Call Me Zebra

Call Me Zebra

A feisty heroine?s quest to reclaim her past through the power of literature?even as she navigates the murkier mysteries of love.   Zebra is the last in a line of anarchists, atheists, and autodidacts. When war came, her family didn?t fight; they took refuge in books. Now alone and in exile, Zebra leaves New York for Barcelona, retracing the journey she and her father made A feisty heroine?s quest to reclaim her past through the power of literature?even as she navigates the mur...

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Title:Call Me Zebra
Author:Azareen Van der Vliet Oloomi
Rating:
Genres:Fiction
ISBN:0544944607
Edition Language:English
Format Type:Hardcover
Number of Pages:304 pages pages

Call Me Zebra Reviews

  • Rebecca
    Feb 06, 2018

    Zebra, the narrator, is a young Iranian refugee who decides to explore her roots after the death of her parents. She aspires to fully inherit her family?s ?treasured roles? of Autodidacts, Anarchists, and Atheists. She is a deeply infuriating, unsentimental, hopelessly pretentiou...

    Once in a while, there comes a book that infuses literature and life so brilliantly that you can?t help but reread it the minute you are done with it. That is what happened to me when I just finished reading, ?Call Me Zebra? by Azareen Van der Vliet Oloomi. I had to reread it. To...

    https://www.nytimes.com/2018/03/29/bo... ...

    3.5, rounded down. I find this one a tricky one to review. Van der Vliet Oloomi is a talented writer and I think she may very well be a genius - if not a genius, certainly incredibly whip smart and well read. Her main character and narrator, Bibi Abbas Abbas Hosseini (aka Zebra) shares...

    Why it got 2 ?: ? For moments like this. "What path leads to freedom? I asked. Any vein in your body, I answered..." ? For the sheer bliss that came over me when I got to read the protagonist expound on powerhouse literary greats. The first third of the book was less awk...

    Can't decide if this is amazing & intelligent literature (it definitely is, in parts) or if it's too precocious for its own good. Feeling fizzled out on reading this one because the irritation is overriding the intelligence of this one. ...

    Call Me Zebra by Azareen Van der Vliet Oloomi is a novel from this award winning author. This is the author?s second novel. Zebra is a 22 year old woman, born in Iran to a family who took refuge in literature from the violent present of their time. Zebra is the last of the family ...

    Pretentious writing style obscured what would otherwise have been a really touching story about a young woman coping with tragedy and growing up. Currently, I prefer to read authors who can communicate universal topics in simple, yet beautiful, ways. Van der Vilet Oloomi seemed more co...

    I don't imagine this novel is for everyone but I devoured it. I had never heard of it but it came to me in the mail from my subscription to The Nervous Breakdown Book Club as the March selection. The author was interviewed on the associated Other People podcast, so I knew her backgrou...

    3.5 stars. Review to come ...

    I was drawn to this book, I admit, because it was so highly anticipated among the most informed voices of literature. I have grown wary of expert opinions of any kind, to be honest, so I began the book, I suppose, with some skepticism that it would meet the ?most anticipated? statu...

    What did I just read? Why did I read it? What in me convinced me that I should persist and keep turning virtual pages and read on? I have no answers to any of those questions. I think I wasted my time reading this book and trying to figure it out.  It's a book about immigrant girl ...

    Let's face it, this is a seriously weird book. It's like Freshwater but with literature instead of religion. The thing with those two books, is that they were really intriguing at first, luring you in with their exotic and foreign settings. Then they start to spiral down a weird pa...

    I find novels about the interweaving of life and art fascinating, but Call Me Zebra felt somehow shallow, especially in the light of The Idiot by Elif Batuman, or A Line Made by Walking by Sara Baume, two profound meditations on the subject. On the plus side, I thought the refugee aspe...

    I'm afraid I simply did not get this book at all. I was intrigued by the idea of a woman connecting to her dead parents and her heritage through literature, but I was just left confused the entire time. The references went way over my head, and the MC was just way too eccentric for my ...

    Sometimes you read a novel and you're left with more questions than answers or satisfaction. I think that's what the author intended here. I still don't understand why Zebra chose that name for herself. What was wrong with her given name? Did she really have no other family? Why had th...

    The only character I liked in this book was the bird. ...

    you either get this or you don't. it's better if you do. zebra is unconsciously unironic. she is both an unquestionable victim of exile and tragedy and an illicit manufacturer of drama. she is miserably elitist, but masterfully hyperbolic and communicative of a bestial, guarded, unstab...

    On the list of 46 books by women of color to read in 2018. ...

  • Audacia Ray
    Feb 21, 2018

    Zebra, the narrator, is a young Iranian refugee who decides to explore her roots after the death of her parents. She aspires to fully inherit her family?s ?treasured roles? of Autodidacts, Anarchists, and Atheists. She is a deeply infuriating, unsentimental, hopelessly pretentiou...

  • Laura
    Mar 30, 2018

    Zebra, the narrator, is a young Iranian refugee who decides to explore her roots after the death of her parents. She aspires to fully inherit her family?s ?treasured roles? of Autodidacts, Anarchists, and Atheists. She is a deeply infuriating, unsentimental, hopelessly pretentiou...

    Once in a while, there comes a book that infuses literature and life so brilliantly that you can?t help but reread it the minute you are done with it. That is what happened to me when I just finished reading, ?Call Me Zebra? by Azareen Van der Vliet Oloomi. I had to reread it. To...

    https://www.nytimes.com/2018/03/29/bo... ...

  • Gloria
    Apr 13, 2018

    Zebra, the narrator, is a young Iranian refugee who decides to explore her roots after the death of her parents. She aspires to fully inherit her family?s ?treasured roles? of Autodidacts, Anarchists, and Atheists. She is a deeply infuriating, unsentimental, hopelessly pretentiou...

    Once in a while, there comes a book that infuses literature and life so brilliantly that you can?t help but reread it the minute you are done with it. That is what happened to me when I just finished reading, ?Call Me Zebra? by Azareen Van der Vliet Oloomi. I had to reread it. To...

    https://www.nytimes.com/2018/03/29/bo... ...

    3.5, rounded down. I find this one a tricky one to review. Van der Vliet Oloomi is a talented writer and I think she may very well be a genius - if not a genius, certainly incredibly whip smart and well read. Her main character and narrator, Bibi Abbas Abbas Hosseini (aka Zebra) shares...

    Why it got 2 ?: ? For moments like this. "What path leads to freedom? I asked. Any vein in your body, I answered..." ? For the sheer bliss that came over me when I got to read the protagonist expound on powerhouse literary greats. The first third of the book was less awk...

    Can't decide if this is amazing & intelligent literature (it definitely is, in parts) or if it's too precocious for its own good. Feeling fizzled out on reading this one because the irritation is overriding the intelligence of this one. ...

    Call Me Zebra by Azareen Van der Vliet Oloomi is a novel from this award winning author. This is the author?s second novel. Zebra is a 22 year old woman, born in Iran to a family who took refuge in literature from the violent present of their time. Zebra is the last of the family ...

    Pretentious writing style obscured what would otherwise have been a really touching story about a young woman coping with tragedy and growing up. Currently, I prefer to read authors who can communicate universal topics in simple, yet beautiful, ways. Van der Vilet Oloomi seemed more co...

    I don't imagine this novel is for everyone but I devoured it. I had never heard of it but it came to me in the mail from my subscription to The Nervous Breakdown Book Club as the March selection. The author was interviewed on the associated Other People podcast, so I knew her backgrou...

    3.5 stars. Review to come ...

    I was drawn to this book, I admit, because it was so highly anticipated among the most informed voices of literature. I have grown wary of expert opinions of any kind, to be honest, so I began the book, I suppose, with some skepticism that it would meet the ?most anticipated? statu...

    What did I just read? Why did I read it? What in me convinced me that I should persist and keep turning virtual pages and read on? I have no answers to any of those questions. I think I wasted my time reading this book and trying to figure it out.  It's a book about immigrant girl ...

    Let's face it, this is a seriously weird book. It's like Freshwater but with literature instead of religion. The thing with those two books, is that they were really intriguing at first, luring you in with their exotic and foreign settings. Then they start to spiral down a weird pa...

    I find novels about the interweaving of life and art fascinating, but Call Me Zebra felt somehow shallow, especially in the light of The Idiot by Elif Batuman, or A Line Made by Walking by Sara Baume, two profound meditations on the subject. On the plus side, I thought the refugee aspe...

    I'm afraid I simply did not get this book at all. I was intrigued by the idea of a woman connecting to her dead parents and her heritage through literature, but I was just left confused the entire time. The references went way over my head, and the MC was just way too eccentric for my ...

    Sometimes you read a novel and you're left with more questions than answers or satisfaction. I think that's what the author intended here. I still don't understand why Zebra chose that name for herself. What was wrong with her given name? Did she really have no other family? Why had th...

    The only character I liked in this book was the bird. ...

    you either get this or you don't. it's better if you do. zebra is unconsciously unironic. she is both an unquestionable victim of exile and tragedy and an illicit manufacturer of drama. she is miserably elitist, but masterfully hyperbolic and communicative of a bestial, guarded, unstab...

    On the list of 46 books by women of color to read in 2018. ...

    I was extremely excited when I began this book due to the strong fast pace of the language, but there was no let-up, no growth in the character. The writing, like the character, became tedious. There are flashes of brilliance such as "I picked up languages the way some people pick up v...

    I've seen this book cover many times - and it was because of the book's cover that I didn't really dig into what this book is about. Today, I finally read a description of it and have since added it to my TBR mountain! (there is this cover Call Me Zebra that appeals to me much more, bu...

    At the heart of "Call Me Zebra" is a heart-breaking story of a young Iranian girl, who flees her war-torn country with her parents, losing her mother en route. She settles in New York with her father, but when he also passes, she decides to head on a reverse pilgrimage, retracing the p...

    What a tedious book. I can?t believe I finished this, but I did, hoping I would eventually enjoy it. Nope, it was a rough read and honestly, there was no ending. ...

    Call Me Zebra by Azareen Van der Vliet Oloomi is a beautiful, heartbreaking story of exile, loss, love, and ultimately self. Zebra comes from a long line of scholars whose lives are literally literature. They are born and raised with literature, eat and sleep literature, and speak in l...

    I felt so badly for the main character. Her parents had to flee Iran on foot, her mother dying in route. With her father, she crosses through Europe, ending up in New York City. Her father, in an attempt to raise her in the family tradition of literature, I assume to protect her from w...

    This is the sort of book I wish I could have read in my English classes.  It's written with the sort of language you would expect from one of those "classics."  But it's by an author of color about an Iranian woman.  Like, imagine having had this sort of representation in bookstores...

    A young child is born into an inhospitable world. Her Middle East country is war torn, her mother perishes. Death is on every road. She and her father manage to get to Europe where he later dies leaving a young woman grappling with grief for years after. As she buries her father, sh...

  • Jade
    Mar 06, 2018

    Zebra, the narrator, is a young Iranian refugee who decides to explore her roots after the death of her parents. She aspires to fully inherit her family?s ?treasured roles? of Autodidacts, Anarchists, and Atheists. She is a deeply infuriating, unsentimental, hopelessly pretentiou...

    Once in a while, there comes a book that infuses literature and life so brilliantly that you can?t help but reread it the minute you are done with it. That is what happened to me when I just finished reading, ?Call Me Zebra? by Azareen Van der Vliet Oloomi. I had to reread it. To...

    https://www.nytimes.com/2018/03/29/bo... ...

    3.5, rounded down. I find this one a tricky one to review. Van der Vliet Oloomi is a talented writer and I think she may very well be a genius - if not a genius, certainly incredibly whip smart and well read. Her main character and narrator, Bibi Abbas Abbas Hosseini (aka Zebra) shares...

    Why it got 2 ?: ? For moments like this. "What path leads to freedom? I asked. Any vein in your body, I answered..." ? For the sheer bliss that came over me when I got to read the protagonist expound on powerhouse literary greats. The first third of the book was less awk...

