Technically Wrong: Sexist Apps, Biased Algorithms, and Other Threats of Toxic Tech

Technically Wrong: Sexist Apps, Biased Algorithms, and Other Threats of Toxic Tech

Buying groceries, tracking our health, finding a date: whatever we want to do, odds are that we can now do it online. But few of us ask why all these digital products are designed the way they are. It?s time we change that. Many of the services we rely on are full of oversights, biases, and downright ethical nightmares: Chatbots that harass women. Signup forms that fail an Buying groceries, tracking our health, finding a date: whatever we want to do, odds are that we can now do it online. B...

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Title:Technically Wrong: Sexist Apps, Biased Algorithms, and Other Threats of Toxic Tech
Author:Sara Wachter-Boettcher
Rating:
Genres:Nonfiction
ISBN:Technically Wrong: Sexist Apps, Biased Algorithms, and Other Threats of Toxic Tech
ISBN
Edition Language:English
Format Type:Hardcover
Number of Pages:240 pages pages

Technically Wrong: Sexist Apps, Biased Algorithms, and Other Threats of Toxic Tech Reviews

  • John Norman
    Nov 14, 2017

    I'm so grateful to have received a free ARC of Technically Wrong! The 3-star rating was hard to decide and isn't reflective of my full range of feelings. That's why the review that follows will be massively long. First off, the minor typos and technical errors, likely due to it bei...

    Well . . . This is another one of those funny books that is sort of a ?5? and sort of a ?3.? The book broadly claims that the tech industry builds interfaces and products that are (not necessarily intentionally) biased. The book says that the main driver is the homogeneity of t...

  • Emily Finke
    Oct 20, 2017

    I'm so grateful to have received a free ARC of Technically Wrong! The 3-star rating was hard to decide and isn't reflective of my full range of feelings. That's why the review that follows will be massively long. First off, the minor typos and technical errors, likely due to it bei...

    Well . . . This is another one of those funny books that is sort of a ?5? and sort of a ?3.? The book broadly claims that the tech industry builds interfaces and products that are (not necessarily intentionally) biased. The book says that the main driver is the homogeneity of t...

    A good and short read. Plenty of examples, but mostly the famous ones on the internet - the author's alignment with the truly marginalized is limited, mostly with female/gays/transgender/nonwhites but still the educated, unlike O'Neil in Weapons of Math Destruction: How Big Data Increa...

    Recommended reading on the current (very current) state of the tech industry. Overlaps a little bit with and cites Weapons of Math Destruction: How Big Data Increases Inequality and Threatens Democracy, but focuses more on programmer an designer choices, assumptions and hidden biases i...

    This was a very thoughtful exploration of how bias is built into the tech products we use every day, and how that bias subsequently shapes and reinforces behaviors offline. Wachter-Boettcher explores not just how technology is built, but also how the organizations that build it perpetu...

    I won this book in a giveaway. I work in the tech sector and was interested in this book because I am leading a digital transformation effort at my job and wanted to make sure i didn't fall into any of these traps. The book was not what I was thinking it was but boy were my eyes opened...

    I want to qualify my rating of this book: If you haven?t previously thought about sexism, racism, or other forms of discrimination in the tech industry, this is a five-star recommendation. However, as someone who regularly reads about this topic and pays attention to tech news, I enc...

    A must read for anyone who designs digital experiences, and doesn't want to be an inadvertent dude-bro. Against a backdrop of increasingly ubiquitous technology, with every online interaction forcing us to expose parts of ourselves, Sara Wachter-Boettcher weaves a challenging narrat...

    Some parts of it dragged, but overall, it was terrifying. I thought it made especially interesting points about the necessity of training algorithms with unbiased training data so as not to perpetuate past injustices, the myth of the "tech industry" monoculture, and the way free speech...

    Must read for anyone who creates tech products - any product, really. Wachter-Boettcher tells story after story of how tech is only as inclusive, useful, and fair as the ideas behind it. "Because, no matter how much tech companies talk about algorithms like they?re nothing but ad...

    This book doesn't really cover anything new, if you've been following conversations about bias in technology in recent years. However, that really isn't a mark against it, since it's trying to be an introduction to the topic rather than an expansive deep dive. It's a really great prime...

  • kat
    Nov 18, 2017

    I'm so grateful to have received a free ARC of Technically Wrong! The 3-star rating was hard to decide and isn't reflective of my full range of feelings. That's why the review that follows will be massively long. First off, the minor typos and technical errors, likely due to it bei...

    Well . . . This is another one of those funny books that is sort of a ?5? and sort of a ?3.? The book broadly claims that the tech industry builds interfaces and products that are (not necessarily intentionally) biased. The book says that the main driver is the homogeneity of t...

    A good and short read. Plenty of examples, but mostly the famous ones on the internet - the author's alignment with the truly marginalized is limited, mostly with female/gays/transgender/nonwhites but still the educated, unlike O'Neil in Weapons of Math Destruction: How Big Data Increa...

    Recommended reading on the current (very current) state of the tech industry. Overlaps a little bit with and cites Weapons of Math Destruction: How Big Data Increases Inequality and Threatens Democracy, but focuses more on programmer an designer choices, assumptions and hidden biases i...

    This was a very thoughtful exploration of how bias is built into the tech products we use every day, and how that bias subsequently shapes and reinforces behaviors offline. Wachter-Boettcher explores not just how technology is built, but also how the organizations that build it perpetu...

    I won this book in a giveaway. I work in the tech sector and was interested in this book because I am leading a digital transformation effort at my job and wanted to make sure i didn't fall into any of these traps. The book was not what I was thinking it was but boy were my eyes opened...

    I want to qualify my rating of this book: If you haven?t previously thought about sexism, racism, or other forms of discrimination in the tech industry, this is a five-star recommendation. However, as someone who regularly reads about this topic and pays attention to tech news, I enc...

    A must read for anyone who designs digital experiences, and doesn't want to be an inadvertent dude-bro. Against a backdrop of increasingly ubiquitous technology, with every online interaction forcing us to expose parts of ourselves, Sara Wachter-Boettcher weaves a challenging narrat...

    Some parts of it dragged, but overall, it was terrifying. I thought it made especially interesting points about the necessity of training algorithms with unbiased training data so as not to perpetuate past injustices, the myth of the "tech industry" monoculture, and the way free speech...

    Must read for anyone who creates tech products - any product, really. Wachter-Boettcher tells story after story of how tech is only as inclusive, useful, and fair as the ideas behind it. "Because, no matter how much tech companies talk about algorithms like they?re nothing but ad...

    This book doesn't really cover anything new, if you've been following conversations about bias in technology in recent years. However, that really isn't a mark against it, since it's trying to be an introduction to the topic rather than an expansive deep dive. It's a really great prime...

    This book is a must read for anyone who uses technology in their daily lives. Sara's writing is so approachable and demystifies tech with examples of how biases in applications affect all of us. It was refreshing to read such an honest critique of the tech-focused world we live in. I c...

    A really important look into the biases built into the tech that permeates our lives. Insightful anecdotes and important points about the need for ethics and diversity in the tech industry. As someone in that space already, most of it wasn?t new, but I?m glad the book exists! I hop...

    Technology is now the energy field that surrounds us and penetrates us; it binds our planet together. But the tech industry is failing all of us in myriads of ways. This book gives a great summary of the problems of technology and how they came to be. Recommended: for everyone who ...

    Insightful and highly readable. None of the examples used will come as a surprise to anyone who?s been following tech stories for the last few years, but the author draws a neat through line that bring the problems into sharper focus. ...

    This isn't the first book I've read about big data and the algorithms behind the technology that works in every facet of our lives can work against us. What was new for me about this book was the discussion on the culture of tech companies that is often sexist and racist. Things like t...

    This is a good solid introduction to a really important issue. Given the nature of the subject matter, a lot of the most striking anecdotes in here were covered by the tech press and so were widely circulated within the community of people observing this kind of thing closely. But even...

    Pretty good look with examples/data at how/why the current SV companies bias their apps towards 'young Caucasian males' and what companies should do to fix this. ...

    CD, this is a fascinating read that I borrowed from my friend Grace. It looks into the ways our technology has been created with less than the majority audience in mind. It's not written in academic jargon, which I appreciate?Wachter-Boettcher clearly wanted her text to be understood...

    Wachter-Boettcher's book on understanding the exclusionary power and privilege of technology is must-read for anyone who works in technology or with technology (which yes, means the vast majority of us). She moves through a variety of technologies, platforms, and systems to show how wh...

    Concise and motivating (if depressing). Should be required reading for everyone in tech. ...

  • Lance Eaton
    Dec 15, 2017

    I'm so grateful to have received a free ARC of Technically Wrong! The 3-star rating was hard to decide and isn't reflective of my full range of feelings. That's why the review that follows will be massively long. First off, the minor typos and technical errors, likely due to it bei...

    Well . . . This is another one of those funny books that is sort of a ?5? and sort of a ?3.? The book broadly claims that the tech industry builds interfaces and products that are (not necessarily intentionally) biased. The book says that the main driver is the homogeneity of t...

    A good and short read. Plenty of examples, but mostly the famous ones on the internet - the author's alignment with the truly marginalized is limited, mostly with female/gays/transgender/nonwhites but still the educated, unlike O'Neil in Weapons of Math Destruction: How Big Data Increa...

    Recommended reading on the current (very current) state of the tech industry. Overlaps a little bit with and cites Weapons of Math Destruction: How Big Data Increases Inequality and Threatens Democracy, but focuses more on programmer an designer choices, assumptions and hidden biases i...

    This was a very thoughtful exploration of how bias is built into the tech products we use every day, and how that bias subsequently shapes and reinforces behaviors offline. Wachter-Boettcher explores not just how technology is built, but also how the organizations that build it perpetu...

    I won this book in a giveaway. I work in the tech sector and was interested in this book because I am leading a digital transformation effort at my job and wanted to make sure i didn't fall into any of these traps. The book was not what I was thinking it was but boy were my eyes opened...

    I want to qualify my rating of this book: If you haven?t previously thought about sexism, racism, or other forms of discrimination in the tech industry, this is a five-star recommendation. However, as someone who regularly reads about this topic and pays attention to tech news, I enc...

    A must read for anyone who designs digital experiences, and doesn't want to be an inadvertent dude-bro. Against a backdrop of increasingly ubiquitous technology, with every online interaction forcing us to expose parts of ourselves, Sara Wachter-Boettcher weaves a challenging narrat...

    Some parts of it dragged, but overall, it was terrifying. I thought it made especially interesting points about the necessity of training algorithms with unbiased training data so as not to perpetuate past injustices, the myth of the "tech industry" monoculture, and the way free speech...

    Must read for anyone who creates tech products - any product, really. Wachter-Boettcher tells story after story of how tech is only as inclusive, useful, and fair as the ideas behind it. "Because, no matter how much tech companies talk about algorithms like they?re nothing but ad...

    This book doesn't really cover anything new, if you've been following conversations about bias in technology in recent years. However, that really isn't a mark against it, since it's trying to be an introduction to the topic rather than an expansive deep dive. It's a really great prime...

    This book is a must read for anyone who uses technology in their daily lives. Sara's writing is so approachable and demystifies tech with examples of how biases in applications affect all of us. It was refreshing to read such an honest critique of the tech-focused world we live in. I c...

    A really important look into the biases built into the tech that permeates our lives. Insightful anecdotes and important points about the need for ethics and diversity in the tech industry. As someone in that space already, most of it wasn?t new, but I?m glad the book exists! I hop...

    Technology is now the energy field that surrounds us and penetrates us; it binds our planet together. But the tech industry is failing all of us in myriads of ways. This book gives a great summary of the problems of technology and how they came to be. Recommended: for everyone who ...

    Insightful and highly readable. None of the examples used will come as a surprise to anyone who?s been following tech stories for the last few years, but the author draws a neat through line that bring the problems into sharper focus. ...

    This isn't the first book I've read about big data and the algorithms behind the technology that works in every facet of our lives can work against us. What was new for me about this book was the discussion on the culture of tech companies that is often sexist and racist. Things like t...

    This is a good solid introduction to a really important issue. Given the nature of the subject matter, a lot of the most striking anecdotes in here were covered by the tech press and so were widely circulated within the community of people observing this kind of thing closely. But even...

    Pretty good look with examples/data at how/why the current SV companies bias their apps towards 'young Caucasian males' and what companies should do to fix this. ...

    CD, this is a fascinating read that I borrowed from my friend Grace. It looks into the ways our technology has been created with less than the majority audience in mind. It's not written in academic jargon, which I appreciate?Wachter-Boettcher clearly wanted her text to be understood...

    Wachter-Boettcher's book on understanding the exclusionary power and privilege of technology is must-read for anyone who works in technology or with technology (which yes, means the vast majority of us). She moves through a variety of technologies, platforms, and systems to show how wh...

