corporations starting with colonial America and transitioning through each stage of corporate rights and limitations all the way to the ...

    This is a well written book that puts into perspective the Supreme Court's decisions in "Citizens United" and "Hobby Lobby." Winkler traces the history and expansion of corporate rights from the beginning of the nation to the present day. He also points out that the Supreme Court has s...

    Fascinating overview of the creep of Corporations Really interesting book which is full of facts to remember. Also very interesting to read how Corporate rights have come to be; often either via deception or taking advantage of rulings initially intended to aid individuals or minori...

    An interesting and well researched book about the legal cases that led to a gradual expansion of rights for corporations. I found it especially interesting that a theory of First Amendment Rights centred on the listener, that was pivotal in Citizen?s United, was first advanced by...

    This was a great history of how corporations have gained rights in the Supreme Court pretty much since the beginning of the country. It was particularly interesting to understand how corporate personhood is actually not the culprit, but giving the rights of the corporate owners to the ...

    This was a compelling read, very well written for a non-technical audience. It goes quickly, from the founding of our republic to present day, discussing the legal status of corporations and how that status evolved. It should be required reading for anyone who wants to reform the probl...

    Very detailed history of corporate rights in America, from the East India Company all the way to Citizens United. It's too detailed for me, I got about half way then skipped to the concluding chapter. I would say read this is you're looking for a lot of depth, but a more accessible boo...

    It is not really fair to offer a review without reading most of a book. This one, however could have been an interesting essay, but the exhaustive treatment was good for many readers. For me, I lost interest. ...

    This was a well researched and written book. I learned quite a bit and it could be helpful if more people read it and understood how corporations have gained constitutional rights. It can be a bit dry, though no fault of the author. It?s just the nature of the subject and evidence. ...

    The most stunning book I've read all year. I plan to buy a copy and use it like a reference book. Really need to read slowly if you have no legal training (which I don't). The only drawback is that it's dry, but what do you expect from a book about corporate constitutional law? ...

  • John_g
    Jun 27, 2018

    It's hard to write a 400 year history, but this was very well done and admirably focused. At times I wished for more analysis and less of a play by play, but the story that emerges is pretty clear. What I found fascinating is the early American history--We, the people of America, were ...

    I knew law could be arbitrary but I didn't know law could be fun. The author likes to repeat, a good 100 pages could easily have been shaved off. The historical research is on fleek, to borrow a phrase from the kids. ...

    One of my top 2018 reads. _We the Corporations _ traces the history of corporate rights in America, and clearly shows what led up to the landmark decision Citizens United. Apparently, based on research cited in this book- there is nonpartisan disapproval across the board regarding Citi...

    It is endlessly entertaining to examine Supreme Court decisions, to follow the logic and often the prejudice and corruption they comprise. We The Corporations selectively follows the tribulations of the 14th amendment, designed specifically to prevent discrimination among the newly fre...

    This is a book by a law professor at UCLA detailing the history of how US corporate bodies came to increasingly be viewed as legal persons with a widening array of property and liberty rights comparable to those we normally consider as being possessed by individual human beings. The st...

    This is one of the books I always wanted to write (along with Anne Bogel's Reading People book.) I've known that the history of corporation rights began early in our country's history. I just didn't know how early. We the Corporations is an important book about an important topic. Co...

    The content is excellent and informative, but the writing is a little dry and repetitive. It presents the history of corporate law, and the expansion of corporate rights from the founding of the colonies up to Citizens United and Hobby Lobby ? including how the courts swing between t...

    A very worthwhile read, but not an easy one. America has struggled with the personhood of corporations for more than two hundred years, and yet the recent Citizens United and Hobby Lobby decisions are, according to bipartisan agreement, among the worst ever made. I was fascinated but s...

    A fascinating, and highly accessible story of the development of rights for corporations. In spite of the overwhelming public opposition to the SCOTUS decision in "Citizens United" that opened the floodgates for money in politics, Winkler demonstrates that that decision sits on a scaff...

    wait, there's no Kindle edition?? ...

