God: A Human History

God: A Human History

NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER ? The bestselling author of Zealot and host of Believer explores humanity?s quest to make sense of the divine in this concise and fascinating history of our understanding of God.   In Zealot, Reza Aslan replaced the staid, well-worn portrayal of Jesus of Nazareth with a startling new image of the man in all his contradictions. In his new book, Asla NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER ? The bestselling author of Zealot and host of Believer explores humanity?s quest ...

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Title:God: A Human History
Author:Reza Aslan
Rating:
Genres:Religion
ISBN:B01MR8VAQF
Format Type:Kindle Edition
Number of Pages:321 pages pages

God: A Human History Reviews

  • Socraticgadfly
    Dec 11, 2017

    In July, I read a book called Evolving Brains, Emerging Gods: Early Humans and the Origins of Religion by E. Fuller Torrey. It presents the evolutionary theory of the creation of gods by examining the cognitive development of man and I found it truly fascinating. In this short work,...

    5 ? stuff. Many thanks to NetGalley, publisher and author for sharing the ARC. Honestly, my experience with ARCs so far was very disappointing. Also, I haven't encountered Reza Aslan before. So my expectations were pretty low to start with. But then I started reading... and wa...

    Although comparable in scope to Karen Armstrong?s A History of God, this is more of an anthropological and sociological approach to how religion arose. We created God in our image, Aslan argues. Using ?Adam? and ?Eve? as representatives of primitive humans, he explores what s...

    This book is well written and fascinating. As an Iranian, I especially love that he includes the vital history of God and religion that began in Iran. The content however is very similar to Robert Wright?s Evolution is God and Karen Armstrong?s history of God. But I suppose the out...

    This review and others can be found on BW Book Reviews. Thanks to Netgalley and Random House for an advanced copy! All opinions here are my own and are not influenced by them. Admittedly, I do love Reza Aslan, though. I?ve read two of his books and one of them completely change...

    Not bad for looking at theories on how humanity creates its gods. I was interested to note that as Aslan comes out as a pantheist at the end his extreme pantheism isn't all that different from atheism -- one is everything, every moment, every object, every particle is God vs. nothing, ...

    I am, in my essential reality, God made manifest. We all are. So then, worship God not through fear and trembling but through awe and wonder at the workings of the universe ? for the universe is God. Pray to God not to ask for things but to become one with God. Recognize that the kn...

    Each of Reza Aslan?s previous books made a lasting impression on me. God: A Human History is no different. It is an empowering study that relies on impeccable scholarship and yet reads with the lyricism and emotion of great literature. All the while, Aslan maintains a page-turning na...

    The author begins with an illogical premise and spirals downward from there. His original premise ignores the three basic Laws of Thought: the law of identity, the law of excluded middle and the law of non-contradiction. Aslan is an ethical relativist who has never examined his own tho...

    "What is God? That question has been st the center of the human quest to make sense of the divine from the very beginning." This was a lot shorter than I expected, the actual content taking up only about 50% of the book. However, the rest of the book is the authors bibliography, not...

    "All is One, and One is all. It is simply up to the individual to decide what "the One" is: how it should be defined, and how it should be experienced." - Reza Aslan. The author takes us on a journey through history and the evolution of 'God' as Lennon put it 'God is a concept' coming ...

    Aslan reminds me a lot of Harari - both are intelligent, extremely accessible and bold and love to paint with a very broad brush. They also cover some similar ground, although Aslan is more narrowly focused on religious themes. For some reason, I also find him less irritating than Hara...

    For 90+% of this book, I was fascinated. It's an engaging history of the development of humankind's relationship to the divine, from prehistoric (i.e, neanderthal) times up to, roughly, the development and spread of the most recent major western religion, Islam. It ties in psychology a...

    I suppose if you have never considered the case that humans have fashioned the, "divine," in their own image for thousands of years then there may be something interesting here. I suppose if you know nothing of early monotheisms that predate the one you may subscribe to then there m...

    Fascinating and thought provoking, Aslan attempts to trace the development of the concept of a soul throughout human existence, and also of a deity/deities with human attributes and virtues - one who is actively involved in human life. Almost half the book is footnotes and bibliography...

    Reza Aslan is both a brilliant scholar and a skillful storyteller. 'God: A Human History' is fascinating, educational and accessible. It is as much an explanation of the way in which we have given God human qualities as it is a history of the rise of monotheism, two stories which are i...

    God is made in man's image, not the other way around, and Aslan documents this truth from ancient cultures around the world, also showing how and why humans moved from a pantheon of gods to a single God. His book is scholarly/heavily footnoted, but also quite engaging -- and short! Fa...

    Perhaps 'Zealot' set the bar too high for me. While I enjoyed Zealot as a comprehensive, fully-realized vision of Aslan?s interpretation of Jesus, I find 'God' to come up short. Aslan casts too wide of a net, trying to explore the meaning of the world?s great religions in 171 pages...

    I enjoyed this book that details the evolution of religion. What Aslan describes is how throughout history civilizations consistently defined god/gods in their own image, often attributing human traits to those they worship. This led to rituals such as animal sacrifices to fed the gods...

    review to come ...

    This is my third book by Reza Aslan and I've enjoyed them all. His writing is clear and his scholarship is deep and thoughtful. Aslan takes the reader on a quick review of man's history of "deification", starting with ancestor worship and progressing through today's major religions. He...

    Biblical, and using that term generically, texts aside, author-scholar Reza Aslan charts the history ? and the concept ? of God, providing a fascinating follow-up to Zealot, where he de-constructed and then re-constructed a historical look at Jesus the Messiah. Here, Aslan does not...

    Several pages into this book I started to wonder if it was satire. An author whose name is Aslan (the Christ-figure in the Narnia books) writes without any apparent sense of irony, having ignored what the opening chapters of Genesis says about man being made in God's image, "if we are ...