    Can't decide if this is amazing & intelligent literature (it definitely is, in parts) or if it's too precocious for its own good. Feeling fizzled out on reading this one because the irritation is overriding the intelligence of this one. ...

    Call Me Zebra by Azareen Van der Vliet Oloomi is a novel from this award winning author. This is the author?s second novel. Zebra is a 22 year old woman, born in Iran to a family who took refuge in literature from the violent present of their time. Zebra is the last of the family ...

    Pretentious writing style obscured what would otherwise have been a really touching story about a young woman coping with tragedy and growing up. Currently, I prefer to read authors who can communicate universal topics in simple, yet beautiful, ways. Van der Vilet Oloomi seemed more co...

    I don't imagine this novel is for everyone but I devoured it. I had never heard of it but it came to me in the mail from my subscription to The Nervous Breakdown Book Club as the March selection. The author was interviewed on the associated Other People podcast, so I knew her backgrou...

    3.5 stars. Review to come ...

    I was drawn to this book, I admit, because it was so highly anticipated among the most informed voices of literature. I have grown wary of expert opinions of any kind, to be honest, so I began the book, I suppose, with some skepticism that it would meet the ?most anticipated? statu...

    What did I just read? Why did I read it? What in me convinced me that I should persist and keep turning virtual pages and read on? I have no answers to any of those questions. I think I wasted my time reading this book and trying to figure it out.  It's a book about immigrant girl ...

    Let's face it, this is a seriously weird book. It's like Freshwater but with literature instead of religion. The thing with those two books, is that they were really intriguing at first, luring you in with their exotic and foreign settings. Then they start to spiral down a weird pa...

    I find novels about the interweaving of life and art fascinating, but Call Me Zebra felt somehow shallow, especially in the light of The Idiot by Elif Batuman, or A Line Made by Walking by Sara Baume, two profound meditations on the subject. On the plus side, I thought the refugee aspe...

    I'm afraid I simply did not get this book at all. I was intrigued by the idea of a woman connecting to her dead parents and her heritage through literature, but I was just left confused the entire time. The references went way over my head, and the MC was just way too eccentric for my ...

    Sometimes you read a novel and you're left with more questions than answers or satisfaction. I think that's what the author intended here. I still don't understand why Zebra chose that name for herself. What was wrong with her given name? Did she really have no other family? Why had th...

    The only character I liked in this book was the bird. ...

    you either get this or you don't. it's better if you do. zebra is unconsciously unironic. she is both an unquestionable victim of exile and tragedy and an illicit manufacturer of drama. she is miserably elitist, but masterfully hyperbolic and communicative of a bestial, guarded, unstab...

    On the list of 46 books by women of color to read in 2018. ...

    I was extremely excited when I began this book due to the strong fast pace of the language, but there was no let-up, no growth in the character. The writing, like the character, became tedious. There are flashes of brilliance such as "I picked up languages the way some people pick up v...

    I've seen this book cover many times - and it was because of the book's cover that I didn't really dig into what this book is about. Today, I finally read a description of it and have since added it to my TBR mountain! (there is this cover Call Me Zebra that appeals to me much more, bu...

    At the heart of "Call Me Zebra" is a heart-breaking story of a young Iranian girl, who flees her war-torn country with her parents, losing her mother en route. She settles in New York with her father, but when he also passes, she decides to head on a reverse pilgrimage, retracing the p...

    What a tedious book. I can?t believe I finished this, but I did, hoping I would eventually enjoy it. Nope, it was a rough read and honestly, there was no ending. ...

    Call Me Zebra by Azareen Van der Vliet Oloomi is a beautiful, heartbreaking story of exile, loss, love, and ultimately self. Zebra comes from a long line of scholars whose lives are literally literature. They are born and raised with literature, eat and sleep literature, and speak in l...

  • Vivek Tejuja
    Mar 06, 2018

    Zebra, the narrator, is a young Iranian refugee who decides to explore her roots after the death of her parents. She aspires to fully inherit her family?s ?treasured roles? of Autodidacts, Anarchists, and Atheists. She is a deeply infuriating, unsentimental, hopelessly pretentiou...

    Once in a while, there comes a book that infuses literature and life so brilliantly that you can?t help but reread it the minute you are done with it. That is what happened to me when I just finished reading, ?Call Me Zebra? by Azareen Van der Vliet Oloomi. I had to reread it. To...

  • Tommi
    Mar 05, 2018

    Zebra, the narrator, is a young Iranian refugee who decides to explore her roots after the death of her parents. She aspires to fully inherit her family?s ?treasured roles? of Autodidacts, Anarchists, and Atheists. She is a deeply infuriating, unsentimental, hopelessly pretentiou...

    Once in a while, there comes a book that infuses literature and life so brilliantly that you can?t help but reread it the minute you are done with it. That is what happened to me when I just finished reading, ?Call Me Zebra? by Azareen Van der Vliet Oloomi. I had to reread it. To...

    https://www.nytimes.com/2018/03/29/bo... ...

    3.5, rounded down. I find this one a tricky one to review. Van der Vliet Oloomi is a talented writer and I think she may very well be a genius - if not a genius, certainly incredibly whip smart and well read. Her main character and narrator, Bibi Abbas Abbas Hosseini (aka Zebra) shares...

    Why it got 2 ?: ? For moments like this. "What path leads to freedom? I asked. Any vein in your body, I answered..." ? For the sheer bliss that came over me when I got to read the protagonist expound on powerhouse literary greats. The first third of the book was less awk...

    Can't decide if this is amazing & intelligent literature (it definitely is, in parts) or if it's too precocious for its own good. Feeling fizzled out on reading this one because the irritation is overriding the intelligence of this one. ...

    Call Me Zebra by Azareen Van der Vliet Oloomi is a novel from this award winning author. This is the author?s second novel. Zebra is a 22 year old woman, born in Iran to a family who took refuge in literature from the violent present of their time. Zebra is the last of the family ...

    Pretentious writing style obscured what would otherwise have been a really touching story about a young woman coping with tragedy and growing up. Currently, I prefer to read authors who can communicate universal topics in simple, yet beautiful, ways. Van der Vilet Oloomi seemed more co...

    I don't imagine this novel is for everyone but I devoured it. I had never heard of it but it came to me in the mail from my subscription to The Nervous Breakdown Book Club as the March selection. The author was interviewed on the associated Other People podcast, so I knew her backgrou...

    3.5 stars. Review to come ...

    I was drawn to this book, I admit, because it was so highly anticipated among the most informed voices of literature. I have grown wary of expert opinions of any kind, to be honest, so I began the book, I suppose, with some skepticism that it would meet the ?most anticipated? statu...

    What did I just read? Why did I read it? What in me convinced me that I should persist and keep turning virtual pages and read on? I have no answers to any of those questions. I think I wasted my time reading this book and trying to figure it out.  It's a book about immigrant girl ...

    Let's face it, this is a seriously weird book. It's like Freshwater but with literature instead of religion. The thing with those two books, is that they were really intriguing at first, luring you in with their exotic and foreign settings. Then they start to spiral down a weird pa...

    I find novels about the interweaving of life and art fascinating, but Call Me Zebra felt somehow shallow, especially in the light of The Idiot by Elif Batuman, or A Line Made by Walking by Sara Baume, two profound meditations on the subject. On the plus side, I thought the refugee aspe...

  • Judy
    Mar 15, 2018

    Zebra, the narrator, is a young Iranian refugee who decides to explore her roots after the death of her parents. She aspires to fully inherit her family?s ?treasured roles? of Autodidacts, Anarchists, and Atheists. She is a deeply infuriating, unsentimental, hopelessly pretentiou...

    Once in a while, there comes a book that infuses literature and life so brilliantly that you can?t help but reread it the minute you are done with it. That is what happened to me when I just finished reading, ?Call Me Zebra? by Azareen Van der Vliet Oloomi. I had to reread it. To...

    https://www.nytimes.com/2018/03/29/bo... ...

    3.5, rounded down. I find this one a tricky one to review. Van der Vliet Oloomi is a talented writer and I think she may very well be a genius - if not a genius, certainly incredibly whip smart and well read. Her main character and narrator, Bibi Abbas Abbas Hosseini (aka Zebra) shares...

    Why it got 2 ?: ? For moments like this. "What path leads to freedom? I asked. Any vein in your body, I answered..." ? For the sheer bliss that came over me when I got to read the protagonist expound on powerhouse literary greats. The first third of the book was less awk...

    Can't decide if this is amazing & intelligent literature (it definitely is, in parts) or if it's too precocious for its own good. Feeling fizzled out on reading this one because the irritation is overriding the intelligence of this one. ...

    Call Me Zebra by Azareen Van der Vliet Oloomi is a novel from this award winning author. This is the author?s second novel. Zebra is a 22 year old woman, born in Iran to a family who took refuge in literature from the violent present of their time. Zebra is the last of the family ...

    Pretentious writing style obscured what would otherwise have been a really touching story about a young woman coping with tragedy and growing up. Currently, I prefer to read authors who can communicate universal topics in simple, yet beautiful, ways. Van der Vilet Oloomi seemed more co...

    I don't imagine this novel is for everyone but I devoured it. I had never heard of it but it came to me in the mail from my subscription to The Nervous Breakdown Book Club as the March selection. The author was interviewed on the associated Other People podcast, so I knew her backgrou...

  • Brita
    Apr 07, 2018

    Zebra, the narrator, is a young Iranian refugee who decides to explore her roots after the death of her parents. She aspires to fully inherit her family?s ?treasured roles? of Autodidacts, Anarchists, and Atheists. She is a deeply infuriating, unsentimental, hopelessly pretentiou...

    Once in a while, there comes a book that infuses literature and life so brilliantly that you can?t help but reread it the minute you are done with it. That is what happened to me when I just finished reading, ?Call Me Zebra? by Azareen Van der Vliet Oloomi. I had to reread it. To...

    https://www.nytimes.com/2018/03/29/bo... ...

    3.5, rounded down. I find this one a tricky one to review. Van der Vliet Oloomi is a talented writer and I think she may very well be a genius - if not a genius, certainly incredibly whip smart and well read. Her main character and narrator, Bibi Abbas Abbas Hosseini (aka Zebra) shares...

    Why it got 2 ?: ? For moments like this. "What path leads to freedom? I asked. Any vein in your body, I answered..." ? For the sheer bliss that came over me when I got to read the protagonist expound on powerhouse literary greats. The first third of the book was less awk...

    Can't decide if this is amazing & intelligent literature (it definitely is, in parts) or if it's too precocious for its own good. Feeling fizzled out on reading this one because the irritation is overriding the intelligence of this one. ...

    Call Me Zebra by Azareen Van der Vliet Oloomi is a novel from this award winning author. This is the author?s second novel. Zebra is a 22 year old woman, born in Iran to a family who took refuge in literature from the violent present of their time. Zebra is the last of the family ...

    Pretentious writing style obscured what would otherwise have been a really touching story about a young woman coping with tragedy and growing up. Currently, I prefer to read authors who can communicate universal topics in simple, yet beautiful, ways. Van der Vilet Oloomi seemed more co...

    I don't imagine this novel is for everyone but I devoured it. I had never heard of it but it came to me in the mail from my subscription to The Nervous Breakdown Book Club as the March selection. The author was interviewed on the associated Other People podcast, so I knew her backgrou...

    3.5 stars. Review to come ...

    I was drawn to this book, I admit, because it was so highly anticipated among the most informed voices of literature. I have grown wary of expert opinions of any kind, to be honest, so I began the book, I suppose, with some skepticism that it would meet the ?most anticipated? statu...

    What did I just read? Why did I read it? What in me convinced me that I should persist and keep turning virtual pages and read on? I have no answers to any of those questions. I think I wasted my time reading this book and trying to figure it out.  It's a book about immigrant girl ...

    Let's face it, this is a seriously weird book. It's like Freshwater but with literature instead of religion. The thing with those two books, is that they were really intriguing at first, luring you in with their exotic and foreign settings. Then they start to spiral down a weird pa...

    I find novels about the interweaving of life and art fascinating, but Call Me Zebra felt somehow shallow, especially in the light of The Idiot by Elif Batuman, or A Line Made by Walking by Sara Baume, two profound meditations on the subject. On the plus side, I thought the refugee aspe...

