Outliers: The Story of Success

Outliers: The Story of Success

In this stunning new book, Malcolm Gladwell takes us on an intellectual journey through the world of "outliers"--the best and the brightest, the most famous and the most successful. He asks the question: what makes high-achievers different? His answer is that we pay too much attention to what successful people are like, and too little attention to where they are from: that In this stunning new book, Malcolm Gladwell takes us on an intellectual journey through the world of "outliers"--the b...

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Title:Outliers: The Story of Success
Author:Malcolm Gladwell
Rating:
Genres:Nonfiction
ISBN:Outliers: The Story of Success
ISBN
Edition Language:English
Format Type:Hardcover
Number of Pages:309 pages pages

Outliers: The Story of Success Reviews

  • Eric
    Dec 19, 2008

    Gladwell argues that success is tightly married to opportunity and time on task. He states that it takes approximately 10,000 hours to master something and that gives me comfort. It helps me feel better about my many failures at initial attempts to master things (like glazing pottery, ...

    When I think about Malcolm Gladwell, the first phrase that comes to mind is "less than meets the eye." At first glance, his work seems thoroughly researched, even visionary at times. Beginning with a few maverick, counter-intuitive insights, he often ends with an affirmation of c...

    I know, you don?t think you have the time and there are other and more important books to read at the moment, but be warned, you do need to read this book. There are a number of ways I can tell a book will be good; one of those ways is if Graham has recommended it to me (how am I ...

    Didn't exactly read this book - Joe and I listened to it in the car on the way home from visiting family for Christmas. I really enjoyed it, and was very fascinated by certain parts of it, especially the sections about the Beatles, computer programmers and Korean co-pilots. But my e...

    Occasionally insightful, but Gladwell's science is pretty junky. His reasons for success change by the page. And he cherry-picks examples to exactly fit the scheme under consideration. Plus, he's obsessed with callbacks and summary statements that only showcase the faulty connections b...

    Malcolm Gladwell's new book reads like a series of cocktail-party anecdotes. Whether the book is a mere fluff piece or something more is open to debate. At its heart, it has two themes: (1) That success depends not just on talent but opportunity, and (2) that success (and failure) also...

    I can save you the trouble of reading the book: smart people don't automatically become successful, they do so because they got lucky. This rule applies to everyone including the likes of Bill Gates and Robert Oppenheimer. That's it. That's what the whole book is about. Gladwell looks ...

  • David
    Nov 14, 2008

    Gladwell argues that success is tightly married to opportunity and time on task. He states that it takes approximately 10,000 hours to master something and that gives me comfort. It helps me feel better about my many failures at initial attempts to master things (like glazing pottery, ...

    When I think about Malcolm Gladwell, the first phrase that comes to mind is "less than meets the eye." At first glance, his work seems thoroughly researched, even visionary at times. Beginning with a few maverick, counter-intuitive insights, he often ends with an affirmation of c...

    I know, you don?t think you have the time and there are other and more important books to read at the moment, but be warned, you do need to read this book. There are a number of ways I can tell a book will be good; one of those ways is if Graham has recommended it to me (how am I ...

    Didn't exactly read this book - Joe and I listened to it in the car on the way home from visiting family for Christmas. I really enjoyed it, and was very fascinated by certain parts of it, especially the sections about the Beatles, computer programmers and Korean co-pilots. But my e...

    Occasionally insightful, but Gladwell's science is pretty junky. His reasons for success change by the page. And he cherry-picks examples to exactly fit the scheme under consideration. Plus, he's obsessed with callbacks and summary statements that only showcase the faulty connections b...

    Malcolm Gladwell's new book reads like a series of cocktail-party anecdotes. Whether the book is a mere fluff piece or something more is open to debate. At its heart, it has two themes: (1) That success depends not just on talent but opportunity, and (2) that success (and failure) also...

  • Chloe
    Oct 08, 2009

    Gladwell argues that success is tightly married to opportunity and time on task. He states that it takes approximately 10,000 hours to master something and that gives me comfort. It helps me feel better about my many failures at initial attempts to master things (like glazing pottery, ...

    When I think about Malcolm Gladwell, the first phrase that comes to mind is "less than meets the eye." At first glance, his work seems thoroughly researched, even visionary at times. Beginning with a few maverick, counter-intuitive insights, he often ends with an affirmation of c...

    I know, you don?t think you have the time and there are other and more important books to read at the moment, but be warned, you do need to read this book. There are a number of ways I can tell a book will be good; one of those ways is if Graham has recommended it to me (how am I ...

    Didn't exactly read this book - Joe and I listened to it in the car on the way home from visiting family for Christmas. I really enjoyed it, and was very fascinated by certain parts of it, especially the sections about the Beatles, computer programmers and Korean co-pilots. But my e...

    Occasionally insightful, but Gladwell's science is pretty junky. His reasons for success change by the page. And he cherry-picks examples to exactly fit the scheme under consideration. Plus, he's obsessed with callbacks and summary statements that only showcase the faulty connections b...

    Malcolm Gladwell's new book reads like a series of cocktail-party anecdotes. Whether the book is a mere fluff piece or something more is open to debate. At its heart, it has two themes: (1) That success depends not just on talent but opportunity, and (2) that success (and failure) also...

    I can save you the trouble of reading the book: smart people don't automatically become successful, they do so because they got lucky. This rule applies to everyone including the likes of Bill Gates and Robert Oppenheimer. That's it. That's what the whole book is about. Gladwell looks ...

    Here's what I wrote earlier. I have to admit to the more I think and talk about the book, the less I think of it. It all seems too superficial. A pretty interesting book, albeit with not quite as many "knock me over with a feather" moments as Blink. It starts off with a bang, as he ...

    People are criticizing this book because it is not a journal article. Well guess what: we're not all sociologists. I have read plenty of journal articles in my own field (law). I'm in no position to read journal articles in fields outside my own. Having a well-written piece of mass-mar...

    I skimmed this book instead of reading it. I didn?t entirely love it. Although the author makes some interesting points, I find some of the correlations he tries to draw a little silly. Like the Italian community in Pennsylvania where people are healthier and live longer because t...

    Well, it's official: Malcolm Gladwell has run out of things to say. His prose is still lively and entertaining, and he maintains his famous I-look-at-things-differently-than-anyone-else attitude, but "Outliers" has so little meat that it would have more appropriately been published ...

    Recommend to: If you like exploring phenomenon beyond their appearance and if you enjoy story-telling writings about factual subjects, here: success What this book is about: Here, the famous columnist, Malcolm Gladwell deeply investigates the topic of success and people or nations w...

    Outliers : the story of success, Malcolm Gladwell ???????: ????? ??? ??? ????? : ?????? ??????? ?????? ????? ???? ??????? ???????? ?? : ?????? ??????? ????? ??? ????? : ?????? ????...

    Outliers. Or as it should be called, "Outliers don't exist." I not only couldn't put it down, but my wife feels like she's read it now too. It starts with a story about a town whose inhabitants only ever die from old age (i.e., not from cancer or ANY OTHER problem) and quickly goes...

    Malcolm Gladwell writes very interesting and entertaining books. J.R.R. Tolkein writes very interesting and entertaining books as well. However, after reading Tolkein, I did not venture out into the world in search of hobbits, dwarves and elves to be my new friends, or worry about bein...

    "Outliers" those wildly successful people, for whom 'normal rules don't apply.' Are they just lucky, talented? Maybe...but, outliers may not be outliers after all...after reading the entire book, I was slapped by that at the very end. Gladwell looks closely at success, and those who se...

    ?????? ???? ???? ??????.. ?????? ????? ??? ?????. ?????? ?? ???? ??? ????? ??????? ???? ?? ????? ?? ?? ??????? ??????? ????? ????? ???? ????? ?????? ?????? ??...

    "If only I'd read this book earlier," the old man sighed. He shook his head sadly. "I was at the wrong end of the cut-off age. I'd have made a champion swimmer...". His voice trailed off. "Hmmm." He sighed again. "Then there's this 10000 hour rule. What the hell am I supposed to do a...

    This is not a feeling oriented review like those that seem to be getting esteem here. While this is a well-researched and easily readable book that makes some interesting points, most of its contents are pure common sense. In a world so highly populated with such strong inequities,...

    This was such an unexpected pleasure to listen to. The narration was fantastic. The information clear and written is such a way that I absorbed and considered the facts presented. For me that is amazing, I am easily distracted and seldom retain most information, ADHD yep. Some of the i...

    Wow! This book was incredible. This goes directly on the very tiny pile of books that I can say have drastically shifted the way I understand and view the world. I know I've heard this author's work referred to many times in other books and IRL, but I didn't realize how much of a parad...

    Here is my animated review! youtu.be/5HUjk6Zf0xg This book made me think about the advantages and disadvantages connected to the birth date, place and few other things most kids can't change. ...

    I'm starting to think that all Malcolm Gladwell books are the same thing - a rather ordinary/non-controversial statement about life which is padded with pretty neat examples and then praised as revolutionary, thus selling millions of copies. Main thesis is that social ability is a g...

    In just one week, this book transformed a relatively normal woman into someone who's been saying, "Well, in this book I'm reading. . . you know, Outliers? Yeah, there's this section on. . . there's this part about. . . You should read this chapter. . . No, no, just wait here and let me...

    I listened to the unabridged copy while driving to/from Thanksgiving. Gladwell's books are often controversial because he tends to present only one side -- HIS side -- of an argument and gloss over anything that doesn't jive with his view. That said, the guy knows how to write and how ...

    ?We cling to the idea that success is a simple function of individual merit and that the world in which we all grow up and the rules we choose to write as a society don?t matter at all.? ?Who we are cannot be separated from where we?re from.? Blog Bloglovin? T...

    A well-researched subject put down to plausible conclusions through inductive reasoning. Gladwell did a commendable job in bringing this subject of success into a logical paradigm that is both palatable and eye-opening. ...

    My first exposure to Gladwell. SO was more or les blown away by the ideas. Have grown more conservative in acceptance of his views as I have grown familiar with his topics through other books. But still an eminently quotable book. ...

    Malcolm, meet Fonzie. Fonzie, Malcolm. I think you two will get along well together now that you?ve both jumped the shark. I never wanted to introduce the two of them, but I sort of feel obligated to after reading Outliers. In this, his third book, Gladwell stretches his sociological...

  • Claudia
    Jan 19, 2009

    Gladwell argues that success is tightly married to opportunity and time on task. He states that it takes approximately 10,000 hours to master something and that gives me comfort. It helps me feel better about my many failures at initial attempts to master things (like glazing pottery, ...

    When I think about Malcolm Gladwell, the first phrase that comes to mind is "less than meets the eye." At first glance, his work seems thoroughly researched, even visionary at times. Beginning with a few maverick, counter-intuitive insights, he often ends with an affirmation of c...

    I know, you don?t think you have the time and there are other and more important books to read at the moment, but be warned, you do need to read this book. There are a number of ways I can tell a book will be good; one of those ways is if Graham has recommended it to me (how am I ...

    Didn't exactly read this book - Joe and I listened to it in the car on the way home from visiting family for Christmas. I really enjoyed it, and was very fascinated by certain parts of it, especially the sections about the Beatles, computer programmers and Korean co-pilots. But my e...

    Occasionally insightful, but Gladwell's science is pretty junky. His reasons for success change by the page. And he cherry-picks examples to exactly fit the scheme under consideration. Plus, he's obsessed with callbacks and summary statements that only showcase the faulty connections b...

    Malcolm Gladwell's new book reads like a series of cocktail-party anecdotes. Whether the book is a mere fluff piece or something more is open to debate. At its heart, it has two themes: (1) That success depends not just on talent but opportunity, and (2) that success (and failure) also...

    I can save you the trouble of reading the book: smart people don't automatically become successful, they do so because they got lucky. This rule applies to everyone including the likes of Bill Gates and Robert Oppenheimer. That's it. That's what the whole book is about. Gladwell looks ...

    Here's what I wrote earlier. I have to admit to the more I think and talk about the book, the less I think of it. It all seems too superficial. A pretty interesting book, albeit with not quite as many "knock me over with a feather" moments as Blink. It starts off with a bang, as he ...

    People are criticizing this book because it is not a journal article. Well guess what: we're not all sociologists. I have read plenty of journal articles in my own field (law). I'm in no position to read journal articles in fields outside my own. Having a well-written piece of mass-mar...

    I skimmed this book instead of reading it. I didn?t entirely love it. Although the author makes some interesting points, I find some of the correlations he tries to draw a little silly. Like the Italian community in Pennsylvania where people are healthier and live longer because t...

    Well, it's official: Malcolm Gladwell has run out of things to say. His prose is still lively and entertaining, and he maintains his famous I-look-at-things-differently-than-anyone-else attitude, but "Outliers" has so little meat that it would have more appropriately been published ...

    Recommend to: If you like exploring phenomenon beyond their appearance and if you enjoy story-telling writings about factual subjects, here: success What this book is about: Here, the famous columnist, Malcolm Gladwell deeply investigates the topic of success and people or nations w...

    Outliers : the story of success, Malcolm Gladwell ???????: ????? ??? ??? ????? : ?????? ??????? ?????? ????? ???? ??????? ???????? ?? : ?????? ??????? ????? ??? ????? : ?????? ????...

    Outliers. Or as it should be called, "Outliers don't exist." I not only couldn't put it down, but my wife feels like she's read it now too. It starts with a story about a town whose inhabitants only ever die from old age (i.e., not from cancer or ANY OTHER problem) and quickly goes...