    A quick, interesting read. I didn't love it as much as I loved Zealot, but Aslan still puts forth a lot of interesting religious history. The history in this book is what I really enjoyed, however he comes at this topic with his opinions about what God is and why our interpretations of...

    Better than much previous That said, while better than most, it's not perfect. I ? even if a majority of Torah scholars disagree ? think Yahweh comes from the MIdianiate "HWY," which is "to storm, blow or thunder," rather than the Hebrew "HYH," "to be." It derives easier, and...

  • Mehrsa
    Nov 10, 2017

    In July, I read a book called Evolving Brains, Emerging Gods: Early Humans and the Origins of Religion by E. Fuller Torrey. It presents the evolutionary theory of the creation of gods by examining the cognitive development of man and I found it truly fascinating. In this short work,...

    5 ? stuff. Many thanks to NetGalley, publisher and author for sharing the ARC. Honestly, my experience with ARCs so far was very disappointing. Also, I haven't encountered Reza Aslan before. So my expectations were pretty low to start with. But then I started reading... and wa...

    Although comparable in scope to Karen Armstrong?s A History of God, this is more of an anthropological and sociological approach to how religion arose. We created God in our image, Aslan argues. Using ?Adam? and ?Eve? as representatives of primitive humans, he explores what s...

    This book is well written and fascinating. As an Iranian, I especially love that he includes the vital history of God and religion that began in Iran. The content however is very similar to Robert Wright?s Evolution is God and Karen Armstrong?s history of God. But I suppose the out...

  • Kent Winward
    Feb 07, 2018

    In July, I read a book called Evolving Brains, Emerging Gods: Early Humans and the Origins of Religion by E. Fuller Torrey. It presents the evolutionary theory of the creation of gods by examining the cognitive development of man and I found it truly fascinating. In this short work,...

    5 ? stuff. Many thanks to NetGalley, publisher and author for sharing the ARC. Honestly, my experience with ARCs so far was very disappointing. Also, I haven't encountered Reza Aslan before. So my expectations were pretty low to start with. But then I started reading... and wa...

    Although comparable in scope to Karen Armstrong?s A History of God, this is more of an anthropological and sociological approach to how religion arose. We created God in our image, Aslan argues. Using ?Adam? and ?Eve? as representatives of primitive humans, he explores what s...

    This book is well written and fascinating. As an Iranian, I especially love that he includes the vital history of God and religion that began in Iran. The content however is very similar to Robert Wright?s Evolution is God and Karen Armstrong?s history of God. But I suppose the out...

    This review and others can be found on BW Book Reviews. Thanks to Netgalley and Random House for an advanced copy! All opinions here are my own and are not influenced by them. Admittedly, I do love Reza Aslan, though. I?ve read two of his books and one of them completely change...

    Not bad for looking at theories on how humanity creates its gods. I was interested to note that as Aslan comes out as a pantheist at the end his extreme pantheism isn't all that different from atheism -- one is everything, every moment, every object, every particle is God vs. nothing, ...

  • Mitchell
    Jan 24, 2018

    In July, I read a book called Evolving Brains, Emerging Gods: Early Humans and the Origins of Religion by E. Fuller Torrey. It presents the evolutionary theory of the creation of gods by examining the cognitive development of man and I found it truly fascinating. In this short work,...

    5 ? stuff. Many thanks to NetGalley, publisher and author for sharing the ARC. Honestly, my experience with ARCs so far was very disappointing. Also, I haven't encountered Reza Aslan before. So my expectations were pretty low to start with. But then I started reading... and wa...

    Although comparable in scope to Karen Armstrong?s A History of God, this is more of an anthropological and sociological approach to how religion arose. We created God in our image, Aslan argues. Using ?Adam? and ?Eve? as representatives of primitive humans, he explores what s...

    This book is well written and fascinating. As an Iranian, I especially love that he includes the vital history of God and religion that began in Iran. The content however is very similar to Robert Wright?s Evolution is God and Karen Armstrong?s history of God. But I suppose the out...

    This review and others can be found on BW Book Reviews. Thanks to Netgalley and Random House for an advanced copy! All opinions here are my own and are not influenced by them. Admittedly, I do love Reza Aslan, though. I?ve read two of his books and one of them completely change...

    Not bad for looking at theories on how humanity creates its gods. I was interested to note that as Aslan comes out as a pantheist at the end his extreme pantheism isn't all that different from atheism -- one is everything, every moment, every object, every particle is God vs. nothing, ...

    I am, in my essential reality, God made manifest. We all are. So then, worship God not through fear and trembling but through awe and wonder at the workings of the universe ? for the universe is God. Pray to God not to ask for things but to become one with God. Recognize that the kn...

    Each of Reza Aslan?s previous books made a lasting impression on me. God: A Human History is no different. It is an empowering study that relies on impeccable scholarship and yet reads with the lyricism and emotion of great literature. All the while, Aslan maintains a page-turning na...

    The author begins with an illogical premise and spirals downward from there. His original premise ignores the three basic Laws of Thought: the law of identity, the law of excluded middle and the law of non-contradiction. Aslan is an ethical relativist who has never examined his own tho...

    "What is God? That question has been st the center of the human quest to make sense of the divine from the very beginning." This was a lot shorter than I expected, the actual content taking up only about 50% of the book. However, the rest of the book is the authors bibliography, not...

    "All is One, and One is all. It is simply up to the individual to decide what "the One" is: how it should be defined, and how it should be experienced." - Reza Aslan. The author takes us on a journey through history and the evolution of 'God' as Lennon put it 'God is a concept' coming ...

    Aslan reminds me a lot of Harari - both are intelligent, extremely accessible and bold and love to paint with a very broad brush. They also cover some similar ground, although Aslan is more narrowly focused on religious themes. For some reason, I also find him less irritating than Hara...

    For 90+% of this book, I was fascinated. It's an engaging history of the development of humankind's relationship to the divine, from prehistoric (i.e, neanderthal) times up to, roughly, the development and spread of the most recent major western religion, Islam. It ties in psychology a...