    We the Corporations: How American Businesses Won Their Civil Rights (Hardcover) by Adam Winkler from the library heard au on 1A ( https://the1a.org/) on NPR Feb 26 2018 also On the Media Apr 16 2018 https://www.wnycstudios.org/story/how... listen 4:20 to end--- esp on the 14t...

    I became interested in this book for two reasons: The first reason was spurred by a review I read in ?The Nation? by David Cole on ?Artificial Persons? that discussed the ?Citizen United? Supreme Court decision and recommended Adam Winkler?s book. The second reason ...

    The cry of "Corporations are not people!" after 'Citizens United' was not quite right. The US Supreme Court has tended to restrict corporate rights when it has treated corporations as persons, artificial legal persons; and to grant them rights when it has treated them as bearers of the...

    This important and timely book, published 2/2018, reveals Corporate America's ability to persuade the Supreme Court that corporations qualify for more and more constitutional rights. The author corrects the misunderstanding that SCOTUS thinks corporations are people. To the contrary "r...

  • David Wineberg
    Jan 20, 2018

    It's hard to write a 400 year history, but this was very well done and admirably focused. At times I wished for more analysis and less of a play by play, but the story that emerges is pretty clear. What I found fascinating is the early American history--We, the people of America, were ...

    I knew law could be arbitrary but I didn't know law could be fun. The author likes to repeat, a good 100 pages could easily have been shaved off. The historical research is on fleek, to borrow a phrase from the kids. ...

    One of my top 2018 reads. _We the Corporations _ traces the history of corporate rights in America, and clearly shows what led up to the landmark decision Citizens United. Apparently, based on research cited in this book- there is nonpartisan disapproval across the board regarding Citi...

    It is endlessly entertaining to examine Supreme Court decisions, to follow the logic and often the prejudice and corruption they comprise. We The Corporations selectively follows the tribulations of the 14th amendment, designed specifically to prevent discrimination among the newly fre...

  • Gavin
    Apr 06, 2018

    It's hard to write a 400 year history, but this was very well done and admirably focused. At times I wished for more analysis and less of a play by play, but the story that emerges is pretty clear. What I found fascinating is the early American history--We, the people of America, were ...

    I knew law could be arbitrary but I didn't know law could be fun. The author likes to repeat, a good 100 pages could easily have been shaved off. The historical research is on fleek, to borrow a phrase from the kids. ...

    One of my top 2018 reads. _We the Corporations _ traces the history of corporate rights in America, and clearly shows what led up to the landmark decision Citizens United. Apparently, based on research cited in this book- there is nonpartisan disapproval across the board regarding Citi...

    It is endlessly entertaining to examine Supreme Court decisions, to follow the logic and often the prejudice and corruption they comprise. We The Corporations selectively follows the tribulations of the 14th amendment, designed specifically to prevent discrimination among the newly fre...

    This is a book by a law professor at UCLA detailing the history of how US corporate bodies came to increasingly be viewed as legal persons with a widening array of property and liberty rights comparable to those we normally consider as being possessed by individual human beings. The st...

    This is one of the books I always wanted to write (along with Anne Bogel's Reading People book.) I've known that the history of corporation rights began early in our country's history. I just didn't know how early. We the Corporations is an important book about an important topic. Co...

    The content is excellent and informative, but the writing is a little dry and repetitive. It presents the history of corporate law, and the expansion of corporate rights from the founding of the colonies up to Citizens United and Hobby Lobby ? including how the courts swing between t...

    A very worthwhile read, but not an easy one. America has struggled with the personhood of corporations for more than two hundred years, and yet the recent Citizens United and Hobby Lobby decisions are, according to bipartisan agreement, among the worst ever made. I was fascinated but s...

    A fascinating, and highly accessible story of the development of rights for corporations. In spite of the overwhelming public opposition to the SCOTUS decision in "Citizens United" that opened the floodgates for money in politics, Winkler demonstrates that that decision sits on a scaff...

    wait, there's no Kindle edition?? ...