    Malcolm Gladwell writes very interesting and entertaining books. J.R.R. Tolkein writes very interesting and entertaining books as well. However, after reading Tolkein, I did not venture out into the world in search of hobbits, dwarves and elves to be my new friends, or worry about bein...

    "Outliers" those wildly successful people, for whom 'normal rules don't apply.' Are they just lucky, talented? Maybe...but, outliers may not be outliers after all...after reading the entire book, I was slapped by that at the very end. Gladwell looks closely at success, and those who se...

  • Bill  Kerwin
    Jun 24, 2013

    Gladwell argues that success is tightly married to opportunity and time on task. He states that it takes approximately 10,000 hours to master something and that gives me comfort. It helps me feel better about my many failures at initial attempts to master things (like glazing pottery, ...

    When I think about Malcolm Gladwell, the first phrase that comes to mind is "less than meets the eye." At first glance, his work seems thoroughly researched, even visionary at times. Beginning with a few maverick, counter-intuitive insights, he often ends with an affirmation of c...

  • Ben
    Nov 19, 2008

    Gladwell argues that success is tightly married to opportunity and time on task. He states that it takes approximately 10,000 hours to master something and that gives me comfort. It helps me feel better about my many failures at initial attempts to master things (like glazing pottery, ...

    When I think about Malcolm Gladwell, the first phrase that comes to mind is "less than meets the eye." At first glance, his work seems thoroughly researched, even visionary at times. Beginning with a few maverick, counter-intuitive insights, he often ends with an affirmation of c...

    I know, you don?t think you have the time and there are other and more important books to read at the moment, but be warned, you do need to read this book. There are a number of ways I can tell a book will be good; one of those ways is if Graham has recommended it to me (how am I ...

    Didn't exactly read this book - Joe and I listened to it in the car on the way home from visiting family for Christmas. I really enjoyed it, and was very fascinated by certain parts of it, especially the sections about the Beatles, computer programmers and Korean co-pilots. But my e...

    Occasionally insightful, but Gladwell's science is pretty junky. His reasons for success change by the page. And he cherry-picks examples to exactly fit the scheme under consideration. Plus, he's obsessed with callbacks and summary statements that only showcase the faulty connections b...

    Malcolm Gladwell's new book reads like a series of cocktail-party anecdotes. Whether the book is a mere fluff piece or something more is open to debate. At its heart, it has two themes: (1) That success depends not just on talent but opportunity, and (2) that success (and failure) also...

    I can save you the trouble of reading the book: smart people don't automatically become successful, they do so because they got lucky. This rule applies to everyone including the likes of Bill Gates and Robert Oppenheimer. That's it. That's what the whole book is about. Gladwell looks ...

    Here's what I wrote earlier. I have to admit to the more I think and talk about the book, the less I think of it. It all seems too superficial. A pretty interesting book, albeit with not quite as many "knock me over with a feather" moments as Blink. It starts off with a bang, as he ...

    People are criticizing this book because it is not a journal article. Well guess what: we're not all sociologists. I have read plenty of journal articles in my own field (law). I'm in no position to read journal articles in fields outside my own. Having a well-written piece of mass-mar...

    I skimmed this book instead of reading it. I didn?t entirely love it. Although the author makes some interesting points, I find some of the correlations he tries to draw a little silly. Like the Italian community in Pennsylvania where people are healthier and live longer because t...

    Well, it's official: Malcolm Gladwell has run out of things to say. His prose is still lively and entertaining, and he maintains his famous I-look-at-things-differently-than-anyone-else attitude, but "Outliers" has so little meat that it would have more appropriately been published ...

    Recommend to: If you like exploring phenomenon beyond their appearance and if you enjoy story-telling writings about factual subjects, here: success What this book is about: Here, the famous columnist, Malcolm Gladwell deeply investigates the topic of success and people or nations w...

    Outliers : the story of success, Malcolm Gladwell ???????: ????? ??? ??? ????? : ?????? ??????? ?????? ????? ???? ??????? ???????? ?? : ?????? ??????? ????? ??? ????? : ?????? ????...

    Outliers. Or as it should be called, "Outliers don't exist." I not only couldn't put it down, but my wife feels like she's read it now too. It starts with a story about a town whose inhabitants only ever die from old age (i.e., not from cancer or ANY OTHER problem) and quickly goes...

    Malcolm Gladwell writes very interesting and entertaining books. J.R.R. Tolkein writes very interesting and entertaining books as well. However, after reading Tolkein, I did not venture out into the world in search of hobbits, dwarves and elves to be my new friends, or worry about bein...

    "Outliers" those wildly successful people, for whom 'normal rules don't apply.' Are they just lucky, talented? Maybe...but, outliers may not be outliers after all...after reading the entire book, I was slapped by that at the very end. Gladwell looks closely at success, and those who se...

    ?????? ???? ???? ??????.. ?????? ????? ??? ?????. ?????? ?? ???? ??? ????? ??????? ???? ?? ????? ?? ?? ??????? ??????? ????? ????? ???? ????? ?????? ?????? ??...

    "If only I'd read this book earlier," the old man sighed. He shook his head sadly. "I was at the wrong end of the cut-off age. I'd have made a champion swimmer...". His voice trailed off. "Hmmm." He sighed again. "Then there's this 10000 hour rule. What the hell am I supposed to do a...

    This is not a feeling oriented review like those that seem to be getting esteem here. While this is a well-researched and easily readable book that makes some interesting points, most of its contents are pure common sense. In a world so highly populated with such strong inequities,...

  • Steve
    Dec 16, 2008

    Gladwell argues that success is tightly married to opportunity and time on task. He states that it takes approximately 10,000 hours to master something and that gives me comfort. It helps me feel better about my many failures at initial attempts to master things (like glazing pottery, ...

    When I think about Malcolm Gladwell, the first phrase that comes to mind is "less than meets the eye." At first glance, his work seems thoroughly researched, even visionary at times. Beginning with a few maverick, counter-intuitive insights, he often ends with an affirmation of c...

    I know, you don?t think you have the time and there are other and more important books to read at the moment, but be warned, you do need to read this book. There are a number of ways I can tell a book will be good; one of those ways is if Graham has recommended it to me (how am I ...

    Didn't exactly read this book - Joe and I listened to it in the car on the way home from visiting family for Christmas. I really enjoyed it, and was very fascinated by certain parts of it, especially the sections about the Beatles, computer programmers and Korean co-pilots. But my e...

    Occasionally insightful, but Gladwell's science is pretty junky. His reasons for success change by the page. And he cherry-picks examples to exactly fit the scheme under consideration. Plus, he's obsessed with callbacks and summary statements that only showcase the faulty connections b...

  • Allie
    Dec 29, 2008

    Gladwell argues that success is tightly married to opportunity and time on task. He states that it takes approximately 10,000 hours to master something and that gives me comfort. It helps me feel better about my many failures at initial attempts to master things (like glazing pottery, ...

    When I think about Malcolm Gladwell, the first phrase that comes to mind is "less than meets the eye." At first glance, his work seems thoroughly researched, even visionary at times. Beginning with a few maverick, counter-intuitive insights, he often ends with an affirmation of c...

    I know, you don?t think you have the time and there are other and more important books to read at the moment, but be warned, you do need to read this book. There are a number of ways I can tell a book will be good; one of those ways is if Graham has recommended it to me (how am I ...

    Didn't exactly read this book - Joe and I listened to it in the car on the way home from visiting family for Christmas. I really enjoyed it, and was very fascinated by certain parts of it, especially the sections about the Beatles, computer programmers and Korean co-pilots. But my e...

  • Trevor
    Jan 03, 2009

    Gladwell argues that success is tightly married to opportunity and time on task. He states that it takes approximately 10,000 hours to master something and that gives me comfort. It helps me feel better about my many failures at initial attempts to master things (like glazing pottery, ...

    When I think about Malcolm Gladwell, the first phrase that comes to mind is "less than meets the eye." At first glance, his work seems thoroughly researched, even visionary at times. Beginning with a few maverick, counter-intuitive insights, he often ends with an affirmation of c...

    I know, you don?t think you have the time and there are other and more important books to read at the moment, but be warned, you do need to read this book. There are a number of ways I can tell a book will be good; one of those ways is if Graham has recommended it to me (how am I ...

  • Sarah
    Dec 05, 2008

    Gladwell argues that success is tightly married to opportunity and time on task. He states that it takes approximately 10,000 hours to master something and that gives me comfort. It helps me feel better about my many failures at initial attempts to master things (like glazing pottery, ...

    When I think about Malcolm Gladwell, the first phrase that comes to mind is "less than meets the eye." At first glance, his work seems thoroughly researched, even visionary at times. Beginning with a few maverick, counter-intuitive insights, he often ends with an affirmation of c...

    I know, you don?t think you have the time and there are other and more important books to read at the moment, but be warned, you do need to read this book. There are a number of ways I can tell a book will be good; one of those ways is if Graham has recommended it to me (how am I ...

    Didn't exactly read this book - Joe and I listened to it in the car on the way home from visiting family for Christmas. I really enjoyed it, and was very fascinated by certain parts of it, especially the sections about the Beatles, computer programmers and Korean co-pilots. But my e...

    Occasionally insightful, but Gladwell's science is pretty junky. His reasons for success change by the page. And he cherry-picks examples to exactly fit the scheme under consideration. Plus, he's obsessed with callbacks and summary statements that only showcase the faulty connections b...

    Malcolm Gladwell's new book reads like a series of cocktail-party anecdotes. Whether the book is a mere fluff piece or something more is open to debate. At its heart, it has two themes: (1) That success depends not just on talent but opportunity, and (2) that success (and failure) also...

    I can save you the trouble of reading the book: smart people don't automatically become successful, they do so because they got lucky. This rule applies to everyone including the likes of Bill Gates and Robert Oppenheimer. That's it. That's what the whole book is about. Gladwell looks ...

    Here's what I wrote earlier. I have to admit to the more I think and talk about the book, the less I think of it. It all seems too superficial. A pretty interesting book, albeit with not quite as many "knock me over with a feather" moments as Blink. It starts off with a bang, as he ...

    People are criticizing this book because it is not a journal article. Well guess what: we're not all sociologists. I have read plenty of journal articles in my own field (law). I'm in no position to read journal articles in fields outside my own. Having a well-written piece of mass-mar...

    I skimmed this book instead of reading it. I didn?t entirely love it. Although the author makes some interesting points, I find some of the correlations he tries to draw a little silly. Like the Italian community in Pennsylvania where people are healthier and live longer because t...

    Well, it's official: Malcolm Gladwell has run out of things to say. His prose is still lively and entertaining, and he maintains his famous I-look-at-things-differently-than-anyone-else attitude, but "Outliers" has so little meat that it would have more appropriately been published ...

    Recommend to: If you like exploring phenomenon beyond their appearance and if you enjoy story-telling writings about factual subjects, here: success What this book is about: Here, the famous columnist, Malcolm Gladwell deeply investigates the topic of success and people or nations w...

    Outliers : the story of success, Malcolm Gladwell ???????: ????? ??? ??? ????? : ?????? ??????? ?????? ????? ???? ??????? ???????? ?? : ?????? ??????? ????? ??? ????? : ?????? ????...

    Outliers. Or as it should be called, "Outliers don't exist." I not only couldn't put it down, but my wife feels like she's read it now too. It starts with a story about a town whose inhabitants only ever die from old age (i.e., not from cancer or ANY OTHER problem) and quickly goes...

    Malcolm Gladwell writes very interesting and entertaining books. J.R.R. Tolkein writes very interesting and entertaining books as well. However, after reading Tolkein, I did not venture out into the world in search of hobbits, dwarves and elves to be my new friends, or worry about bein...

    "Outliers" those wildly successful people, for whom 'normal rules don't apply.' Are they just lucky, talented? Maybe...but, outliers may not be outliers after all...after reading the entire book, I was slapped by that at the very end. Gladwell looks closely at success, and those who se...

    ?????? ???? ???? ??????.. ?????? ????? ??? ?????. ?????? ?? ???? ??? ????? ??????? ???? ?? ????? ?? ?? ??????? ??????? ????? ????? ???? ????? ?????? ?????? ??...

    "If only I'd read this book earlier," the old man sighed. He shook his head sadly. "I was at the wrong end of the cut-off age. I'd have made a champion swimmer...". His voice trailed off. "Hmmm." He sighed again. "Then there's this 10000 hour rule. What the hell am I supposed to do a...

    This is not a feeling oriented review like those that seem to be getting esteem here. While this is a well-researched and easily readable book that makes some interesting points, most of its contents are pure common sense. In a world so highly populated with such strong inequities,...

    This was such an unexpected pleasure to listen to. The narration was fantastic. The information clear and written is such a way that I absorbed and considered the facts presented. For me that is amazing, I am easily distracted and seldom retain most information, ADHD yep. Some of the i...

    Wow! This book was incredible. This goes directly on the very tiny pile of books that I can say have drastically shifted the way I understand and view the world. I know I've heard this author's work referred to many times in other books and IRL, but I didn't realize how much of a parad...

    Here is my animated review! youtu.be/5HUjk6Zf0xg This book made me think about the advantages and disadvantages connected to the birth date, place and few other things most kids can't change. ...

    I'm starting to think that all Malcolm Gladwell books are the same thing - a rather ordinary/non-controversial statement about life which is padded with pretty neat examples and then praised as revolutionary, thus selling millions of copies. Main thesis is that social ability is a g...