    I suppose if you have never considered the case that humans have fashioned the, "divine," in their own image for thousands of years then there may be something interesting here. I suppose if you know nothing of early monotheisms that predate the one you may subscribe to then there m...

    Fascinating and thought provoking, Aslan attempts to trace the development of the concept of a soul throughout human existence, and also of a deity/deities with human attributes and virtues - one who is actively involved in human life. Almost half the book is footnotes and bibliography...

    Reza Aslan is both a brilliant scholar and a skillful storyteller. 'God: A Human History' is fascinating, educational and accessible. It is as much an explanation of the way in which we have given God human qualities as it is a history of the rise of monotheism, two stories which are i...

    God is made in man's image, not the other way around, and Aslan documents this truth from ancient cultures around the world, also showing how and why humans moved from a pantheon of gods to a single God. His book is scholarly/heavily footnoted, but also quite engaging -- and short! Fa...

    Perhaps 'Zealot' set the bar too high for me. While I enjoyed Zealot as a comprehensive, fully-realized vision of Aslan?s interpretation of Jesus, I find 'God' to come up short. Aslan casts too wide of a net, trying to explore the meaning of the world?s great religions in 171 pages...

    I enjoyed this book that details the evolution of religion. What Aslan describes is how throughout history civilizations consistently defined god/gods in their own image, often attributing human traits to those they worship. This led to rituals such as animal sacrifices to fed the gods...

    review to come ...

  • Krista
    Oct 15, 2017

    In July, I read a book called Evolving Brains, Emerging Gods: Early Humans and the Origins of Religion by E. Fuller Torrey. It presents the evolutionary theory of the creation of gods by examining the cognitive development of man and I found it truly fascinating. In this short work,...

    5 ? stuff. Many thanks to NetGalley, publisher and author for sharing the ARC. Honestly, my experience with ARCs so far was very disappointing. Also, I haven't encountered Reza Aslan before. So my expectations were pretty low to start with. But then I started reading... and wa...

    Although comparable in scope to Karen Armstrong?s A History of God, this is more of an anthropological and sociological approach to how religion arose. We created God in our image, Aslan argues. Using ?Adam? and ?Eve? as representatives of primitive humans, he explores what s...

    This book is well written and fascinating. As an Iranian, I especially love that he includes the vital history of God and religion that began in Iran. The content however is very similar to Robert Wright?s Evolution is God and Karen Armstrong?s history of God. But I suppose the out...

    This review and others can be found on BW Book Reviews. Thanks to Netgalley and Random House for an advanced copy! All opinions here are my own and are not influenced by them. Admittedly, I do love Reza Aslan, though. I?ve read two of his books and one of them completely change...

    Not bad for looking at theories on how humanity creates its gods. I was interested to note that as Aslan comes out as a pantheist at the end his extreme pantheism isn't all that different from atheism -- one is everything, every moment, every object, every particle is God vs. nothing, ...

    I am, in my essential reality, God made manifest. We all are. So then, worship God not through fear and trembling but through awe and wonder at the workings of the universe ? for the universe is God. Pray to God not to ask for things but to become one with God. Recognize that the kn...

  • Rebecca Foster
    Oct 23, 2017

    In July, I read a book called Evolving Brains, Emerging Gods: Early Humans and the Origins of Religion by E. Fuller Torrey. It presents the evolutionary theory of the creation of gods by examining the cognitive development of man and I found it truly fascinating. In this short work,...

    5 ? stuff. Many thanks to NetGalley, publisher and author for sharing the ARC. Honestly, my experience with ARCs so far was very disappointing. Also, I haven't encountered Reza Aslan before. So my expectations were pretty low to start with. But then I started reading... and wa...

    Although comparable in scope to Karen Armstrong?s A History of God, this is more of an anthropological and sociological approach to how religion arose. We created God in our image, Aslan argues. Using ?Adam? and ?Eve? as representatives of primitive humans, he explores what s...

  • Jeff
    Nov 12, 2017

    In July, I read a book called Evolving Brains, Emerging Gods: Early Humans and the Origins of Religion by E. Fuller Torrey. It presents the evolutionary theory of the creation of gods by examining the cognitive development of man and I found it truly fascinating. In this short work,...

    5 ? stuff. Many thanks to NetGalley, publisher and author for sharing the ARC. Honestly, my experience with ARCs so far was very disappointing. Also, I haven't encountered Reza Aslan before. So my expectations were pretty low to start with. But then I started reading... and wa...

    Although comparable in scope to Karen Armstrong?s A History of God, this is more of an anthropological and sociological approach to how religion arose. We created God in our image, Aslan argues. Using ?Adam? and ?Eve? as representatives of primitive humans, he explores what s...

    This book is well written and fascinating. As an Iranian, I especially love that he includes the vital history of God and religion that began in Iran. The content however is very similar to Robert Wright?s Evolution is God and Karen Armstrong?s history of God. But I suppose the out...

    This review and others can be found on BW Book Reviews. Thanks to Netgalley and Random House for an advanced copy! All opinions here are my own and are not influenced by them. Admittedly, I do love Reza Aslan, though. I?ve read two of his books and one of them completely change...

    Not bad for looking at theories on how humanity creates its gods. I was interested to note that as Aslan comes out as a pantheist at the end his extreme pantheism isn't all that different from atheism -- one is everything, every moment, every object, every particle is God vs. nothing, ...

    I am, in my essential reality, God made manifest. We all are. So then, worship God not through fear and trembling but through awe and wonder at the workings of the universe ? for the universe is God. Pray to God not to ask for things but to become one with God. Recognize that the kn...

    Each of Reza Aslan?s previous books made a lasting impression on me. God: A Human History is no different. It is an empowering study that relies on impeccable scholarship and yet reads with the lyricism and emotion of great literature. All the while, Aslan maintains a page-turning na...