    We the Corporations: How American Businesses Won Their Civil Rights (Hardcover) by Adam Winkler from the library heard au on 1A ( https://the1a.org/) on NPR Feb 26 2018 also On the Media Apr 16 2018 https://www.wnycstudios.org/story/how... listen 4:20 to end--- esp on the 14t...

    I became interested in this book for two reasons: The first reason was spurred by a review I read in ?The Nation? by David Cole on ?Artificial Persons? that discussed the ?Citizen United? Supreme Court decision and recommended Adam Winkler?s book. The second reason ...

    The cry of "Corporations are not people!" after 'Citizens United' was not quite right. The US Supreme Court has tended to restrict corporate rights when it has treated corporations as persons, artificial legal persons; and to grant them rights when it has treated them as bearers of the...

    This important and timely book, published 2/2018, reveals Corporate America's ability to persuade the Supreme Court that corporations qualify for more and more constitutional rights. The author corrects the misunderstanding that SCOTUS thinks corporations are people. To the contrary "r...

    The crescendo of this book is the Citizens United ruling, which to the uninitiated emerged seemingly out of nowhere, from a determined court that re-litigated a case already decided to expand the constitutional rights given to corporations to meddle in our democracy. Adam Winkler shows...

    I expected an uninteresting rant about the plutocracy in America --- valid but nothing we haven't heard a thousand times before. But this book is a lot more interesting than that. It's a legal history describing the cases and arguments that led to the way American law conceptualizes ...

    I had next to zero prior understanding of any of the legal cases or terminology described in the book, and honestly very little background on any Supreme Court justice (other than watching the RBG documentary). This was a fascinating, well-woven, dense, but understandable overview of t...

    Winkler does an admirable job of illustrating the long history of how corporations have functioned in conjunction with the legal system as actors, shielded behind the corporate veil, and in their current state where they have essentially attained personhood. A detailed explanation of o...

    This is a very interesting analysis of the concept of corporate personhood in the United States. The author takes a very close look at the history of corporations starting with colonial America and transitioning through each stage of corporate rights and limitations all the way to the ...

    This is a well written book that puts into perspective the Supreme Court's decisions in "Citizens United" and "Hobby Lobby." Winkler traces the history and expansion of corporate rights from the beginning of the nation to the present day. He also points out that the Supreme Court has s...

    Fascinating overview of the creep of Corporations Really interesting book which is full of facts to remember. Also very interesting to read how Corporate rights have come to be; often either via deception or taking advantage of rulings initially intended to aid individuals or minori...

  • Will A
    Mar 19, 2018

    It's hard to write a 400 year history, but this was very well done and admirably focused. At times I wished for more analysis and less of a play by play, but the story that emerges is pretty clear. What I found fascinating is the early American history--We, the people of America, were ...

    I knew law could be arbitrary but I didn't know law could be fun. The author likes to repeat, a good 100 pages could easily have been shaved off. The historical research is on fleek, to borrow a phrase from the kids. ...

    One of my top 2018 reads. _We the Corporations _ traces the history of corporate rights in America, and clearly shows what led up to the landmark decision Citizens United. Apparently, based on research cited in this book- there is nonpartisan disapproval across the board regarding Citi...

    It is endlessly entertaining to examine Supreme Court decisions, to follow the logic and often the prejudice and corruption they comprise. We The Corporations selectively follows the tribulations of the 14th amendment, designed specifically to prevent discrimination among the newly fre...

    This is a book by a law professor at UCLA detailing the history of how US corporate bodies came to increasingly be viewed as legal persons with a widening array of property and liberty rights comparable to those we normally consider as being possessed by individual human beings. The st...

    This is one of the books I always wanted to write (along with Anne Bogel's Reading People book.) I've known that the history of corporation rights began early in our country's history. I just didn't know how early. We the Corporations is an important book about an important topic. Co...

    The content is excellent and informative, but the writing is a little dry and repetitive. It presents the history of corporate law, and the expansion of corporate rights from the founding of the colonies up to Citizens United and Hobby Lobby ? including how the courts swing between t...