  • Nicole
    Feb 03, 2018

    I'm so grateful to have received a free ARC of Technically Wrong! The 3-star rating was hard to decide and isn't reflective of my full range of feelings. That's why the review that follows will be massively long. First off, the minor typos and technical errors, likely due to it bei...

    Well . . . This is another one of those funny books that is sort of a ?5? and sort of a ?3.? The book broadly claims that the tech industry builds interfaces and products that are (not necessarily intentionally) biased. The book says that the main driver is the homogeneity of t...

    A good and short read. Plenty of examples, but mostly the famous ones on the internet - the author's alignment with the truly marginalized is limited, mostly with female/gays/transgender/nonwhites but still the educated, unlike O'Neil in Weapons of Math Destruction: How Big Data Increa...

    Recommended reading on the current (very current) state of the tech industry. Overlaps a little bit with and cites Weapons of Math Destruction: How Big Data Increases Inequality and Threatens Democracy, but focuses more on programmer an designer choices, assumptions and hidden biases i...

    This was a very thoughtful exploration of how bias is built into the tech products we use every day, and how that bias subsequently shapes and reinforces behaviors offline. Wachter-Boettcher explores not just how technology is built, but also how the organizations that build it perpetu...

    I won this book in a giveaway. I work in the tech sector and was interested in this book because I am leading a digital transformation effort at my job and wanted to make sure i didn't fall into any of these traps. The book was not what I was thinking it was but boy were my eyes opened...

    I want to qualify my rating of this book: If you haven?t previously thought about sexism, racism, or other forms of discrimination in the tech industry, this is a five-star recommendation. However, as someone who regularly reads about this topic and pays attention to tech news, I enc...

    A must read for anyone who designs digital experiences, and doesn't want to be an inadvertent dude-bro. Against a backdrop of increasingly ubiquitous technology, with every online interaction forcing us to expose parts of ourselves, Sara Wachter-Boettcher weaves a challenging narrat...

    Some parts of it dragged, but overall, it was terrifying. I thought it made especially interesting points about the necessity of training algorithms with unbiased training data so as not to perpetuate past injustices, the myth of the "tech industry" monoculture, and the way free speech...

    Must read for anyone who creates tech products - any product, really. Wachter-Boettcher tells story after story of how tech is only as inclusive, useful, and fair as the ideas behind it. "Because, no matter how much tech companies talk about algorithms like they?re nothing but ad...

    This book doesn't really cover anything new, if you've been following conversations about bias in technology in recent years. However, that really isn't a mark against it, since it's trying to be an introduction to the topic rather than an expansive deep dive. It's a really great prime...

    This book is a must read for anyone who uses technology in their daily lives. Sara's writing is so approachable and demystifies tech with examples of how biases in applications affect all of us. It was refreshing to read such an honest critique of the tech-focused world we live in. I c...

    A really important look into the biases built into the tech that permeates our lives. Insightful anecdotes and important points about the need for ethics and diversity in the tech industry. As someone in that space already, most of it wasn?t new, but I?m glad the book exists! I hop...

    Technology is now the energy field that surrounds us and penetrates us; it binds our planet together. But the tech industry is failing all of us in myriads of ways. This book gives a great summary of the problems of technology and how they came to be. Recommended: for everyone who ...

    Insightful and highly readable. None of the examples used will come as a surprise to anyone who?s been following tech stories for the last few years, but the author draws a neat through line that bring the problems into sharper focus. ...

  • Tim Kadlec
    Feb 09, 2018

    I'm so grateful to have received a free ARC of Technically Wrong! The 3-star rating was hard to decide and isn't reflective of my full range of feelings. That's why the review that follows will be massively long. First off, the minor typos and technical errors, likely due to it bei...

    Well . . . This is another one of those funny books that is sort of a ?5? and sort of a ?3.? The book broadly claims that the tech industry builds interfaces and products that are (not necessarily intentionally) biased. The book says that the main driver is the homogeneity of t...

    A good and short read. Plenty of examples, but mostly the famous ones on the internet - the author's alignment with the truly marginalized is limited, mostly with female/gays/transgender/nonwhites but still the educated, unlike O'Neil in Weapons of Math Destruction: How Big Data Increa...

    Recommended reading on the current (very current) state of the tech industry. Overlaps a little bit with and cites Weapons of Math Destruction: How Big Data Increases Inequality and Threatens Democracy, but focuses more on programmer an designer choices, assumptions and hidden biases i...

    This was a very thoughtful exploration of how bias is built into the tech products we use every day, and how that bias subsequently shapes and reinforces behaviors offline. Wachter-Boettcher explores not just how technology is built, but also how the organizations that build it perpetu...

    I won this book in a giveaway. I work in the tech sector and was interested in this book because I am leading a digital transformation effort at my job and wanted to make sure i didn't fall into any of these traps. The book was not what I was thinking it was but boy were my eyes opened...

    I want to qualify my rating of this book: If you haven?t previously thought about sexism, racism, or other forms of discrimination in the tech industry, this is a five-star recommendation. However, as someone who regularly reads about this topic and pays attention to tech news, I enc...

    A must read for anyone who designs digital experiences, and doesn't want to be an inadvertent dude-bro. Against a backdrop of increasingly ubiquitous technology, with every online interaction forcing us to expose parts of ourselves, Sara Wachter-Boettcher weaves a challenging narrat...

    Some parts of it dragged, but overall, it was terrifying. I thought it made especially interesting points about the necessity of training algorithms with unbiased training data so as not to perpetuate past injustices, the myth of the "tech industry" monoculture, and the way free speech...

    Must read for anyone who creates tech products - any product, really. Wachter-Boettcher tells story after story of how tech is only as inclusive, useful, and fair as the ideas behind it. "Because, no matter how much tech companies talk about algorithms like they?re nothing but ad...

    This book doesn't really cover anything new, if you've been following conversations about bias in technology in recent years. However, that really isn't a mark against it, since it's trying to be an introduction to the topic rather than an expansive deep dive. It's a really great prime...

    This book is a must read for anyone who uses technology in their daily lives. Sara's writing is so approachable and demystifies tech with examples of how biases in applications affect all of us. It was refreshing to read such an honest critique of the tech-focused world we live in. I c...

    A really important look into the biases built into the tech that permeates our lives. Insightful anecdotes and important points about the need for ethics and diversity in the tech industry. As someone in that space already, most of it wasn?t new, but I?m glad the book exists! I hop...

    Technology is now the energy field that surrounds us and penetrates us; it binds our planet together. But the tech industry is failing all of us in myriads of ways. This book gives a great summary of the problems of technology and how they came to be. Recommended: for everyone who ...

    Insightful and highly readable. None of the examples used will come as a surprise to anyone who?s been following tech stories for the last few years, but the author draws a neat through line that bring the problems into sharper focus. ...

    This isn't the first book I've read about big data and the algorithms behind the technology that works in every facet of our lives can work against us. What was new for me about this book was the discussion on the culture of tech companies that is often sexist and racist. Things like t...

    This is a good solid introduction to a really important issue. Given the nature of the subject matter, a lot of the most striking anecdotes in here were covered by the tech press and so were widely circulated within the community of people observing this kind of thing closely. But even...

    Pretty good look with examples/data at how/why the current SV companies bias their apps towards 'young Caucasian males' and what companies should do to fix this. ...

    CD, this is a fascinating read that I borrowed from my friend Grace. It looks into the ways our technology has been created with less than the majority audience in mind. It's not written in academic jargon, which I appreciate?Wachter-Boettcher clearly wanted her text to be understood...

    Wachter-Boettcher's book on understanding the exclusionary power and privilege of technology is must-read for anyone who works in technology or with technology (which yes, means the vast majority of us). She moves through a variety of technologies, platforms, and systems to show how wh...

    Concise and motivating (if depressing). Should be required reading for everyone in tech. ...

    Originally published at https://timkadlec.com/read/2018/techn... ------ Last year I read "Fifty Inventions That Shaped The Modern Economy" by Tim Hartford. My favorite question that he raised repeatedly was about who benefits from what we build, and more importantly, who loses.So whe...

  • Veselin Nikolov
    Dec 09, 2017

    I'm so grateful to have received a free ARC of Technically Wrong! The 3-star rating was hard to decide and isn't reflective of my full range of feelings. That's why the review that follows will be massively long. First off, the minor typos and technical errors, likely due to it bei...

    Well . . . This is another one of those funny books that is sort of a ?5? and sort of a ?3.? The book broadly claims that the tech industry builds interfaces and products that are (not necessarily intentionally) biased. The book says that the main driver is the homogeneity of t...

    A good and short read. Plenty of examples, but mostly the famous ones on the internet - the author's alignment with the truly marginalized is limited, mostly with female/gays/transgender/nonwhites but still the educated, unlike O'Neil in Weapons of Math Destruction: How Big Data Increa...

    Recommended reading on the current (very current) state of the tech industry. Overlaps a little bit with and cites Weapons of Math Destruction: How Big Data Increases Inequality and Threatens Democracy, but focuses more on programmer an designer choices, assumptions and hidden biases i...

    This was a very thoughtful exploration of how bias is built into the tech products we use every day, and how that bias subsequently shapes and reinforces behaviors offline. Wachter-Boettcher explores not just how technology is built, but also how the organizations that build it perpetu...

    I won this book in a giveaway. I work in the tech sector and was interested in this book because I am leading a digital transformation effort at my job and wanted to make sure i didn't fall into any of these traps. The book was not what I was thinking it was but boy were my eyes opened...

    I want to qualify my rating of this book: If you haven?t previously thought about sexism, racism, or other forms of discrimination in the tech industry, this is a five-star recommendation. However, as someone who regularly reads about this topic and pays attention to tech news, I enc...

    A must read for anyone who designs digital experiences, and doesn't want to be an inadvertent dude-bro. Against a backdrop of increasingly ubiquitous technology, with every online interaction forcing us to expose parts of ourselves, Sara Wachter-Boettcher weaves a challenging narrat...

    Some parts of it dragged, but overall, it was terrifying. I thought it made especially interesting points about the necessity of training algorithms with unbiased training data so as not to perpetuate past injustices, the myth of the "tech industry" monoculture, and the way free speech...

    Must read for anyone who creates tech products - any product, really. Wachter-Boettcher tells story after story of how tech is only as inclusive, useful, and fair as the ideas behind it. "Because, no matter how much tech companies talk about algorithms like they?re nothing but ad...

    This book doesn't really cover anything new, if you've been following conversations about bias in technology in recent years. However, that really isn't a mark against it, since it's trying to be an introduction to the topic rather than an expansive deep dive. It's a really great prime...

    This book is a must read for anyone who uses technology in their daily lives. Sara's writing is so approachable and demystifies tech with examples of how biases in applications affect all of us. It was refreshing to read such an honest critique of the tech-focused world we live in. I c...

    A really important look into the biases built into the tech that permeates our lives. Insightful anecdotes and important points about the need for ethics and diversity in the tech industry. As someone in that space already, most of it wasn?t new, but I?m glad the book exists! I hop...

    Technology is now the energy field that surrounds us and penetrates us; it binds our planet together. But the tech industry is failing all of us in myriads of ways. This book gives a great summary of the problems of technology and how they came to be. Recommended: for everyone who ...

    Insightful and highly readable. None of the examples used will come as a surprise to anyone who?s been following tech stories for the last few years, but the author draws a neat through line that bring the problems into sharper focus. ...

    This isn't the first book I've read about big data and the algorithms behind the technology that works in every facet of our lives can work against us. What was new for me about this book was the discussion on the culture of tech companies that is often sexist and racist. Things like t...

    This is a good solid introduction to a really important issue. Given the nature of the subject matter, a lot of the most striking anecdotes in here were covered by the tech press and so were widely circulated within the community of people observing this kind of thing closely. But even...

    Pretty good look with examples/data at how/why the current SV companies bias their apps towards 'young Caucasian males' and what companies should do to fix this. ...

    CD, this is a fascinating read that I borrowed from my friend Grace. It looks into the ways our technology has been created with less than the majority audience in mind. It's not written in academic jargon, which I appreciate?Wachter-Boettcher clearly wanted her text to be understood...

    Wachter-Boettcher's book on understanding the exclusionary power and privilege of technology is must-read for anyone who works in technology or with technology (which yes, means the vast majority of us). She moves through a variety of technologies, platforms, and systems to show how wh...

    Concise and motivating (if depressing). Should be required reading for everyone in tech. ...

    Originally published at https://timkadlec.com/read/2018/techn... ------ Last year I read "Fifty Inventions That Shaped The Modern Economy" by Tim Hartford. My favorite question that he raised repeatedly was about who benefits from what we build, and more importantly, who loses.So whe...

    I received this an an ARC from NetGalley in exchange for a review. Exactly as the title says, this book outlines everything wrong with technology in today's society - namely our most used apps and social networking websites. There is so much relevant information in this book - h...