    The author begins with an illogical premise and spirals downward from there. His original premise ignores the three basic Laws of Thought: the law of identity, the law of excluded middle and the law of non-contradiction. Aslan is an ethical relativist who has never examined his own tho...

    "What is God? That question has been st the center of the human quest to make sense of the divine from the very beginning." This was a lot shorter than I expected, the actual content taking up only about 50% of the book. However, the rest of the book is the authors bibliography, not...

    "All is One, and One is all. It is simply up to the individual to decide what "the One" is: how it should be defined, and how it should be experienced." - Reza Aslan. The author takes us on a journey through history and the evolution of 'God' as Lennon put it 'God is a concept' coming ...

    Aslan reminds me a lot of Harari - both are intelligent, extremely accessible and bold and love to paint with a very broad brush. They also cover some similar ground, although Aslan is more narrowly focused on religious themes. For some reason, I also find him less irritating than Hara...

    For 90+% of this book, I was fascinated. It's an engaging history of the development of humankind's relationship to the divine, from prehistoric (i.e, neanderthal) times up to, roughly, the development and spread of the most recent major western religion, Islam. It ties in psychology a...

    I suppose if you have never considered the case that humans have fashioned the, "divine," in their own image for thousands of years then there may be something interesting here. I suppose if you know nothing of early monotheisms that predate the one you may subscribe to then there m...

    Fascinating and thought provoking, Aslan attempts to trace the development of the concept of a soul throughout human existence, and also of a deity/deities with human attributes and virtues - one who is actively involved in human life. Almost half the book is footnotes and bibliography...

    Reza Aslan is both a brilliant scholar and a skillful storyteller. 'God: A Human History' is fascinating, educational and accessible. It is as much an explanation of the way in which we have given God human qualities as it is a history of the rise of monotheism, two stories which are i...

    God is made in man's image, not the other way around, and Aslan documents this truth from ancient cultures around the world, also showing how and why humans moved from a pantheon of gods to a single God. His book is scholarly/heavily footnoted, but also quite engaging -- and short! Fa...

  • Dan Graser
    Nov 24, 2017

    In July, I read a book called Evolving Brains, Emerging Gods: Early Humans and the Origins of Religion by E. Fuller Torrey. It presents the evolutionary theory of the creation of gods by examining the cognitive development of man and I found it truly fascinating. In this short work,...

    5 ? stuff. Many thanks to NetGalley, publisher and author for sharing the ARC. Honestly, my experience with ARCs so far was very disappointing. Also, I haven't encountered Reza Aslan before. So my expectations were pretty low to start with. But then I started reading... and wa...

    Although comparable in scope to Karen Armstrong?s A History of God, this is more of an anthropological and sociological approach to how religion arose. We created God in our image, Aslan argues. Using ?Adam? and ?Eve? as representatives of primitive humans, he explores what s...

    This book is well written and fascinating. As an Iranian, I especially love that he includes the vital history of God and religion that began in Iran. The content however is very similar to Robert Wright?s Evolution is God and Karen Armstrong?s history of God. But I suppose the out...

    This review and others can be found on BW Book Reviews. Thanks to Netgalley and Random House for an advanced copy! All opinions here are my own and are not influenced by them. Admittedly, I do love Reza Aslan, though. I?ve read two of his books and one of them completely change...

    Not bad for looking at theories on how humanity creates its gods. I was interested to note that as Aslan comes out as a pantheist at the end his extreme pantheism isn't all that different from atheism -- one is everything, every moment, every object, every particle is God vs. nothing, ...

    I am, in my essential reality, God made manifest. We all are. So then, worship God not through fear and trembling but through awe and wonder at the workings of the universe ? for the universe is God. Pray to God not to ask for things but to become one with God. Recognize that the kn...

    Each of Reza Aslan?s previous books made a lasting impression on me. God: A Human History is no different. It is an empowering study that relies on impeccable scholarship and yet reads with the lyricism and emotion of great literature. All the while, Aslan maintains a page-turning na...

    The author begins with an illogical premise and spirals downward from there. His original premise ignores the three basic Laws of Thought: the law of identity, the law of excluded middle and the law of non-contradiction. Aslan is an ethical relativist who has never examined his own tho...

    "What is God? That question has been st the center of the human quest to make sense of the divine from the very beginning." This was a lot shorter than I expected, the actual content taking up only about 50% of the book. However, the rest of the book is the authors bibliography, not...

    "All is One, and One is all. It is simply up to the individual to decide what "the One" is: how it should be defined, and how it should be experienced." - Reza Aslan. The author takes us on a journey through history and the evolution of 'God' as Lennon put it 'God is a concept' coming ...

    Aslan reminds me a lot of Harari - both are intelligent, extremely accessible and bold and love to paint with a very broad brush. They also cover some similar ground, although Aslan is more narrowly focused on religious themes. For some reason, I also find him less irritating than Hara...

    For 90+% of this book, I was fascinated. It's an engaging history of the development of humankind's relationship to the divine, from prehistoric (i.e, neanderthal) times up to, roughly, the development and spread of the most recent major western religion, Islam. It ties in psychology a...

    I suppose if you have never considered the case that humans have fashioned the, "divine," in their own image for thousands of years then there may be something interesting here. I suppose if you know nothing of early monotheisms that predate the one you may subscribe to then there m...

  • Julie
    Dec 08, 2017

    In July, I read a book called Evolving Brains, Emerging Gods: Early Humans and the Origins of Religion by E. Fuller Torrey. It presents the evolutionary theory of the creation of gods by examining the cognitive development of man and I found it truly fascinating. In this short work,...

    5 ? stuff. Many thanks to NetGalley, publisher and author for sharing the ARC. Honestly, my experience with ARCs so far was very disappointing. Also, I haven't encountered Reza Aslan before. So my expectations were pretty low to start with. But then I started reading... and wa...

    Although comparable in scope to Karen Armstrong?s A History of God, this is more of an anthropological and sociological approach to how religion arose. We created God in our image, Aslan argues. Using ?Adam? and ?Eve? as representatives of primitive humans, he explores what s...