    A very worthwhile read, but not an easy one. America has struggled with the personhood of corporations for more than two hundred years, and yet the recent Citizens United and Hobby Lobby decisions are, according to bipartisan agreement, among the worst ever made. I was fascinated but s...

    A fascinating, and highly accessible story of the development of rights for corporations. In spite of the overwhelming public opposition to the SCOTUS decision in "Citizens United" that opened the floodgates for money in politics, Winkler demonstrates that that decision sits on a scaff...

    wait, there's no Kindle edition?? ...

    We the Corporations: How American Businesses Won Their Civil Rights (Hardcover) by Adam Winkler from the library heard au on 1A ( https://the1a.org/) on NPR Feb 26 2018 also On the Media Apr 16 2018 https://www.wnycstudios.org/story/how... listen 4:20 to end--- esp on the 14t...

    I became interested in this book for two reasons: The first reason was spurred by a review I read in ?The Nation? by David Cole on ?Artificial Persons? that discussed the ?Citizen United? Supreme Court decision and recommended Adam Winkler?s book. The second reason ...

    The cry of "Corporations are not people!" after 'Citizens United' was not quite right. The US Supreme Court has tended to restrict corporate rights when it has treated corporations as persons, artificial legal persons; and to grant them rights when it has treated them as bearers of the...

  • Robert Stevenson
    Jun 20, 2018

    It's hard to write a 400 year history, but this was very well done and admirably focused. At times I wished for more analysis and less of a play by play, but the story that emerges is pretty clear. What I found fascinating is the early American history--We, the people of America, were ...

    I knew law could be arbitrary but I didn't know law could be fun. The author likes to repeat, a good 100 pages could easily have been shaved off. The historical research is on fleek, to borrow a phrase from the kids. ...

    One of my top 2018 reads. _We the Corporations _ traces the history of corporate rights in America, and clearly shows what led up to the landmark decision Citizens United. Apparently, based on research cited in this book- there is nonpartisan disapproval across the board regarding Citi...

    It is endlessly entertaining to examine Supreme Court decisions, to follow the logic and often the prejudice and corruption they comprise. We The Corporations selectively follows the tribulations of the 14th amendment, designed specifically to prevent discrimination among the newly fre...

    This is a book by a law professor at UCLA detailing the history of how US corporate bodies came to increasingly be viewed as legal persons with a widening array of property and liberty rights comparable to those we normally consider as being possessed by individual human beings. The st...

    This is one of the books I always wanted to write (along with Anne Bogel's Reading People book.) I've known that the history of corporation rights began early in our country's history. I just didn't know how early. We the Corporations is an important book about an important topic. Co...

    The content is excellent and informative, but the writing is a little dry and repetitive. It presents the history of corporate law, and the expansion of corporate rights from the founding of the colonies up to Citizens United and Hobby Lobby ? including how the courts swing between t...

    A very worthwhile read, but not an easy one. America has struggled with the personhood of corporations for more than two hundred years, and yet the recent Citizens United and Hobby Lobby decisions are, according to bipartisan agreement, among the worst ever made. I was fascinated but s...

    A fascinating, and highly accessible story of the development of rights for corporations. In spite of the overwhelming public opposition to the SCOTUS decision in "Citizens United" that opened the floodgates for money in politics, Winkler demonstrates that that decision sits on a scaff...

    wait, there's no Kindle edition?? ...

    We the Corporations: How American Businesses Won Their Civil Rights (Hardcover) by Adam Winkler from the library heard au on 1A ( https://the1a.org/) on NPR Feb 26 2018 also On the Media Apr 16 2018 https://www.wnycstudios.org/story/how... listen 4:20 to end--- esp on the 14t...

    I became interested in this book for two reasons: The first reason was spurred by a review I read in ?The Nation? by David Cole on ?Artificial Persons? that discussed the ?Citizen United? Supreme Court decision and recommended Adam Winkler?s book. The second reason ...

  • David Dayen
    Jun 10, 2018

    It's hard to write a 400 year history, but this was very well done and admirably focused. At times I wished for more analysis and less of a play by play, but the story that emerges is pretty clear. What I found fascinating is the early American history--We, the people of America, were ...