    This scathing critique of the tech industry and its techniques is both informative and hair-raising. Wachter-Boettcher winningly posits that from top (industry giants like Facebook) to bottom (smaller, niche companies), services rely on finely crafted promises of ease, interconnectedne...

    Deceptively simple book. We all know that tech is sexist and cares more about selling our info to advertisers than about our experiences using it. We know that design is more about looks than substance. Wachter-Boettcher lays out the evidence we already know, and adds in the stuff we m...

    This was a very interesting journey for me. I wanted to read about UX, biased algorithms, and accessibility. There is that but for the most part, the book is about diversity and inclusion from author's perspective. The selling point of the book is how lack of diversity in tech lead...

  • Sequoia M
    Oct 17, 2017

    I'm so grateful to have received a free ARC of Technically Wrong! The 3-star rating was hard to decide and isn't reflective of my full range of feelings. That's why the review that follows will be massively long. First off, the minor typos and technical errors, likely due to it bei...

    Well . . . This is another one of those funny books that is sort of a ?5? and sort of a ?3.? The book broadly claims that the tech industry builds interfaces and products that are (not necessarily intentionally) biased. The book says that the main driver is the homogeneity of t...

    A good and short read. Plenty of examples, but mostly the famous ones on the internet - the author's alignment with the truly marginalized is limited, mostly with female/gays/transgender/nonwhites but still the educated, unlike O'Neil in Weapons of Math Destruction: How Big Data Increa...

    Recommended reading on the current (very current) state of the tech industry. Overlaps a little bit with and cites Weapons of Math Destruction: How Big Data Increases Inequality and Threatens Democracy, but focuses more on programmer an designer choices, assumptions and hidden biases i...

    This was a very thoughtful exploration of how bias is built into the tech products we use every day, and how that bias subsequently shapes and reinforces behaviors offline. Wachter-Boettcher explores not just how technology is built, but also how the organizations that build it perpetu...

    I won this book in a giveaway. I work in the tech sector and was interested in this book because I am leading a digital transformation effort at my job and wanted to make sure i didn't fall into any of these traps. The book was not what I was thinking it was but boy were my eyes opened...

    I want to qualify my rating of this book: If you haven?t previously thought about sexism, racism, or other forms of discrimination in the tech industry, this is a five-star recommendation. However, as someone who regularly reads about this topic and pays attention to tech news, I enc...

    A must read for anyone who designs digital experiences, and doesn't want to be an inadvertent dude-bro. Against a backdrop of increasingly ubiquitous technology, with every online interaction forcing us to expose parts of ourselves, Sara Wachter-Boettcher weaves a challenging narrat...

    Some parts of it dragged, but overall, it was terrifying. I thought it made especially interesting points about the necessity of training algorithms with unbiased training data so as not to perpetuate past injustices, the myth of the "tech industry" monoculture, and the way free speech...

    Must read for anyone who creates tech products - any product, really. Wachter-Boettcher tells story after story of how tech is only as inclusive, useful, and fair as the ideas behind it. "Because, no matter how much tech companies talk about algorithms like they?re nothing but ad...

    This book doesn't really cover anything new, if you've been following conversations about bias in technology in recent years. However, that really isn't a mark against it, since it's trying to be an introduction to the topic rather than an expansive deep dive. It's a really great prime...

    This book is a must read for anyone who uses technology in their daily lives. Sara's writing is so approachable and demystifies tech with examples of how biases in applications affect all of us. It was refreshing to read such an honest critique of the tech-focused world we live in. I c...

    A really important look into the biases built into the tech that permeates our lives. Insightful anecdotes and important points about the need for ethics and diversity in the tech industry. As someone in that space already, most of it wasn?t new, but I?m glad the book exists! I hop...

    Technology is now the energy field that surrounds us and penetrates us; it binds our planet together. But the tech industry is failing all of us in myriads of ways. This book gives a great summary of the problems of technology and how they came to be. Recommended: for everyone who ...

    Insightful and highly readable. None of the examples used will come as a surprise to anyone who?s been following tech stories for the last few years, but the author draws a neat through line that bring the problems into sharper focus. ...

    This isn't the first book I've read about big data and the algorithms behind the technology that works in every facet of our lives can work against us. What was new for me about this book was the discussion on the culture of tech companies that is often sexist and racist. Things like t...

    This is a good solid introduction to a really important issue. Given the nature of the subject matter, a lot of the most striking anecdotes in here were covered by the tech press and so were widely circulated within the community of people observing this kind of thing closely. But even...

    Pretty good look with examples/data at how/why the current SV companies bias their apps towards 'young Caucasian males' and what companies should do to fix this. ...

    CD, this is a fascinating read that I borrowed from my friend Grace. It looks into the ways our technology has been created with less than the majority audience in mind. It's not written in academic jargon, which I appreciate?Wachter-Boettcher clearly wanted her text to be understood...

    Wachter-Boettcher's book on understanding the exclusionary power and privilege of technology is must-read for anyone who works in technology or with technology (which yes, means the vast majority of us). She moves through a variety of technologies, platforms, and systems to show how wh...

    Concise and motivating (if depressing). Should be required reading for everyone in tech. ...

    Originally published at https://timkadlec.com/read/2018/techn... ------ Last year I read "Fifty Inventions That Shaped The Modern Economy" by Tim Hartford. My favorite question that he raised repeatedly was about who benefits from what we build, and more importantly, who loses.So whe...

    I received this an an ARC from NetGalley in exchange for a review. Exactly as the title says, this book outlines everything wrong with technology in today's society - namely our most used apps and social networking websites. There is so much relevant information in this book - h...

    This scathing critique of the tech industry and its techniques is both informative and hair-raising. Wachter-Boettcher winningly posits that from top (industry giants like Facebook) to bottom (smaller, niche companies), services rely on finely crafted promises of ease, interconnectedne...

    Deceptively simple book. We all know that tech is sexist and cares more about selling our info to advertisers than about our experiences using it. We know that design is more about looks than substance. Wachter-Boettcher lays out the evidence we already know, and adds in the stuff we m...

    This was a very interesting journey for me. I wanted to read about UX, biased algorithms, and accessibility. There is that but for the most part, the book is about diversity and inclusion from author's perspective. The selling point of the book is how lack of diversity in tech lead...

    I really enjoyed this book. I found it to be a chatty, personable approach to the major issues intersecting the tech industry and ethics. Although I was familiar with many of the examples presented, most of them having made headlines and been the subject of hot takes, it was interestin...

  • Suzy
    Oct 17, 2017

    I'm so grateful to have received a free ARC of Technically Wrong! The 3-star rating was hard to decide and isn't reflective of my full range of feelings. That's why the review that follows will be massively long. First off, the minor typos and technical errors, likely due to it bei...

    Well . . . This is another one of those funny books that is sort of a ?5? and sort of a ?3.? The book broadly claims that the tech industry builds interfaces and products that are (not necessarily intentionally) biased. The book says that the main driver is the homogeneity of t...

    A good and short read. Plenty of examples, but mostly the famous ones on the internet - the author's alignment with the truly marginalized is limited, mostly with female/gays/transgender/nonwhites but still the educated, unlike O'Neil in Weapons of Math Destruction: How Big Data Increa...

    Recommended reading on the current (very current) state of the tech industry. Overlaps a little bit with and cites Weapons of Math Destruction: How Big Data Increases Inequality and Threatens Democracy, but focuses more on programmer an designer choices, assumptions and hidden biases i...

    This was a very thoughtful exploration of how bias is built into the tech products we use every day, and how that bias subsequently shapes and reinforces behaviors offline. Wachter-Boettcher explores not just how technology is built, but also how the organizations that build it perpetu...

    I won this book in a giveaway. I work in the tech sector and was interested in this book because I am leading a digital transformation effort at my job and wanted to make sure i didn't fall into any of these traps. The book was not what I was thinking it was but boy were my eyes opened...

    I want to qualify my rating of this book: If you haven?t previously thought about sexism, racism, or other forms of discrimination in the tech industry, this is a five-star recommendation. However, as someone who regularly reads about this topic and pays attention to tech news, I enc...

    A must read for anyone who designs digital experiences, and doesn't want to be an inadvertent dude-bro. Against a backdrop of increasingly ubiquitous technology, with every online interaction forcing us to expose parts of ourselves, Sara Wachter-Boettcher weaves a challenging narrat...

    Some parts of it dragged, but overall, it was terrifying. I thought it made especially interesting points about the necessity of training algorithms with unbiased training data so as not to perpetuate past injustices, the myth of the "tech industry" monoculture, and the way free speech...

    Must read for anyone who creates tech products - any product, really. Wachter-Boettcher tells story after story of how tech is only as inclusive, useful, and fair as the ideas behind it. "Because, no matter how much tech companies talk about algorithms like they?re nothing but ad...

    This book doesn't really cover anything new, if you've been following conversations about bias in technology in recent years. However, that really isn't a mark against it, since it's trying to be an introduction to the topic rather than an expansive deep dive. It's a really great prime...

    This book is a must read for anyone who uses technology in their daily lives. Sara's writing is so approachable and demystifies tech with examples of how biases in applications affect all of us. It was refreshing to read such an honest critique of the tech-focused world we live in. I c...

    A really important look into the biases built into the tech that permeates our lives. Insightful anecdotes and important points about the need for ethics and diversity in the tech industry. As someone in that space already, most of it wasn?t new, but I?m glad the book exists! I hop...

    Technology is now the energy field that surrounds us and penetrates us; it binds our planet together. But the tech industry is failing all of us in myriads of ways. This book gives a great summary of the problems of technology and how they came to be. Recommended: for everyone who ...

    Insightful and highly readable. None of the examples used will come as a surprise to anyone who?s been following tech stories for the last few years, but the author draws a neat through line that bring the problems into sharper focus. ...

    This isn't the first book I've read about big data and the algorithms behind the technology that works in every facet of our lives can work against us. What was new for me about this book was the discussion on the culture of tech companies that is often sexist and racist. Things like t...

    This is a good solid introduction to a really important issue. Given the nature of the subject matter, a lot of the most striking anecdotes in here were covered by the tech press and so were widely circulated within the community of people observing this kind of thing closely. But even...

    Pretty good look with examples/data at how/why the current SV companies bias their apps towards 'young Caucasian males' and what companies should do to fix this. ...

    CD, this is a fascinating read that I borrowed from my friend Grace. It looks into the ways our technology has been created with less than the majority audience in mind. It's not written in academic jargon, which I appreciate?Wachter-Boettcher clearly wanted her text to be understood...

    Wachter-Boettcher's book on understanding the exclusionary power and privilege of technology is must-read for anyone who works in technology or with technology (which yes, means the vast majority of us). She moves through a variety of technologies, platforms, and systems to show how wh...

    Concise and motivating (if depressing). Should be required reading for everyone in tech. ...

    Originally published at https://timkadlec.com/read/2018/techn... ------ Last year I read "Fifty Inventions That Shaped The Modern Economy" by Tim Hartford. My favorite question that he raised repeatedly was about who benefits from what we build, and more importantly, who loses.So whe...

    I received this an an ARC from NetGalley in exchange for a review. Exactly as the title says, this book outlines everything wrong with technology in today's society - namely our most used apps and social networking websites. There is so much relevant information in this book - h...

    This scathing critique of the tech industry and its techniques is both informative and hair-raising. Wachter-Boettcher winningly posits that from top (industry giants like Facebook) to bottom (smaller, niche companies), services rely on finely crafted promises of ease, interconnectedne...

    Deceptively simple book. We all know that tech is sexist and cares more about selling our info to advertisers than about our experiences using it. We know that design is more about looks than substance. Wachter-Boettcher lays out the evidence we already know, and adds in the stuff we m...

    This was a very interesting journey for me. I wanted to read about UX, biased algorithms, and accessibility. There is that but for the most part, the book is about diversity and inclusion from author's perspective. The selling point of the book is how lack of diversity in tech lead...

    I really enjoyed this book. I found it to be a chatty, personable approach to the major issues intersecting the tech industry and ethics. Although I was familiar with many of the examples presented, most of them having made headlines and been the subject of hot takes, it was interestin...

    Technically Wrong demystifies the tech industry and shows the innards of how the information that we freely give is used against us. Well, maybe not against us- but not for us It is primarily utilized for the tech companies to make money and secondly to sell to other companies for prof...

    Left me filled with rage to the point where I had to spend a good hour calming down after I hit about 80% of the way through the book. I didn't learn much I didn't already know about the biased algorithms and toxic, male-dominated Silicon Valley culture that perpetuates them, but Wacht...

    I read this in one sitting during a long plane ride. I work in tech and have a keen interest in ethical design and related issues. I would say that I already knew most of this, but I'm glad that this book exists, as Watcher-Boettcher has laid it all out so clearly and eloquently. I...