    In just one week, this book transformed a relatively normal woman into someone who's been saying, "Well, in this book I'm reading. . . you know, Outliers? Yeah, there's this section on. . . there's this part about. . . You should read this chapter. . . No, no, just wait here and let me...

    I listened to the unabridged copy while driving to/from Thanksgiving. Gladwell's books are often controversial because he tends to present only one side -- HIS side -- of an argument and gloss over anything that doesn't jive with his view. That said, the guy knows how to write and how ...

  • Kressel Housman
    Dec 11, 2008

    Gladwell argues that success is tightly married to opportunity and time on task. He states that it takes approximately 10,000 hours to master something and that gives me comfort. It helps me feel better about my many failures at initial attempts to master things (like glazing pottery, ...

    When I think about Malcolm Gladwell, the first phrase that comes to mind is "less than meets the eye." At first glance, his work seems thoroughly researched, even visionary at times. Beginning with a few maverick, counter-intuitive insights, he often ends with an affirmation of c...

    I know, you don?t think you have the time and there are other and more important books to read at the moment, but be warned, you do need to read this book. There are a number of ways I can tell a book will be good; one of those ways is if Graham has recommended it to me (how am I ...

    Didn't exactly read this book - Joe and I listened to it in the car on the way home from visiting family for Christmas. I really enjoyed it, and was very fascinated by certain parts of it, especially the sections about the Beatles, computer programmers and Korean co-pilots. But my e...

    Occasionally insightful, but Gladwell's science is pretty junky. His reasons for success change by the page. And he cherry-picks examples to exactly fit the scheme under consideration. Plus, he's obsessed with callbacks and summary statements that only showcase the faulty connections b...

    Malcolm Gladwell's new book reads like a series of cocktail-party anecdotes. Whether the book is a mere fluff piece or something more is open to debate. At its heart, it has two themes: (1) That success depends not just on talent but opportunity, and (2) that success (and failure) also...

    I can save you the trouble of reading the book: smart people don't automatically become successful, they do so because they got lucky. This rule applies to everyone including the likes of Bill Gates and Robert Oppenheimer. That's it. That's what the whole book is about. Gladwell looks ...

    Here's what I wrote earlier. I have to admit to the more I think and talk about the book, the less I think of it. It all seems too superficial. A pretty interesting book, albeit with not quite as many "knock me over with a feather" moments as Blink. It starts off with a bang, as he ...

    People are criticizing this book because it is not a journal article. Well guess what: we're not all sociologists. I have read plenty of journal articles in my own field (law). I'm in no position to read journal articles in fields outside my own. Having a well-written piece of mass-mar...

    I skimmed this book instead of reading it. I didn?t entirely love it. Although the author makes some interesting points, I find some of the correlations he tries to draw a little silly. Like the Italian community in Pennsylvania where people are healthier and live longer because t...

    Well, it's official: Malcolm Gladwell has run out of things to say. His prose is still lively and entertaining, and he maintains his famous I-look-at-things-differently-than-anyone-else attitude, but "Outliers" has so little meat that it would have more appropriately been published ...

    Recommend to: If you like exploring phenomenon beyond their appearance and if you enjoy story-telling writings about factual subjects, here: success What this book is about: Here, the famous columnist, Malcolm Gladwell deeply investigates the topic of success and people or nations w...

    Outliers : the story of success, Malcolm Gladwell ???????: ????? ??? ??? ????? : ?????? ??????? ?????? ????? ???? ??????? ???????? ?? : ?????? ??????? ????? ??? ????? : ?????? ????...

    Outliers. Or as it should be called, "Outliers don't exist." I not only couldn't put it down, but my wife feels like she's read it now too. It starts with a story about a town whose inhabitants only ever die from old age (i.e., not from cancer or ANY OTHER problem) and quickly goes...

    Malcolm Gladwell writes very interesting and entertaining books. J.R.R. Tolkein writes very interesting and entertaining books as well. However, after reading Tolkein, I did not venture out into the world in search of hobbits, dwarves and elves to be my new friends, or worry about bein...

    "Outliers" those wildly successful people, for whom 'normal rules don't apply.' Are they just lucky, talented? Maybe...but, outliers may not be outliers after all...after reading the entire book, I was slapped by that at the very end. Gladwell looks closely at success, and those who se...

    ?????? ???? ???? ??????.. ?????? ????? ??? ?????. ?????? ?? ???? ??? ????? ??????? ???? ?? ????? ?? ?? ??????? ??????? ????? ????? ???? ????? ?????? ?????? ??...

    "If only I'd read this book earlier," the old man sighed. He shook his head sadly. "I was at the wrong end of the cut-off age. I'd have made a champion swimmer...". His voice trailed off. "Hmmm." He sighed again. "Then there's this 10000 hour rule. What the hell am I supposed to do a...

    This is not a feeling oriented review like those that seem to be getting esteem here. While this is a well-researched and easily readable book that makes some interesting points, most of its contents are pure common sense. In a world so highly populated with such strong inequities,...

    This was such an unexpected pleasure to listen to. The narration was fantastic. The information clear and written is such a way that I absorbed and considered the facts presented. For me that is amazing, I am easily distracted and seldom retain most information, ADHD yep. Some of the i...

    Wow! This book was incredible. This goes directly on the very tiny pile of books that I can say have drastically shifted the way I understand and view the world. I know I've heard this author's work referred to many times in other books and IRL, but I didn't realize how much of a parad...

    Here is my animated review! youtu.be/5HUjk6Zf0xg This book made me think about the advantages and disadvantages connected to the birth date, place and few other things most kids can't change. ...

    I'm starting to think that all Malcolm Gladwell books are the same thing - a rather ordinary/non-controversial statement about life which is padded with pretty neat examples and then praised as revolutionary, thus selling millions of copies. Main thesis is that social ability is a g...

    In just one week, this book transformed a relatively normal woman into someone who's been saying, "Well, in this book I'm reading. . . you know, Outliers? Yeah, there's this section on. . . there's this part about. . . You should read this chapter. . . No, no, just wait here and let me...

    I listened to the unabridged copy while driving to/from Thanksgiving. Gladwell's books are often controversial because he tends to present only one side -- HIS side -- of an argument and gloss over anything that doesn't jive with his view. That said, the guy knows how to write and how ...

    ?We cling to the idea that success is a simple function of individual merit and that the world in which we all grow up and the rules we choose to write as a society don?t matter at all.? ?Who we are cannot be separated from where we?re from.? Blog Bloglovin? T...

    A well-researched subject put down to plausible conclusions through inductive reasoning. Gladwell did a commendable job in bringing this subject of success into a logical paradigm that is both palatable and eye-opening. ...

    My first exposure to Gladwell. SO was more or les blown away by the ideas. Have grown more conservative in acceptance of his views as I have grown familiar with his topics through other books. But still an eminently quotable book. ...

    Malcolm, meet Fonzie. Fonzie, Malcolm. I think you two will get along well together now that you?ve both jumped the shark. I never wanted to introduce the two of them, but I sort of feel obligated to after reading Outliers. In this, his third book, Gladwell stretches his sociological...

    This has got to be Malcolm Gladwell?s best book yet, and coming from a fan like me, that?s saying something! As the subtitle states, this is a book of success stories, and true to his usual style, Gladwell draws on a diverse and interesting set of examples and presents a unique...

  • Ahmad Sharabiani
    Sep 15, 2016

    Gladwell argues that success is tightly married to opportunity and time on task. He states that it takes approximately 10,000 hours to master something and that gives me comfort. It helps me feel better about my many failures at initial attempts to master things (like glazing pottery, ...

    When I think about Malcolm Gladwell, the first phrase that comes to mind is "less than meets the eye." At first glance, his work seems thoroughly researched, even visionary at times. Beginning with a few maverick, counter-intuitive insights, he often ends with an affirmation of c...

    I know, you don?t think you have the time and there are other and more important books to read at the moment, but be warned, you do need to read this book. There are a number of ways I can tell a book will be good; one of those ways is if Graham has recommended it to me (how am I ...

    Didn't exactly read this book - Joe and I listened to it in the car on the way home from visiting family for Christmas. I really enjoyed it, and was very fascinated by certain parts of it, especially the sections about the Beatles, computer programmers and Korean co-pilots. But my e...

    Occasionally insightful, but Gladwell's science is pretty junky. His reasons for success change by the page. And he cherry-picks examples to exactly fit the scheme under consideration. Plus, he's obsessed with callbacks and summary statements that only showcase the faulty connections b...

    Malcolm Gladwell's new book reads like a series of cocktail-party anecdotes. Whether the book is a mere fluff piece or something more is open to debate. At its heart, it has two themes: (1) That success depends not just on talent but opportunity, and (2) that success (and failure) also...

    I can save you the trouble of reading the book: smart people don't automatically become successful, they do so because they got lucky. This rule applies to everyone including the likes of Bill Gates and Robert Oppenheimer. That's it. That's what the whole book is about. Gladwell looks ...

    Here's what I wrote earlier. I have to admit to the more I think and talk about the book, the less I think of it. It all seems too superficial. A pretty interesting book, albeit with not quite as many "knock me over with a feather" moments as Blink. It starts off with a bang, as he ...

    People are criticizing this book because it is not a journal article. Well guess what: we're not all sociologists. I have read plenty of journal articles in my own field (law). I'm in no position to read journal articles in fields outside my own. Having a well-written piece of mass-mar...

    I skimmed this book instead of reading it. I didn?t entirely love it. Although the author makes some interesting points, I find some of the correlations he tries to draw a little silly. Like the Italian community in Pennsylvania where people are healthier and live longer because t...

    Well, it's official: Malcolm Gladwell has run out of things to say. His prose is still lively and entertaining, and he maintains his famous I-look-at-things-differently-than-anyone-else attitude, but "Outliers" has so little meat that it would have more appropriately been published ...

    Recommend to: If you like exploring phenomenon beyond their appearance and if you enjoy story-telling writings about factual subjects, here: success What this book is about: Here, the famous columnist, Malcolm Gladwell deeply investigates the topic of success and people or nations w...

    Outliers : the story of success, Malcolm Gladwell ???????: ????? ??? ??? ????? : ?????? ??????? ?????? ????? ???? ??????? ???????? ?? : ?????? ??????? ????? ??? ????? : ?????? ????...

  • Rebecca
    Dec 06, 2008

    Gladwell argues that success is tightly married to opportunity and time on task. He states that it takes approximately 10,000 hours to master something and that gives me comfort. It helps me feel better about my many failures at initial attempts to master things (like glazing pottery, ...

  • Hank Mishkoff
    Dec 26, 2008

    Gladwell argues that success is tightly married to opportunity and time on task. He states that it takes approximately 10,000 hours to master something and that gives me comfort. It helps me feel better about my many failures at initial attempts to master things (like glazing pottery, ...

    When I think about Malcolm Gladwell, the first phrase that comes to mind is "less than meets the eye." At first glance, his work seems thoroughly researched, even visionary at times. Beginning with a few maverick, counter-intuitive insights, he often ends with an affirmation of c...

    I know, you don?t think you have the time and there are other and more important books to read at the moment, but be warned, you do need to read this book. There are a number of ways I can tell a book will be good; one of those ways is if Graham has recommended it to me (how am I ...

    Didn't exactly read this book - Joe and I listened to it in the car on the way home from visiting family for Christmas. I really enjoyed it, and was very fascinated by certain parts of it, especially the sections about the Beatles, computer programmers and Korean co-pilots. But my e...

    Occasionally insightful, but Gladwell's science is pretty junky. His reasons for success change by the page. And he cherry-picks examples to exactly fit the scheme under consideration. Plus, he's obsessed with callbacks and summary statements that only showcase the faulty connections b...

    Malcolm Gladwell's new book reads like a series of cocktail-party anecdotes. Whether the book is a mere fluff piece or something more is open to debate. At its heart, it has two themes: (1) That success depends not just on talent but opportunity, and (2) that success (and failure) also...

    I can save you the trouble of reading the book: smart people don't automatically become successful, they do so because they got lucky. This rule applies to everyone including the likes of Bill Gates and Robert Oppenheimer. That's it. That's what the whole book is about. Gladwell looks ...

    Here's what I wrote earlier. I have to admit to the more I think and talk about the book, the less I think of it. It all seems too superficial. A pretty interesting book, albeit with not quite as many "knock me over with a feather" moments as Blink. It starts off with a bang, as he ...

    People are criticizing this book because it is not a journal article. Well guess what: we're not all sociologists. I have read plenty of journal articles in my own field (law). I'm in no position to read journal articles in fields outside my own. Having a well-written piece of mass-mar...

    I skimmed this book instead of reading it. I didn?t entirely love it. Although the author makes some interesting points, I find some of the correlations he tries to draw a little silly. Like the Italian community in Pennsylvania where people are healthier and live longer because t...

    Well, it's official: Malcolm Gladwell has run out of things to say. His prose is still lively and entertaining, and he maintains his famous I-look-at-things-differently-than-anyone-else attitude, but "Outliers" has so little meat that it would have more appropriately been published ...

  • Riku Sayuj
    Jul 14, 2011

    Gladwell argues that success is tightly married to opportunity and time on task. He states that it takes approximately 10,000 hours to master something and that gives me comfort. It helps me feel better about my many failures at initial attempts to master things (like glazing pottery, ...