    I'm afraid I simply did not get this book at all. I was intrigued by the idea of a woman connecting to her dead parents and her heritage through literature, but I was just left confused the entire time. The references went way over my head, and the MC was just way too eccentric for my ...

    Sometimes you read a novel and you're left with more questions than answers or satisfaction. I think that's what the author intended here. I still don't understand why Zebra chose that name for herself. What was wrong with her given name? Did she really have no other family? Why had th...

    The only character I liked in this book was the bird. ...

  • Penny (Literary Hoarders)
    Feb 01, 2018

    Zebra, the narrator, is a young Iranian refugee who decides to explore her roots after the death of her parents. She aspires to fully inherit her family?s ?treasured roles? of Autodidacts, Anarchists, and Atheists. She is a deeply infuriating, unsentimental, hopelessly pretentiou...

    Once in a while, there comes a book that infuses literature and life so brilliantly that you can?t help but reread it the minute you are done with it. That is what happened to me when I just finished reading, ?Call Me Zebra? by Azareen Van der Vliet Oloomi. I had to reread it. To...

    https://www.nytimes.com/2018/03/29/bo... ...

    3.5, rounded down. I find this one a tricky one to review. Van der Vliet Oloomi is a talented writer and I think she may very well be a genius - if not a genius, certainly incredibly whip smart and well read. Her main character and narrator, Bibi Abbas Abbas Hosseini (aka Zebra) shares...

    Why it got 2 ?: ? For moments like this. "What path leads to freedom? I asked. Any vein in your body, I answered..." ? For the sheer bliss that came over me when I got to read the protagonist expound on powerhouse literary greats. The first third of the book was less awk...

    Can't decide if this is amazing & intelligent literature (it definitely is, in parts) or if it's too precocious for its own good. Feeling fizzled out on reading this one because the irritation is overriding the intelligence of this one. ...

    Call Me Zebra by Azareen Van der Vliet Oloomi is a novel from this award winning author. This is the author?s second novel. Zebra is a 22 year old woman, born in Iran to a family who took refuge in literature from the violent present of their time. Zebra is the last of the family ...

    Pretentious writing style obscured what would otherwise have been a really touching story about a young woman coping with tragedy and growing up. Currently, I prefer to read authors who can communicate universal topics in simple, yet beautiful, ways. Van der Vilet Oloomi seemed more co...

    I don't imagine this novel is for everyone but I devoured it. I had never heard of it but it came to me in the mail from my subscription to The Nervous Breakdown Book Club as the March selection. The author was interviewed on the associated Other People podcast, so I knew her backgrou...

    3.5 stars. Review to come ...

    I was drawn to this book, I admit, because it was so highly anticipated among the most informed voices of literature. I have grown wary of expert opinions of any kind, to be honest, so I began the book, I suppose, with some skepticism that it would meet the ?most anticipated? statu...

    What did I just read? Why did I read it? What in me convinced me that I should persist and keep turning virtual pages and read on? I have no answers to any of those questions. I think I wasted my time reading this book and trying to figure it out.  It's a book about immigrant girl ...

    Let's face it, this is a seriously weird book. It's like Freshwater but with literature instead of religion. The thing with those two books, is that they were really intriguing at first, luring you in with their exotic and foreign settings. Then they start to spiral down a weird pa...

    I find novels about the interweaving of life and art fascinating, but Call Me Zebra felt somehow shallow, especially in the light of The Idiot by Elif Batuman, or A Line Made by Walking by Sara Baume, two profound meditations on the subject. On the plus side, I thought the refugee aspe...

    I'm afraid I simply did not get this book at all. I was intrigued by the idea of a woman connecting to her dead parents and her heritage through literature, but I was just left confused the entire time. The references went way over my head, and the MC was just way too eccentric for my ...

    Sometimes you read a novel and you're left with more questions than answers or satisfaction. I think that's what the author intended here. I still don't understand why Zebra chose that name for herself. What was wrong with her given name? Did she really have no other family? Why had th...

    The only character I liked in this book was the bird. ...

    you either get this or you don't. it's better if you do. zebra is unconsciously unironic. she is both an unquestionable victim of exile and tragedy and an illicit manufacturer of drama. she is miserably elitist, but masterfully hyperbolic and communicative of a bestial, guarded, unstab...

    On the list of 46 books by women of color to read in 2018. ...

    I was extremely excited when I began this book due to the strong fast pace of the language, but there was no let-up, no growth in the character. The writing, like the character, became tedious. There are flashes of brilliance such as "I picked up languages the way some people pick up v...

    I've seen this book cover many times - and it was because of the book's cover that I didn't really dig into what this book is about. Today, I finally read a description of it and have since added it to my TBR mountain! (there is this cover Call Me Zebra that appeals to me much more, bu...

  • Zohar - ManOfLaBook.com
    Jan 15, 2018

    Zebra, the narrator, is a young Iranian refugee who decides to explore her roots after the death of her parents. She aspires to fully inherit her family?s ?treasured roles? of Autodidacts, Anarchists, and Atheists. She is a deeply infuriating, unsentimental, hopelessly pretentiou...

    Once in a while, there comes a book that infuses literature and life so brilliantly that you can?t help but reread it the minute you are done with it. That is what happened to me when I just finished reading, ?Call Me Zebra? by Azareen Van der Vliet Oloomi. I had to reread it. To...

    https://www.nytimes.com/2018/03/29/bo... ...

    3.5, rounded down. I find this one a tricky one to review. Van der Vliet Oloomi is a talented writer and I think she may very well be a genius - if not a genius, certainly incredibly whip smart and well read. Her main character and narrator, Bibi Abbas Abbas Hosseini (aka Zebra) shares...

    Why it got 2 ?: ? For moments like this. "What path leads to freedom? I asked. Any vein in your body, I answered..." ? For the sheer bliss that came over me when I got to read the protagonist expound on powerhouse literary greats. The first third of the book was less awk...

    Can't decide if this is amazing & intelligent literature (it definitely is, in parts) or if it's too precocious for its own good. Feeling fizzled out on reading this one because the irritation is overriding the intelligence of this one. ...

    Call Me Zebra by Azareen Van der Vliet Oloomi is a novel from this award winning author. This is the author?s second novel. Zebra is a 22 year old woman, born in Iran to a family who took refuge in literature from the violent present of their time. Zebra is the last of the family ...

  • Stacia
    Apr 02, 2018

    Zebra, the narrator, is a young Iranian refugee who decides to explore her roots after the death of her parents. She aspires to fully inherit her family?s ?treasured roles? of Autodidacts, Anarchists, and Atheists. She is a deeply infuriating, unsentimental, hopelessly pretentiou...

    Once in a while, there comes a book that infuses literature and life so brilliantly that you can?t help but reread it the minute you are done with it. That is what happened to me when I just finished reading, ?Call Me Zebra? by Azareen Van der Vliet Oloomi. I had to reread it. To...

    https://www.nytimes.com/2018/03/29/bo... ...

    3.5, rounded down. I find this one a tricky one to review. Van der Vliet Oloomi is a talented writer and I think she may very well be a genius - if not a genius, certainly incredibly whip smart and well read. Her main character and narrator, Bibi Abbas Abbas Hosseini (aka Zebra) shares...

    Why it got 2 ?: ? For moments like this. "What path leads to freedom? I asked. Any vein in your body, I answered..." ? For the sheer bliss that came over me when I got to read the protagonist expound on powerhouse literary greats. The first third of the book was less awk...

    Can't decide if this is amazing & intelligent literature (it definitely is, in parts) or if it's too precocious for its own good. Feeling fizzled out on reading this one because the irritation is overriding the intelligence of this one. ...

  • Kyrie
    Feb 26, 2018

    Zebra, the narrator, is a young Iranian refugee who decides to explore her roots after the death of her parents. She aspires to fully inherit her family?s ?treasured roles? of Autodidacts, Anarchists, and Atheists. She is a deeply infuriating, unsentimental, hopelessly pretentiou...

    Once in a while, there comes a book that infuses literature and life so brilliantly that you can?t help but reread it the minute you are done with it. That is what happened to me when I just finished reading, ?Call Me Zebra? by Azareen Van der Vliet Oloomi. I had to reread it. To...

    https://www.nytimes.com/2018/03/29/bo... ...

    3.5, rounded down. I find this one a tricky one to review. Van der Vliet Oloomi is a talented writer and I think she may very well be a genius - if not a genius, certainly incredibly whip smart and well read. Her main character and narrator, Bibi Abbas Abbas Hosseini (aka Zebra) shares...

    Why it got 2 ?: ? For moments like this. "What path leads to freedom? I asked. Any vein in your body, I answered..." ? For the sheer bliss that came over me when I got to read the protagonist expound on powerhouse literary greats. The first third of the book was less awk...

    Can't decide if this is amazing & intelligent literature (it definitely is, in parts) or if it's too precocious for its own good. Feeling fizzled out on reading this one because the irritation is overriding the intelligence of this one. ...

    Call Me Zebra by Azareen Van der Vliet Oloomi is a novel from this award winning author. This is the author?s second novel. Zebra is a 22 year old woman, born in Iran to a family who took refuge in literature from the violent present of their time. Zebra is the last of the family ...

    Pretentious writing style obscured what would otherwise have been a really touching story about a young woman coping with tragedy and growing up. Currently, I prefer to read authors who can communicate universal topics in simple, yet beautiful, ways. Van der Vilet Oloomi seemed more co...

    I don't imagine this novel is for everyone but I devoured it. I had never heard of it but it came to me in the mail from my subscription to The Nervous Breakdown Book Club as the March selection. The author was interviewed on the associated Other People podcast, so I knew her backgrou...

    3.5 stars. Review to come ...

    I was drawn to this book, I admit, because it was so highly anticipated among the most informed voices of literature. I have grown wary of expert opinions of any kind, to be honest, so I began the book, I suppose, with some skepticism that it would meet the ?most anticipated? statu...

    What did I just read? Why did I read it? What in me convinced me that I should persist and keep turning virtual pages and read on? I have no answers to any of those questions. I think I wasted my time reading this book and trying to figure it out.  It's a book about immigrant girl ...

    Let's face it, this is a seriously weird book. It's like Freshwater but with literature instead of religion. The thing with those two books, is that they were really intriguing at first, luring you in with their exotic and foreign settings. Then they start to spiral down a weird pa...

    I find novels about the interweaving of life and art fascinating, but Call Me Zebra felt somehow shallow, especially in the light of The Idiot by Elif Batuman, or A Line Made by Walking by Sara Baume, two profound meditations on the subject. On the plus side, I thought the refugee aspe...

    I'm afraid I simply did not get this book at all. I was intrigued by the idea of a woman connecting to her dead parents and her heritage through literature, but I was just left confused the entire time. The references went way over my head, and the MC was just way too eccentric for my ...

    Sometimes you read a novel and you're left with more questions than answers or satisfaction. I think that's what the author intended here. I still don't understand why Zebra chose that name for herself. What was wrong with her given name? Did she really have no other family? Why had th...

    The only character I liked in this book was the bird. ...

    you either get this or you don't. it's better if you do. zebra is unconsciously unironic. she is both an unquestionable victim of exile and tragedy and an illicit manufacturer of drama. she is miserably elitist, but masterfully hyperbolic and communicative of a bestial, guarded, unstab...

    On the list of 46 books by women of color to read in 2018. ...

    I was extremely excited when I began this book due to the strong fast pace of the language, but there was no let-up, no growth in the character. The writing, like the character, became tedious. There are flashes of brilliance such as "I picked up languages the way some people pick up v...

    I've seen this book cover many times - and it was because of the book's cover that I didn't really dig into what this book is about. Today, I finally read a description of it and have since added it to my TBR mountain! (there is this cover Call Me Zebra that appeals to me much more, bu...

    At the heart of "Call Me Zebra" is a heart-breaking story of a young Iranian girl, who flees her war-torn country with her parents, losing her mother en route. She settles in New York with her father, but when he also passes, she decides to head on a reverse pilgrimage, retracing the p...