  • Parker
    Jan 23, 2018

    I'm so grateful to have received a free ARC of Technically Wrong! The 3-star rating was hard to decide and isn't reflective of my full range of feelings. That's why the review that follows will be massively long. First off, the minor typos and technical errors, likely due to it bei...

    Well . . . This is another one of those funny books that is sort of a ?5? and sort of a ?3.? The book broadly claims that the tech industry builds interfaces and products that are (not necessarily intentionally) biased. The book says that the main driver is the homogeneity of t...

    A good and short read. Plenty of examples, but mostly the famous ones on the internet - the author's alignment with the truly marginalized is limited, mostly with female/gays/transgender/nonwhites but still the educated, unlike O'Neil in Weapons of Math Destruction: How Big Data Increa...

    Recommended reading on the current (very current) state of the tech industry. Overlaps a little bit with and cites Weapons of Math Destruction: How Big Data Increases Inequality and Threatens Democracy, but focuses more on programmer an designer choices, assumptions and hidden biases i...

    This was a very thoughtful exploration of how bias is built into the tech products we use every day, and how that bias subsequently shapes and reinforces behaviors offline. Wachter-Boettcher explores not just how technology is built, but also how the organizations that build it perpetu...

    I won this book in a giveaway. I work in the tech sector and was interested in this book because I am leading a digital transformation effort at my job and wanted to make sure i didn't fall into any of these traps. The book was not what I was thinking it was but boy were my eyes opened...

    I want to qualify my rating of this book: If you haven?t previously thought about sexism, racism, or other forms of discrimination in the tech industry, this is a five-star recommendation. However, as someone who regularly reads about this topic and pays attention to tech news, I enc...

    A must read for anyone who designs digital experiences, and doesn't want to be an inadvertent dude-bro. Against a backdrop of increasingly ubiquitous technology, with every online interaction forcing us to expose parts of ourselves, Sara Wachter-Boettcher weaves a challenging narrat...

    Some parts of it dragged, but overall, it was terrifying. I thought it made especially interesting points about the necessity of training algorithms with unbiased training data so as not to perpetuate past injustices, the myth of the "tech industry" monoculture, and the way free speech...

    Must read for anyone who creates tech products - any product, really. Wachter-Boettcher tells story after story of how tech is only as inclusive, useful, and fair as the ideas behind it. "Because, no matter how much tech companies talk about algorithms like they?re nothing but ad...

    This book doesn't really cover anything new, if you've been following conversations about bias in technology in recent years. However, that really isn't a mark against it, since it's trying to be an introduction to the topic rather than an expansive deep dive. It's a really great prime...

    This book is a must read for anyone who uses technology in their daily lives. Sara's writing is so approachable and demystifies tech with examples of how biases in applications affect all of us. It was refreshing to read such an honest critique of the tech-focused world we live in. I c...

    A really important look into the biases built into the tech that permeates our lives. Insightful anecdotes and important points about the need for ethics and diversity in the tech industry. As someone in that space already, most of it wasn?t new, but I?m glad the book exists! I hop...

    Technology is now the energy field that surrounds us and penetrates us; it binds our planet together. But the tech industry is failing all of us in myriads of ways. This book gives a great summary of the problems of technology and how they came to be. Recommended: for everyone who ...

    Insightful and highly readable. None of the examples used will come as a surprise to anyone who?s been following tech stories for the last few years, but the author draws a neat through line that bring the problems into sharper focus. ...

    This isn't the first book I've read about big data and the algorithms behind the technology that works in every facet of our lives can work against us. What was new for me about this book was the discussion on the culture of tech companies that is often sexist and racist. Things like t...

    This is a good solid introduction to a really important issue. Given the nature of the subject matter, a lot of the most striking anecdotes in here were covered by the tech press and so were widely circulated within the community of people observing this kind of thing closely. But even...

  • Rachel
    Nov 07, 2017

    I'm so grateful to have received a free ARC of Technically Wrong! The 3-star rating was hard to decide and isn't reflective of my full range of feelings. That's why the review that follows will be massively long. First off, the minor typos and technical errors, likely due to it bei...

    Well . . . This is another one of those funny books that is sort of a ?5? and sort of a ?3.? The book broadly claims that the tech industry builds interfaces and products that are (not necessarily intentionally) biased. The book says that the main driver is the homogeneity of t...

    A good and short read. Plenty of examples, but mostly the famous ones on the internet - the author's alignment with the truly marginalized is limited, mostly with female/gays/transgender/nonwhites but still the educated, unlike O'Neil in Weapons of Math Destruction: How Big Data Increa...

    Recommended reading on the current (very current) state of the tech industry. Overlaps a little bit with and cites Weapons of Math Destruction: How Big Data Increases Inequality and Threatens Democracy, but focuses more on programmer an designer choices, assumptions and hidden biases i...

    This was a very thoughtful exploration of how bias is built into the tech products we use every day, and how that bias subsequently shapes and reinforces behaviors offline. Wachter-Boettcher explores not just how technology is built, but also how the organizations that build it perpetu...

    I won this book in a giveaway. I work in the tech sector and was interested in this book because I am leading a digital transformation effort at my job and wanted to make sure i didn't fall into any of these traps. The book was not what I was thinking it was but boy were my eyes opened...

    I want to qualify my rating of this book: If you haven?t previously thought about sexism, racism, or other forms of discrimination in the tech industry, this is a five-star recommendation. However, as someone who regularly reads about this topic and pays attention to tech news, I enc...

  • Cyndi
    Dec 15, 2017

    I'm so grateful to have received a free ARC of Technically Wrong! The 3-star rating was hard to decide and isn't reflective of my full range of feelings. That's why the review that follows will be massively long. First off, the minor typos and technical errors, likely due to it bei...

    Well . . . This is another one of those funny books that is sort of a ?5? and sort of a ?3.? The book broadly claims that the tech industry builds interfaces and products that are (not necessarily intentionally) biased. The book says that the main driver is the homogeneity of t...

    A good and short read. Plenty of examples, but mostly the famous ones on the internet - the author's alignment with the truly marginalized is limited, mostly with female/gays/transgender/nonwhites but still the educated, unlike O'Neil in Weapons of Math Destruction: How Big Data Increa...

    Recommended reading on the current (very current) state of the tech industry. Overlaps a little bit with and cites Weapons of Math Destruction: How Big Data Increases Inequality and Threatens Democracy, but focuses more on programmer an designer choices, assumptions and hidden biases i...

    This was a very thoughtful exploration of how bias is built into the tech products we use every day, and how that bias subsequently shapes and reinforces behaviors offline. Wachter-Boettcher explores not just how technology is built, but also how the organizations that build it perpetu...

    I won this book in a giveaway. I work in the tech sector and was interested in this book because I am leading a digital transformation effort at my job and wanted to make sure i didn't fall into any of these traps. The book was not what I was thinking it was but boy were my eyes opened...

    I want to qualify my rating of this book: If you haven?t previously thought about sexism, racism, or other forms of discrimination in the tech industry, this is a five-star recommendation. However, as someone who regularly reads about this topic and pays attention to tech news, I enc...

    A must read for anyone who designs digital experiences, and doesn't want to be an inadvertent dude-bro. Against a backdrop of increasingly ubiquitous technology, with every online interaction forcing us to expose parts of ourselves, Sara Wachter-Boettcher weaves a challenging narrat...

    Some parts of it dragged, but overall, it was terrifying. I thought it made especially interesting points about the necessity of training algorithms with unbiased training data so as not to perpetuate past injustices, the myth of the "tech industry" monoculture, and the way free speech...

    Must read for anyone who creates tech products - any product, really. Wachter-Boettcher tells story after story of how tech is only as inclusive, useful, and fair as the ideas behind it. "Because, no matter how much tech companies talk about algorithms like they?re nothing but ad...

    This book doesn't really cover anything new, if you've been following conversations about bias in technology in recent years. However, that really isn't a mark against it, since it's trying to be an introduction to the topic rather than an expansive deep dive. It's a really great prime...

    This book is a must read for anyone who uses technology in their daily lives. Sara's writing is so approachable and demystifies tech with examples of how biases in applications affect all of us. It was refreshing to read such an honest critique of the tech-focused world we live in. I c...

    A really important look into the biases built into the tech that permeates our lives. Insightful anecdotes and important points about the need for ethics and diversity in the tech industry. As someone in that space already, most of it wasn?t new, but I?m glad the book exists! I hop...

    Technology is now the energy field that surrounds us and penetrates us; it binds our planet together. But the tech industry is failing all of us in myriads of ways. This book gives a great summary of the problems of technology and how they came to be. Recommended: for everyone who ...

    Insightful and highly readable. None of the examples used will come as a surprise to anyone who?s been following tech stories for the last few years, but the author draws a neat through line that bring the problems into sharper focus. ...

    This isn't the first book I've read about big data and the algorithms behind the technology that works in every facet of our lives can work against us. What was new for me about this book was the discussion on the culture of tech companies that is often sexist and racist. Things like t...

    This is a good solid introduction to a really important issue. Given the nature of the subject matter, a lot of the most striking anecdotes in here were covered by the tech press and so were widely circulated within the community of people observing this kind of thing closely. But even...

    Pretty good look with examples/data at how/why the current SV companies bias their apps towards 'young Caucasian males' and what companies should do to fix this. ...

    CD, this is a fascinating read that I borrowed from my friend Grace. It looks into the ways our technology has been created with less than the majority audience in mind. It's not written in academic jargon, which I appreciate?Wachter-Boettcher clearly wanted her text to be understood...

    Wachter-Boettcher's book on understanding the exclusionary power and privilege of technology is must-read for anyone who works in technology or with technology (which yes, means the vast majority of us). She moves through a variety of technologies, platforms, and systems to show how wh...

    Concise and motivating (if depressing). Should be required reading for everyone in tech. ...

    Originally published at https://timkadlec.com/read/2018/techn... ------ Last year I read "Fifty Inventions That Shaped The Modern Economy" by Tim Hartford. My favorite question that he raised repeatedly was about who benefits from what we build, and more importantly, who loses.So whe...

    I received this an an ARC from NetGalley in exchange for a review. Exactly as the title says, this book outlines everything wrong with technology in today's society - namely our most used apps and social networking websites. There is so much relevant information in this book - h...

    This scathing critique of the tech industry and its techniques is both informative and hair-raising. Wachter-Boettcher winningly posits that from top (industry giants like Facebook) to bottom (smaller, niche companies), services rely on finely crafted promises of ease, interconnectedne...

    Deceptively simple book. We all know that tech is sexist and cares more about selling our info to advertisers than about our experiences using it. We know that design is more about looks than substance. Wachter-Boettcher lays out the evidence we already know, and adds in the stuff we m...

  • Bastian Greshake Tzovaras
    Dec 17, 2017

    I'm so grateful to have received a free ARC of Technically Wrong! The 3-star rating was hard to decide and isn't reflective of my full range of feelings. That's why the review that follows will be massively long. First off, the minor typos and technical errors, likely due to it bei...

    Well . . . This is another one of those funny books that is sort of a ?5? and sort of a ?3.? The book broadly claims that the tech industry builds interfaces and products that are (not necessarily intentionally) biased. The book says that the main driver is the homogeneity of t...

    A good and short read. Plenty of examples, but mostly the famous ones on the internet - the author's alignment with the truly marginalized is limited, mostly with female/gays/transgender/nonwhites but still the educated, unlike O'Neil in Weapons of Math Destruction: How Big Data Increa...

    Recommended reading on the current (very current) state of the tech industry. Overlaps a little bit with and cites Weapons of Math Destruction: How Big Data Increases Inequality and Threatens Democracy, but focuses more on programmer an designer choices, assumptions and hidden biases i...

    This was a very thoughtful exploration of how bias is built into the tech products we use every day, and how that bias subsequently shapes and reinforces behaviors offline. Wachter-Boettcher explores not just how technology is built, but also how the organizations that build it perpetu...

    I won this book in a giveaway. I work in the tech sector and was interested in this book because I am leading a digital transformation effort at my job and wanted to make sure i didn't fall into any of these traps. The book was not what I was thinking it was but boy were my eyes opened...

    I want to qualify my rating of this book: If you haven?t previously thought about sexism, racism, or other forms of discrimination in the tech industry, this is a five-star recommendation. However, as someone who regularly reads about this topic and pays attention to tech news, I enc...

    A must read for anyone who designs digital experiences, and doesn't want to be an inadvertent dude-bro. Against a backdrop of increasingly ubiquitous technology, with every online interaction forcing us to expose parts of ourselves, Sara Wachter-Boettcher weaves a challenging narrat...

    Some parts of it dragged, but overall, it was terrifying. I thought it made especially interesting points about the necessity of training algorithms with unbiased training data so as not to perpetuate past injustices, the myth of the "tech industry" monoculture, and the way free speech...