    This book is well written and fascinating. As an Iranian, I especially love that he includes the vital history of God and religion that began in Iran. The content however is very similar to Robert Wright?s Evolution is God and Karen Armstrong?s history of God. But I suppose the out...

    This review and others can be found on BW Book Reviews. Thanks to Netgalley and Random House for an advanced copy! All opinions here are my own and are not influenced by them. Admittedly, I do love Reza Aslan, though. I?ve read two of his books and one of them completely change...

    Not bad for looking at theories on how humanity creates its gods. I was interested to note that as Aslan comes out as a pantheist at the end his extreme pantheism isn't all that different from atheism -- one is everything, every moment, every object, every particle is God vs. nothing, ...

    I am, in my essential reality, God made manifest. We all are. So then, worship God not through fear and trembling but through awe and wonder at the workings of the universe ? for the universe is God. Pray to God not to ask for things but to become one with God. Recognize that the kn...

    Each of Reza Aslan?s previous books made a lasting impression on me. God: A Human History is no different. It is an empowering study that relies on impeccable scholarship and yet reads with the lyricism and emotion of great literature. All the while, Aslan maintains a page-turning na...

    The author begins with an illogical premise and spirals downward from there. His original premise ignores the three basic Laws of Thought: the law of identity, the law of excluded middle and the law of non-contradiction. Aslan is an ethical relativist who has never examined his own tho...

    "What is God? That question has been st the center of the human quest to make sense of the divine from the very beginning." This was a lot shorter than I expected, the actual content taking up only about 50% of the book. However, the rest of the book is the authors bibliography, not...

    "All is One, and One is all. It is simply up to the individual to decide what "the One" is: how it should be defined, and how it should be experienced." - Reza Aslan. The author takes us on a journey through history and the evolution of 'God' as Lennon put it 'God is a concept' coming ...

    Aslan reminds me a lot of Harari - both are intelligent, extremely accessible and bold and love to paint with a very broad brush. They also cover some similar ground, although Aslan is more narrowly focused on religious themes. For some reason, I also find him less irritating than Hara...

    For 90+% of this book, I was fascinated. It's an engaging history of the development of humankind's relationship to the divine, from prehistoric (i.e, neanderthal) times up to, roughly, the development and spread of the most recent major western religion, Islam. It ties in psychology a...

    I suppose if you have never considered the case that humans have fashioned the, "divine," in their own image for thousands of years then there may be something interesting here. I suppose if you know nothing of early monotheisms that predate the one you may subscribe to then there m...

    Fascinating and thought provoking, Aslan attempts to trace the development of the concept of a soul throughout human existence, and also of a deity/deities with human attributes and virtues - one who is actively involved in human life. Almost half the book is footnotes and bibliography...

    Reza Aslan is both a brilliant scholar and a skillful storyteller. 'God: A Human History' is fascinating, educational and accessible. It is as much an explanation of the way in which we have given God human qualities as it is a history of the rise of monotheism, two stories which are i...

    God is made in man's image, not the other way around, and Aslan documents this truth from ancient cultures around the world, also showing how and why humans moved from a pantheon of gods to a single God. His book is scholarly/heavily footnoted, but also quite engaging -- and short! Fa...

    Perhaps 'Zealot' set the bar too high for me. While I enjoyed Zealot as a comprehensive, fully-realized vision of Aslan?s interpretation of Jesus, I find 'God' to come up short. Aslan casts too wide of a net, trying to explore the meaning of the world?s great religions in 171 pages...

    I enjoyed this book that details the evolution of religion. What Aslan describes is how throughout history civilizations consistently defined god/gods in their own image, often attributing human traits to those they worship. This led to rituals such as animal sacrifices to fed the gods...

    review to come ...

    This is my third book by Reza Aslan and I've enjoyed them all. His writing is clear and his scholarship is deep and thoughtful. Aslan takes the reader on a quick review of man's history of "deification", starting with ancestor worship and progressing through today's major religions. He...

    Biblical, and using that term generically, texts aside, author-scholar Reza Aslan charts the history ? and the concept ? of God, providing a fascinating follow-up to Zealot, where he de-constructed and then re-constructed a historical look at Jesus the Messiah. Here, Aslan does not...

    Several pages into this book I started to wonder if it was satire. An author whose name is Aslan (the Christ-figure in the Narnia books) writes without any apparent sense of irony, having ignored what the opening chapters of Genesis says about man being made in God's image, "if we are ...

    A quick, interesting read. I didn't love it as much as I loved Zealot, but Aslan still puts forth a lot of interesting religious history. The history in this book is what I really enjoyed, however he comes at this topic with his opinions about what God is and why our interpretations of...

    Better than much previous That said, while better than most, it's not perfect. I ? even if a majority of Torah scholars disagree ? think Yahweh comes from the MIdianiate "HWY," which is "to storm, blow or thunder," rather than the Hebrew "HYH," "to be." It derives easier, and...

    I usually recoil from reading books about religion written by believers, they do tend to ignore the obvious when it contradicts their belief in scripture or tradition and fall in logical traps that render their reasoning unpalatable. On the other hand, books about religion by non-belie...

    An absolutely pleasurable read. A beautifully crafted story of God through an anthropological, sociological, psychological and historical lens. "As a believer and a pantheist, I worship God not through fear and trembling but through awe and wonder at the workings of the universe -...

    This was a fascinating read. Aslan is excellent at explaining very complicated philosophical and theological ideas. He leads us on a journey through the origins and development of religion to what current faiths represent (and how they got there); and miraculously this very long journe...

  • Roger DeBlanck
    Nov 17, 2017

    In July, I read a book called Evolving Brains, Emerging Gods: Early Humans and the Origins of Religion by E. Fuller Torrey. It presents the evolutionary theory of the creation of gods by examining the cognitive development of man and I found it truly fascinating. In this short work,...