    When I think about Malcolm Gladwell, the first phrase that comes to mind is "less than meets the eye." At first glance, his work seems thoroughly researched, even visionary at times. Beginning with a few maverick, counter-intuitive insights, he often ends with an affirmation of c...

    I know, you don?t think you have the time and there are other and more important books to read at the moment, but be warned, you do need to read this book. There are a number of ways I can tell a book will be good; one of those ways is if Graham has recommended it to me (how am I ...

    Didn't exactly read this book - Joe and I listened to it in the car on the way home from visiting family for Christmas. I really enjoyed it, and was very fascinated by certain parts of it, especially the sections about the Beatles, computer programmers and Korean co-pilots. But my e...

    Occasionally insightful, but Gladwell's science is pretty junky. His reasons for success change by the page. And he cherry-picks examples to exactly fit the scheme under consideration. Plus, he's obsessed with callbacks and summary statements that only showcase the faulty connections b...

    Malcolm Gladwell's new book reads like a series of cocktail-party anecdotes. Whether the book is a mere fluff piece or something more is open to debate. At its heart, it has two themes: (1) That success depends not just on talent but opportunity, and (2) that success (and failure) also...

    I can save you the trouble of reading the book: smart people don't automatically become successful, they do so because they got lucky. This rule applies to everyone including the likes of Bill Gates and Robert Oppenheimer. That's it. That's what the whole book is about. Gladwell looks ...

    Here's what I wrote earlier. I have to admit to the more I think and talk about the book, the less I think of it. It all seems too superficial. A pretty interesting book, albeit with not quite as many "knock me over with a feather" moments as Blink. It starts off with a bang, as he ...

    People are criticizing this book because it is not a journal article. Well guess what: we're not all sociologists. I have read plenty of journal articles in my own field (law). I'm in no position to read journal articles in fields outside my own. Having a well-written piece of mass-mar...

    I skimmed this book instead of reading it. I didn?t entirely love it. Although the author makes some interesting points, I find some of the correlations he tries to draw a little silly. Like the Italian community in Pennsylvania where people are healthier and live longer because t...

    Well, it's official: Malcolm Gladwell has run out of things to say. His prose is still lively and entertaining, and he maintains his famous I-look-at-things-differently-than-anyone-else attitude, but "Outliers" has so little meat that it would have more appropriately been published ...

    Recommend to: If you like exploring phenomenon beyond their appearance and if you enjoy story-telling writings about factual subjects, here: success What this book is about: Here, the famous columnist, Malcolm Gladwell deeply investigates the topic of success and people or nations w...

    Outliers : the story of success, Malcolm Gladwell ???????: ????? ??? ??? ????? : ?????? ??????? ?????? ????? ???? ??????? ???????? ?? : ?????? ??????? ????? ??? ????? : ?????? ????...

    Outliers. Or as it should be called, "Outliers don't exist." I not only couldn't put it down, but my wife feels like she's read it now too. It starts with a story about a town whose inhabitants only ever die from old age (i.e., not from cancer or ANY OTHER problem) and quickly goes...

    Malcolm Gladwell writes very interesting and entertaining books. J.R.R. Tolkein writes very interesting and entertaining books as well. However, after reading Tolkein, I did not venture out into the world in search of hobbits, dwarves and elves to be my new friends, or worry about bein...

    "Outliers" those wildly successful people, for whom 'normal rules don't apply.' Are they just lucky, talented? Maybe...but, outliers may not be outliers after all...after reading the entire book, I was slapped by that at the very end. Gladwell looks closely at success, and those who se...

    ?????? ???? ???? ??????.. ?????? ????? ??? ?????. ?????? ?? ???? ??? ????? ??????? ???? ?? ????? ?? ?? ??????? ??????? ????? ????? ???? ????? ?????? ?????? ??...

    "If only I'd read this book earlier," the old man sighed. He shook his head sadly. "I was at the wrong end of the cut-off age. I'd have made a champion swimmer...". His voice trailed off. "Hmmm." He sighed again. "Then there's this 10000 hour rule. What the hell am I supposed to do a...

    This is not a feeling oriented review like those that seem to be getting esteem here. While this is a well-researched and easily readable book that makes some interesting points, most of its contents are pure common sense. In a world so highly populated with such strong inequities,...

    This was such an unexpected pleasure to listen to. The narration was fantastic. The information clear and written is such a way that I absorbed and considered the facts presented. For me that is amazing, I am easily distracted and seldom retain most information, ADHD yep. Some of the i...

    Wow! This book was incredible. This goes directly on the very tiny pile of books that I can say have drastically shifted the way I understand and view the world. I know I've heard this author's work referred to many times in other books and IRL, but I didn't realize how much of a parad...

    Here is my animated review! youtu.be/5HUjk6Zf0xg This book made me think about the advantages and disadvantages connected to the birth date, place and few other things most kids can't change. ...

    I'm starting to think that all Malcolm Gladwell books are the same thing - a rather ordinary/non-controversial statement about life which is padded with pretty neat examples and then praised as revolutionary, thus selling millions of copies. Main thesis is that social ability is a g...

    In just one week, this book transformed a relatively normal woman into someone who's been saying, "Well, in this book I'm reading. . . you know, Outliers? Yeah, there's this section on. . . there's this part about. . . You should read this chapter. . . No, no, just wait here and let me...

    I listened to the unabridged copy while driving to/from Thanksgiving. Gladwell's books are often controversial because he tends to present only one side -- HIS side -- of an argument and gloss over anything that doesn't jive with his view. That said, the guy knows how to write and how ...

    ?We cling to the idea that success is a simple function of individual merit and that the world in which we all grow up and the rules we choose to write as a society don?t matter at all.? ?Who we are cannot be separated from where we?re from.? Blog Bloglovin? T...

    A well-researched subject put down to plausible conclusions through inductive reasoning. Gladwell did a commendable job in bringing this subject of success into a logical paradigm that is both palatable and eye-opening. ...

    My first exposure to Gladwell. SO was more or les blown away by the ideas. Have grown more conservative in acceptance of his views as I have grown familiar with his topics through other books. But still an eminently quotable book. ...

  • Jonathan
    Dec 05, 2008

    Gladwell argues that success is tightly married to opportunity and time on task. He states that it takes approximately 10,000 hours to master something and that gives me comfort. It helps me feel better about my many failures at initial attempts to master things (like glazing pottery, ...

    When I think about Malcolm Gladwell, the first phrase that comes to mind is "less than meets the eye." At first glance, his work seems thoroughly researched, even visionary at times. Beginning with a few maverick, counter-intuitive insights, he often ends with an affirmation of c...

    I know, you don?t think you have the time and there are other and more important books to read at the moment, but be warned, you do need to read this book. There are a number of ways I can tell a book will be good; one of those ways is if Graham has recommended it to me (how am I ...

    Didn't exactly read this book - Joe and I listened to it in the car on the way home from visiting family for Christmas. I really enjoyed it, and was very fascinated by certain parts of it, especially the sections about the Beatles, computer programmers and Korean co-pilots. But my e...

    Occasionally insightful, but Gladwell's science is pretty junky. His reasons for success change by the page. And he cherry-picks examples to exactly fit the scheme under consideration. Plus, he's obsessed with callbacks and summary statements that only showcase the faulty connections b...

    Malcolm Gladwell's new book reads like a series of cocktail-party anecdotes. Whether the book is a mere fluff piece or something more is open to debate. At its heart, it has two themes: (1) That success depends not just on talent but opportunity, and (2) that success (and failure) also...

    I can save you the trouble of reading the book: smart people don't automatically become successful, they do so because they got lucky. This rule applies to everyone including the likes of Bill Gates and Robert Oppenheimer. That's it. That's what the whole book is about. Gladwell looks ...

    Here's what I wrote earlier. I have to admit to the more I think and talk about the book, the less I think of it. It all seems too superficial. A pretty interesting book, albeit with not quite as many "knock me over with a feather" moments as Blink. It starts off with a bang, as he ...

  • seak
    Apr 09, 2013

    Gladwell argues that success is tightly married to opportunity and time on task. He states that it takes approximately 10,000 hours to master something and that gives me comfort. It helps me feel better about my many failures at initial attempts to master things (like glazing pottery, ...

    When I think about Malcolm Gladwell, the first phrase that comes to mind is "less than meets the eye." At first glance, his work seems thoroughly researched, even visionary at times. Beginning with a few maverick, counter-intuitive insights, he often ends with an affirmation of c...

    I know, you don?t think you have the time and there are other and more important books to read at the moment, but be warned, you do need to read this book. There are a number of ways I can tell a book will be good; one of those ways is if Graham has recommended it to me (how am I ...

    Didn't exactly read this book - Joe and I listened to it in the car on the way home from visiting family for Christmas. I really enjoyed it, and was very fascinated by certain parts of it, especially the sections about the Beatles, computer programmers and Korean co-pilots. But my e...

    Occasionally insightful, but Gladwell's science is pretty junky. His reasons for success change by the page. And he cherry-picks examples to exactly fit the scheme under consideration. Plus, he's obsessed with callbacks and summary statements that only showcase the faulty connections b...

    Malcolm Gladwell's new book reads like a series of cocktail-party anecdotes. Whether the book is a mere fluff piece or something more is open to debate. At its heart, it has two themes: (1) That success depends not just on talent but opportunity, and (2) that success (and failure) also...

    I can save you the trouble of reading the book: smart people don't automatically become successful, they do so because they got lucky. This rule applies to everyone including the likes of Bill Gates and Robert Oppenheimer. That's it. That's what the whole book is about. Gladwell looks ...

    Here's what I wrote earlier. I have to admit to the more I think and talk about the book, the less I think of it. It all seems too superficial. A pretty interesting book, albeit with not quite as many "knock me over with a feather" moments as Blink. It starts off with a bang, as he ...

    People are criticizing this book because it is not a journal article. Well guess what: we're not all sociologists. I have read plenty of journal articles in my own field (law). I'm in no position to read journal articles in fields outside my own. Having a well-written piece of mass-mar...

    I skimmed this book instead of reading it. I didn?t entirely love it. Although the author makes some interesting points, I find some of the correlations he tries to draw a little silly. Like the Italian community in Pennsylvania where people are healthier and live longer because t...

    Well, it's official: Malcolm Gladwell has run out of things to say. His prose is still lively and entertaining, and he maintains his famous I-look-at-things-differently-than-anyone-else attitude, but "Outliers" has so little meat that it would have more appropriately been published ...

    Recommend to: If you like exploring phenomenon beyond their appearance and if you enjoy story-telling writings about factual subjects, here: success What this book is about: Here, the famous columnist, Malcolm Gladwell deeply investigates the topic of success and people or nations w...

    Outliers : the story of success, Malcolm Gladwell ???????: ????? ??? ??? ????? : ?????? ??????? ?????? ????? ???? ??????? ???????? ?? : ?????? ??????? ????? ??? ????? : ?????? ????...

    Outliers. Or as it should be called, "Outliers don't exist." I not only couldn't put it down, but my wife feels like she's read it now too. It starts with a story about a town whose inhabitants only ever die from old age (i.e., not from cancer or ANY OTHER problem) and quickly goes...

  • Adam
    Dec 30, 2008

    Gladwell argues that success is tightly married to opportunity and time on task. He states that it takes approximately 10,000 hours to master something and that gives me comfort. It helps me feel better about my many failures at initial attempts to master things (like glazing pottery, ...

    When I think about Malcolm Gladwell, the first phrase that comes to mind is "less than meets the eye." At first glance, his work seems thoroughly researched, even visionary at times. Beginning with a few maverick, counter-intuitive insights, he often ends with an affirmation of c...

    I know, you don?t think you have the time and there are other and more important books to read at the moment, but be warned, you do need to read this book. There are a number of ways I can tell a book will be good; one of those ways is if Graham has recommended it to me (how am I ...

    Didn't exactly read this book - Joe and I listened to it in the car on the way home from visiting family for Christmas. I really enjoyed it, and was very fascinated by certain parts of it, especially the sections about the Beatles, computer programmers and Korean co-pilots. But my e...

    Occasionally insightful, but Gladwell's science is pretty junky. His reasons for success change by the page. And he cherry-picks examples to exactly fit the scheme under consideration. Plus, he's obsessed with callbacks and summary statements that only showcase the faulty connections b...

    Malcolm Gladwell's new book reads like a series of cocktail-party anecdotes. Whether the book is a mere fluff piece or something more is open to debate. At its heart, it has two themes: (1) That success depends not just on talent but opportunity, and (2) that success (and failure) also...

    I can save you the trouble of reading the book: smart people don't automatically become successful, they do so because they got lucky. This rule applies to everyone including the likes of Bill Gates and Robert Oppenheimer. That's it. That's what the whole book is about. Gladwell looks ...

    Here's what I wrote earlier. I have to admit to the more I think and talk about the book, the less I think of it. It all seems too superficial. A pretty interesting book, albeit with not quite as many "knock me over with a feather" moments as Blink. It starts off with a bang, as he ...

    People are criticizing this book because it is not a journal article. Well guess what: we're not all sociologists. I have read plenty of journal articles in my own field (law). I'm in no position to read journal articles in fields outside my own. Having a well-written piece of mass-mar...

  • أشرف فقيه
    Jun 06, 2009

    Gladwell argues that success is tightly married to opportunity and time on task. He states that it takes approximately 10,000 hours to master something and that gives me comfort. It helps me feel better about my many failures at initial attempts to master things (like glazing pottery, ...