    Must read for anyone who creates tech products - any product, really. Wachter-Boettcher tells story after story of how tech is only as inclusive, useful, and fair as the ideas behind it. "Because, no matter how much tech companies talk about algorithms like they?re nothing but ad...

    This book doesn't really cover anything new, if you've been following conversations about bias in technology in recent years. However, that really isn't a mark against it, since it's trying to be an introduction to the topic rather than an expansive deep dive. It's a really great prime...

    This book is a must read for anyone who uses technology in their daily lives. Sara's writing is so approachable and demystifies tech with examples of how biases in applications affect all of us. It was refreshing to read such an honest critique of the tech-focused world we live in. I c...

    A really important look into the biases built into the tech that permeates our lives. Insightful anecdotes and important points about the need for ethics and diversity in the tech industry. As someone in that space already, most of it wasn?t new, but I?m glad the book exists! I hop...

    Technology is now the energy field that surrounds us and penetrates us; it binds our planet together. But the tech industry is failing all of us in myriads of ways. This book gives a great summary of the problems of technology and how they came to be. Recommended: for everyone who ...

  • Rahul Phatak
    Dec 23, 2017

    I'm so grateful to have received a free ARC of Technically Wrong! The 3-star rating was hard to decide and isn't reflective of my full range of feelings. That's why the review that follows will be massively long. First off, the minor typos and technical errors, likely due to it bei...

    Well . . . This is another one of those funny books that is sort of a ?5? and sort of a ?3.? The book broadly claims that the tech industry builds interfaces and products that are (not necessarily intentionally) biased. The book says that the main driver is the homogeneity of t...

    A good and short read. Plenty of examples, but mostly the famous ones on the internet - the author's alignment with the truly marginalized is limited, mostly with female/gays/transgender/nonwhites but still the educated, unlike O'Neil in Weapons of Math Destruction: How Big Data Increa...

    Recommended reading on the current (very current) state of the tech industry. Overlaps a little bit with and cites Weapons of Math Destruction: How Big Data Increases Inequality and Threatens Democracy, but focuses more on programmer an designer choices, assumptions and hidden biases i...

    This was a very thoughtful exploration of how bias is built into the tech products we use every day, and how that bias subsequently shapes and reinforces behaviors offline. Wachter-Boettcher explores not just how technology is built, but also how the organizations that build it perpetu...

    I won this book in a giveaway. I work in the tech sector and was interested in this book because I am leading a digital transformation effort at my job and wanted to make sure i didn't fall into any of these traps. The book was not what I was thinking it was but boy were my eyes opened...

    I want to qualify my rating of this book: If you haven?t previously thought about sexism, racism, or other forms of discrimination in the tech industry, this is a five-star recommendation. However, as someone who regularly reads about this topic and pays attention to tech news, I enc...

    A must read for anyone who designs digital experiences, and doesn't want to be an inadvertent dude-bro. Against a backdrop of increasingly ubiquitous technology, with every online interaction forcing us to expose parts of ourselves, Sara Wachter-Boettcher weaves a challenging narrat...

    Some parts of it dragged, but overall, it was terrifying. I thought it made especially interesting points about the necessity of training algorithms with unbiased training data so as not to perpetuate past injustices, the myth of the "tech industry" monoculture, and the way free speech...

    Must read for anyone who creates tech products - any product, really. Wachter-Boettcher tells story after story of how tech is only as inclusive, useful, and fair as the ideas behind it. "Because, no matter how much tech companies talk about algorithms like they?re nothing but ad...

    This book doesn't really cover anything new, if you've been following conversations about bias in technology in recent years. However, that really isn't a mark against it, since it's trying to be an introduction to the topic rather than an expansive deep dive. It's a really great prime...

    This book is a must read for anyone who uses technology in their daily lives. Sara's writing is so approachable and demystifies tech with examples of how biases in applications affect all of us. It was refreshing to read such an honest critique of the tech-focused world we live in. I c...

    A really important look into the biases built into the tech that permeates our lives. Insightful anecdotes and important points about the need for ethics and diversity in the tech industry. As someone in that space already, most of it wasn?t new, but I?m glad the book exists! I hop...

    Technology is now the energy field that surrounds us and penetrates us; it binds our planet together. But the tech industry is failing all of us in myriads of ways. This book gives a great summary of the problems of technology and how they came to be. Recommended: for everyone who ...

    Insightful and highly readable. None of the examples used will come as a surprise to anyone who?s been following tech stories for the last few years, but the author draws a neat through line that bring the problems into sharper focus. ...

    This isn't the first book I've read about big data and the algorithms behind the technology that works in every facet of our lives can work against us. What was new for me about this book was the discussion on the culture of tech companies that is often sexist and racist. Things like t...

    This is a good solid introduction to a really important issue. Given the nature of the subject matter, a lot of the most striking anecdotes in here were covered by the tech press and so were widely circulated within the community of people observing this kind of thing closely. But even...

    Pretty good look with examples/data at how/why the current SV companies bias their apps towards 'young Caucasian males' and what companies should do to fix this. ...

  • Amy
    Nov 30, 2017

    I'm so grateful to have received a free ARC of Technically Wrong! The 3-star rating was hard to decide and isn't reflective of my full range of feelings. That's why the review that follows will be massively long. First off, the minor typos and technical errors, likely due to it bei...

    Well . . . This is another one of those funny books that is sort of a ?5? and sort of a ?3.? The book broadly claims that the tech industry builds interfaces and products that are (not necessarily intentionally) biased. The book says that the main driver is the homogeneity of t...

    A good and short read. Plenty of examples, but mostly the famous ones on the internet - the author's alignment with the truly marginalized is limited, mostly with female/gays/transgender/nonwhites but still the educated, unlike O'Neil in Weapons of Math Destruction: How Big Data Increa...

    Recommended reading on the current (very current) state of the tech industry. Overlaps a little bit with and cites Weapons of Math Destruction: How Big Data Increases Inequality and Threatens Democracy, but focuses more on programmer an designer choices, assumptions and hidden biases i...

    This was a very thoughtful exploration of how bias is built into the tech products we use every day, and how that bias subsequently shapes and reinforces behaviors offline. Wachter-Boettcher explores not just how technology is built, but also how the organizations that build it perpetu...

  • Philipp
    Dec 08, 2017

    I'm so grateful to have received a free ARC of Technically Wrong! The 3-star rating was hard to decide and isn't reflective of my full range of feelings. That's why the review that follows will be massively long. First off, the minor typos and technical errors, likely due to it bei...

    Well . . . This is another one of those funny books that is sort of a ?5? and sort of a ?3.? The book broadly claims that the tech industry builds interfaces and products that are (not necessarily intentionally) biased. The book says that the main driver is the homogeneity of t...

    A good and short read. Plenty of examples, but mostly the famous ones on the internet - the author's alignment with the truly marginalized is limited, mostly with female/gays/transgender/nonwhites but still the educated, unlike O'Neil in Weapons of Math Destruction: How Big Data Increa...

    Recommended reading on the current (very current) state of the tech industry. Overlaps a little bit with and cites Weapons of Math Destruction: How Big Data Increases Inequality and Threatens Democracy, but focuses more on programmer an designer choices, assumptions and hidden biases i...

  • Sophia Ramos
    Oct 06, 2017

    I'm so grateful to have received a free ARC of Technically Wrong! The 3-star rating was hard to decide and isn't reflective of my full range of feelings. That's why the review that follows will be massively long. First off, the minor typos and technical errors, likely due to it bei...

    Well . . . This is another one of those funny books that is sort of a ?5? and sort of a ?3.? The book broadly claims that the tech industry builds interfaces and products that are (not necessarily intentionally) biased. The book says that the main driver is the homogeneity of t...

    A good and short read. Plenty of examples, but mostly the famous ones on the internet - the author's alignment with the truly marginalized is limited, mostly with female/gays/transgender/nonwhites but still the educated, unlike O'Neil in Weapons of Math Destruction: How Big Data Increa...

    Recommended reading on the current (very current) state of the tech industry. Overlaps a little bit with and cites Weapons of Math Destruction: How Big Data Increases Inequality and Threatens Democracy, but focuses more on programmer an designer choices, assumptions and hidden biases i...

    This was a very thoughtful exploration of how bias is built into the tech products we use every day, and how that bias subsequently shapes and reinforces behaviors offline. Wachter-Boettcher explores not just how technology is built, but also how the organizations that build it perpetu...

    I won this book in a giveaway. I work in the tech sector and was interested in this book because I am leading a digital transformation effort at my job and wanted to make sure i didn't fall into any of these traps. The book was not what I was thinking it was but boy were my eyes opened...

    I want to qualify my rating of this book: If you haven?t previously thought about sexism, racism, or other forms of discrimination in the tech industry, this is a five-star recommendation. However, as someone who regularly reads about this topic and pays attention to tech news, I enc...

    A must read for anyone who designs digital experiences, and doesn't want to be an inadvertent dude-bro. Against a backdrop of increasingly ubiquitous technology, with every online interaction forcing us to expose parts of ourselves, Sara Wachter-Boettcher weaves a challenging narrat...

    Some parts of it dragged, but overall, it was terrifying. I thought it made especially interesting points about the necessity of training algorithms with unbiased training data so as not to perpetuate past injustices, the myth of the "tech industry" monoculture, and the way free speech...

    Must read for anyone who creates tech products - any product, really. Wachter-Boettcher tells story after story of how tech is only as inclusive, useful, and fair as the ideas behind it. "Because, no matter how much tech companies talk about algorithms like they?re nothing but ad...

    This book doesn't really cover anything new, if you've been following conversations about bias in technology in recent years. However, that really isn't a mark against it, since it's trying to be an introduction to the topic rather than an expansive deep dive. It's a really great prime...

    This book is a must read for anyone who uses technology in their daily lives. Sara's writing is so approachable and demystifies tech with examples of how biases in applications affect all of us. It was refreshing to read such an honest critique of the tech-focused world we live in. I c...

    A really important look into the biases built into the tech that permeates our lives. Insightful anecdotes and important points about the need for ethics and diversity in the tech industry. As someone in that space already, most of it wasn?t new, but I?m glad the book exists! I hop...

    Technology is now the energy field that surrounds us and penetrates us; it binds our planet together. But the tech industry is failing all of us in myriads of ways. This book gives a great summary of the problems of technology and how they came to be. Recommended: for everyone who ...

    Insightful and highly readable. None of the examples used will come as a surprise to anyone who?s been following tech stories for the last few years, but the author draws a neat through line that bring the problems into sharper focus. ...

    This isn't the first book I've read about big data and the algorithms behind the technology that works in every facet of our lives can work against us. What was new for me about this book was the discussion on the culture of tech companies that is often sexist and racist. Things like t...

    This is a good solid introduction to a really important issue. Given the nature of the subject matter, a lot of the most striking anecdotes in here were covered by the tech press and so were widely circulated within the community of people observing this kind of thing closely. But even...

    Pretty good look with examples/data at how/why the current SV companies bias their apps towards 'young Caucasian males' and what companies should do to fix this. ...

    CD, this is a fascinating read that I borrowed from my friend Grace. It looks into the ways our technology has been created with less than the majority audience in mind. It's not written in academic jargon, which I appreciate?Wachter-Boettcher clearly wanted her text to be understood...

  • Jen Naughton
    Jul 15, 2017

    I'm so grateful to have received a free ARC of Technically Wrong! The 3-star rating was hard to decide and isn't reflective of my full range of feelings. That's why the review that follows will be massively long. First off, the minor typos and technical errors, likely due to it bei...

    Well . . . This is another one of those funny books that is sort of a ?5? and sort of a ?3.? The book broadly claims that the tech industry builds interfaces and products that are (not necessarily intentionally) biased. The book says that the main driver is the homogeneity of t...

    A good and short read. Plenty of examples, but mostly the famous ones on the internet - the author's alignment with the truly marginalized is limited, mostly with female/gays/transgender/nonwhites but still the educated, unlike O'Neil in Weapons of Math Destruction: How Big Data Increa...

    Recommended reading on the current (very current) state of the tech industry. Overlaps a little bit with and cites Weapons of Math Destruction: How Big Data Increases Inequality and Threatens Democracy, but focuses more on programmer an designer choices, assumptions and hidden biases i...

    This was a very thoughtful exploration of how bias is built into the tech products we use every day, and how that bias subsequently shapes and reinforces behaviors offline. Wachter-Boettcher explores not just how technology is built, but also how the organizations that build it perpetu...

    I won this book in a giveaway. I work in the tech sector and was interested in this book because I am leading a digital transformation effort at my job and wanted to make sure i didn't fall into any of these traps. The book was not what I was thinking it was but boy were my eyes opened...

    I want to qualify my rating of this book: If you haven?t previously thought about sexism, racism, or other forms of discrimination in the tech industry, this is a five-star recommendation. However, as someone who regularly reads about this topic and pays attention to tech news, I enc...