    5 ? stuff. Many thanks to NetGalley, publisher and author for sharing the ARC. Honestly, my experience with ARCs so far was very disappointing. Also, I haven't encountered Reza Aslan before. So my expectations were pretty low to start with. But then I started reading... and wa...

    Although comparable in scope to Karen Armstrong?s A History of God, this is more of an anthropological and sociological approach to how religion arose. We created God in our image, Aslan argues. Using ?Adam? and ?Eve? as representatives of primitive humans, he explores what s...

    This book is well written and fascinating. As an Iranian, I especially love that he includes the vital history of God and religion that began in Iran. The content however is very similar to Robert Wright?s Evolution is God and Karen Armstrong?s history of God. But I suppose the out...

    This review and others can be found on BW Book Reviews. Thanks to Netgalley and Random House for an advanced copy! All opinions here are my own and are not influenced by them. Admittedly, I do love Reza Aslan, though. I?ve read two of his books and one of them completely change...

    Not bad for looking at theories on how humanity creates its gods. I was interested to note that as Aslan comes out as a pantheist at the end his extreme pantheism isn't all that different from atheism -- one is everything, every moment, every object, every particle is God vs. nothing, ...

    I am, in my essential reality, God made manifest. We all are. So then, worship God not through fear and trembling but through awe and wonder at the workings of the universe ? for the universe is God. Pray to God not to ask for things but to become one with God. Recognize that the kn...

    Each of Reza Aslan?s previous books made a lasting impression on me. God: A Human History is no different. It is an empowering study that relies on impeccable scholarship and yet reads with the lyricism and emotion of great literature. All the while, Aslan maintains a page-turning na...

  • Abby Rosmarin
    Nov 15, 2017

    In July, I read a book called Evolving Brains, Emerging Gods: Early Humans and the Origins of Religion by E. Fuller Torrey. It presents the evolutionary theory of the creation of gods by examining the cognitive development of man and I found it truly fascinating. In this short work,...

    5 ? stuff. Many thanks to NetGalley, publisher and author for sharing the ARC. Honestly, my experience with ARCs so far was very disappointing. Also, I haven't encountered Reza Aslan before. So my expectations were pretty low to start with. But then I started reading... and wa...

    Although comparable in scope to Karen Armstrong?s A History of God, this is more of an anthropological and sociological approach to how religion arose. We created God in our image, Aslan argues. Using ?Adam? and ?Eve? as representatives of primitive humans, he explores what s...

    This book is well written and fascinating. As an Iranian, I especially love that he includes the vital history of God and religion that began in Iran. The content however is very similar to Robert Wright?s Evolution is God and Karen Armstrong?s history of God. But I suppose the out...

    This review and others can be found on BW Book Reviews. Thanks to Netgalley and Random House for an advanced copy! All opinions here are my own and are not influenced by them. Admittedly, I do love Reza Aslan, though. I?ve read two of his books and one of them completely change...

    Not bad for looking at theories on how humanity creates its gods. I was interested to note that as Aslan comes out as a pantheist at the end his extreme pantheism isn't all that different from atheism -- one is everything, every moment, every object, every particle is God vs. nothing, ...

    I am, in my essential reality, God made manifest. We all are. So then, worship God not through fear and trembling but through awe and wonder at the workings of the universe ? for the universe is God. Pray to God not to ask for things but to become one with God. Recognize that the kn...

    Each of Reza Aslan?s previous books made a lasting impression on me. God: A Human History is no different. It is an empowering study that relies on impeccable scholarship and yet reads with the lyricism and emotion of great literature. All the while, Aslan maintains a page-turning na...

    The author begins with an illogical premise and spirals downward from there. His original premise ignores the three basic Laws of Thought: the law of identity, the law of excluded middle and the law of non-contradiction. Aslan is an ethical relativist who has never examined his own tho...

    "What is God? That question has been st the center of the human quest to make sense of the divine from the very beginning." This was a lot shorter than I expected, the actual content taking up only about 50% of the book. However, the rest of the book is the authors bibliography, not...

    "All is One, and One is all. It is simply up to the individual to decide what "the One" is: how it should be defined, and how it should be experienced." - Reza Aslan. The author takes us on a journey through history and the evolution of 'God' as Lennon put it 'God is a concept' coming ...

    Aslan reminds me a lot of Harari - both are intelligent, extremely accessible and bold and love to paint with a very broad brush. They also cover some similar ground, although Aslan is more narrowly focused on religious themes. For some reason, I also find him less irritating than Hara...

    For 90+% of this book, I was fascinated. It's an engaging history of the development of humankind's relationship to the divine, from prehistoric (i.e, neanderthal) times up to, roughly, the development and spread of the most recent major western religion, Islam. It ties in psychology a...

    I suppose if you have never considered the case that humans have fashioned the, "divine," in their own image for thousands of years then there may be something interesting here. I suppose if you know nothing of early monotheisms that predate the one you may subscribe to then there m...

    Fascinating and thought provoking, Aslan attempts to trace the development of the concept of a soul throughout human existence, and also of a deity/deities with human attributes and virtues - one who is actively involved in human life. Almost half the book is footnotes and bibliography...

    Reza Aslan is both a brilliant scholar and a skillful storyteller. 'God: A Human History' is fascinating, educational and accessible. It is as much an explanation of the way in which we have given God human qualities as it is a history of the rise of monotheism, two stories which are i...

    God is made in man's image, not the other way around, and Aslan documents this truth from ancient cultures around the world, also showing how and why humans moved from a pantheon of gods to a single God. His book is scholarly/heavily footnoted, but also quite engaging -- and short! Fa...

    Perhaps 'Zealot' set the bar too high for me. While I enjoyed Zealot as a comprehensive, fully-realized vision of Aslan?s interpretation of Jesus, I find 'God' to come up short. Aslan casts too wide of a net, trying to explore the meaning of the world?s great religions in 171 pages...