    What a tedious book. I can?t believe I finished this, but I did, hoping I would eventually enjoy it. Nope, it was a rough read and honestly, there was no ending. ...

    Call Me Zebra by Azareen Van der Vliet Oloomi is a beautiful, heartbreaking story of exile, loss, love, and ultimately self. Zebra comes from a long line of scholars whose lives are literally literature. They are born and raised with literature, eat and sleep literature, and speak in l...

    I felt so badly for the main character. Her parents had to flee Iran on foot, her mother dying in route. With her father, she crosses through Europe, ending up in New York City. Her father, in an attempt to raise her in the family tradition of literature, I assume to protect her from w...

  • Stacey A.  Prose and Palate
    Mar 07, 2018

    Zebra, the narrator, is a young Iranian refugee who decides to explore her roots after the death of her parents. She aspires to fully inherit her family?s ?treasured roles? of Autodidacts, Anarchists, and Atheists. She is a deeply infuriating, unsentimental, hopelessly pretentiou...

    Once in a while, there comes a book that infuses literature and life so brilliantly that you can?t help but reread it the minute you are done with it. That is what happened to me when I just finished reading, ?Call Me Zebra? by Azareen Van der Vliet Oloomi. I had to reread it. To...

    https://www.nytimes.com/2018/03/29/bo... ...

    3.5, rounded down. I find this one a tricky one to review. Van der Vliet Oloomi is a talented writer and I think she may very well be a genius - if not a genius, certainly incredibly whip smart and well read. Her main character and narrator, Bibi Abbas Abbas Hosseini (aka Zebra) shares...

    Why it got 2 ?: ? For moments like this. "What path leads to freedom? I asked. Any vein in your body, I answered..." ? For the sheer bliss that came over me when I got to read the protagonist expound on powerhouse literary greats. The first third of the book was less awk...

    Can't decide if this is amazing & intelligent literature (it definitely is, in parts) or if it's too precocious for its own good. Feeling fizzled out on reading this one because the irritation is overriding the intelligence of this one. ...

    Call Me Zebra by Azareen Van der Vliet Oloomi is a novel from this award winning author. This is the author?s second novel. Zebra is a 22 year old woman, born in Iran to a family who took refuge in literature from the violent present of their time. Zebra is the last of the family ...

    Pretentious writing style obscured what would otherwise have been a really touching story about a young woman coping with tragedy and growing up. Currently, I prefer to read authors who can communicate universal topics in simple, yet beautiful, ways. Van der Vilet Oloomi seemed more co...

    I don't imagine this novel is for everyone but I devoured it. I had never heard of it but it came to me in the mail from my subscription to The Nervous Breakdown Book Club as the March selection. The author was interviewed on the associated Other People podcast, so I knew her backgrou...

    3.5 stars. Review to come ...

  • Alice  Heiserman
    Mar 20, 2018

    Zebra, the narrator, is a young Iranian refugee who decides to explore her roots after the death of her parents. She aspires to fully inherit her family?s ?treasured roles? of Autodidacts, Anarchists, and Atheists. She is a deeply infuriating, unsentimental, hopelessly pretentiou...

    Once in a while, there comes a book that infuses literature and life so brilliantly that you can?t help but reread it the minute you are done with it. That is what happened to me when I just finished reading, ?Call Me Zebra? by Azareen Van der Vliet Oloomi. I had to reread it. To...

    https://www.nytimes.com/2018/03/29/bo... ...

    3.5, rounded down. I find this one a tricky one to review. Van der Vliet Oloomi is a talented writer and I think she may very well be a genius - if not a genius, certainly incredibly whip smart and well read. Her main character and narrator, Bibi Abbas Abbas Hosseini (aka Zebra) shares...

    Why it got 2 ?: ? For moments like this. "What path leads to freedom? I asked. Any vein in your body, I answered..." ? For the sheer bliss that came over me when I got to read the protagonist expound on powerhouse literary greats. The first third of the book was less awk...

    Can't decide if this is amazing & intelligent literature (it definitely is, in parts) or if it's too precocious for its own good. Feeling fizzled out on reading this one because the irritation is overriding the intelligence of this one. ...

    Call Me Zebra by Azareen Van der Vliet Oloomi is a novel from this award winning author. This is the author?s second novel. Zebra is a 22 year old woman, born in Iran to a family who took refuge in literature from the violent present of their time. Zebra is the last of the family ...

    Pretentious writing style obscured what would otherwise have been a really touching story about a young woman coping with tragedy and growing up. Currently, I prefer to read authors who can communicate universal topics in simple, yet beautiful, ways. Van der Vilet Oloomi seemed more co...

    I don't imagine this novel is for everyone but I devoured it. I had never heard of it but it came to me in the mail from my subscription to The Nervous Breakdown Book Club as the March selection. The author was interviewed on the associated Other People podcast, so I knew her backgrou...

    3.5 stars. Review to come ...

    I was drawn to this book, I admit, because it was so highly anticipated among the most informed voices of literature. I have grown wary of expert opinions of any kind, to be honest, so I began the book, I suppose, with some skepticism that it would meet the ?most anticipated? statu...

    What did I just read? Why did I read it? What in me convinced me that I should persist and keep turning virtual pages and read on? I have no answers to any of those questions. I think I wasted my time reading this book and trying to figure it out.  It's a book about immigrant girl ...

    Let's face it, this is a seriously weird book. It's like Freshwater but with literature instead of religion. The thing with those two books, is that they were really intriguing at first, luring you in with their exotic and foreign settings. Then they start to spiral down a weird pa...

    I find novels about the interweaving of life and art fascinating, but Call Me Zebra felt somehow shallow, especially in the light of The Idiot by Elif Batuman, or A Line Made by Walking by Sara Baume, two profound meditations on the subject. On the plus side, I thought the refugee aspe...

    I'm afraid I simply did not get this book at all. I was intrigued by the idea of a woman connecting to her dead parents and her heritage through literature, but I was just left confused the entire time. The references went way over my head, and the MC was just way too eccentric for my ...

    Sometimes you read a novel and you're left with more questions than answers or satisfaction. I think that's what the author intended here. I still don't understand why Zebra chose that name for herself. What was wrong with her given name? Did she really have no other family? Why had th...

    The only character I liked in this book was the bird. ...

    you either get this or you don't. it's better if you do. zebra is unconsciously unironic. she is both an unquestionable victim of exile and tragedy and an illicit manufacturer of drama. she is miserably elitist, but masterfully hyperbolic and communicative of a bestial, guarded, unstab...

    On the list of 46 books by women of color to read in 2018. ...

    I was extremely excited when I began this book due to the strong fast pace of the language, but there was no let-up, no growth in the character. The writing, like the character, became tedious. There are flashes of brilliance such as "I picked up languages the way some people pick up v...

  • Helen Marquis
    Jan 18, 2018

    Zebra, the narrator, is a young Iranian refugee who decides to explore her roots after the death of her parents. She aspires to fully inherit her family?s ?treasured roles? of Autodidacts, Anarchists, and Atheists. She is a deeply infuriating, unsentimental, hopelessly pretentiou...

    Once in a while, there comes a book that infuses literature and life so brilliantly that you can?t help but reread it the minute you are done with it. That is what happened to me when I just finished reading, ?Call Me Zebra? by Azareen Van der Vliet Oloomi. I had to reread it. To...

    https://www.nytimes.com/2018/03/29/bo... ...

    3.5, rounded down. I find this one a tricky one to review. Van der Vliet Oloomi is a talented writer and I think she may very well be a genius - if not a genius, certainly incredibly whip smart and well read. Her main character and narrator, Bibi Abbas Abbas Hosseini (aka Zebra) shares...

    Why it got 2 ?: ? For moments like this. "What path leads to freedom? I asked. Any vein in your body, I answered..." ? For the sheer bliss that came over me when I got to read the protagonist expound on powerhouse literary greats. The first third of the book was less awk...

    Can't decide if this is amazing & intelligent literature (it definitely is, in parts) or if it's too precocious for its own good. Feeling fizzled out on reading this one because the irritation is overriding the intelligence of this one. ...

    Call Me Zebra by Azareen Van der Vliet Oloomi is a novel from this award winning author. This is the author?s second novel. Zebra is a 22 year old woman, born in Iran to a family who took refuge in literature from the violent present of their time. Zebra is the last of the family ...

    Pretentious writing style obscured what would otherwise have been a really touching story about a young woman coping with tragedy and growing up. Currently, I prefer to read authors who can communicate universal topics in simple, yet beautiful, ways. Van der Vilet Oloomi seemed more co...

    I don't imagine this novel is for everyone but I devoured it. I had never heard of it but it came to me in the mail from my subscription to The Nervous Breakdown Book Club as the March selection. The author was interviewed on the associated Other People podcast, so I knew her backgrou...

    3.5 stars. Review to come ...

    I was drawn to this book, I admit, because it was so highly anticipated among the most informed voices of literature. I have grown wary of expert opinions of any kind, to be honest, so I began the book, I suppose, with some skepticism that it would meet the ?most anticipated? statu...

    What did I just read? Why did I read it? What in me convinced me that I should persist and keep turning virtual pages and read on? I have no answers to any of those questions. I think I wasted my time reading this book and trying to figure it out.  It's a book about immigrant girl ...

    Let's face it, this is a seriously weird book. It's like Freshwater but with literature instead of religion. The thing with those two books, is that they were really intriguing at first, luring you in with their exotic and foreign settings. Then they start to spiral down a weird pa...

    I find novels about the interweaving of life and art fascinating, but Call Me Zebra felt somehow shallow, especially in the light of The Idiot by Elif Batuman, or A Line Made by Walking by Sara Baume, two profound meditations on the subject. On the plus side, I thought the refugee aspe...

    I'm afraid I simply did not get this book at all. I was intrigued by the idea of a woman connecting to her dead parents and her heritage through literature, but I was just left confused the entire time. The references went way over my head, and the MC was just way too eccentric for my ...

    Sometimes you read a novel and you're left with more questions than answers or satisfaction. I think that's what the author intended here. I still don't understand why Zebra chose that name for herself. What was wrong with her given name? Did she really have no other family? Why had th...

    The only character I liked in this book was the bird. ...

    you either get this or you don't. it's better if you do. zebra is unconsciously unironic. she is both an unquestionable victim of exile and tragedy and an illicit manufacturer of drama. she is miserably elitist, but masterfully hyperbolic and communicative of a bestial, guarded, unstab...

    On the list of 46 books by women of color to read in 2018. ...

    I was extremely excited when I began this book due to the strong fast pace of the language, but there was no let-up, no growth in the character. The writing, like the character, became tedious. There are flashes of brilliance such as "I picked up languages the way some people pick up v...

    I've seen this book cover many times - and it was because of the book's cover that I didn't really dig into what this book is about. Today, I finally read a description of it and have since added it to my TBR mountain! (there is this cover Call Me Zebra that appeals to me much more, bu...

    At the heart of "Call Me Zebra" is a heart-breaking story of a young Iranian girl, who flees her war-torn country with her parents, losing her mother en route. She settles in New York with her father, but when he also passes, she decides to head on a reverse pilgrimage, retracing the p...

  • Amy Layton
    Feb 18, 2018

    Zebra, the narrator, is a young Iranian refugee who decides to explore her roots after the death of her parents. She aspires to fully inherit her family?s ?treasured roles? of Autodidacts, Anarchists, and Atheists. She is a deeply infuriating, unsentimental, hopelessly pretentiou...

    Once in a while, there comes a book that infuses literature and life so brilliantly that you can?t help but reread it the minute you are done with it. That is what happened to me when I just finished reading, ?Call Me Zebra? by Azareen Van der Vliet Oloomi. I had to reread it. To...

    https://www.nytimes.com/2018/03/29/bo... ...

    3.5, rounded down. I find this one a tricky one to review. Van der Vliet Oloomi is a talented writer and I think she may very well be a genius - if not a genius, certainly incredibly whip smart and well read. Her main character and narrator, Bibi Abbas Abbas Hosseini (aka Zebra) shares...