    A must read for anyone who designs digital experiences, and doesn't want to be an inadvertent dude-bro. Against a backdrop of increasingly ubiquitous technology, with every online interaction forcing us to expose parts of ourselves, Sara Wachter-Boettcher weaves a challenging narrat...

    Some parts of it dragged, but overall, it was terrifying. I thought it made especially interesting points about the necessity of training algorithms with unbiased training data so as not to perpetuate past injustices, the myth of the "tech industry" monoculture, and the way free speech...

    Must read for anyone who creates tech products - any product, really. Wachter-Boettcher tells story after story of how tech is only as inclusive, useful, and fair as the ideas behind it. "Because, no matter how much tech companies talk about algorithms like they?re nothing but ad...

    This book doesn't really cover anything new, if you've been following conversations about bias in technology in recent years. However, that really isn't a mark against it, since it's trying to be an introduction to the topic rather than an expansive deep dive. It's a really great prime...

    This book is a must read for anyone who uses technology in their daily lives. Sara's writing is so approachable and demystifies tech with examples of how biases in applications affect all of us. It was refreshing to read such an honest critique of the tech-focused world we live in. I c...

    A really important look into the biases built into the tech that permeates our lives. Insightful anecdotes and important points about the need for ethics and diversity in the tech industry. As someone in that space already, most of it wasn?t new, but I?m glad the book exists! I hop...

    Technology is now the energy field that surrounds us and penetrates us; it binds our planet together. But the tech industry is failing all of us in myriads of ways. This book gives a great summary of the problems of technology and how they came to be. Recommended: for everyone who ...

    Insightful and highly readable. None of the examples used will come as a surprise to anyone who?s been following tech stories for the last few years, but the author draws a neat through line that bring the problems into sharper focus. ...

    This isn't the first book I've read about big data and the algorithms behind the technology that works in every facet of our lives can work against us. What was new for me about this book was the discussion on the culture of tech companies that is often sexist and racist. Things like t...

    This is a good solid introduction to a really important issue. Given the nature of the subject matter, a lot of the most striking anecdotes in here were covered by the tech press and so were widely circulated within the community of people observing this kind of thing closely. But even...

    Pretty good look with examples/data at how/why the current SV companies bias their apps towards 'young Caucasian males' and what companies should do to fix this. ...

    CD, this is a fascinating read that I borrowed from my friend Grace. It looks into the ways our technology has been created with less than the majority audience in mind. It's not written in academic jargon, which I appreciate?Wachter-Boettcher clearly wanted her text to be understood...

    Wachter-Boettcher's book on understanding the exclusionary power and privilege of technology is must-read for anyone who works in technology or with technology (which yes, means the vast majority of us). She moves through a variety of technologies, platforms, and systems to show how wh...

    Concise and motivating (if depressing). Should be required reading for everyone in tech. ...

    Originally published at https://timkadlec.com/read/2018/techn... ------ Last year I read "Fifty Inventions That Shaped The Modern Economy" by Tim Hartford. My favorite question that he raised repeatedly was about who benefits from what we build, and more importantly, who loses.So whe...

    I received this an an ARC from NetGalley in exchange for a review. Exactly as the title says, this book outlines everything wrong with technology in today's society - namely our most used apps and social networking websites. There is so much relevant information in this book - h...

    This scathing critique of the tech industry and its techniques is both informative and hair-raising. Wachter-Boettcher winningly posits that from top (industry giants like Facebook) to bottom (smaller, niche companies), services rely on finely crafted promises of ease, interconnectedne...

    Deceptively simple book. We all know that tech is sexist and cares more about selling our info to advertisers than about our experiences using it. We know that design is more about looks than substance. Wachter-Boettcher lays out the evidence we already know, and adds in the stuff we m...

    This was a very interesting journey for me. I wanted to read about UX, biased algorithms, and accessibility. There is that but for the most part, the book is about diversity and inclusion from author's perspective. The selling point of the book is how lack of diversity in tech lead...

    I really enjoyed this book. I found it to be a chatty, personable approach to the major issues intersecting the tech industry and ethics. Although I was familiar with many of the examples presented, most of them having made headlines and been the subject of hot takes, it was interestin...

    Technically Wrong demystifies the tech industry and shows the innards of how the information that we freely give is used against us. Well, maybe not against us- but not for us It is primarily utilized for the tech companies to make money and secondly to sell to other companies for prof...

  • Katie
    Jan 06, 2018

    I'm so grateful to have received a free ARC of Technically Wrong! The 3-star rating was hard to decide and isn't reflective of my full range of feelings. That's why the review that follows will be massively long. First off, the minor typos and technical errors, likely due to it bei...

    Well . . . This is another one of those funny books that is sort of a ?5? and sort of a ?3.? The book broadly claims that the tech industry builds interfaces and products that are (not necessarily intentionally) biased. The book says that the main driver is the homogeneity of t...

    A good and short read. Plenty of examples, but mostly the famous ones on the internet - the author's alignment with the truly marginalized is limited, mostly with female/gays/transgender/nonwhites but still the educated, unlike O'Neil in Weapons of Math Destruction: How Big Data Increa...

    Recommended reading on the current (very current) state of the tech industry. Overlaps a little bit with and cites Weapons of Math Destruction: How Big Data Increases Inequality and Threatens Democracy, but focuses more on programmer an designer choices, assumptions and hidden biases i...

    This was a very thoughtful exploration of how bias is built into the tech products we use every day, and how that bias subsequently shapes and reinforces behaviors offline. Wachter-Boettcher explores not just how technology is built, but also how the organizations that build it perpetu...

    I won this book in a giveaway. I work in the tech sector and was interested in this book because I am leading a digital transformation effort at my job and wanted to make sure i didn't fall into any of these traps. The book was not what I was thinking it was but boy were my eyes opened...

    I want to qualify my rating of this book: If you haven?t previously thought about sexism, racism, or other forms of discrimination in the tech industry, this is a five-star recommendation. However, as someone who regularly reads about this topic and pays attention to tech news, I enc...

    A must read for anyone who designs digital experiences, and doesn't want to be an inadvertent dude-bro. Against a backdrop of increasingly ubiquitous technology, with every online interaction forcing us to expose parts of ourselves, Sara Wachter-Boettcher weaves a challenging narrat...

    Some parts of it dragged, but overall, it was terrifying. I thought it made especially interesting points about the necessity of training algorithms with unbiased training data so as not to perpetuate past injustices, the myth of the "tech industry" monoculture, and the way free speech...

    Must read for anyone who creates tech products - any product, really. Wachter-Boettcher tells story after story of how tech is only as inclusive, useful, and fair as the ideas behind it. "Because, no matter how much tech companies talk about algorithms like they?re nothing but ad...

    This book doesn't really cover anything new, if you've been following conversations about bias in technology in recent years. However, that really isn't a mark against it, since it's trying to be an introduction to the topic rather than an expansive deep dive. It's a really great prime...

    This book is a must read for anyone who uses technology in their daily lives. Sara's writing is so approachable and demystifies tech with examples of how biases in applications affect all of us. It was refreshing to read such an honest critique of the tech-focused world we live in. I c...

    A really important look into the biases built into the tech that permeates our lives. Insightful anecdotes and important points about the need for ethics and diversity in the tech industry. As someone in that space already, most of it wasn?t new, but I?m glad the book exists! I hop...

    Technology is now the energy field that surrounds us and penetrates us; it binds our planet together. But the tech industry is failing all of us in myriads of ways. This book gives a great summary of the problems of technology and how they came to be. Recommended: for everyone who ...

    Insightful and highly readable. None of the examples used will come as a surprise to anyone who?s been following tech stories for the last few years, but the author draws a neat through line that bring the problems into sharper focus. ...

    This isn't the first book I've read about big data and the algorithms behind the technology that works in every facet of our lives can work against us. What was new for me about this book was the discussion on the culture of tech companies that is often sexist and racist. Things like t...

  • Kathy Reid
    Oct 31, 2017

    I'm so grateful to have received a free ARC of Technically Wrong! The 3-star rating was hard to decide and isn't reflective of my full range of feelings. That's why the review that follows will be massively long. First off, the minor typos and technical errors, likely due to it bei...

    Well . . . This is another one of those funny books that is sort of a ?5? and sort of a ?3.? The book broadly claims that the tech industry builds interfaces and products that are (not necessarily intentionally) biased. The book says that the main driver is the homogeneity of t...

    A good and short read. Plenty of examples, but mostly the famous ones on the internet - the author's alignment with the truly marginalized is limited, mostly with female/gays/transgender/nonwhites but still the educated, unlike O'Neil in Weapons of Math Destruction: How Big Data Increa...

    Recommended reading on the current (very current) state of the tech industry. Overlaps a little bit with and cites Weapons of Math Destruction: How Big Data Increases Inequality and Threatens Democracy, but focuses more on programmer an designer choices, assumptions and hidden biases i...

    This was a very thoughtful exploration of how bias is built into the tech products we use every day, and how that bias subsequently shapes and reinforces behaviors offline. Wachter-Boettcher explores not just how technology is built, but also how the organizations that build it perpetu...

    I won this book in a giveaway. I work in the tech sector and was interested in this book because I am leading a digital transformation effort at my job and wanted to make sure i didn't fall into any of these traps. The book was not what I was thinking it was but boy were my eyes opened...

    I want to qualify my rating of this book: If you haven?t previously thought about sexism, racism, or other forms of discrimination in the tech industry, this is a five-star recommendation. However, as someone who regularly reads about this topic and pays attention to tech news, I enc...

    A must read for anyone who designs digital experiences, and doesn't want to be an inadvertent dude-bro. Against a backdrop of increasingly ubiquitous technology, with every online interaction forcing us to expose parts of ourselves, Sara Wachter-Boettcher weaves a challenging narrat...

  • Jill
    Oct 13, 2017

    I'm so grateful to have received a free ARC of Technically Wrong! The 3-star rating was hard to decide and isn't reflective of my full range of feelings. That's why the review that follows will be massively long. First off, the minor typos and technical errors, likely due to it bei...

    Well . . . This is another one of those funny books that is sort of a ?5? and sort of a ?3.? The book broadly claims that the tech industry builds interfaces and products that are (not necessarily intentionally) biased. The book says that the main driver is the homogeneity of t...

    A good and short read. Plenty of examples, but mostly the famous ones on the internet - the author's alignment with the truly marginalized is limited, mostly with female/gays/transgender/nonwhites but still the educated, unlike O'Neil in Weapons of Math Destruction: How Big Data Increa...

    Recommended reading on the current (very current) state of the tech industry. Overlaps a little bit with and cites Weapons of Math Destruction: How Big Data Increases Inequality and Threatens Democracy, but focuses more on programmer an designer choices, assumptions and hidden biases i...

    This was a very thoughtful exploration of how bias is built into the tech products we use every day, and how that bias subsequently shapes and reinforces behaviors offline. Wachter-Boettcher explores not just how technology is built, but also how the organizations that build it perpetu...

    I won this book in a giveaway. I work in the tech sector and was interested in this book because I am leading a digital transformation effort at my job and wanted to make sure i didn't fall into any of these traps. The book was not what I was thinking it was but boy were my eyes opened...

  • linhtalinhtinh
    Dec 15, 2017

    I'm so grateful to have received a free ARC of Technically Wrong! The 3-star rating was hard to decide and isn't reflective of my full range of feelings. That's why the review that follows will be massively long. First off, the minor typos and technical errors, likely due to it bei...

    Well . . . This is another one of those funny books that is sort of a ?5? and sort of a ?3.? The book broadly claims that the tech industry builds interfaces and products that are (not necessarily intentionally) biased. The book says that the main driver is the homogeneity of t...

    A good and short read. Plenty of examples, but mostly the famous ones on the internet - the author's alignment with the truly marginalized is limited, mostly with female/gays/transgender/nonwhites but still the educated, unlike O'Neil in Weapons of Math Destruction: How Big Data Increa...

  • Douglas Lord
    Dec 05, 2017

    I'm so grateful to have received a free ARC of Technically Wrong! The 3-star rating was hard to decide and isn't reflective of my full range of feelings. That's why the review that follows will be massively long. First off, the minor typos and technical errors, likely due to it bei...

    Well . . . This is another one of those funny books that is sort of a ?5? and sort of a ?3.? The book broadly claims that the tech industry builds interfaces and products that are (not necessarily intentionally) biased. The book says that the main driver is the homogeneity of t...

    A good and short read. Plenty of examples, but mostly the famous ones on the internet - the author's alignment with the truly marginalized is limited, mostly with female/gays/transgender/nonwhites but still the educated, unlike O'Neil in Weapons of Math Destruction: How Big Data Increa...

    Recommended reading on the current (very current) state of the tech industry. Overlaps a little bit with and cites Weapons of Math Destruction: How Big Data Increases Inequality and Threatens Democracy, but focuses more on programmer an designer choices, assumptions and hidden biases i...