    When I think about Malcolm Gladwell, the first phrase that comes to mind is "less than meets the eye." At first glance, his work seems thoroughly researched, even visionary at times. Beginning with a few maverick, counter-intuitive insights, he often ends with an affirmation of c...

    I know, you don?t think you have the time and there are other and more important books to read at the moment, but be warned, you do need to read this book. There are a number of ways I can tell a book will be good; one of those ways is if Graham has recommended it to me (how am I ...

    Didn't exactly read this book - Joe and I listened to it in the car on the way home from visiting family for Christmas. I really enjoyed it, and was very fascinated by certain parts of it, especially the sections about the Beatles, computer programmers and Korean co-pilots. But my e...

    Occasionally insightful, but Gladwell's science is pretty junky. His reasons for success change by the page. And he cherry-picks examples to exactly fit the scheme under consideration. Plus, he's obsessed with callbacks and summary statements that only showcase the faulty connections b...

    Malcolm Gladwell's new book reads like a series of cocktail-party anecdotes. Whether the book is a mere fluff piece or something more is open to debate. At its heart, it has two themes: (1) That success depends not just on talent but opportunity, and (2) that success (and failure) also...

    I can save you the trouble of reading the book: smart people don't automatically become successful, they do so because they got lucky. This rule applies to everyone including the likes of Bill Gates and Robert Oppenheimer. That's it. That's what the whole book is about. Gladwell looks ...

    Here's what I wrote earlier. I have to admit to the more I think and talk about the book, the less I think of it. It all seems too superficial. A pretty interesting book, albeit with not quite as many "knock me over with a feather" moments as Blink. It starts off with a bang, as he ...

    People are criticizing this book because it is not a journal article. Well guess what: we're not all sociologists. I have read plenty of journal articles in my own field (law). I'm in no position to read journal articles in fields outside my own. Having a well-written piece of mass-mar...

    I skimmed this book instead of reading it. I didn?t entirely love it. Although the author makes some interesting points, I find some of the correlations he tries to draw a little silly. Like the Italian community in Pennsylvania where people are healthier and live longer because t...

    Well, it's official: Malcolm Gladwell has run out of things to say. His prose is still lively and entertaining, and he maintains his famous I-look-at-things-differently-than-anyone-else attitude, but "Outliers" has so little meat that it would have more appropriately been published ...

    Recommend to: If you like exploring phenomenon beyond their appearance and if you enjoy story-telling writings about factual subjects, here: success What this book is about: Here, the famous columnist, Malcolm Gladwell deeply investigates the topic of success and people or nations w...

    Outliers : the story of success, Malcolm Gladwell ???????: ????? ??? ??? ????? : ?????? ??????? ?????? ????? ???? ??????? ???????? ?? : ?????? ??????? ????? ??? ????? : ?????? ????...

    Outliers. Or as it should be called, "Outliers don't exist." I not only couldn't put it down, but my wife feels like she's read it now too. It starts with a story about a town whose inhabitants only ever die from old age (i.e., not from cancer or ANY OTHER problem) and quickly goes...

    Malcolm Gladwell writes very interesting and entertaining books. J.R.R. Tolkein writes very interesting and entertaining books as well. However, after reading Tolkein, I did not venture out into the world in search of hobbits, dwarves and elves to be my new friends, or worry about bein...

    "Outliers" those wildly successful people, for whom 'normal rules don't apply.' Are they just lucky, talented? Maybe...but, outliers may not be outliers after all...after reading the entire book, I was slapped by that at the very end. Gladwell looks closely at success, and those who se...

    ?????? ???? ???? ??????.. ?????? ????? ??? ?????. ?????? ?? ???? ??? ????? ??????? ???? ?? ????? ?? ?? ??????? ??????? ????? ????? ???? ????? ?????? ?????? ??...

  • Yodamom
    Mar 29, 2018

    Gladwell argues that success is tightly married to opportunity and time on task. He states that it takes approximately 10,000 hours to master something and that gives me comfort. It helps me feel better about my many failures at initial attempts to master things (like glazing pottery, ...

    When I think about Malcolm Gladwell, the first phrase that comes to mind is "less than meets the eye." At first glance, his work seems thoroughly researched, even visionary at times. Beginning with a few maverick, counter-intuitive insights, he often ends with an affirmation of c...

    I know, you don?t think you have the time and there are other and more important books to read at the moment, but be warned, you do need to read this book. There are a number of ways I can tell a book will be good; one of those ways is if Graham has recommended it to me (how am I ...

    Didn't exactly read this book - Joe and I listened to it in the car on the way home from visiting family for Christmas. I really enjoyed it, and was very fascinated by certain parts of it, especially the sections about the Beatles, computer programmers and Korean co-pilots. But my e...

    Occasionally insightful, but Gladwell's science is pretty junky. His reasons for success change by the page. And he cherry-picks examples to exactly fit the scheme under consideration. Plus, he's obsessed with callbacks and summary statements that only showcase the faulty connections b...

    Malcolm Gladwell's new book reads like a series of cocktail-party anecdotes. Whether the book is a mere fluff piece or something more is open to debate. At its heart, it has two themes: (1) That success depends not just on talent but opportunity, and (2) that success (and failure) also...

    I can save you the trouble of reading the book: smart people don't automatically become successful, they do so because they got lucky. This rule applies to everyone including the likes of Bill Gates and Robert Oppenheimer. That's it. That's what the whole book is about. Gladwell looks ...

    Here's what I wrote earlier. I have to admit to the more I think and talk about the book, the less I think of it. It all seems too superficial. A pretty interesting book, albeit with not quite as many "knock me over with a feather" moments as Blink. It starts off with a bang, as he ...

    People are criticizing this book because it is not a journal article. Well guess what: we're not all sociologists. I have read plenty of journal articles in my own field (law). I'm in no position to read journal articles in fields outside my own. Having a well-written piece of mass-mar...

    I skimmed this book instead of reading it. I didn?t entirely love it. Although the author makes some interesting points, I find some of the correlations he tries to draw a little silly. Like the Italian community in Pennsylvania where people are healthier and live longer because t...

    Well, it's official: Malcolm Gladwell has run out of things to say. His prose is still lively and entertaining, and he maintains his famous I-look-at-things-differently-than-anyone-else attitude, but "Outliers" has so little meat that it would have more appropriately been published ...

    Recommend to: If you like exploring phenomenon beyond their appearance and if you enjoy story-telling writings about factual subjects, here: success What this book is about: Here, the famous columnist, Malcolm Gladwell deeply investigates the topic of success and people or nations w...

    Outliers : the story of success, Malcolm Gladwell ???????: ????? ??? ??? ????? : ?????? ??????? ?????? ????? ???? ??????? ???????? ?? : ?????? ??????? ????? ??? ????? : ?????? ????...

    Outliers. Or as it should be called, "Outliers don't exist." I not only couldn't put it down, but my wife feels like she's read it now too. It starts with a story about a town whose inhabitants only ever die from old age (i.e., not from cancer or ANY OTHER problem) and quickly goes...

    Malcolm Gladwell writes very interesting and entertaining books. J.R.R. Tolkein writes very interesting and entertaining books as well. However, after reading Tolkein, I did not venture out into the world in search of hobbits, dwarves and elves to be my new friends, or worry about bein...

    "Outliers" those wildly successful people, for whom 'normal rules don't apply.' Are they just lucky, talented? Maybe...but, outliers may not be outliers after all...after reading the entire book, I was slapped by that at the very end. Gladwell looks closely at success, and those who se...

    ?????? ???? ???? ??????.. ?????? ????? ??? ?????. ?????? ?? ???? ??? ????? ??????? ???? ?? ????? ?? ?? ??????? ??????? ????? ????? ???? ????? ?????? ?????? ??...

    "If only I'd read this book earlier," the old man sighed. He shook his head sadly. "I was at the wrong end of the cut-off age. I'd have made a champion swimmer...". His voice trailed off. "Hmmm." He sighed again. "Then there's this 10000 hour rule. What the hell am I supposed to do a...

    This is not a feeling oriented review like those that seem to be getting esteem here. While this is a well-researched and easily readable book that makes some interesting points, most of its contents are pure common sense. In a world so highly populated with such strong inequities,...

    This was such an unexpected pleasure to listen to. The narration was fantastic. The information clear and written is such a way that I absorbed and considered the facts presented. For me that is amazing, I am easily distracted and seldom retain most information, ADHD yep. Some of the i...

  • Daphne
    Aug 25, 2015

    Gladwell argues that success is tightly married to opportunity and time on task. He states that it takes approximately 10,000 hours to master something and that gives me comfort. It helps me feel better about my many failures at initial attempts to master things (like glazing pottery, ...

    When I think about Malcolm Gladwell, the first phrase that comes to mind is "less than meets the eye." At first glance, his work seems thoroughly researched, even visionary at times. Beginning with a few maverick, counter-intuitive insights, he often ends with an affirmation of c...

    I know, you don?t think you have the time and there are other and more important books to read at the moment, but be warned, you do need to read this book. There are a number of ways I can tell a book will be good; one of those ways is if Graham has recommended it to me (how am I ...

    Didn't exactly read this book - Joe and I listened to it in the car on the way home from visiting family for Christmas. I really enjoyed it, and was very fascinated by certain parts of it, especially the sections about the Beatles, computer programmers and Korean co-pilots. But my e...

    Occasionally insightful, but Gladwell's science is pretty junky. His reasons for success change by the page. And he cherry-picks examples to exactly fit the scheme under consideration. Plus, he's obsessed with callbacks and summary statements that only showcase the faulty connections b...

    Malcolm Gladwell's new book reads like a series of cocktail-party anecdotes. Whether the book is a mere fluff piece or something more is open to debate. At its heart, it has two themes: (1) That success depends not just on talent but opportunity, and (2) that success (and failure) also...

    I can save you the trouble of reading the book: smart people don't automatically become successful, they do so because they got lucky. This rule applies to everyone including the likes of Bill Gates and Robert Oppenheimer. That's it. That's what the whole book is about. Gladwell looks ...

    Here's what I wrote earlier. I have to admit to the more I think and talk about the book, the less I think of it. It all seems too superficial. A pretty interesting book, albeit with not quite as many "knock me over with a feather" moments as Blink. It starts off with a bang, as he ...

    People are criticizing this book because it is not a journal article. Well guess what: we're not all sociologists. I have read plenty of journal articles in my own field (law). I'm in no position to read journal articles in fields outside my own. Having a well-written piece of mass-mar...

    I skimmed this book instead of reading it. I didn?t entirely love it. Although the author makes some interesting points, I find some of the correlations he tries to draw a little silly. Like the Italian community in Pennsylvania where people are healthier and live longer because t...

    Well, it's official: Malcolm Gladwell has run out of things to say. His prose is still lively and entertaining, and he maintains his famous I-look-at-things-differently-than-anyone-else attitude, but "Outliers" has so little meat that it would have more appropriately been published ...

    Recommend to: If you like exploring phenomenon beyond their appearance and if you enjoy story-telling writings about factual subjects, here: success What this book is about: Here, the famous columnist, Malcolm Gladwell deeply investigates the topic of success and people or nations w...

    Outliers : the story of success, Malcolm Gladwell ???????: ????? ??? ??? ????? : ?????? ??????? ?????? ????? ???? ??????? ???????? ?? : ?????? ??????? ????? ??? ????? : ?????? ????...

    Outliers. Or as it should be called, "Outliers don't exist." I not only couldn't put it down, but my wife feels like she's read it now too. It starts with a story about a town whose inhabitants only ever die from old age (i.e., not from cancer or ANY OTHER problem) and quickly goes...

    Malcolm Gladwell writes very interesting and entertaining books. J.R.R. Tolkein writes very interesting and entertaining books as well. However, after reading Tolkein, I did not venture out into the world in search of hobbits, dwarves and elves to be my new friends, or worry about bein...

    "Outliers" those wildly successful people, for whom 'normal rules don't apply.' Are they just lucky, talented? Maybe...but, outliers may not be outliers after all...after reading the entire book, I was slapped by that at the very end. Gladwell looks closely at success, and those who se...

    ?????? ???? ???? ??????.. ?????? ????? ??? ?????. ?????? ?? ???? ??? ????? ??????? ???? ?? ????? ?? ?? ??????? ??????? ????? ????? ???? ????? ?????? ?????? ??...

    "If only I'd read this book earlier," the old man sighed. He shook his head sadly. "I was at the wrong end of the cut-off age. I'd have made a champion swimmer...". His voice trailed off. "Hmmm." He sighed again. "Then there's this 10000 hour rule. What the hell am I supposed to do a...

    This is not a feeling oriented review like those that seem to be getting esteem here. While this is a well-researched and easily readable book that makes some interesting points, most of its contents are pure common sense. In a world so highly populated with such strong inequities,...

    This was such an unexpected pleasure to listen to. The narration was fantastic. The information clear and written is such a way that I absorbed and considered the facts presented. For me that is amazing, I am easily distracted and seldom retain most information, ADHD yep. Some of the i...

    Wow! This book was incredible. This goes directly on the very tiny pile of books that I can say have drastically shifted the way I understand and view the world. I know I've heard this author's work referred to many times in other books and IRL, but I didn't realize how much of a parad...

  • Hadrian
    May 13, 2011

    Gladwell argues that success is tightly married to opportunity and time on task. He states that it takes approximately 10,000 hours to master something and that gives me comfort. It helps me feel better about my many failures at initial attempts to master things (like glazing pottery, ...