    Why it got 2 ?: ? For moments like this. "What path leads to freedom? I asked. Any vein in your body, I answered..." ? For the sheer bliss that came over me when I got to read the protagonist expound on powerhouse literary greats. The first third of the book was less awk...

    Can't decide if this is amazing & intelligent literature (it definitely is, in parts) or if it's too precocious for its own good. Feeling fizzled out on reading this one because the irritation is overriding the intelligence of this one. ...

    Call Me Zebra by Azareen Van der Vliet Oloomi is a novel from this award winning author. This is the author?s second novel. Zebra is a 22 year old woman, born in Iran to a family who took refuge in literature from the violent present of their time. Zebra is the last of the family ...

    Pretentious writing style obscured what would otherwise have been a really touching story about a young woman coping with tragedy and growing up. Currently, I prefer to read authors who can communicate universal topics in simple, yet beautiful, ways. Van der Vilet Oloomi seemed more co...

    I don't imagine this novel is for everyone but I devoured it. I had never heard of it but it came to me in the mail from my subscription to The Nervous Breakdown Book Club as the March selection. The author was interviewed on the associated Other People podcast, so I knew her backgrou...

    3.5 stars. Review to come ...

    I was drawn to this book, I admit, because it was so highly anticipated among the most informed voices of literature. I have grown wary of expert opinions of any kind, to be honest, so I began the book, I suppose, with some skepticism that it would meet the ?most anticipated? statu...

    What did I just read? Why did I read it? What in me convinced me that I should persist and keep turning virtual pages and read on? I have no answers to any of those questions. I think I wasted my time reading this book and trying to figure it out.  It's a book about immigrant girl ...

    Let's face it, this is a seriously weird book. It's like Freshwater but with literature instead of religion. The thing with those two books, is that they were really intriguing at first, luring you in with their exotic and foreign settings. Then they start to spiral down a weird pa...

    I find novels about the interweaving of life and art fascinating, but Call Me Zebra felt somehow shallow, especially in the light of The Idiot by Elif Batuman, or A Line Made by Walking by Sara Baume, two profound meditations on the subject. On the plus side, I thought the refugee aspe...

    I'm afraid I simply did not get this book at all. I was intrigued by the idea of a woman connecting to her dead parents and her heritage through literature, but I was just left confused the entire time. The references went way over my head, and the MC was just way too eccentric for my ...

    Sometimes you read a novel and you're left with more questions than answers or satisfaction. I think that's what the author intended here. I still don't understand why Zebra chose that name for herself. What was wrong with her given name? Did she really have no other family? Why had th...

    The only character I liked in this book was the bird. ...

    you either get this or you don't. it's better if you do. zebra is unconsciously unironic. she is both an unquestionable victim of exile and tragedy and an illicit manufacturer of drama. she is miserably elitist, but masterfully hyperbolic and communicative of a bestial, guarded, unstab...

    On the list of 46 books by women of color to read in 2018. ...

    I was extremely excited when I began this book due to the strong fast pace of the language, but there was no let-up, no growth in the character. The writing, like the character, became tedious. There are flashes of brilliance such as "I picked up languages the way some people pick up v...

    I've seen this book cover many times - and it was because of the book's cover that I didn't really dig into what this book is about. Today, I finally read a description of it and have since added it to my TBR mountain! (there is this cover Call Me Zebra that appeals to me much more, bu...

    At the heart of "Call Me Zebra" is a heart-breaking story of a young Iranian girl, who flees her war-torn country with her parents, losing her mother en route. She settles in New York with her father, but when he also passes, she decides to head on a reverse pilgrimage, retracing the p...

    What a tedious book. I can?t believe I finished this, but I did, hoping I would eventually enjoy it. Nope, it was a rough read and honestly, there was no ending. ...

    Call Me Zebra by Azareen Van der Vliet Oloomi is a beautiful, heartbreaking story of exile, loss, love, and ultimately self. Zebra comes from a long line of scholars whose lives are literally literature. They are born and raised with literature, eat and sleep literature, and speak in l...

    I felt so badly for the main character. Her parents had to flee Iran on foot, her mother dying in route. With her father, she crosses through Europe, ending up in New York City. Her father, in an attempt to raise her in the family tradition of literature, I assume to protect her from w...

    This is the sort of book I wish I could have read in my English classes.  It's written with the sort of language you would expect from one of those "classics."  But it's by an author of color about an Iranian woman.  Like, imagine having had this sort of representation in bookstores...

  • Erin
    Mar 24, 2018

    Zebra, the narrator, is a young Iranian refugee who decides to explore her roots after the death of her parents. She aspires to fully inherit her family?s ?treasured roles? of Autodidacts, Anarchists, and Atheists. She is a deeply infuriating, unsentimental, hopelessly pretentiou...

    Once in a while, there comes a book that infuses literature and life so brilliantly that you can?t help but reread it the minute you are done with it. That is what happened to me when I just finished reading, ?Call Me Zebra? by Azareen Van der Vliet Oloomi. I had to reread it. To...

    https://www.nytimes.com/2018/03/29/bo... ...

    3.5, rounded down. I find this one a tricky one to review. Van der Vliet Oloomi is a talented writer and I think she may very well be a genius - if not a genius, certainly incredibly whip smart and well read. Her main character and narrator, Bibi Abbas Abbas Hosseini (aka Zebra) shares...

    Why it got 2 ?: ? For moments like this. "What path leads to freedom? I asked. Any vein in your body, I answered..." ? For the sheer bliss that came over me when I got to read the protagonist expound on powerhouse literary greats. The first third of the book was less awk...

    Can't decide if this is amazing & intelligent literature (it definitely is, in parts) or if it's too precocious for its own good. Feeling fizzled out on reading this one because the irritation is overriding the intelligence of this one. ...

    Call Me Zebra by Azareen Van der Vliet Oloomi is a novel from this award winning author. This is the author?s second novel. Zebra is a 22 year old woman, born in Iran to a family who took refuge in literature from the violent present of their time. Zebra is the last of the family ...

    Pretentious writing style obscured what would otherwise have been a really touching story about a young woman coping with tragedy and growing up. Currently, I prefer to read authors who can communicate universal topics in simple, yet beautiful, ways. Van der Vilet Oloomi seemed more co...

    I don't imagine this novel is for everyone but I devoured it. I had never heard of it but it came to me in the mail from my subscription to The Nervous Breakdown Book Club as the March selection. The author was interviewed on the associated Other People podcast, so I knew her backgrou...

    3.5 stars. Review to come ...

    I was drawn to this book, I admit, because it was so highly anticipated among the most informed voices of literature. I have grown wary of expert opinions of any kind, to be honest, so I began the book, I suppose, with some skepticism that it would meet the ?most anticipated? statu...

    What did I just read? Why did I read it? What in me convinced me that I should persist and keep turning virtual pages and read on? I have no answers to any of those questions. I think I wasted my time reading this book and trying to figure it out.  It's a book about immigrant girl ...

    Let's face it, this is a seriously weird book. It's like Freshwater but with literature instead of religion. The thing with those two books, is that they were really intriguing at first, luring you in with their exotic and foreign settings. Then they start to spiral down a weird pa...

    I find novels about the interweaving of life and art fascinating, but Call Me Zebra felt somehow shallow, especially in the light of The Idiot by Elif Batuman, or A Line Made by Walking by Sara Baume, two profound meditations on the subject. On the plus side, I thought the refugee aspe...

    I'm afraid I simply did not get this book at all. I was intrigued by the idea of a woman connecting to her dead parents and her heritage through literature, but I was just left confused the entire time. The references went way over my head, and the MC was just way too eccentric for my ...

  • Cynthia
    Feb 23, 2018

    Zebra, the narrator, is a young Iranian refugee who decides to explore her roots after the death of her parents. She aspires to fully inherit her family?s ?treasured roles? of Autodidacts, Anarchists, and Atheists. She is a deeply infuriating, unsentimental, hopelessly pretentiou...

    Once in a while, there comes a book that infuses literature and life so brilliantly that you can?t help but reread it the minute you are done with it. That is what happened to me when I just finished reading, ?Call Me Zebra? by Azareen Van der Vliet Oloomi. I had to reread it. To...

    https://www.nytimes.com/2018/03/29/bo... ...

    3.5, rounded down. I find this one a tricky one to review. Van der Vliet Oloomi is a talented writer and I think she may very well be a genius - if not a genius, certainly incredibly whip smart and well read. Her main character and narrator, Bibi Abbas Abbas Hosseini (aka Zebra) shares...

    Why it got 2 ?: ? For moments like this. "What path leads to freedom? I asked. Any vein in your body, I answered..." ? For the sheer bliss that came over me when I got to read the protagonist expound on powerhouse literary greats. The first third of the book was less awk...

    Can't decide if this is amazing & intelligent literature (it definitely is, in parts) or if it's too precocious for its own good. Feeling fizzled out on reading this one because the irritation is overriding the intelligence of this one. ...

    Call Me Zebra by Azareen Van der Vliet Oloomi is a novel from this award winning author. This is the author?s second novel. Zebra is a 22 year old woman, born in Iran to a family who took refuge in literature from the violent present of their time. Zebra is the last of the family ...

    Pretentious writing style obscured what would otherwise have been a really touching story about a young woman coping with tragedy and growing up. Currently, I prefer to read authors who can communicate universal topics in simple, yet beautiful, ways. Van der Vilet Oloomi seemed more co...

    I don't imagine this novel is for everyone but I devoured it. I had never heard of it but it came to me in the mail from my subscription to The Nervous Breakdown Book Club as the March selection. The author was interviewed on the associated Other People podcast, so I knew her backgrou...

    3.5 stars. Review to come ...

    I was drawn to this book, I admit, because it was so highly anticipated among the most informed voices of literature. I have grown wary of expert opinions of any kind, to be honest, so I began the book, I suppose, with some skepticism that it would meet the ?most anticipated? statu...

    What did I just read? Why did I read it? What in me convinced me that I should persist and keep turning virtual pages and read on? I have no answers to any of those questions. I think I wasted my time reading this book and trying to figure it out.  It's a book about immigrant girl ...

    Let's face it, this is a seriously weird book. It's like Freshwater but with literature instead of religion. The thing with those two books, is that they were really intriguing at first, luring you in with their exotic and foreign settings. Then they start to spiral down a weird pa...

    I find novels about the interweaving of life and art fascinating, but Call Me Zebra felt somehow shallow, especially in the light of The Idiot by Elif Batuman, or A Line Made by Walking by Sara Baume, two profound meditations on the subject. On the plus side, I thought the refugee aspe...

    I'm afraid I simply did not get this book at all. I was intrigued by the idea of a woman connecting to her dead parents and her heritage through literature, but I was just left confused the entire time. The references went way over my head, and the MC was just way too eccentric for my ...

    Sometimes you read a novel and you're left with more questions than answers or satisfaction. I think that's what the author intended here. I still don't understand why Zebra chose that name for herself. What was wrong with her given name? Did she really have no other family? Why had th...

  • Rochel
    Feb 28, 2018

    Zebra, the narrator, is a young Iranian refugee who decides to explore her roots after the death of her parents. She aspires to fully inherit her family?s ?treasured roles? of Autodidacts, Anarchists, and Atheists. She is a deeply infuriating, unsentimental, hopelessly pretentiou...

    Once in a while, there comes a book that infuses literature and life so brilliantly that you can?t help but reread it the minute you are done with it. That is what happened to me when I just finished reading, ?Call Me Zebra? by Azareen Van der Vliet Oloomi. I had to reread it. To...

    https://www.nytimes.com/2018/03/29/bo... ...

    3.5, rounded down. I find this one a tricky one to review. Van der Vliet Oloomi is a talented writer and I think she may very well be a genius - if not a genius, certainly incredibly whip smart and well read. Her main character and narrator, Bibi Abbas Abbas Hosseini (aka Zebra) shares...

    Why it got 2 ?: ? For moments like this. "What path leads to freedom? I asked. Any vein in your body, I answered..." ? For the sheer bliss that came over me when I got to read the protagonist expound on powerhouse literary greats. The first third of the book was less awk...