    I enjoyed this book that details the evolution of religion. What Aslan describes is how throughout history civilizations consistently defined god/gods in their own image, often attributing human traits to those they worship. This led to rituals such as animal sacrifices to fed the gods...

    review to come ...

    This is my third book by Reza Aslan and I've enjoyed them all. His writing is clear and his scholarship is deep and thoughtful. Aslan takes the reader on a quick review of man's history of "deification", starting with ancestor worship and progressing through today's major religions. He...

    Biblical, and using that term generically, texts aside, author-scholar Reza Aslan charts the history ? and the concept ? of God, providing a fascinating follow-up to Zealot, where he de-constructed and then re-constructed a historical look at Jesus the Messiah. Here, Aslan does not...

    Several pages into this book I started to wonder if it was satire. An author whose name is Aslan (the Christ-figure in the Narnia books) writes without any apparent sense of irony, having ignored what the opening chapters of Genesis says about man being made in God's image, "if we are ...

    A quick, interesting read. I didn't love it as much as I loved Zealot, but Aslan still puts forth a lot of interesting religious history. The history in this book is what I really enjoyed, however he comes at this topic with his opinions about what God is and why our interpretations of...

    Better than much previous That said, while better than most, it's not perfect. I ? even if a majority of Torah scholars disagree ? think Yahweh comes from the MIdianiate "HWY," which is "to storm, blow or thunder," rather than the Hebrew "HYH," "to be." It derives easier, and...

    I usually recoil from reading books about religion written by believers, they do tend to ignore the obvious when it contradicts their belief in scripture or tradition and fall in logical traps that render their reasoning unpalatable. On the other hand, books about religion by non-belie...

    An absolutely pleasurable read. A beautifully crafted story of God through an anthropological, sociological, psychological and historical lens. "As a believer and a pantheist, I worship God not through fear and trembling but through awe and wonder at the workings of the universe -...

    This was a fascinating read. Aslan is excellent at explaining very complicated philosophical and theological ideas. He leads us on a journey through the origins and development of religion to what current faiths represent (and how they got there); and miraculously this very long journe...

    Reza is a pantheist and writes from that perspective. I am a Christian pastor, so I do not at all agree with his conclusions or his reasoning. However, I found this book fascinating on many different levels. First of all, Reza is a great writer (and I listened to the audiobook which wa...

    Full disclosure: Reza Aslan's spiritual journey very much mimics my own (minus the foray into Sufism), and I, too, ended up becoming very pantheistic in my belief systems, so a lot of God was an echo of things I already believed, with historical evidence and backstory. That being said,...

  • Fiona
    Sep 22, 2017

    In July, I read a book called Evolving Brains, Emerging Gods: Early Humans and the Origins of Religion by E. Fuller Torrey. It presents the evolutionary theory of the creation of gods by examining the cognitive development of man and I found it truly fascinating. In this short work,...

  • Cindy Leighton
    Dec 10, 2017

    In July, I read a book called Evolving Brains, Emerging Gods: Early Humans and the Origins of Religion by E. Fuller Torrey. It presents the evolutionary theory of the creation of gods by examining the cognitive development of man and I found it truly fascinating. In this short work,...

    5 ? stuff. Many thanks to NetGalley, publisher and author for sharing the ARC. Honestly, my experience with ARCs so far was very disappointing. Also, I haven't encountered Reza Aslan before. So my expectations were pretty low to start with. But then I started reading... and wa...

    Although comparable in scope to Karen Armstrong?s A History of God, this is more of an anthropological and sociological approach to how religion arose. We created God in our image, Aslan argues. Using ?Adam? and ?Eve? as representatives of primitive humans, he explores what s...

    This book is well written and fascinating. As an Iranian, I especially love that he includes the vital history of God and religion that began in Iran. The content however is very similar to Robert Wright?s Evolution is God and Karen Armstrong?s history of God. But I suppose the out...

    This review and others can be found on BW Book Reviews. Thanks to Netgalley and Random House for an advanced copy! All opinions here are my own and are not influenced by them. Admittedly, I do love Reza Aslan, though. I?ve read two of his books and one of them completely change...

    Not bad for looking at theories on how humanity creates its gods. I was interested to note that as Aslan comes out as a pantheist at the end his extreme pantheism isn't all that different from atheism -- one is everything, every moment, every object, every particle is God vs. nothing, ...

    I am, in my essential reality, God made manifest. We all are. So then, worship God not through fear and trembling but through awe and wonder at the workings of the universe ? for the universe is God. Pray to God not to ask for things but to become one with God. Recognize that the kn...

    Each of Reza Aslan?s previous books made a lasting impression on me. God: A Human History is no different. It is an empowering study that relies on impeccable scholarship and yet reads with the lyricism and emotion of great literature. All the while, Aslan maintains a page-turning na...

    The author begins with an illogical premise and spirals downward from there. His original premise ignores the three basic Laws of Thought: the law of identity, the law of excluded middle and the law of non-contradiction. Aslan is an ethical relativist who has never examined his own tho...

    "What is God? That question has been st the center of the human quest to make sense of the divine from the very beginning." This was a lot shorter than I expected, the actual content taking up only about 50% of the book. However, the rest of the book is the authors bibliography, not...

    "All is One, and One is all. It is simply up to the individual to decide what "the One" is: how it should be defined, and how it should be experienced." - Reza Aslan. The author takes us on a journey through history and the evolution of 'God' as Lennon put it 'God is a concept' coming ...

    Aslan reminds me a lot of Harari - both are intelligent, extremely accessible and bold and love to paint with a very broad brush. They also cover some similar ground, although Aslan is more narrowly focused on religious themes. For some reason, I also find him less irritating than Hara...

    For 90+% of this book, I was fascinated. It's an engaging history of the development of humankind's relationship to the divine, from prehistoric (i.e, neanderthal) times up to, roughly, the development and spread of the most recent major western religion, Islam. It ties in psychology a...