    When I think about Malcolm Gladwell, the first phrase that comes to mind is "less than meets the eye." At first glance, his work seems thoroughly researched, even visionary at times. Beginning with a few maverick, counter-intuitive insights, he often ends with an affirmation of c...

    I know, you don?t think you have the time and there are other and more important books to read at the moment, but be warned, you do need to read this book. There are a number of ways I can tell a book will be good; one of those ways is if Graham has recommended it to me (how am I ...

    Didn't exactly read this book - Joe and I listened to it in the car on the way home from visiting family for Christmas. I really enjoyed it, and was very fascinated by certain parts of it, especially the sections about the Beatles, computer programmers and Korean co-pilots. But my e...

    Occasionally insightful, but Gladwell's science is pretty junky. His reasons for success change by the page. And he cherry-picks examples to exactly fit the scheme under consideration. Plus, he's obsessed with callbacks and summary statements that only showcase the faulty connections b...

    Malcolm Gladwell's new book reads like a series of cocktail-party anecdotes. Whether the book is a mere fluff piece or something more is open to debate. At its heart, it has two themes: (1) That success depends not just on talent but opportunity, and (2) that success (and failure) also...

    I can save you the trouble of reading the book: smart people don't automatically become successful, they do so because they got lucky. This rule applies to everyone including the likes of Bill Gates and Robert Oppenheimer. That's it. That's what the whole book is about. Gladwell looks ...

    Here's what I wrote earlier. I have to admit to the more I think and talk about the book, the less I think of it. It all seems too superficial. A pretty interesting book, albeit with not quite as many "knock me over with a feather" moments as Blink. It starts off with a bang, as he ...

    People are criticizing this book because it is not a journal article. Well guess what: we're not all sociologists. I have read plenty of journal articles in my own field (law). I'm in no position to read journal articles in fields outside my own. Having a well-written piece of mass-mar...

    I skimmed this book instead of reading it. I didn?t entirely love it. Although the author makes some interesting points, I find some of the correlations he tries to draw a little silly. Like the Italian community in Pennsylvania where people are healthier and live longer because t...

    Well, it's official: Malcolm Gladwell has run out of things to say. His prose is still lively and entertaining, and he maintains his famous I-look-at-things-differently-than-anyone-else attitude, but "Outliers" has so little meat that it would have more appropriately been published ...

    Recommend to: If you like exploring phenomenon beyond their appearance and if you enjoy story-telling writings about factual subjects, here: success What this book is about: Here, the famous columnist, Malcolm Gladwell deeply investigates the topic of success and people or nations w...

    Outliers : the story of success, Malcolm Gladwell ???????: ????? ??? ??? ????? : ?????? ??????? ?????? ????? ???? ??????? ???????? ?? : ?????? ??????? ????? ??? ????? : ?????? ????...

    Outliers. Or as it should be called, "Outliers don't exist." I not only couldn't put it down, but my wife feels like she's read it now too. It starts with a story about a town whose inhabitants only ever die from old age (i.e., not from cancer or ANY OTHER problem) and quickly goes...

    Malcolm Gladwell writes very interesting and entertaining books. J.R.R. Tolkein writes very interesting and entertaining books as well. However, after reading Tolkein, I did not venture out into the world in search of hobbits, dwarves and elves to be my new friends, or worry about bein...

    "Outliers" those wildly successful people, for whom 'normal rules don't apply.' Are they just lucky, talented? Maybe...but, outliers may not be outliers after all...after reading the entire book, I was slapped by that at the very end. Gladwell looks closely at success, and those who se...

    ?????? ???? ???? ??????.. ?????? ????? ??? ?????. ?????? ?? ???? ??? ????? ??????? ???? ?? ????? ?? ?? ??????? ??????? ????? ????? ???? ????? ?????? ?????? ??...

    "If only I'd read this book earlier," the old man sighed. He shook his head sadly. "I was at the wrong end of the cut-off age. I'd have made a champion swimmer...". His voice trailed off. "Hmmm." He sighed again. "Then there's this 10000 hour rule. What the hell am I supposed to do a...

    This is not a feeling oriented review like those that seem to be getting esteem here. While this is a well-researched and easily readable book that makes some interesting points, most of its contents are pure common sense. In a world so highly populated with such strong inequities,...

    This was such an unexpected pleasure to listen to. The narration was fantastic. The information clear and written is such a way that I absorbed and considered the facts presented. For me that is amazing, I am easily distracted and seldom retain most information, ADHD yep. Some of the i...

    Wow! This book was incredible. This goes directly on the very tiny pile of books that I can say have drastically shifted the way I understand and view the world. I know I've heard this author's work referred to many times in other books and IRL, but I didn't realize how much of a parad...

    Here is my animated review! youtu.be/5HUjk6Zf0xg This book made me think about the advantages and disadvantages connected to the birth date, place and few other things most kids can't change. ...

    I'm starting to think that all Malcolm Gladwell books are the same thing - a rather ordinary/non-controversial statement about life which is padded with pretty neat examples and then praised as revolutionary, thus selling millions of copies. Main thesis is that social ability is a g...

  • Jason
    May 11, 2011

    Gladwell argues that success is tightly married to opportunity and time on task. He states that it takes approximately 10,000 hours to master something and that gives me comfort. It helps me feel better about my many failures at initial attempts to master things (like glazing pottery, ...

    When I think about Malcolm Gladwell, the first phrase that comes to mind is "less than meets the eye." At first glance, his work seems thoroughly researched, even visionary at times. Beginning with a few maverick, counter-intuitive insights, he often ends with an affirmation of c...

    I know, you don?t think you have the time and there are other and more important books to read at the moment, but be warned, you do need to read this book. There are a number of ways I can tell a book will be good; one of those ways is if Graham has recommended it to me (how am I ...

    Didn't exactly read this book - Joe and I listened to it in the car on the way home from visiting family for Christmas. I really enjoyed it, and was very fascinated by certain parts of it, especially the sections about the Beatles, computer programmers and Korean co-pilots. But my e...

    Occasionally insightful, but Gladwell's science is pretty junky. His reasons for success change by the page. And he cherry-picks examples to exactly fit the scheme under consideration. Plus, he's obsessed with callbacks and summary statements that only showcase the faulty connections b...

    Malcolm Gladwell's new book reads like a series of cocktail-party anecdotes. Whether the book is a mere fluff piece or something more is open to debate. At its heart, it has two themes: (1) That success depends not just on talent but opportunity, and (2) that success (and failure) also...

    I can save you the trouble of reading the book: smart people don't automatically become successful, they do so because they got lucky. This rule applies to everyone including the likes of Bill Gates and Robert Oppenheimer. That's it. That's what the whole book is about. Gladwell looks ...

    Here's what I wrote earlier. I have to admit to the more I think and talk about the book, the less I think of it. It all seems too superficial. A pretty interesting book, albeit with not quite as many "knock me over with a feather" moments as Blink. It starts off with a bang, as he ...

    People are criticizing this book because it is not a journal article. Well guess what: we're not all sociologists. I have read plenty of journal articles in my own field (law). I'm in no position to read journal articles in fields outside my own. Having a well-written piece of mass-mar...

    I skimmed this book instead of reading it. I didn?t entirely love it. Although the author makes some interesting points, I find some of the correlations he tries to draw a little silly. Like the Italian community in Pennsylvania where people are healthier and live longer because t...

  • David
    Sep 10, 2011

    Gladwell argues that success is tightly married to opportunity and time on task. He states that it takes approximately 10,000 hours to master something and that gives me comfort. It helps me feel better about my many failures at initial attempts to master things (like glazing pottery, ...

    When I think about Malcolm Gladwell, the first phrase that comes to mind is "less than meets the eye." At first glance, his work seems thoroughly researched, even visionary at times. Beginning with a few maverick, counter-intuitive insights, he often ends with an affirmation of c...

    I know, you don?t think you have the time and there are other and more important books to read at the moment, but be warned, you do need to read this book. There are a number of ways I can tell a book will be good; one of those ways is if Graham has recommended it to me (how am I ...

    Didn't exactly read this book - Joe and I listened to it in the car on the way home from visiting family for Christmas. I really enjoyed it, and was very fascinated by certain parts of it, especially the sections about the Beatles, computer programmers and Korean co-pilots. But my e...

    Occasionally insightful, but Gladwell's science is pretty junky. His reasons for success change by the page. And he cherry-picks examples to exactly fit the scheme under consideration. Plus, he's obsessed with callbacks and summary statements that only showcase the faulty connections b...

    Malcolm Gladwell's new book reads like a series of cocktail-party anecdotes. Whether the book is a mere fluff piece or something more is open to debate. At its heart, it has two themes: (1) That success depends not just on talent but opportunity, and (2) that success (and failure) also...

    I can save you the trouble of reading the book: smart people don't automatically become successful, they do so because they got lucky. This rule applies to everyone including the likes of Bill Gates and Robert Oppenheimer. That's it. That's what the whole book is about. Gladwell looks ...

    Here's what I wrote earlier. I have to admit to the more I think and talk about the book, the less I think of it. It all seems too superficial. A pretty interesting book, albeit with not quite as many "knock me over with a feather" moments as Blink. It starts off with a bang, as he ...

    People are criticizing this book because it is not a journal article. Well guess what: we're not all sociologists. I have read plenty of journal articles in my own field (law). I'm in no position to read journal articles in fields outside my own. Having a well-written piece of mass-mar...

    I skimmed this book instead of reading it. I didn?t entirely love it. Although the author makes some interesting points, I find some of the correlations he tries to draw a little silly. Like the Italian community in Pennsylvania where people are healthier and live longer because t...

    Well, it's official: Malcolm Gladwell has run out of things to say. His prose is still lively and entertaining, and he maintains his famous I-look-at-things-differently-than-anyone-else attitude, but "Outliers" has so little meat that it would have more appropriately been published ...

    Recommend to: If you like exploring phenomenon beyond their appearance and if you enjoy story-telling writings about factual subjects, here: success What this book is about: Here, the famous columnist, Malcolm Gladwell deeply investigates the topic of success and people or nations w...

    Outliers : the story of success, Malcolm Gladwell ???????: ????? ??? ??? ????? : ?????? ??????? ?????? ????? ???? ??????? ???????? ?? : ?????? ??????? ????? ??? ????? : ?????? ????...

    Outliers. Or as it should be called, "Outliers don't exist." I not only couldn't put it down, but my wife feels like she's read it now too. It starts with a story about a town whose inhabitants only ever die from old age (i.e., not from cancer or ANY OTHER problem) and quickly goes...

    Malcolm Gladwell writes very interesting and entertaining books. J.R.R. Tolkein writes very interesting and entertaining books as well. However, after reading Tolkein, I did not venture out into the world in search of hobbits, dwarves and elves to be my new friends, or worry about bein...

  • Siddharth
    Jan 12, 2013

    Gladwell argues that success is tightly married to opportunity and time on task. He states that it takes approximately 10,000 hours to master something and that gives me comfort. It helps me feel better about my many failures at initial attempts to master things (like glazing pottery, ...

    When I think about Malcolm Gladwell, the first phrase that comes to mind is "less than meets the eye." At first glance, his work seems thoroughly researched, even visionary at times. Beginning with a few maverick, counter-intuitive insights, he often ends with an affirmation of c...

    I know, you don?t think you have the time and there are other and more important books to read at the moment, but be warned, you do need to read this book. There are a number of ways I can tell a book will be good; one of those ways is if Graham has recommended it to me (how am I ...

    Didn't exactly read this book - Joe and I listened to it in the car on the way home from visiting family for Christmas. I really enjoyed it, and was very fascinated by certain parts of it, especially the sections about the Beatles, computer programmers and Korean co-pilots. But my e...

    Occasionally insightful, but Gladwell's science is pretty junky. His reasons for success change by the page. And he cherry-picks examples to exactly fit the scheme under consideration. Plus, he's obsessed with callbacks and summary statements that only showcase the faulty connections b...

    Malcolm Gladwell's new book reads like a series of cocktail-party anecdotes. Whether the book is a mere fluff piece or something more is open to debate. At its heart, it has two themes: (1) That success depends not just on talent but opportunity, and (2) that success (and failure) also...

    I can save you the trouble of reading the book: smart people don't automatically become successful, they do so because they got lucky. This rule applies to everyone including the likes of Bill Gates and Robert Oppenheimer. That's it. That's what the whole book is about. Gladwell looks ...

    Here's what I wrote earlier. I have to admit to the more I think and talk about the book, the less I think of it. It all seems too superficial. A pretty interesting book, albeit with not quite as many "knock me over with a feather" moments as Blink. It starts off with a bang, as he ...

    People are criticizing this book because it is not a journal article. Well guess what: we're not all sociologists. I have read plenty of journal articles in my own field (law). I'm in no position to read journal articles in fields outside my own. Having a well-written piece of mass-mar...

    I skimmed this book instead of reading it. I didn?t entirely love it. Although the author makes some interesting points, I find some of the correlations he tries to draw a little silly. Like the Italian community in Pennsylvania where people are healthier and live longer because t...

    Well, it's official: Malcolm Gladwell has run out of things to say. His prose is still lively and entertaining, and he maintains his famous I-look-at-things-differently-than-anyone-else attitude, but "Outliers" has so little meat that it would have more appropriately been published ...

    Recommend to: If you like exploring phenomenon beyond their appearance and if you enjoy story-telling writings about factual subjects, here: success What this book is about: Here, the famous columnist, Malcolm Gladwell deeply investigates the topic of success and people or nations w...