    Can't decide if this is amazing & intelligent literature (it definitely is, in parts) or if it's too precocious for its own good. Feeling fizzled out on reading this one because the irritation is overriding the intelligence of this one. ...

    Call Me Zebra by Azareen Van der Vliet Oloomi is a novel from this award winning author. This is the author?s second novel. Zebra is a 22 year old woman, born in Iran to a family who took refuge in literature from the violent present of their time. Zebra is the last of the family ...

    Pretentious writing style obscured what would otherwise have been a really touching story about a young woman coping with tragedy and growing up. Currently, I prefer to read authors who can communicate universal topics in simple, yet beautiful, ways. Van der Vilet Oloomi seemed more co...

    I don't imagine this novel is for everyone but I devoured it. I had never heard of it but it came to me in the mail from my subscription to The Nervous Breakdown Book Club as the March selection. The author was interviewed on the associated Other People podcast, so I knew her backgrou...

    3.5 stars. Review to come ...

    I was drawn to this book, I admit, because it was so highly anticipated among the most informed voices of literature. I have grown wary of expert opinions of any kind, to be honest, so I began the book, I suppose, with some skepticism that it would meet the ?most anticipated? statu...

    What did I just read? Why did I read it? What in me convinced me that I should persist and keep turning virtual pages and read on? I have no answers to any of those questions. I think I wasted my time reading this book and trying to figure it out.  It's a book about immigrant girl ...

    Let's face it, this is a seriously weird book. It's like Freshwater but with literature instead of religion. The thing with those two books, is that they were really intriguing at first, luring you in with their exotic and foreign settings. Then they start to spiral down a weird pa...

    I find novels about the interweaving of life and art fascinating, but Call Me Zebra felt somehow shallow, especially in the light of The Idiot by Elif Batuman, or A Line Made by Walking by Sara Baume, two profound meditations on the subject. On the plus side, I thought the refugee aspe...

    I'm afraid I simply did not get this book at all. I was intrigued by the idea of a woman connecting to her dead parents and her heritage through literature, but I was just left confused the entire time. The references went way over my head, and the MC was just way too eccentric for my ...

    Sometimes you read a novel and you're left with more questions than answers or satisfaction. I think that's what the author intended here. I still don't understand why Zebra chose that name for herself. What was wrong with her given name? Did she really have no other family? Why had th...

    The only character I liked in this book was the bird. ...

    you either get this or you don't. it's better if you do. zebra is unconsciously unironic. she is both an unquestionable victim of exile and tragedy and an illicit manufacturer of drama. she is miserably elitist, but masterfully hyperbolic and communicative of a bestial, guarded, unstab...

    On the list of 46 books by women of color to read in 2018. ...

    I was extremely excited when I began this book due to the strong fast pace of the language, but there was no let-up, no growth in the character. The writing, like the character, became tedious. There are flashes of brilliance such as "I picked up languages the way some people pick up v...

    I've seen this book cover many times - and it was because of the book's cover that I didn't really dig into what this book is about. Today, I finally read a description of it and have since added it to my TBR mountain! (there is this cover Call Me Zebra that appeals to me much more, bu...

    At the heart of "Call Me Zebra" is a heart-breaking story of a young Iranian girl, who flees her war-torn country with her parents, losing her mother en route. She settles in New York with her father, but when he also passes, she decides to head on a reverse pilgrimage, retracing the p...

    What a tedious book. I can?t believe I finished this, but I did, hoping I would eventually enjoy it. Nope, it was a rough read and honestly, there was no ending. ...

  • Ola
    Apr 04, 2018

    Zebra, the narrator, is a young Iranian refugee who decides to explore her roots after the death of her parents. She aspires to fully inherit her family?s ?treasured roles? of Autodidacts, Anarchists, and Atheists. She is a deeply infuriating, unsentimental, hopelessly pretentiou...

    Once in a while, there comes a book that infuses literature and life so brilliantly that you can?t help but reread it the minute you are done with it. That is what happened to me when I just finished reading, ?Call Me Zebra? by Azareen Van der Vliet Oloomi. I had to reread it. To...

    https://www.nytimes.com/2018/03/29/bo... ...

    3.5, rounded down. I find this one a tricky one to review. Van der Vliet Oloomi is a talented writer and I think she may very well be a genius - if not a genius, certainly incredibly whip smart and well read. Her main character and narrator, Bibi Abbas Abbas Hosseini (aka Zebra) shares...

    Why it got 2 ?: ? For moments like this. "What path leads to freedom? I asked. Any vein in your body, I answered..." ? For the sheer bliss that came over me when I got to read the protagonist expound on powerhouse literary greats. The first third of the book was less awk...

    Can't decide if this is amazing & intelligent literature (it definitely is, in parts) or if it's too precocious for its own good. Feeling fizzled out on reading this one because the irritation is overriding the intelligence of this one. ...

    Call Me Zebra by Azareen Van der Vliet Oloomi is a novel from this award winning author. This is the author?s second novel. Zebra is a 22 year old woman, born in Iran to a family who took refuge in literature from the violent present of their time. Zebra is the last of the family ...

    Pretentious writing style obscured what would otherwise have been a really touching story about a young woman coping with tragedy and growing up. Currently, I prefer to read authors who can communicate universal topics in simple, yet beautiful, ways. Van der Vilet Oloomi seemed more co...

    I don't imagine this novel is for everyone but I devoured it. I had never heard of it but it came to me in the mail from my subscription to The Nervous Breakdown Book Club as the March selection. The author was interviewed on the associated Other People podcast, so I knew her backgrou...

    3.5 stars. Review to come ...

    I was drawn to this book, I admit, because it was so highly anticipated among the most informed voices of literature. I have grown wary of expert opinions of any kind, to be honest, so I began the book, I suppose, with some skepticism that it would meet the ?most anticipated? statu...

    What did I just read? Why did I read it? What in me convinced me that I should persist and keep turning virtual pages and read on? I have no answers to any of those questions. I think I wasted my time reading this book and trying to figure it out.  It's a book about immigrant girl ...

  • Ivana
    Apr 01, 2018

    Zebra, the narrator, is a young Iranian refugee who decides to explore her roots after the death of her parents. She aspires to fully inherit her family?s ?treasured roles? of Autodidacts, Anarchists, and Atheists. She is a deeply infuriating, unsentimental, hopelessly pretentiou...

    Once in a while, there comes a book that infuses literature and life so brilliantly that you can?t help but reread it the minute you are done with it. That is what happened to me when I just finished reading, ?Call Me Zebra? by Azareen Van der Vliet Oloomi. I had to reread it. To...

    https://www.nytimes.com/2018/03/29/bo... ...

    3.5, rounded down. I find this one a tricky one to review. Van der Vliet Oloomi is a talented writer and I think she may very well be a genius - if not a genius, certainly incredibly whip smart and well read. Her main character and narrator, Bibi Abbas Abbas Hosseini (aka Zebra) shares...

    Why it got 2 ?: ? For moments like this. "What path leads to freedom? I asked. Any vein in your body, I answered..." ? For the sheer bliss that came over me when I got to read the protagonist expound on powerhouse literary greats. The first third of the book was less awk...

  • Susie Wang
    Mar 05, 2018

    Zebra, the narrator, is a young Iranian refugee who decides to explore her roots after the death of her parents. She aspires to fully inherit her family?s ?treasured roles? of Autodidacts, Anarchists, and Atheists. She is a deeply infuriating, unsentimental, hopelessly pretentiou...

    Once in a while, there comes a book that infuses literature and life so brilliantly that you can?t help but reread it the minute you are done with it. That is what happened to me when I just finished reading, ?Call Me Zebra? by Azareen Van der Vliet Oloomi. I had to reread it. To...

    https://www.nytimes.com/2018/03/29/bo... ...

    3.5, rounded down. I find this one a tricky one to review. Van der Vliet Oloomi is a talented writer and I think she may very well be a genius - if not a genius, certainly incredibly whip smart and well read. Her main character and narrator, Bibi Abbas Abbas Hosseini (aka Zebra) shares...

    Why it got 2 ?: ? For moments like this. "What path leads to freedom? I asked. Any vein in your body, I answered..." ? For the sheer bliss that came over me when I got to read the protagonist expound on powerhouse literary greats. The first third of the book was less awk...

    Can't decide if this is amazing & intelligent literature (it definitely is, in parts) or if it's too precocious for its own good. Feeling fizzled out on reading this one because the irritation is overriding the intelligence of this one. ...

    Call Me Zebra by Azareen Van der Vliet Oloomi is a novel from this award winning author. This is the author?s second novel. Zebra is a 22 year old woman, born in Iran to a family who took refuge in literature from the violent present of their time. Zebra is the last of the family ...

    Pretentious writing style obscured what would otherwise have been a really touching story about a young woman coping with tragedy and growing up. Currently, I prefer to read authors who can communicate universal topics in simple, yet beautiful, ways. Van der Vilet Oloomi seemed more co...

    I don't imagine this novel is for everyone but I devoured it. I had never heard of it but it came to me in the mail from my subscription to The Nervous Breakdown Book Club as the March selection. The author was interviewed on the associated Other People podcast, so I knew her backgrou...

    3.5 stars. Review to come ...

    I was drawn to this book, I admit, because it was so highly anticipated among the most informed voices of literature. I have grown wary of expert opinions of any kind, to be honest, so I began the book, I suppose, with some skepticism that it would meet the ?most anticipated? statu...

    What did I just read? Why did I read it? What in me convinced me that I should persist and keep turning virtual pages and read on? I have no answers to any of those questions. I think I wasted my time reading this book and trying to figure it out.  It's a book about immigrant girl ...

    Let's face it, this is a seriously weird book. It's like Freshwater but with literature instead of religion. The thing with those two books, is that they were really intriguing at first, luring you in with their exotic and foreign settings. Then they start to spiral down a weird pa...

  • Gary Moreau
    Feb 27, 2018

    Zebra, the narrator, is a young Iranian refugee who decides to explore her roots after the death of her parents. She aspires to fully inherit her family?s ?treasured roles? of Autodidacts, Anarchists, and Atheists. She is a deeply infuriating, unsentimental, hopelessly pretentiou...

    Once in a while, there comes a book that infuses literature and life so brilliantly that you can?t help but reread it the minute you are done with it. That is what happened to me when I just finished reading, ?Call Me Zebra? by Azareen Van der Vliet Oloomi. I had to reread it. To...

    https://www.nytimes.com/2018/03/29/bo... ...

    3.5, rounded down. I find this one a tricky one to review. Van der Vliet Oloomi is a talented writer and I think she may very well be a genius - if not a genius, certainly incredibly whip smart and well read. Her main character and narrator, Bibi Abbas Abbas Hosseini (aka Zebra) shares...

    Why it got 2 ?: ? For moments like this. "What path leads to freedom? I asked. Any vein in your body, I answered..." ? For the sheer bliss that came over me when I got to read the protagonist expound on powerhouse literary greats. The first third of the book was less awk...

    Can't decide if this is amazing & intelligent literature (it definitely is, in parts) or if it's too precocious for its own good. Feeling fizzled out on reading this one because the irritation is overriding the intelligence of this one. ...

    Call Me Zebra by Azareen Van der Vliet Oloomi is a novel from this award winning author. This is the author?s second novel. Zebra is a 22 year old woman, born in Iran to a family who took refuge in literature from the violent present of their time. Zebra is the last of the family ...

    Pretentious writing style obscured what would otherwise have been a really touching story about a young woman coping with tragedy and growing up. Currently, I prefer to read authors who can communicate universal topics in simple, yet beautiful, ways. Van der Vilet Oloomi seemed more co...

    I don't imagine this novel is for everyone but I devoured it. I had never heard of it but it came to me in the mail from my subscription to The Nervous Breakdown Book Club as the March selection. The author was interviewed on the associated Other People podcast, so I knew her backgrou...

    3.5 stars. Review to come ...

    I was drawn to this book, I admit, because it was so highly anticipated among the most informed voices of literature. I have grown wary of expert opinions of any kind, to be honest, so I began the book, I suppose, with some skepticism that it would meet the ?most anticipated? statu...