    This was a very thoughtful exploration of how bias is built into the tech products we use every day, and how that bias subsequently shapes and reinforces behaviors offline. Wachter-Boettcher explores not just how technology is built, but also how the organizations that build it perpetu...

    I won this book in a giveaway. I work in the tech sector and was interested in this book because I am leading a digital transformation effort at my job and wanted to make sure i didn't fall into any of these traps. The book was not what I was thinking it was but boy were my eyes opened...

    I want to qualify my rating of this book: If you haven?t previously thought about sexism, racism, or other forms of discrimination in the tech industry, this is a five-star recommendation. However, as someone who regularly reads about this topic and pays attention to tech news, I enc...

    A must read for anyone who designs digital experiences, and doesn't want to be an inadvertent dude-bro. Against a backdrop of increasingly ubiquitous technology, with every online interaction forcing us to expose parts of ourselves, Sara Wachter-Boettcher weaves a challenging narrat...

    Some parts of it dragged, but overall, it was terrifying. I thought it made especially interesting points about the necessity of training algorithms with unbiased training data so as not to perpetuate past injustices, the myth of the "tech industry" monoculture, and the way free speech...

    Must read for anyone who creates tech products - any product, really. Wachter-Boettcher tells story after story of how tech is only as inclusive, useful, and fair as the ideas behind it. "Because, no matter how much tech companies talk about algorithms like they?re nothing but ad...

    This book doesn't really cover anything new, if you've been following conversations about bias in technology in recent years. However, that really isn't a mark against it, since it's trying to be an introduction to the topic rather than an expansive deep dive. It's a really great prime...

    This book is a must read for anyone who uses technology in their daily lives. Sara's writing is so approachable and demystifies tech with examples of how biases in applications affect all of us. It was refreshing to read such an honest critique of the tech-focused world we live in. I c...

    A really important look into the biases built into the tech that permeates our lives. Insightful anecdotes and important points about the need for ethics and diversity in the tech industry. As someone in that space already, most of it wasn?t new, but I?m glad the book exists! I hop...

    Technology is now the energy field that surrounds us and penetrates us; it binds our planet together. But the tech industry is failing all of us in myriads of ways. This book gives a great summary of the problems of technology and how they came to be. Recommended: for everyone who ...

    Insightful and highly readable. None of the examples used will come as a surprise to anyone who?s been following tech stories for the last few years, but the author draws a neat through line that bring the problems into sharper focus. ...

    This isn't the first book I've read about big data and the algorithms behind the technology that works in every facet of our lives can work against us. What was new for me about this book was the discussion on the culture of tech companies that is often sexist and racist. Things like t...

    This is a good solid introduction to a really important issue. Given the nature of the subject matter, a lot of the most striking anecdotes in here were covered by the tech press and so were widely circulated within the community of people observing this kind of thing closely. But even...

    Pretty good look with examples/data at how/why the current SV companies bias their apps towards 'young Caucasian males' and what companies should do to fix this. ...

    CD, this is a fascinating read that I borrowed from my friend Grace. It looks into the ways our technology has been created with less than the majority audience in mind. It's not written in academic jargon, which I appreciate?Wachter-Boettcher clearly wanted her text to be understood...

    Wachter-Boettcher's book on understanding the exclusionary power and privilege of technology is must-read for anyone who works in technology or with technology (which yes, means the vast majority of us). She moves through a variety of technologies, platforms, and systems to show how wh...

    Concise and motivating (if depressing). Should be required reading for everyone in tech. ...

    Originally published at https://timkadlec.com/read/2018/techn... ------ Last year I read "Fifty Inventions That Shaped The Modern Economy" by Tim Hartford. My favorite question that he raised repeatedly was about who benefits from what we build, and more importantly, who loses.So whe...

    I received this an an ARC from NetGalley in exchange for a review. Exactly as the title says, this book outlines everything wrong with technology in today's society - namely our most used apps and social networking websites. There is so much relevant information in this book - h...

    This scathing critique of the tech industry and its techniques is both informative and hair-raising. Wachter-Boettcher winningly posits that from top (industry giants like Facebook) to bottom (smaller, niche companies), services rely on finely crafted promises of ease, interconnectedne...

  • Anna Livingston
    Oct 21, 2017

    I'm so grateful to have received a free ARC of Technically Wrong! The 3-star rating was hard to decide and isn't reflective of my full range of feelings. That's why the review that follows will be massively long. First off, the minor typos and technical errors, likely due to it bei...

    Well . . . This is another one of those funny books that is sort of a ?5? and sort of a ?3.? The book broadly claims that the tech industry builds interfaces and products that are (not necessarily intentionally) biased. The book says that the main driver is the homogeneity of t...

    A good and short read. Plenty of examples, but mostly the famous ones on the internet - the author's alignment with the truly marginalized is limited, mostly with female/gays/transgender/nonwhites but still the educated, unlike O'Neil in Weapons of Math Destruction: How Big Data Increa...

    Recommended reading on the current (very current) state of the tech industry. Overlaps a little bit with and cites Weapons of Math Destruction: How Big Data Increases Inequality and Threatens Democracy, but focuses more on programmer an designer choices, assumptions and hidden biases i...

    This was a very thoughtful exploration of how bias is built into the tech products we use every day, and how that bias subsequently shapes and reinforces behaviors offline. Wachter-Boettcher explores not just how technology is built, but also how the organizations that build it perpetu...

    I won this book in a giveaway. I work in the tech sector and was interested in this book because I am leading a digital transformation effort at my job and wanted to make sure i didn't fall into any of these traps. The book was not what I was thinking it was but boy were my eyes opened...

    I want to qualify my rating of this book: If you haven?t previously thought about sexism, racism, or other forms of discrimination in the tech industry, this is a five-star recommendation. However, as someone who regularly reads about this topic and pays attention to tech news, I enc...

    A must read for anyone who designs digital experiences, and doesn't want to be an inadvertent dude-bro. Against a backdrop of increasingly ubiquitous technology, with every online interaction forcing us to expose parts of ourselves, Sara Wachter-Boettcher weaves a challenging narrat...

    Some parts of it dragged, but overall, it was terrifying. I thought it made especially interesting points about the necessity of training algorithms with unbiased training data so as not to perpetuate past injustices, the myth of the "tech industry" monoculture, and the way free speech...

    Must read for anyone who creates tech products - any product, really. Wachter-Boettcher tells story after story of how tech is only as inclusive, useful, and fair as the ideas behind it. "Because, no matter how much tech companies talk about algorithms like they?re nothing but ad...

    This book doesn't really cover anything new, if you've been following conversations about bias in technology in recent years. However, that really isn't a mark against it, since it's trying to be an introduction to the topic rather than an expansive deep dive. It's a really great prime...

    This book is a must read for anyone who uses technology in their daily lives. Sara's writing is so approachable and demystifies tech with examples of how biases in applications affect all of us. It was refreshing to read such an honest critique of the tech-focused world we live in. I c...

    A really important look into the biases built into the tech that permeates our lives. Insightful anecdotes and important points about the need for ethics and diversity in the tech industry. As someone in that space already, most of it wasn?t new, but I?m glad the book exists! I hop...

    Technology is now the energy field that surrounds us and penetrates us; it binds our planet together. But the tech industry is failing all of us in myriads of ways. This book gives a great summary of the problems of technology and how they came to be. Recommended: for everyone who ...

    Insightful and highly readable. None of the examples used will come as a surprise to anyone who?s been following tech stories for the last few years, but the author draws a neat through line that bring the problems into sharper focus. ...

    This isn't the first book I've read about big data and the algorithms behind the technology that works in every facet of our lives can work against us. What was new for me about this book was the discussion on the culture of tech companies that is often sexist and racist. Things like t...

    This is a good solid introduction to a really important issue. Given the nature of the subject matter, a lot of the most striking anecdotes in here were covered by the tech press and so were widely circulated within the community of people observing this kind of thing closely. But even...

    Pretty good look with examples/data at how/why the current SV companies bias their apps towards 'young Caucasian males' and what companies should do to fix this. ...

    CD, this is a fascinating read that I borrowed from my friend Grace. It looks into the ways our technology has been created with less than the majority audience in mind. It's not written in academic jargon, which I appreciate?Wachter-Boettcher clearly wanted her text to be understood...

    Wachter-Boettcher's book on understanding the exclusionary power and privilege of technology is must-read for anyone who works in technology or with technology (which yes, means the vast majority of us). She moves through a variety of technologies, platforms, and systems to show how wh...

    Concise and motivating (if depressing). Should be required reading for everyone in tech. ...

    Originally published at https://timkadlec.com/read/2018/techn... ------ Last year I read "Fifty Inventions That Shaped The Modern Economy" by Tim Hartford. My favorite question that he raised repeatedly was about who benefits from what we build, and more importantly, who loses.So whe...

    I received this an an ARC from NetGalley in exchange for a review. Exactly as the title says, this book outlines everything wrong with technology in today's society - namely our most used apps and social networking websites. There is so much relevant information in this book - h...

    This scathing critique of the tech industry and its techniques is both informative and hair-raising. Wachter-Boettcher winningly posits that from top (industry giants like Facebook) to bottom (smaller, niche companies), services rely on finely crafted promises of ease, interconnectedne...

    Deceptively simple book. We all know that tech is sexist and cares more about selling our info to advertisers than about our experiences using it. We know that design is more about looks than substance. Wachter-Boettcher lays out the evidence we already know, and adds in the stuff we m...

    This was a very interesting journey for me. I wanted to read about UX, biased algorithms, and accessibility. There is that but for the most part, the book is about diversity and inclusion from author's perspective. The selling point of the book is how lack of diversity in tech lead...

    I really enjoyed this book. I found it to be a chatty, personable approach to the major issues intersecting the tech industry and ethics. Although I was familiar with many of the examples presented, most of them having made headlines and been the subject of hot takes, it was interestin...

    Technically Wrong demystifies the tech industry and shows the innards of how the information that we freely give is used against us. Well, maybe not against us- but not for us It is primarily utilized for the tech companies to make money and secondly to sell to other companies for prof...

    Left me filled with rage to the point where I had to spend a good hour calming down after I hit about 80% of the way through the book. I didn't learn much I didn't already know about the biased algorithms and toxic, male-dominated Silicon Valley culture that perpetuates them, but Wacht...

  • Holly Dowell
    Nov 26, 2017

    I'm so grateful to have received a free ARC of Technically Wrong! The 3-star rating was hard to decide and isn't reflective of my full range of feelings. That's why the review that follows will be massively long. First off, the minor typos and technical errors, likely due to it bei...

    Well . . . This is another one of those funny books that is sort of a ?5? and sort of a ?3.? The book broadly claims that the tech industry builds interfaces and products that are (not necessarily intentionally) biased. The book says that the main driver is the homogeneity of t...

    A good and short read. Plenty of examples, but mostly the famous ones on the internet - the author's alignment with the truly marginalized is limited, mostly with female/gays/transgender/nonwhites but still the educated, unlike O'Neil in Weapons of Math Destruction: How Big Data Increa...

    Recommended reading on the current (very current) state of the tech industry. Overlaps a little bit with and cites Weapons of Math Destruction: How Big Data Increases Inequality and Threatens Democracy, but focuses more on programmer an designer choices, assumptions and hidden biases i...

    This was a very thoughtful exploration of how bias is built into the tech products we use every day, and how that bias subsequently shapes and reinforces behaviors offline. Wachter-Boettcher explores not just how technology is built, but also how the organizations that build it perpetu...

    I won this book in a giveaway. I work in the tech sector and was interested in this book because I am leading a digital transformation effort at my job and wanted to make sure i didn't fall into any of these traps. The book was not what I was thinking it was but boy were my eyes opened...

    I want to qualify my rating of this book: If you haven?t previously thought about sexism, racism, or other forms of discrimination in the tech industry, this is a five-star recommendation. However, as someone who regularly reads about this topic and pays attention to tech news, I enc...

    A must read for anyone who designs digital experiences, and doesn't want to be an inadvertent dude-bro. Against a backdrop of increasingly ubiquitous technology, with every online interaction forcing us to expose parts of ourselves, Sara Wachter-Boettcher weaves a challenging narrat...

    Some parts of it dragged, but overall, it was terrifying. I thought it made especially interesting points about the necessity of training algorithms with unbiased training data so as not to perpetuate past injustices, the myth of the "tech industry" monoculture, and the way free speech...

    Must read for anyone who creates tech products - any product, really. Wachter-Boettcher tells story after story of how tech is only as inclusive, useful, and fair as the ideas behind it. "Because, no matter how much tech companies talk about algorithms like they?re nothing but ad...

    This book doesn't really cover anything new, if you've been following conversations about bias in technology in recent years. However, that really isn't a mark against it, since it's trying to be an introduction to the topic rather than an expansive deep dive. It's a really great prime...