    Outliers : the story of success, Malcolm Gladwell ???????: ????? ??? ??? ????? : ?????? ??????? ?????? ????? ???? ??????? ???????? ?? : ?????? ??????? ????? ??? ????? : ?????? ????...

    Outliers. Or as it should be called, "Outliers don't exist." I not only couldn't put it down, but my wife feels like she's read it now too. It starts with a story about a town whose inhabitants only ever die from old age (i.e., not from cancer or ANY OTHER problem) and quickly goes...

    Malcolm Gladwell writes very interesting and entertaining books. J.R.R. Tolkein writes very interesting and entertaining books as well. However, after reading Tolkein, I did not venture out into the world in search of hobbits, dwarves and elves to be my new friends, or worry about bein...

    "Outliers" those wildly successful people, for whom 'normal rules don't apply.' Are they just lucky, talented? Maybe...but, outliers may not be outliers after all...after reading the entire book, I was slapped by that at the very end. Gladwell looks closely at success, and those who se...

    ?????? ???? ???? ??????.. ?????? ????? ??? ?????. ?????? ?? ???? ??? ????? ??????? ???? ?? ????? ?? ?? ??????? ??????? ????? ????? ???? ????? ?????? ?????? ??...

    "If only I'd read this book earlier," the old man sighed. He shook his head sadly. "I was at the wrong end of the cut-off age. I'd have made a champion swimmer...". His voice trailed off. "Hmmm." He sighed again. "Then there's this 10000 hour rule. What the hell am I supposed to do a...

  • Julie
    Jan 09, 2014

    Gladwell argues that success is tightly married to opportunity and time on task. He states that it takes approximately 10,000 hours to master something and that gives me comfort. It helps me feel better about my many failures at initial attempts to master things (like glazing pottery, ...

    When I think about Malcolm Gladwell, the first phrase that comes to mind is "less than meets the eye." At first glance, his work seems thoroughly researched, even visionary at times. Beginning with a few maverick, counter-intuitive insights, he often ends with an affirmation of c...

    I know, you don?t think you have the time and there are other and more important books to read at the moment, but be warned, you do need to read this book. There are a number of ways I can tell a book will be good; one of those ways is if Graham has recommended it to me (how am I ...

    Didn't exactly read this book - Joe and I listened to it in the car on the way home from visiting family for Christmas. I really enjoyed it, and was very fascinated by certain parts of it, especially the sections about the Beatles, computer programmers and Korean co-pilots. But my e...

    Occasionally insightful, but Gladwell's science is pretty junky. His reasons for success change by the page. And he cherry-picks examples to exactly fit the scheme under consideration. Plus, he's obsessed with callbacks and summary statements that only showcase the faulty connections b...

    Malcolm Gladwell's new book reads like a series of cocktail-party anecdotes. Whether the book is a mere fluff piece or something more is open to debate. At its heart, it has two themes: (1) That success depends not just on talent but opportunity, and (2) that success (and failure) also...

    I can save you the trouble of reading the book: smart people don't automatically become successful, they do so because they got lucky. This rule applies to everyone including the likes of Bill Gates and Robert Oppenheimer. That's it. That's what the whole book is about. Gladwell looks ...

    Here's what I wrote earlier. I have to admit to the more I think and talk about the book, the less I think of it. It all seems too superficial. A pretty interesting book, albeit with not quite as many "knock me over with a feather" moments as Blink. It starts off with a bang, as he ...

    People are criticizing this book because it is not a journal article. Well guess what: we're not all sociologists. I have read plenty of journal articles in my own field (law). I'm in no position to read journal articles in fields outside my own. Having a well-written piece of mass-mar...

    I skimmed this book instead of reading it. I didn?t entirely love it. Although the author makes some interesting points, I find some of the correlations he tries to draw a little silly. Like the Italian community in Pennsylvania where people are healthier and live longer because t...

    Well, it's official: Malcolm Gladwell has run out of things to say. His prose is still lively and entertaining, and he maintains his famous I-look-at-things-differently-than-anyone-else attitude, but "Outliers" has so little meat that it would have more appropriately been published ...

    Recommend to: If you like exploring phenomenon beyond their appearance and if you enjoy story-telling writings about factual subjects, here: success What this book is about: Here, the famous columnist, Malcolm Gladwell deeply investigates the topic of success and people or nations w...

    Outliers : the story of success, Malcolm Gladwell ???????: ????? ??? ??? ????? : ?????? ??????? ?????? ????? ???? ??????? ???????? ?? : ?????? ??????? ????? ??? ????? : ?????? ????...

    Outliers. Or as it should be called, "Outliers don't exist." I not only couldn't put it down, but my wife feels like she's read it now too. It starts with a story about a town whose inhabitants only ever die from old age (i.e., not from cancer or ANY OTHER problem) and quickly goes...

    Malcolm Gladwell writes very interesting and entertaining books. J.R.R. Tolkein writes very interesting and entertaining books as well. However, after reading Tolkein, I did not venture out into the world in search of hobbits, dwarves and elves to be my new friends, or worry about bein...

    "Outliers" those wildly successful people, for whom 'normal rules don't apply.' Are they just lucky, talented? Maybe...but, outliers may not be outliers after all...after reading the entire book, I was slapped by that at the very end. Gladwell looks closely at success, and those who se...

    ?????? ???? ???? ??????.. ?????? ????? ??? ?????. ?????? ?? ???? ??? ????? ??????? ???? ?? ????? ?? ?? ??????? ??????? ????? ????? ???? ????? ?????? ?????? ??...

    "If only I'd read this book earlier," the old man sighed. He shook his head sadly. "I was at the wrong end of the cut-off age. I'd have made a champion swimmer...". His voice trailed off. "Hmmm." He sighed again. "Then there's this 10000 hour rule. What the hell am I supposed to do a...

    This is not a feeling oriented review like those that seem to be getting esteem here. While this is a well-researched and easily readable book that makes some interesting points, most of its contents are pure common sense. In a world so highly populated with such strong inequities,...

    This was such an unexpected pleasure to listen to. The narration was fantastic. The information clear and written is such a way that I absorbed and considered the facts presented. For me that is amazing, I am easily distracted and seldom retain most information, ADHD yep. Some of the i...

    Wow! This book was incredible. This goes directly on the very tiny pile of books that I can say have drastically shifted the way I understand and view the world. I know I've heard this author's work referred to many times in other books and IRL, but I didn't realize how much of a parad...

    Here is my animated review! youtu.be/5HUjk6Zf0xg This book made me think about the advantages and disadvantages connected to the birth date, place and few other things most kids can't change. ...

    I'm starting to think that all Malcolm Gladwell books are the same thing - a rather ordinary/non-controversial statement about life which is padded with pretty neat examples and then praised as revolutionary, thus selling millions of copies. Main thesis is that social ability is a g...

    In just one week, this book transformed a relatively normal woman into someone who's been saying, "Well, in this book I'm reading. . . you know, Outliers? Yeah, there's this section on. . . there's this part about. . . You should read this chapter. . . No, no, just wait here and let me...

  • Lily ☁️
    Jul 13, 2018

    Gladwell argues that success is tightly married to opportunity and time on task. He states that it takes approximately 10,000 hours to master something and that gives me comfort. It helps me feel better about my many failures at initial attempts to master things (like glazing pottery, ...

    When I think about Malcolm Gladwell, the first phrase that comes to mind is "less than meets the eye." At first glance, his work seems thoroughly researched, even visionary at times. Beginning with a few maverick, counter-intuitive insights, he often ends with an affirmation of c...

    I know, you don?t think you have the time and there are other and more important books to read at the moment, but be warned, you do need to read this book. There are a number of ways I can tell a book will be good; one of those ways is if Graham has recommended it to me (how am I ...

    Didn't exactly read this book - Joe and I listened to it in the car on the way home from visiting family for Christmas. I really enjoyed it, and was very fascinated by certain parts of it, especially the sections about the Beatles, computer programmers and Korean co-pilots. But my e...

    Occasionally insightful, but Gladwell's science is pretty junky. His reasons for success change by the page. And he cherry-picks examples to exactly fit the scheme under consideration. Plus, he's obsessed with callbacks and summary statements that only showcase the faulty connections b...

    Malcolm Gladwell's new book reads like a series of cocktail-party anecdotes. Whether the book is a mere fluff piece or something more is open to debate. At its heart, it has two themes: (1) That success depends not just on talent but opportunity, and (2) that success (and failure) also...

    I can save you the trouble of reading the book: smart people don't automatically become successful, they do so because they got lucky. This rule applies to everyone including the likes of Bill Gates and Robert Oppenheimer. That's it. That's what the whole book is about. Gladwell looks ...

    Here's what I wrote earlier. I have to admit to the more I think and talk about the book, the less I think of it. It all seems too superficial. A pretty interesting book, albeit with not quite as many "knock me over with a feather" moments as Blink. It starts off with a bang, as he ...

    People are criticizing this book because it is not a journal article. Well guess what: we're not all sociologists. I have read plenty of journal articles in my own field (law). I'm in no position to read journal articles in fields outside my own. Having a well-written piece of mass-mar...

    I skimmed this book instead of reading it. I didn?t entirely love it. Although the author makes some interesting points, I find some of the correlations he tries to draw a little silly. Like the Italian community in Pennsylvania where people are healthier and live longer because t...

    Well, it's official: Malcolm Gladwell has run out of things to say. His prose is still lively and entertaining, and he maintains his famous I-look-at-things-differently-than-anyone-else attitude, but "Outliers" has so little meat that it would have more appropriately been published ...

    Recommend to: If you like exploring phenomenon beyond their appearance and if you enjoy story-telling writings about factual subjects, here: success What this book is about: Here, the famous columnist, Malcolm Gladwell deeply investigates the topic of success and people or nations w...

    Outliers : the story of success, Malcolm Gladwell ???????: ????? ??? ??? ????? : ?????? ??????? ?????? ????? ???? ??????? ???????? ?? : ?????? ??????? ????? ??? ????? : ?????? ????...

    Outliers. Or as it should be called, "Outliers don't exist." I not only couldn't put it down, but my wife feels like she's read it now too. It starts with a story about a town whose inhabitants only ever die from old age (i.e., not from cancer or ANY OTHER problem) and quickly goes...

    Malcolm Gladwell writes very interesting and entertaining books. J.R.R. Tolkein writes very interesting and entertaining books as well. However, after reading Tolkein, I did not venture out into the world in search of hobbits, dwarves and elves to be my new friends, or worry about bein...

    "Outliers" those wildly successful people, for whom 'normal rules don't apply.' Are they just lucky, talented? Maybe...but, outliers may not be outliers after all...after reading the entire book, I was slapped by that at the very end. Gladwell looks closely at success, and those who se...

    ?????? ???? ???? ??????.. ?????? ????? ??? ?????. ?????? ?? ???? ??? ????? ??????? ???? ?? ????? ?? ?? ??????? ??????? ????? ????? ???? ????? ?????? ?????? ??...

    "If only I'd read this book earlier," the old man sighed. He shook his head sadly. "I was at the wrong end of the cut-off age. I'd have made a champion swimmer...". His voice trailed off. "Hmmm." He sighed again. "Then there's this 10000 hour rule. What the hell am I supposed to do a...

    This is not a feeling oriented review like those that seem to be getting esteem here. While this is a well-researched and easily readable book that makes some interesting points, most of its contents are pure common sense. In a world so highly populated with such strong inequities,...

    This was such an unexpected pleasure to listen to. The narration was fantastic. The information clear and written is such a way that I absorbed and considered the facts presented. For me that is amazing, I am easily distracted and seldom retain most information, ADHD yep. Some of the i...

    Wow! This book was incredible. This goes directly on the very tiny pile of books that I can say have drastically shifted the way I understand and view the world. I know I've heard this author's work referred to many times in other books and IRL, but I didn't realize how much of a parad...

    Here is my animated review! youtu.be/5HUjk6Zf0xg This book made me think about the advantages and disadvantages connected to the birth date, place and few other things most kids can't change. ...

    I'm starting to think that all Malcolm Gladwell books are the same thing - a rather ordinary/non-controversial statement about life which is padded with pretty neat examples and then praised as revolutionary, thus selling millions of copies. Main thesis is that social ability is a g...

    In just one week, this book transformed a relatively normal woman into someone who's been saying, "Well, in this book I'm reading. . . you know, Outliers? Yeah, there's this section on. . . there's this part about. . . You should read this chapter. . . No, no, just wait here and let me...

    I listened to the unabridged copy while driving to/from Thanksgiving. Gladwell's books are often controversial because he tends to present only one side -- HIS side -- of an argument and gloss over anything that doesn't jive with his view. That said, the guy knows how to write and how ...

    ?We cling to the idea that success is a simple function of individual merit and that the world in which we all grow up and the rules we choose to write as a society don?t matter at all.? ?Who we are cannot be separated from where we?re from.? Blog Bloglovin? T...

  • Gautam
    Oct 09, 2016

    Gladwell argues that success is tightly married to opportunity and time on task. He states that it takes approximately 10,000 hours to master something and that gives me comfort. It helps me feel better about my many failures at initial attempts to master things (like glazing pottery, ...

    When I think about Malcolm Gladwell, the first phrase that comes to mind is "less than meets the eye." At first glance, his work seems thoroughly researched, even visionary at times. Beginning with a few maverick, counter-intuitive insights, he often ends with an affirmation of c...