  • jenni
    Apr 02, 2018

    Zebra, the narrator, is a young Iranian refugee who decides to explore her roots after the death of her parents. She aspires to fully inherit her family?s ?treasured roles? of Autodidacts, Anarchists, and Atheists. She is a deeply infuriating, unsentimental, hopelessly pretentiou...

    Once in a while, there comes a book that infuses literature and life so brilliantly that you can?t help but reread it the minute you are done with it. That is what happened to me when I just finished reading, ?Call Me Zebra? by Azareen Van der Vliet Oloomi. I had to reread it. To...

    https://www.nytimes.com/2018/03/29/bo... ...

    3.5, rounded down. I find this one a tricky one to review. Van der Vliet Oloomi is a talented writer and I think she may very well be a genius - if not a genius, certainly incredibly whip smart and well read. Her main character and narrator, Bibi Abbas Abbas Hosseini (aka Zebra) shares...

    Why it got 2 ?: ? For moments like this. "What path leads to freedom? I asked. Any vein in your body, I answered..." ? For the sheer bliss that came over me when I got to read the protagonist expound on powerhouse literary greats. The first third of the book was less awk...

    Can't decide if this is amazing & intelligent literature (it definitely is, in parts) or if it's too precocious for its own good. Feeling fizzled out on reading this one because the irritation is overriding the intelligence of this one. ...

    Call Me Zebra by Azareen Van der Vliet Oloomi is a novel from this award winning author. This is the author?s second novel. Zebra is a 22 year old woman, born in Iran to a family who took refuge in literature from the violent present of their time. Zebra is the last of the family ...

    Pretentious writing style obscured what would otherwise have been a really touching story about a young woman coping with tragedy and growing up. Currently, I prefer to read authors who can communicate universal topics in simple, yet beautiful, ways. Van der Vilet Oloomi seemed more co...

    I don't imagine this novel is for everyone but I devoured it. I had never heard of it but it came to me in the mail from my subscription to The Nervous Breakdown Book Club as the March selection. The author was interviewed on the associated Other People podcast, so I knew her backgrou...

    3.5 stars. Review to come ...

    I was drawn to this book, I admit, because it was so highly anticipated among the most informed voices of literature. I have grown wary of expert opinions of any kind, to be honest, so I began the book, I suppose, with some skepticism that it would meet the ?most anticipated? statu...

    What did I just read? Why did I read it? What in me convinced me that I should persist and keep turning virtual pages and read on? I have no answers to any of those questions. I think I wasted my time reading this book and trying to figure it out.  It's a book about immigrant girl ...

    Let's face it, this is a seriously weird book. It's like Freshwater but with literature instead of religion. The thing with those two books, is that they were really intriguing at first, luring you in with their exotic and foreign settings. Then they start to spiral down a weird pa...

    I find novels about the interweaving of life and art fascinating, but Call Me Zebra felt somehow shallow, especially in the light of The Idiot by Elif Batuman, or A Line Made by Walking by Sara Baume, two profound meditations on the subject. On the plus side, I thought the refugee aspe...

    I'm afraid I simply did not get this book at all. I was intrigued by the idea of a woman connecting to her dead parents and her heritage through literature, but I was just left confused the entire time. The references went way over my head, and the MC was just way too eccentric for my ...

    Sometimes you read a novel and you're left with more questions than answers or satisfaction. I think that's what the author intended here. I still don't understand why Zebra chose that name for herself. What was wrong with her given name? Did she really have no other family? Why had th...

    The only character I liked in this book was the bird. ...

    you either get this or you don't. it's better if you do. zebra is unconsciously unironic. she is both an unquestionable victim of exile and tragedy and an illicit manufacturer of drama. she is miserably elitist, but masterfully hyperbolic and communicative of a bestial, guarded, unstab...

  • Emily
    Mar 04, 2018

    Zebra, the narrator, is a young Iranian refugee who decides to explore her roots after the death of her parents. She aspires to fully inherit her family?s ?treasured roles? of Autodidacts, Anarchists, and Atheists. She is a deeply infuriating, unsentimental, hopelessly pretentiou...

    Once in a while, there comes a book that infuses literature and life so brilliantly that you can?t help but reread it the minute you are done with it. That is what happened to me when I just finished reading, ?Call Me Zebra? by Azareen Van der Vliet Oloomi. I had to reread it. To...

    https://www.nytimes.com/2018/03/29/bo... ...

    3.5, rounded down. I find this one a tricky one to review. Van der Vliet Oloomi is a talented writer and I think she may very well be a genius - if not a genius, certainly incredibly whip smart and well read. Her main character and narrator, Bibi Abbas Abbas Hosseini (aka Zebra) shares...

    Why it got 2 ?: ? For moments like this. "What path leads to freedom? I asked. Any vein in your body, I answered..." ? For the sheer bliss that came over me when I got to read the protagonist expound on powerhouse literary greats. The first third of the book was less awk...

    Can't decide if this is amazing & intelligent literature (it definitely is, in parts) or if it's too precocious for its own good. Feeling fizzled out on reading this one because the irritation is overriding the intelligence of this one. ...

    Call Me Zebra by Azareen Van der Vliet Oloomi is a novel from this award winning author. This is the author?s second novel. Zebra is a 22 year old woman, born in Iran to a family who took refuge in literature from the violent present of their time. Zebra is the last of the family ...

    Pretentious writing style obscured what would otherwise have been a really touching story about a young woman coping with tragedy and growing up. Currently, I prefer to read authors who can communicate universal topics in simple, yet beautiful, ways. Van der Vilet Oloomi seemed more co...

  • Will
    Mar 06, 2018

    Zebra, the narrator, is a young Iranian refugee who decides to explore her roots after the death of her parents. She aspires to fully inherit her family?s ?treasured roles? of Autodidacts, Anarchists, and Atheists. She is a deeply infuriating, unsentimental, hopelessly pretentiou...

    Once in a while, there comes a book that infuses literature and life so brilliantly that you can?t help but reread it the minute you are done with it. That is what happened to me when I just finished reading, ?Call Me Zebra? by Azareen Van der Vliet Oloomi. I had to reread it. To...

    https://www.nytimes.com/2018/03/29/bo... ...

    3.5, rounded down. I find this one a tricky one to review. Van der Vliet Oloomi is a talented writer and I think she may very well be a genius - if not a genius, certainly incredibly whip smart and well read. Her main character and narrator, Bibi Abbas Abbas Hosseini (aka Zebra) shares...

  • Alexander C.
    Feb 15, 2018

    Zebra, the narrator, is a young Iranian refugee who decides to explore her roots after the death of her parents. She aspires to fully inherit her family?s ?treasured roles? of Autodidacts, Anarchists, and Atheists. She is a deeply infuriating, unsentimental, hopelessly pretentiou...

    Once in a while, there comes a book that infuses literature and life so brilliantly that you can?t help but reread it the minute you are done with it. That is what happened to me when I just finished reading, ?Call Me Zebra? by Azareen Van der Vliet Oloomi. I had to reread it. To...

    https://www.nytimes.com/2018/03/29/bo... ...

    3.5, rounded down. I find this one a tricky one to review. Van der Vliet Oloomi is a talented writer and I think she may very well be a genius - if not a genius, certainly incredibly whip smart and well read. Her main character and narrator, Bibi Abbas Abbas Hosseini (aka Zebra) shares...

    Why it got 2 ?: ? For moments like this. "What path leads to freedom? I asked. Any vein in your body, I answered..." ? For the sheer bliss that came over me when I got to read the protagonist expound on powerhouse literary greats. The first third of the book was less awk...

    Can't decide if this is amazing & intelligent literature (it definitely is, in parts) or if it's too precocious for its own good. Feeling fizzled out on reading this one because the irritation is overriding the intelligence of this one. ...

    Call Me Zebra by Azareen Van der Vliet Oloomi is a novel from this award winning author. This is the author?s second novel. Zebra is a 22 year old woman, born in Iran to a family who took refuge in literature from the violent present of their time. Zebra is the last of the family ...

    Pretentious writing style obscured what would otherwise have been a really touching story about a young woman coping with tragedy and growing up. Currently, I prefer to read authors who can communicate universal topics in simple, yet beautiful, ways. Van der Vilet Oloomi seemed more co...

    I don't imagine this novel is for everyone but I devoured it. I had never heard of it but it came to me in the mail from my subscription to The Nervous Breakdown Book Club as the March selection. The author was interviewed on the associated Other People podcast, so I knew her backgrou...

    3.5 stars. Review to come ...

    I was drawn to this book, I admit, because it was so highly anticipated among the most informed voices of literature. I have grown wary of expert opinions of any kind, to be honest, so I began the book, I suppose, with some skepticism that it would meet the ?most anticipated? statu...

    What did I just read? Why did I read it? What in me convinced me that I should persist and keep turning virtual pages and read on? I have no answers to any of those questions. I think I wasted my time reading this book and trying to figure it out.  It's a book about immigrant girl ...

    Let's face it, this is a seriously weird book. It's like Freshwater but with literature instead of religion. The thing with those two books, is that they were really intriguing at first, luring you in with their exotic and foreign settings. Then they start to spiral down a weird pa...

    I find novels about the interweaving of life and art fascinating, but Call Me Zebra felt somehow shallow, especially in the light of The Idiot by Elif Batuman, or A Line Made by Walking by Sara Baume, two profound meditations on the subject. On the plus side, I thought the refugee aspe...

    I'm afraid I simply did not get this book at all. I was intrigued by the idea of a woman connecting to her dead parents and her heritage through literature, but I was just left confused the entire time. The references went way over my head, and the MC was just way too eccentric for my ...

    Sometimes you read a novel and you're left with more questions than answers or satisfaction. I think that's what the author intended here. I still don't understand why Zebra chose that name for herself. What was wrong with her given name? Did she really have no other family? Why had th...

    The only character I liked in this book was the bird. ...

    you either get this or you don't. it's better if you do. zebra is unconsciously unironic. she is both an unquestionable victim of exile and tragedy and an illicit manufacturer of drama. she is miserably elitist, but masterfully hyperbolic and communicative of a bestial, guarded, unstab...

    On the list of 46 books by women of color to read in 2018. ...

    I was extremely excited when I began this book due to the strong fast pace of the language, but there was no let-up, no growth in the character. The writing, like the character, became tedious. There are flashes of brilliance such as "I picked up languages the way some people pick up v...

    I've seen this book cover many times - and it was because of the book's cover that I didn't really dig into what this book is about. Today, I finally read a description of it and have since added it to my TBR mountain! (there is this cover Call Me Zebra that appeals to me much more, bu...

    At the heart of "Call Me Zebra" is a heart-breaking story of a young Iranian girl, who flees her war-torn country with her parents, losing her mother en route. She settles in New York with her father, but when he also passes, she decides to head on a reverse pilgrimage, retracing the p...

    What a tedious book. I can?t believe I finished this, but I did, hoping I would eventually enjoy it. Nope, it was a rough read and honestly, there was no ending. ...

    Call Me Zebra by Azareen Van der Vliet Oloomi is a beautiful, heartbreaking story of exile, loss, love, and ultimately self. Zebra comes from a long line of scholars whose lives are literally literature. They are born and raised with literature, eat and sleep literature, and speak in l...

    I felt so badly for the main character. Her parents had to flee Iran on foot, her mother dying in route. With her father, she crosses through Europe, ending up in New York City. Her father, in an attempt to raise her in the family tradition of literature, I assume to protect her from w...

    This is the sort of book I wish I could have read in my English classes.  It's written with the sort of language you would expect from one of those "classics."  But it's by an author of color about an Iranian woman.  Like, imagine having had this sort of representation in bookstores...

    A young child is born into an inhospitable world. Her Middle East country is war torn, her mother perishes. Death is on every road. She and her father manage to get to Europe where he later dies leaving a young woman grappling with grief for years after. As she buries her father, sh...

    Some titles in the literary genre can be challenging to read. Azareen Van der Vliet Oloomi?s Call Me Zebra is one of those titles. But when does the adjective ?challenging? become a weakness rather than a strength? It will depend on the reader. From the opening line of this novel...