    This book is a must read for anyone who uses technology in their daily lives. Sara's writing is so approachable and demystifies tech with examples of how biases in applications affect all of us. It was refreshing to read such an honest critique of the tech-focused world we live in. I c...

    A really important look into the biases built into the tech that permeates our lives. Insightful anecdotes and important points about the need for ethics and diversity in the tech industry. As someone in that space already, most of it wasn?t new, but I?m glad the book exists! I hop...

  • Katie Kovalcin
    Oct 10, 2017

    I'm so grateful to have received a free ARC of Technically Wrong! The 3-star rating was hard to decide and isn't reflective of my full range of feelings. That's why the review that follows will be massively long. First off, the minor typos and technical errors, likely due to it bei...

    Well . . . This is another one of those funny books that is sort of a ?5? and sort of a ?3.? The book broadly claims that the tech industry builds interfaces and products that are (not necessarily intentionally) biased. The book says that the main driver is the homogeneity of t...

    A good and short read. Plenty of examples, but mostly the famous ones on the internet - the author's alignment with the truly marginalized is limited, mostly with female/gays/transgender/nonwhites but still the educated, unlike O'Neil in Weapons of Math Destruction: How Big Data Increa...

    Recommended reading on the current (very current) state of the tech industry. Overlaps a little bit with and cites Weapons of Math Destruction: How Big Data Increases Inequality and Threatens Democracy, but focuses more on programmer an designer choices, assumptions and hidden biases i...

    This was a very thoughtful exploration of how bias is built into the tech products we use every day, and how that bias subsequently shapes and reinforces behaviors offline. Wachter-Boettcher explores not just how technology is built, but also how the organizations that build it perpetu...

    I won this book in a giveaway. I work in the tech sector and was interested in this book because I am leading a digital transformation effort at my job and wanted to make sure i didn't fall into any of these traps. The book was not what I was thinking it was but boy were my eyes opened...

    I want to qualify my rating of this book: If you haven?t previously thought about sexism, racism, or other forms of discrimination in the tech industry, this is a five-star recommendation. However, as someone who regularly reads about this topic and pays attention to tech news, I enc...

    A must read for anyone who designs digital experiences, and doesn't want to be an inadvertent dude-bro. Against a backdrop of increasingly ubiquitous technology, with every online interaction forcing us to expose parts of ourselves, Sara Wachter-Boettcher weaves a challenging narrat...

    Some parts of it dragged, but overall, it was terrifying. I thought it made especially interesting points about the necessity of training algorithms with unbiased training data so as not to perpetuate past injustices, the myth of the "tech industry" monoculture, and the way free speech...

    Must read for anyone who creates tech products - any product, really. Wachter-Boettcher tells story after story of how tech is only as inclusive, useful, and fair as the ideas behind it. "Because, no matter how much tech companies talk about algorithms like they?re nothing but ad...

    This book doesn't really cover anything new, if you've been following conversations about bias in technology in recent years. However, that really isn't a mark against it, since it's trying to be an introduction to the topic rather than an expansive deep dive. It's a really great prime...

    This book is a must read for anyone who uses technology in their daily lives. Sara's writing is so approachable and demystifies tech with examples of how biases in applications affect all of us. It was refreshing to read such an honest critique of the tech-focused world we live in. I c...

  • Katie
    Oct 14, 2017

    I'm so grateful to have received a free ARC of Technically Wrong! The 3-star rating was hard to decide and isn't reflective of my full range of feelings. That's why the review that follows will be massively long. First off, the minor typos and technical errors, likely due to it bei...

    Well . . . This is another one of those funny books that is sort of a ?5? and sort of a ?3.? The book broadly claims that the tech industry builds interfaces and products that are (not necessarily intentionally) biased. The book says that the main driver is the homogeneity of t...

    A good and short read. Plenty of examples, but mostly the famous ones on the internet - the author's alignment with the truly marginalized is limited, mostly with female/gays/transgender/nonwhites but still the educated, unlike O'Neil in Weapons of Math Destruction: How Big Data Increa...

    Recommended reading on the current (very current) state of the tech industry. Overlaps a little bit with and cites Weapons of Math Destruction: How Big Data Increases Inequality and Threatens Democracy, but focuses more on programmer an designer choices, assumptions and hidden biases i...

    This was a very thoughtful exploration of how bias is built into the tech products we use every day, and how that bias subsequently shapes and reinforces behaviors offline. Wachter-Boettcher explores not just how technology is built, but also how the organizations that build it perpetu...

    I won this book in a giveaway. I work in the tech sector and was interested in this book because I am leading a digital transformation effort at my job and wanted to make sure i didn't fall into any of these traps. The book was not what I was thinking it was but boy were my eyes opened...

    I want to qualify my rating of this book: If you haven?t previously thought about sexism, racism, or other forms of discrimination in the tech industry, this is a five-star recommendation. However, as someone who regularly reads about this topic and pays attention to tech news, I enc...

    A must read for anyone who designs digital experiences, and doesn't want to be an inadvertent dude-bro. Against a backdrop of increasingly ubiquitous technology, with every online interaction forcing us to expose parts of ourselves, Sara Wachter-Boettcher weaves a challenging narrat...

    Some parts of it dragged, but overall, it was terrifying. I thought it made especially interesting points about the necessity of training algorithms with unbiased training data so as not to perpetuate past injustices, the myth of the "tech industry" monoculture, and the way free speech...

    Must read for anyone who creates tech products - any product, really. Wachter-Boettcher tells story after story of how tech is only as inclusive, useful, and fair as the ideas behind it. "Because, no matter how much tech companies talk about algorithms like they?re nothing but ad...

  • Tahlia
    Sep 18, 2017

    I'm so grateful to have received a free ARC of Technically Wrong! The 3-star rating was hard to decide and isn't reflective of my full range of feelings. That's why the review that follows will be massively long. First off, the minor typos and technical errors, likely due to it bei...

    Well . . . This is another one of those funny books that is sort of a ?5? and sort of a ?3.? The book broadly claims that the tech industry builds interfaces and products that are (not necessarily intentionally) biased. The book says that the main driver is the homogeneity of t...

    A good and short read. Plenty of examples, but mostly the famous ones on the internet - the author's alignment with the truly marginalized is limited, mostly with female/gays/transgender/nonwhites but still the educated, unlike O'Neil in Weapons of Math Destruction: How Big Data Increa...

    Recommended reading on the current (very current) state of the tech industry. Overlaps a little bit with and cites Weapons of Math Destruction: How Big Data Increases Inequality and Threatens Democracy, but focuses more on programmer an designer choices, assumptions and hidden biases i...

    This was a very thoughtful exploration of how bias is built into the tech products we use every day, and how that bias subsequently shapes and reinforces behaviors offline. Wachter-Boettcher explores not just how technology is built, but also how the organizations that build it perpetu...

    I won this book in a giveaway. I work in the tech sector and was interested in this book because I am leading a digital transformation effort at my job and wanted to make sure i didn't fall into any of these traps. The book was not what I was thinking it was but boy were my eyes opened...

    I want to qualify my rating of this book: If you haven?t previously thought about sexism, racism, or other forms of discrimination in the tech industry, this is a five-star recommendation. However, as someone who regularly reads about this topic and pays attention to tech news, I enc...

    A must read for anyone who designs digital experiences, and doesn't want to be an inadvertent dude-bro. Against a backdrop of increasingly ubiquitous technology, with every online interaction forcing us to expose parts of ourselves, Sara Wachter-Boettcher weaves a challenging narrat...

    Some parts of it dragged, but overall, it was terrifying. I thought it made especially interesting points about the necessity of training algorithms with unbiased training data so as not to perpetuate past injustices, the myth of the "tech industry" monoculture, and the way free speech...

    Must read for anyone who creates tech products - any product, really. Wachter-Boettcher tells story after story of how tech is only as inclusive, useful, and fair as the ideas behind it. "Because, no matter how much tech companies talk about algorithms like they?re nothing but ad...

    This book doesn't really cover anything new, if you've been following conversations about bias in technology in recent years. However, that really isn't a mark against it, since it's trying to be an introduction to the topic rather than an expansive deep dive. It's a really great prime...

    This book is a must read for anyone who uses technology in their daily lives. Sara's writing is so approachable and demystifies tech with examples of how biases in applications affect all of us. It was refreshing to read such an honest critique of the tech-focused world we live in. I c...

    A really important look into the biases built into the tech that permeates our lives. Insightful anecdotes and important points about the need for ethics and diversity in the tech industry. As someone in that space already, most of it wasn?t new, but I?m glad the book exists! I hop...

    Technology is now the energy field that surrounds us and penetrates us; it binds our planet together. But the tech industry is failing all of us in myriads of ways. This book gives a great summary of the problems of technology and how they came to be. Recommended: for everyone who ...

    Insightful and highly readable. None of the examples used will come as a surprise to anyone who?s been following tech stories for the last few years, but the author draws a neat through line that bring the problems into sharper focus. ...

    This isn't the first book I've read about big data and the algorithms behind the technology that works in every facet of our lives can work against us. What was new for me about this book was the discussion on the culture of tech companies that is often sexist and racist. Things like t...

    This is a good solid introduction to a really important issue. Given the nature of the subject matter, a lot of the most striking anecdotes in here were covered by the tech press and so were widely circulated within the community of people observing this kind of thing closely. But even...

    Pretty good look with examples/data at how/why the current SV companies bias their apps towards 'young Caucasian males' and what companies should do to fix this. ...

    CD, this is a fascinating read that I borrowed from my friend Grace. It looks into the ways our technology has been created with less than the majority audience in mind. It's not written in academic jargon, which I appreciate?Wachter-Boettcher clearly wanted her text to be understood...

    Wachter-Boettcher's book on understanding the exclusionary power and privilege of technology is must-read for anyone who works in technology or with technology (which yes, means the vast majority of us). She moves through a variety of technologies, platforms, and systems to show how wh...

    Concise and motivating (if depressing). Should be required reading for everyone in tech. ...

    Originally published at https://timkadlec.com/read/2018/techn... ------ Last year I read "Fifty Inventions That Shaped The Modern Economy" by Tim Hartford. My favorite question that he raised repeatedly was about who benefits from what we build, and more importantly, who loses.So whe...

    I received this an an ARC from NetGalley in exchange for a review. Exactly as the title says, this book outlines everything wrong with technology in today's society - namely our most used apps and social networking websites. There is so much relevant information in this book - h...

  • Rachel Moyes
    Oct 06, 2017

    I'm so grateful to have received a free ARC of Technically Wrong! The 3-star rating was hard to decide and isn't reflective of my full range of feelings. That's why the review that follows will be massively long. First off, the minor typos and technical errors, likely due to it bei...

    Well . . . This is another one of those funny books that is sort of a ?5? and sort of a ?3.? The book broadly claims that the tech industry builds interfaces and products that are (not necessarily intentionally) biased. The book says that the main driver is the homogeneity of t...

    A good and short read. Plenty of examples, but mostly the famous ones on the internet - the author's alignment with the truly marginalized is limited, mostly with female/gays/transgender/nonwhites but still the educated, unlike O'Neil in Weapons of Math Destruction: How Big Data Increa...

    Recommended reading on the current (very current) state of the tech industry. Overlaps a little bit with and cites Weapons of Math Destruction: How Big Data Increases Inequality and Threatens Democracy, but focuses more on programmer an designer choices, assumptions and hidden biases i...

    This was a very thoughtful exploration of how bias is built into the tech products we use every day, and how that bias subsequently shapes and reinforces behaviors offline. Wachter-Boettcher explores not just how technology is built, but also how the organizations that build it perpetu...

    I won this book in a giveaway. I work in the tech sector and was interested in this book because I am leading a digital transformation effort at my job and wanted to make sure i didn't fall into any of these traps. The book was not what I was thinking it was but boy were my eyes opened...

    I want to qualify my rating of this book: If you haven?t previously thought about sexism, racism, or other forms of discrimination in the tech industry, this is a five-star recommendation. However, as someone who regularly reads about this topic and pays attention to tech news, I enc...

    A must read for anyone who designs digital experiences, and doesn't want to be an inadvertent dude-bro. Against a backdrop of increasingly ubiquitous technology, with every online interaction forcing us to expose parts of ourselves, Sara Wachter-Boettcher weaves a challenging narrat...

    Some parts of it dragged, but overall, it was terrifying. I thought it made especially interesting points about the necessity of training algorithms with unbiased training data so as not to perpetuate past injustices, the myth of the "tech industry" monoculture, and the way free speech...

  • Mira
    Aug 01, 2017

    I'm so grateful to have received a free ARC of Technically Wrong! The 3-star rating was hard to decide and isn't reflective of my full range of feelings. That's why the review that follows will be massively long. First off, the minor typos and technical errors, likely due to it bei...