    I knew law could be arbitrary but I didn't know law could be fun. The author likes to repeat, a good 100 pages could easily have been shaved off. The historical research is on fleek, to borrow a phrase from the kids. ...

    One of my top 2018 reads. _We the Corporations _ traces the history of corporate rights in America, and clearly shows what led up to the landmark decision Citizens United. Apparently, based on research cited in this book- there is nonpartisan disapproval across the board regarding Citi...

    It is endlessly entertaining to examine Supreme Court decisions, to follow the logic and often the prejudice and corruption they comprise. We The Corporations selectively follows the tribulations of the 14th amendment, designed specifically to prevent discrimination among the newly fre...

    This is a book by a law professor at UCLA detailing the history of how US corporate bodies came to increasingly be viewed as legal persons with a widening array of property and liberty rights comparable to those we normally consider as being possessed by individual human beings. The st...

    This is one of the books I always wanted to write (along with Anne Bogel's Reading People book.) I've known that the history of corporation rights began early in our country's history. I just didn't know how early. We the Corporations is an important book about an important topic. Co...

    The content is excellent and informative, but the writing is a little dry and repetitive. It presents the history of corporate law, and the expansion of corporate rights from the founding of the colonies up to Citizens United and Hobby Lobby ? including how the courts swing between t...

    A very worthwhile read, but not an easy one. America has struggled with the personhood of corporations for more than two hundred years, and yet the recent Citizens United and Hobby Lobby decisions are, according to bipartisan agreement, among the worst ever made. I was fascinated but s...

    A fascinating, and highly accessible story of the development of rights for corporations. In spite of the overwhelming public opposition to the SCOTUS decision in "Citizens United" that opened the floodgates for money in politics, Winkler demonstrates that that decision sits on a scaff...

    wait, there's no Kindle edition?? ...

    We the Corporations: How American Businesses Won Their Civil Rights (Hardcover) by Adam Winkler from the library heard au on 1A ( https://the1a.org/) on NPR Feb 26 2018 also On the Media Apr 16 2018 https://www.wnycstudios.org/story/how... listen 4:20 to end--- esp on the 14t...

    I became interested in this book for two reasons: The first reason was spurred by a review I read in ?The Nation? by David Cole on ?Artificial Persons? that discussed the ?Citizen United? Supreme Court decision and recommended Adam Winkler?s book. The second reason ...

    The cry of "Corporations are not people!" after 'Citizens United' was not quite right. The US Supreme Court has tended to restrict corporate rights when it has treated corporations as persons, artificial legal persons; and to grant them rights when it has treated them as bearers of the...

    This important and timely book, published 2/2018, reveals Corporate America's ability to persuade the Supreme Court that corporations qualify for more and more constitutional rights. The author corrects the misunderstanding that SCOTUS thinks corporations are people. To the contrary "r...

    The crescendo of this book is the Citizens United ruling, which to the uninitiated emerged seemingly out of nowhere, from a determined court that re-litigated a case already decided to expand the constitutional rights given to corporations to meddle in our democracy. Adam Winkler shows...

  • Jim Johnston
    May 18, 2018

    It's hard to write a 400 year history, but this was very well done and admirably focused. At times I wished for more analysis and less of a play by play, but the story that emerges is pretty clear. What I found fascinating is the early American history--We, the people of America, were ...

    I knew law could be arbitrary but I didn't know law could be fun. The author likes to repeat, a good 100 pages could easily have been shaved off. The historical research is on fleek, to borrow a phrase from the kids. ...

    One of my top 2018 reads. _We the Corporations _ traces the history of corporate rights in America, and clearly shows what led up to the landmark decision Citizens United. Apparently, based on research cited in this book- there is nonpartisan disapproval across the board regarding Citi...

    It is endlessly entertaining to examine Supreme Court decisions, to follow the logic and often the prejudice and corruption they comprise. We The Corporations selectively follows the tribulations of the 14th amendment, designed specifically to prevent discrimination among the newly fre...