    I know, you don?t think you have the time and there are other and more important books to read at the moment, but be warned, you do need to read this book. There are a number of ways I can tell a book will be good; one of those ways is if Graham has recommended it to me (how am I ...

    Didn't exactly read this book - Joe and I listened to it in the car on the way home from visiting family for Christmas. I really enjoyed it, and was very fascinated by certain parts of it, especially the sections about the Beatles, computer programmers and Korean co-pilots. But my e...

    Occasionally insightful, but Gladwell's science is pretty junky. His reasons for success change by the page. And he cherry-picks examples to exactly fit the scheme under consideration. Plus, he's obsessed with callbacks and summary statements that only showcase the faulty connections b...

    Malcolm Gladwell's new book reads like a series of cocktail-party anecdotes. Whether the book is a mere fluff piece or something more is open to debate. At its heart, it has two themes: (1) That success depends not just on talent but opportunity, and (2) that success (and failure) also...

    I can save you the trouble of reading the book: smart people don't automatically become successful, they do so because they got lucky. This rule applies to everyone including the likes of Bill Gates and Robert Oppenheimer. That's it. That's what the whole book is about. Gladwell looks ...

    Here's what I wrote earlier. I have to admit to the more I think and talk about the book, the less I think of it. It all seems too superficial. A pretty interesting book, albeit with not quite as many "knock me over with a feather" moments as Blink. It starts off with a bang, as he ...

    People are criticizing this book because it is not a journal article. Well guess what: we're not all sociologists. I have read plenty of journal articles in my own field (law). I'm in no position to read journal articles in fields outside my own. Having a well-written piece of mass-mar...

    I skimmed this book instead of reading it. I didn?t entirely love it. Although the author makes some interesting points, I find some of the correlations he tries to draw a little silly. Like the Italian community in Pennsylvania where people are healthier and live longer because t...

    Well, it's official: Malcolm Gladwell has run out of things to say. His prose is still lively and entertaining, and he maintains his famous I-look-at-things-differently-than-anyone-else attitude, but "Outliers" has so little meat that it would have more appropriately been published ...

    Recommend to: If you like exploring phenomenon beyond their appearance and if you enjoy story-telling writings about factual subjects, here: success What this book is about: Here, the famous columnist, Malcolm Gladwell deeply investigates the topic of success and people or nations w...

    Outliers : the story of success, Malcolm Gladwell ???????: ????? ??? ??? ????? : ?????? ??????? ?????? ????? ???? ??????? ???????? ?? : ?????? ??????? ????? ??? ????? : ?????? ????...

    Outliers. Or as it should be called, "Outliers don't exist." I not only couldn't put it down, but my wife feels like she's read it now too. It starts with a story about a town whose inhabitants only ever die from old age (i.e., not from cancer or ANY OTHER problem) and quickly goes...

    Malcolm Gladwell writes very interesting and entertaining books. J.R.R. Tolkein writes very interesting and entertaining books as well. However, after reading Tolkein, I did not venture out into the world in search of hobbits, dwarves and elves to be my new friends, or worry about bein...

    "Outliers" those wildly successful people, for whom 'normal rules don't apply.' Are they just lucky, talented? Maybe...but, outliers may not be outliers after all...after reading the entire book, I was slapped by that at the very end. Gladwell looks closely at success, and those who se...

    ?????? ???? ???? ??????.. ?????? ????? ??? ?????. ?????? ?? ???? ??? ????? ??????? ???? ?? ????? ?? ?? ??????? ??????? ????? ????? ???? ????? ?????? ?????? ??...

    "If only I'd read this book earlier," the old man sighed. He shook his head sadly. "I was at the wrong end of the cut-off age. I'd have made a champion swimmer...". His voice trailed off. "Hmmm." He sighed again. "Then there's this 10000 hour rule. What the hell am I supposed to do a...

    This is not a feeling oriented review like those that seem to be getting esteem here. While this is a well-researched and easily readable book that makes some interesting points, most of its contents are pure common sense. In a world so highly populated with such strong inequities,...

    This was such an unexpected pleasure to listen to. The narration was fantastic. The information clear and written is such a way that I absorbed and considered the facts presented. For me that is amazing, I am easily distracted and seldom retain most information, ADHD yep. Some of the i...

    Wow! This book was incredible. This goes directly on the very tiny pile of books that I can say have drastically shifted the way I understand and view the world. I know I've heard this author's work referred to many times in other books and IRL, but I didn't realize how much of a parad...

    Here is my animated review! youtu.be/5HUjk6Zf0xg This book made me think about the advantages and disadvantages connected to the birth date, place and few other things most kids can't change. ...

    I'm starting to think that all Malcolm Gladwell books are the same thing - a rather ordinary/non-controversial statement about life which is padded with pretty neat examples and then praised as revolutionary, thus selling millions of copies. Main thesis is that social ability is a g...

    In just one week, this book transformed a relatively normal woman into someone who's been saying, "Well, in this book I'm reading. . . you know, Outliers? Yeah, there's this section on. . . there's this part about. . . You should read this chapter. . . No, no, just wait here and let me...

    I listened to the unabridged copy while driving to/from Thanksgiving. Gladwell's books are often controversial because he tends to present only one side -- HIS side -- of an argument and gloss over anything that doesn't jive with his view. That said, the guy knows how to write and how ...

    ?We cling to the idea that success is a simple function of individual merit and that the world in which we all grow up and the rules we choose to write as a society don?t matter at all.? ?Who we are cannot be separated from where we?re from.? Blog Bloglovin? T...

    A well-researched subject put down to plausible conclusions through inductive reasoning. Gladwell did a commendable job in bringing this subject of success into a logical paradigm that is both palatable and eye-opening. ...

  • Amir Tesla
    Oct 07, 2016

    Gladwell argues that success is tightly married to opportunity and time on task. He states that it takes approximately 10,000 hours to master something and that gives me comfort. It helps me feel better about my many failures at initial attempts to master things (like glazing pottery, ...

    When I think about Malcolm Gladwell, the first phrase that comes to mind is "less than meets the eye." At first glance, his work seems thoroughly researched, even visionary at times. Beginning with a few maverick, counter-intuitive insights, he often ends with an affirmation of c...

    I know, you don?t think you have the time and there are other and more important books to read at the moment, but be warned, you do need to read this book. There are a number of ways I can tell a book will be good; one of those ways is if Graham has recommended it to me (how am I ...

    Didn't exactly read this book - Joe and I listened to it in the car on the way home from visiting family for Christmas. I really enjoyed it, and was very fascinated by certain parts of it, especially the sections about the Beatles, computer programmers and Korean co-pilots. But my e...

    Occasionally insightful, but Gladwell's science is pretty junky. His reasons for success change by the page. And he cherry-picks examples to exactly fit the scheme under consideration. Plus, he's obsessed with callbacks and summary statements that only showcase the faulty connections b...

    Malcolm Gladwell's new book reads like a series of cocktail-party anecdotes. Whether the book is a mere fluff piece or something more is open to debate. At its heart, it has two themes: (1) That success depends not just on talent but opportunity, and (2) that success (and failure) also...

    I can save you the trouble of reading the book: smart people don't automatically become successful, they do so because they got lucky. This rule applies to everyone including the likes of Bill Gates and Robert Oppenheimer. That's it. That's what the whole book is about. Gladwell looks ...

    Here's what I wrote earlier. I have to admit to the more I think and talk about the book, the less I think of it. It all seems too superficial. A pretty interesting book, albeit with not quite as many "knock me over with a feather" moments as Blink. It starts off with a bang, as he ...

    People are criticizing this book because it is not a journal article. Well guess what: we're not all sociologists. I have read plenty of journal articles in my own field (law). I'm in no position to read journal articles in fields outside my own. Having a well-written piece of mass-mar...

    I skimmed this book instead of reading it. I didn?t entirely love it. Although the author makes some interesting points, I find some of the correlations he tries to draw a little silly. Like the Italian community in Pennsylvania where people are healthier and live longer because t...

    Well, it's official: Malcolm Gladwell has run out of things to say. His prose is still lively and entertaining, and he maintains his famous I-look-at-things-differently-than-anyone-else attitude, but "Outliers" has so little meat that it would have more appropriately been published ...

    Recommend to: If you like exploring phenomenon beyond their appearance and if you enjoy story-telling writings about factual subjects, here: success What this book is about: Here, the famous columnist, Malcolm Gladwell deeply investigates the topic of success and people or nations w...

  • ScienceOfSuccess
    Apr 28, 2017

    Gladwell argues that success is tightly married to opportunity and time on task. He states that it takes approximately 10,000 hours to master something and that gives me comfort. It helps me feel better about my many failures at initial attempts to master things (like glazing pottery, ...

    When I think about Malcolm Gladwell, the first phrase that comes to mind is "less than meets the eye." At first glance, his work seems thoroughly researched, even visionary at times. Beginning with a few maverick, counter-intuitive insights, he often ends with an affirmation of c...

    I know, you don?t think you have the time and there are other and more important books to read at the moment, but be warned, you do need to read this book. There are a number of ways I can tell a book will be good; one of those ways is if Graham has recommended it to me (how am I ...

    Didn't exactly read this book - Joe and I listened to it in the car on the way home from visiting family for Christmas. I really enjoyed it, and was very fascinated by certain parts of it, especially the sections about the Beatles, computer programmers and Korean co-pilots. But my e...

    Occasionally insightful, but Gladwell's science is pretty junky. His reasons for success change by the page. And he cherry-picks examples to exactly fit the scheme under consideration. Plus, he's obsessed with callbacks and summary statements that only showcase the faulty connections b...

    Malcolm Gladwell's new book reads like a series of cocktail-party anecdotes. Whether the book is a mere fluff piece or something more is open to debate. At its heart, it has two themes: (1) That success depends not just on talent but opportunity, and (2) that success (and failure) also...

    I can save you the trouble of reading the book: smart people don't automatically become successful, they do so because they got lucky. This rule applies to everyone including the likes of Bill Gates and Robert Oppenheimer. That's it. That's what the whole book is about. Gladwell looks ...

    Here's what I wrote earlier. I have to admit to the more I think and talk about the book, the less I think of it. It all seems too superficial. A pretty interesting book, albeit with not quite as many "knock me over with a feather" moments as Blink. It starts off with a bang, as he ...

    People are criticizing this book because it is not a journal article. Well guess what: we're not all sociologists. I have read plenty of journal articles in my own field (law). I'm in no position to read journal articles in fields outside my own. Having a well-written piece of mass-mar...

    I skimmed this book instead of reading it. I didn?t entirely love it. Although the author makes some interesting points, I find some of the correlations he tries to draw a little silly. Like the Italian community in Pennsylvania where people are healthier and live longer because t...

    Well, it's official: Malcolm Gladwell has run out of things to say. His prose is still lively and entertaining, and he maintains his famous I-look-at-things-differently-than-anyone-else attitude, but "Outliers" has so little meat that it would have more appropriately been published ...

    Recommend to: If you like exploring phenomenon beyond their appearance and if you enjoy story-telling writings about factual subjects, here: success What this book is about: Here, the famous columnist, Malcolm Gladwell deeply investigates the topic of success and people or nations w...

    Outliers : the story of success, Malcolm Gladwell ???????: ????? ??? ??? ????? : ?????? ??????? ?????? ????? ???? ??????? ???????? ?? : ?????? ??????? ????? ??? ????? : ?????? ????...

    Outliers. Or as it should be called, "Outliers don't exist." I not only couldn't put it down, but my wife feels like she's read it now too. It starts with a story about a town whose inhabitants only ever die from old age (i.e., not from cancer or ANY OTHER problem) and quickly goes...

    Malcolm Gladwell writes very interesting and entertaining books. J.R.R. Tolkein writes very interesting and entertaining books as well. However, after reading Tolkein, I did not venture out into the world in search of hobbits, dwarves and elves to be my new friends, or worry about bein...

    "Outliers" those wildly successful people, for whom 'normal rules don't apply.' Are they just lucky, talented? Maybe...but, outliers may not be outliers after all...after reading the entire book, I was slapped by that at the very end. Gladwell looks closely at success, and those who se...

    ?????? ???? ???? ??????.. ?????? ????? ??? ?????. ?????? ?? ???? ??? ????? ??????? ???? ?? ????? ?? ?? ??????? ??????? ????? ????? ???? ????? ?????? ?????? ??...

    "If only I'd read this book earlier," the old man sighed. He shook his head sadly. "I was at the wrong end of the cut-off age. I'd have made a champion swimmer...". His voice trailed off. "Hmmm." He sighed again. "Then there's this 10000 hour rule. What the hell am I supposed to do a...

    This is not a feeling oriented review like those that seem to be getting esteem here. While this is a well-researched and easily readable book that makes some interesting points, most of its contents are pure common sense. In a world so highly populated with such strong inequities,...

    This was such an unexpected pleasure to listen to. The narration was fantastic. The information clear and written is such a way that I absorbed and considered the facts presented. For me that is amazing, I am easily distracted and seldom retain most information, ADHD yep. Some of the i...

    Wow! This book was incredible. This goes directly on the very tiny pile of books that I can say have drastically shifted the way I understand and view the world. I know I've heard this author's work referred to many times in other books and IRL, but I didn't realize how much of a parad...

    Here is my animated review! youtu.be/5HUjk6Zf0xg This book made me think about the advantages and disadvantages connected to the birth date, place and few other things most kids can't change. ...