    Where do I even start? If the author would have left out the ridiculous, boring, and unrealistic sex scenes I would have given this book a slightly better rating. I feel like this book was a grad school assignment. I appreciate the references to literature and the parts about Barcelona...

    (Audiobook edition) I think the rating system is limiting here. This is a book that does not want you to love the main character, or at least not love her easily. She is pretentious, elitist, and rude. She uses literature and obscure quotes to excuse all of the things she does. At time...

  • Jo
    Feb 02, 2018

    Zebra, the narrator, is a young Iranian refugee who decides to explore her roots after the death of her parents. She aspires to fully inherit her family?s ?treasured roles? of Autodidacts, Anarchists, and Atheists. She is a deeply infuriating, unsentimental, hopelessly pretentiou...

    Once in a while, there comes a book that infuses literature and life so brilliantly that you can?t help but reread it the minute you are done with it. That is what happened to me when I just finished reading, ?Call Me Zebra? by Azareen Van der Vliet Oloomi. I had to reread it. To...

    https://www.nytimes.com/2018/03/29/bo... ...

    3.5, rounded down. I find this one a tricky one to review. Van der Vliet Oloomi is a talented writer and I think she may very well be a genius - if not a genius, certainly incredibly whip smart and well read. Her main character and narrator, Bibi Abbas Abbas Hosseini (aka Zebra) shares...

    Why it got 2 ?: ? For moments like this. "What path leads to freedom? I asked. Any vein in your body, I answered..." ? For the sheer bliss that came over me when I got to read the protagonist expound on powerhouse literary greats. The first third of the book was less awk...

    Can't decide if this is amazing & intelligent literature (it definitely is, in parts) or if it's too precocious for its own good. Feeling fizzled out on reading this one because the irritation is overriding the intelligence of this one. ...

    Call Me Zebra by Azareen Van der Vliet Oloomi is a novel from this award winning author. This is the author?s second novel. Zebra is a 22 year old woman, born in Iran to a family who took refuge in literature from the violent present of their time. Zebra is the last of the family ...

    Pretentious writing style obscured what would otherwise have been a really touching story about a young woman coping with tragedy and growing up. Currently, I prefer to read authors who can communicate universal topics in simple, yet beautiful, ways. Van der Vilet Oloomi seemed more co...

    I don't imagine this novel is for everyone but I devoured it. I had never heard of it but it came to me in the mail from my subscription to The Nervous Breakdown Book Club as the March selection. The author was interviewed on the associated Other People podcast, so I knew her backgrou...

    3.5 stars. Review to come ...

    I was drawn to this book, I admit, because it was so highly anticipated among the most informed voices of literature. I have grown wary of expert opinions of any kind, to be honest, so I began the book, I suppose, with some skepticism that it would meet the ?most anticipated? statu...

    What did I just read? Why did I read it? What in me convinced me that I should persist and keep turning virtual pages and read on? I have no answers to any of those questions. I think I wasted my time reading this book and trying to figure it out.  It's a book about immigrant girl ...

    Let's face it, this is a seriously weird book. It's like Freshwater but with literature instead of religion. The thing with those two books, is that they were really intriguing at first, luring you in with their exotic and foreign settings. Then they start to spiral down a weird pa...

    I find novels about the interweaving of life and art fascinating, but Call Me Zebra felt somehow shallow, especially in the light of The Idiot by Elif Batuman, or A Line Made by Walking by Sara Baume, two profound meditations on the subject. On the plus side, I thought the refugee aspe...

    I'm afraid I simply did not get this book at all. I was intrigued by the idea of a woman connecting to her dead parents and her heritage through literature, but I was just left confused the entire time. The references went way over my head, and the MC was just way too eccentric for my ...

    Sometimes you read a novel and you're left with more questions than answers or satisfaction. I think that's what the author intended here. I still don't understand why Zebra chose that name for herself. What was wrong with her given name? Did she really have no other family? Why had th...

    The only character I liked in this book was the bird. ...

    you either get this or you don't. it's better if you do. zebra is unconsciously unironic. she is both an unquestionable victim of exile and tragedy and an illicit manufacturer of drama. she is miserably elitist, but masterfully hyperbolic and communicative of a bestial, guarded, unstab...

    On the list of 46 books by women of color to read in 2018. ...

    I was extremely excited when I began this book due to the strong fast pace of the language, but there was no let-up, no growth in the character. The writing, like the character, became tedious. There are flashes of brilliance such as "I picked up languages the way some people pick up v...

    I've seen this book cover many times - and it was because of the book's cover that I didn't really dig into what this book is about. Today, I finally read a description of it and have since added it to my TBR mountain! (there is this cover Call Me Zebra that appeals to me much more, bu...

    At the heart of "Call Me Zebra" is a heart-breaking story of a young Iranian girl, who flees her war-torn country with her parents, losing her mother en route. She settles in New York with her father, but when he also passes, she decides to head on a reverse pilgrimage, retracing the p...

    What a tedious book. I can?t believe I finished this, but I did, hoping I would eventually enjoy it. Nope, it was a rough read and honestly, there was no ending. ...

    Call Me Zebra by Azareen Van der Vliet Oloomi is a beautiful, heartbreaking story of exile, loss, love, and ultimately self. Zebra comes from a long line of scholars whose lives are literally literature. They are born and raised with literature, eat and sleep literature, and speak in l...

    I felt so badly for the main character. Her parents had to flee Iran on foot, her mother dying in route. With her father, she crosses through Europe, ending up in New York City. Her father, in an attempt to raise her in the family tradition of literature, I assume to protect her from w...

    This is the sort of book I wish I could have read in my English classes.  It's written with the sort of language you would expect from one of those "classics."  But it's by an author of color about an Iranian woman.  Like, imagine having had this sort of representation in bookstores...

    A young child is born into an inhospitable world. Her Middle East country is war torn, her mother perishes. Death is on every road. She and her father manage to get to Europe where he later dies leaving a young woman grappling with grief for years after. As she buries her father, sh...

    Some titles in the literary genre can be challenging to read. Azareen Van der Vliet Oloomi?s Call Me Zebra is one of those titles. But when does the adjective ?challenging? become a weakness rather than a strength? It will depend on the reader. From the opening line of this novel...

  • Bari Dzomba
    Apr 14, 2018

    Zebra, the narrator, is a young Iranian refugee who decides to explore her roots after the death of her parents. She aspires to fully inherit her family?s ?treasured roles? of Autodidacts, Anarchists, and Atheists. She is a deeply infuriating, unsentimental, hopelessly pretentiou...

    Once in a while, there comes a book that infuses literature and life so brilliantly that you can?t help but reread it the minute you are done with it. That is what happened to me when I just finished reading, ?Call Me Zebra? by Azareen Van der Vliet Oloomi. I had to reread it. To...

    https://www.nytimes.com/2018/03/29/bo... ...

    3.5, rounded down. I find this one a tricky one to review. Van der Vliet Oloomi is a talented writer and I think she may very well be a genius - if not a genius, certainly incredibly whip smart and well read. Her main character and narrator, Bibi Abbas Abbas Hosseini (aka Zebra) shares...

    Why it got 2 ?: ? For moments like this. "What path leads to freedom? I asked. Any vein in your body, I answered..." ? For the sheer bliss that came over me when I got to read the protagonist expound on powerhouse literary greats. The first third of the book was less awk...

    Can't decide if this is amazing & intelligent literature (it definitely is, in parts) or if it's too precocious for its own good. Feeling fizzled out on reading this one because the irritation is overriding the intelligence of this one. ...

    Call Me Zebra by Azareen Van der Vliet Oloomi is a novel from this award winning author. This is the author?s second novel. Zebra is a 22 year old woman, born in Iran to a family who took refuge in literature from the violent present of their time. Zebra is the last of the family ...

    Pretentious writing style obscured what would otherwise have been a really touching story about a young woman coping with tragedy and growing up. Currently, I prefer to read authors who can communicate universal topics in simple, yet beautiful, ways. Van der Vilet Oloomi seemed more co...

    I don't imagine this novel is for everyone but I devoured it. I had never heard of it but it came to me in the mail from my subscription to The Nervous Breakdown Book Club as the March selection. The author was interviewed on the associated Other People podcast, so I knew her backgrou...

    3.5 stars. Review to come ...

    I was drawn to this book, I admit, because it was so highly anticipated among the most informed voices of literature. I have grown wary of expert opinions of any kind, to be honest, so I began the book, I suppose, with some skepticism that it would meet the ?most anticipated? statu...

    What did I just read? Why did I read it? What in me convinced me that I should persist and keep turning virtual pages and read on? I have no answers to any of those questions. I think I wasted my time reading this book and trying to figure it out.  It's a book about immigrant girl ...

    Let's face it, this is a seriously weird book. It's like Freshwater but with literature instead of religion. The thing with those two books, is that they were really intriguing at first, luring you in with their exotic and foreign settings. Then they start to spiral down a weird pa...

    I find novels about the interweaving of life and art fascinating, but Call Me Zebra felt somehow shallow, especially in the light of The Idiot by Elif Batuman, or A Line Made by Walking by Sara Baume, two profound meditations on the subject. On the plus side, I thought the refugee aspe...

    I'm afraid I simply did not get this book at all. I was intrigued by the idea of a woman connecting to her dead parents and her heritage through literature, but I was just left confused the entire time. The references went way over my head, and the MC was just way too eccentric for my ...

    Sometimes you read a novel and you're left with more questions than answers or satisfaction. I think that's what the author intended here. I still don't understand why Zebra chose that name for herself. What was wrong with her given name? Did she really have no other family? Why had th...

    The only character I liked in this book was the bird. ...

    you either get this or you don't. it's better if you do. zebra is unconsciously unironic. she is both an unquestionable victim of exile and tragedy and an illicit manufacturer of drama. she is miserably elitist, but masterfully hyperbolic and communicative of a bestial, guarded, unstab...

    On the list of 46 books by women of color to read in 2018. ...

    I was extremely excited when I began this book due to the strong fast pace of the language, but there was no let-up, no growth in the character. The writing, like the character, became tedious. There are flashes of brilliance such as "I picked up languages the way some people pick up v...

    I've seen this book cover many times - and it was because of the book's cover that I didn't really dig into what this book is about. Today, I finally read a description of it and have since added it to my TBR mountain! (there is this cover Call Me Zebra that appeals to me much more, bu...

    At the heart of "Call Me Zebra" is a heart-breaking story of a young Iranian girl, who flees her war-torn country with her parents, losing her mother en route. She settles in New York with her father, but when he also passes, she decides to head on a reverse pilgrimage, retracing the p...

    What a tedious book. I can?t believe I finished this, but I did, hoping I would eventually enjoy it. Nope, it was a rough read and honestly, there was no ending. ...

    Call Me Zebra by Azareen Van der Vliet Oloomi is a beautiful, heartbreaking story of exile, loss, love, and ultimately self. Zebra comes from a long line of scholars whose lives are literally literature. They are born and raised with literature, eat and sleep literature, and speak in l...

    I felt so badly for the main character. Her parents had to flee Iran on foot, her mother dying in route. With her father, she crosses through Europe, ending up in New York City. Her father, in an attempt to raise her in the family tradition of literature, I assume to protect her from w...

    This is the sort of book I wish I could have read in my English classes.  It's written with the sort of language you would expect from one of those "classics."  But it's by an author of color about an Iranian woman.  Like, imagine having had this sort of representation in bookstores...

    A young child is born into an inhospitable world. Her Middle East country is war torn, her mother perishes. Death is on every road. She and her father manage to get to Europe where he later dies leaving a young woman grappling with grief for years after. As she buries her father, sh...

    Some titles in the literary genre can be challenging to read. Azareen Van der Vliet Oloomi?s Call Me Zebra is one of those titles. But when does the adjective ?challenging? become a weakness rather than a strength? It will depend on the reader. From the opening line of this novel...

    Where do I even start? If the author would have left out the ridiculous, boring, and unrealistic sex scenes I would have given this book a slightly better rating. I feel like this book was a grad school assignment. I appreciate the references to literature and the parts about Barcelona...