    This is a book by a law professor at UCLA detailing the history of how US corporate bodies came to increasingly be viewed as legal persons with a widening array of property and liberty rights comparable to those we normally consider as being possessed by individual human beings. The st...

    This is one of the books I always wanted to write (along with Anne Bogel's Reading People book.) I've known that the history of corporation rights began early in our country's history. I just didn't know how early. We the Corporations is an important book about an important topic. Co...

    The content is excellent and informative, but the writing is a little dry and repetitive. It presents the history of corporate law, and the expansion of corporate rights from the founding of the colonies up to Citizens United and Hobby Lobby ? including how the courts swing between t...

    A very worthwhile read, but not an easy one. America has struggled with the personhood of corporations for more than two hundred years, and yet the recent Citizens United and Hobby Lobby decisions are, according to bipartisan agreement, among the worst ever made. I was fascinated but s...

    A fascinating, and highly accessible story of the development of rights for corporations. In spite of the overwhelming public opposition to the SCOTUS decision in "Citizens United" that opened the floodgates for money in politics, Winkler demonstrates that that decision sits on a scaff...

    wait, there's no Kindle edition?? ...

    We the Corporations: How American Businesses Won Their Civil Rights (Hardcover) by Adam Winkler from the library heard au on 1A ( https://the1a.org/) on NPR Feb 26 2018 also On the Media Apr 16 2018 https://www.wnycstudios.org/story/how... listen 4:20 to end--- esp on the 14t...

    I became interested in this book for two reasons: The first reason was spurred by a review I read in ?The Nation? by David Cole on ?Artificial Persons? that discussed the ?Citizen United? Supreme Court decision and recommended Adam Winkler?s book. The second reason ...

    The cry of "Corporations are not people!" after 'Citizens United' was not quite right. The US Supreme Court has tended to restrict corporate rights when it has treated corporations as persons, artificial legal persons; and to grant them rights when it has treated them as bearers of the...

    This important and timely book, published 2/2018, reveals Corporate America's ability to persuade the Supreme Court that corporations qualify for more and more constitutional rights. The author corrects the misunderstanding that SCOTUS thinks corporations are people. To the contrary "r...

    The crescendo of this book is the Citizens United ruling, which to the uninitiated emerged seemingly out of nowhere, from a determined court that re-litigated a case already decided to expand the constitutional rights given to corporations to meddle in our democracy. Adam Winkler shows...

    I expected an uninteresting rant about the plutocracy in America --- valid but nothing we haven't heard a thousand times before. But this book is a lot more interesting than that. It's a legal history describing the cases and arguments that led to the way American law conceptualizes ...

    I had next to zero prior understanding of any of the legal cases or terminology described in the book, and honestly very little background on any Supreme Court justice (other than watching the RBG documentary). This was a fascinating, well-woven, dense, but understandable overview of t...

    Winkler does an admirable job of illustrating the long history of how corporations have functioned in conjunction with the legal system as actors, shielded behind the corporate veil, and in their current state where they have essentially attained personhood. A detailed explanation of o...

  • Marks54
    Apr 09, 2018

    It's hard to write a 400 year history, but this was very well done and admirably focused. At times I wished for more analysis and less of a play by play, but the story that emerges is pretty clear. What I found fascinating is the early American history--We, the people of America, were ...

    I knew law could be arbitrary but I didn't know law could be fun. The author likes to repeat, a good 100 pages could easily have been shaved off. The historical research is on fleek, to borrow a phrase from the kids. ...

    One of my top 2018 reads. _We the Corporations _ traces the history of corporate rights in America, and clearly shows what led up to the landmark decision Citizens United. Apparently, based on research cited in this book- there is nonpartisan disapproval across the board regarding Citi...

    It is endlessly entertaining to examine Supreme Court decisions, to follow the logic and often the prejudice and corruption they comprise. We The Corporations selectively follows the tribulations of the 14th amendment, designed specifically to prevent discrimination among the newly fre...

    This is a book by a law professor at UCLA detailing the history of how US corporate bodies came to increasingly be viewed as legal persons with a widening array of property and liberty rights comparable to those we normally consider as being possessed by individual human beings. The st...