    I suppose if you have never considered the case that humans have fashioned the, "divine," in their own image for thousands of years then there may be something interesting here. I suppose if you know nothing of early monotheisms that predate the one you may subscribe to then there m...

    Fascinating and thought provoking, Aslan attempts to trace the development of the concept of a soul throughout human existence, and also of a deity/deities with human attributes and virtues - one who is actively involved in human life. Almost half the book is footnotes and bibliography...

  • Tammam Aloudat
    Dec 08, 2017

    In July, I read a book called Evolving Brains, Emerging Gods: Early Humans and the Origins of Religion by E. Fuller Torrey. It presents the evolutionary theory of the creation of gods by examining the cognitive development of man and I found it truly fascinating. In this short work,...

    5 ? stuff. Many thanks to NetGalley, publisher and author for sharing the ARC. Honestly, my experience with ARCs so far was very disappointing. Also, I haven't encountered Reza Aslan before. So my expectations were pretty low to start with. But then I started reading... and wa...

    Although comparable in scope to Karen Armstrong?s A History of God, this is more of an anthropological and sociological approach to how religion arose. We created God in our image, Aslan argues. Using ?Adam? and ?Eve? as representatives of primitive humans, he explores what s...

    This book is well written and fascinating. As an Iranian, I especially love that he includes the vital history of God and religion that began in Iran. The content however is very similar to Robert Wright?s Evolution is God and Karen Armstrong?s history of God. But I suppose the out...

    This review and others can be found on BW Book Reviews. Thanks to Netgalley and Random House for an advanced copy! All opinions here are my own and are not influenced by them. Admittedly, I do love Reza Aslan, though. I?ve read two of his books and one of them completely change...

    Not bad for looking at theories on how humanity creates its gods. I was interested to note that as Aslan comes out as a pantheist at the end his extreme pantheism isn't all that different from atheism -- one is everything, every moment, every object, every particle is God vs. nothing, ...

    I am, in my essential reality, God made manifest. We all are. So then, worship God not through fear and trembling but through awe and wonder at the workings of the universe ? for the universe is God. Pray to God not to ask for things but to become one with God. Recognize that the kn...

    Each of Reza Aslan?s previous books made a lasting impression on me. God: A Human History is no different. It is an empowering study that relies on impeccable scholarship and yet reads with the lyricism and emotion of great literature. All the while, Aslan maintains a page-turning na...

    The author begins with an illogical premise and spirals downward from there. His original premise ignores the three basic Laws of Thought: the law of identity, the law of excluded middle and the law of non-contradiction. Aslan is an ethical relativist who has never examined his own tho...

    "What is God? That question has been st the center of the human quest to make sense of the divine from the very beginning." This was a lot shorter than I expected, the actual content taking up only about 50% of the book. However, the rest of the book is the authors bibliography, not...

    "All is One, and One is all. It is simply up to the individual to decide what "the One" is: how it should be defined, and how it should be experienced." - Reza Aslan. The author takes us on a journey through history and the evolution of 'God' as Lennon put it 'God is a concept' coming ...

    Aslan reminds me a lot of Harari - both are intelligent, extremely accessible and bold and love to paint with a very broad brush. They also cover some similar ground, although Aslan is more narrowly focused on religious themes. For some reason, I also find him less irritating than Hara...

    For 90+% of this book, I was fascinated. It's an engaging history of the development of humankind's relationship to the divine, from prehistoric (i.e, neanderthal) times up to, roughly, the development and spread of the most recent major western religion, Islam. It ties in psychology a...

    I suppose if you have never considered the case that humans have fashioned the, "divine," in their own image for thousands of years then there may be something interesting here. I suppose if you know nothing of early monotheisms that predate the one you may subscribe to then there m...

    Fascinating and thought provoking, Aslan attempts to trace the development of the concept of a soul throughout human existence, and also of a deity/deities with human attributes and virtues - one who is actively involved in human life. Almost half the book is footnotes and bibliography...

    Reza Aslan is both a brilliant scholar and a skillful storyteller. 'God: A Human History' is fascinating, educational and accessible. It is as much an explanation of the way in which we have given God human qualities as it is a history of the rise of monotheism, two stories which are i...

    God is made in man's image, not the other way around, and Aslan documents this truth from ancient cultures around the world, also showing how and why humans moved from a pantheon of gods to a single God. His book is scholarly/heavily footnoted, but also quite engaging -- and short! Fa...

    Perhaps 'Zealot' set the bar too high for me. While I enjoyed Zealot as a comprehensive, fully-realized vision of Aslan?s interpretation of Jesus, I find 'God' to come up short. Aslan casts too wide of a net, trying to explore the meaning of the world?s great religions in 171 pages...

    I enjoyed this book that details the evolution of religion. What Aslan describes is how throughout history civilizations consistently defined god/gods in their own image, often attributing human traits to those they worship. This led to rituals such as animal sacrifices to fed the gods...

    review to come ...

    This is my third book by Reza Aslan and I've enjoyed them all. His writing is clear and his scholarship is deep and thoughtful. Aslan takes the reader on a quick review of man's history of "deification", starting with ancestor worship and progressing through today's major religions. He...

    Biblical, and using that term generically, texts aside, author-scholar Reza Aslan charts the history ? and the concept ? of God, providing a fascinating follow-up to Zealot, where he de-constructed and then re-constructed a historical look at Jesus the Messiah. Here, Aslan does not...

    Several pages into this book I started to wonder if it was satire. An author whose name is Aslan (the Christ-figure in the Narnia books) writes without any apparent sense of irony, having ignored what the opening chapters of Genesis says about man being made in God's image, "if we are ...

    A quick, interesting read. I didn't love it as much as I loved Zealot, but Aslan still puts forth a lot of interesting religious history. The history in this book is what I really enjoyed, however he comes at this topic with his opinions about what God is and why our interpretations of...

    Better than much previous That said, while better than most, it's not perfect. I ? even if a majority of Torah scholars disagree ? think Yahweh comes from the MIdianiate "HWY," which is "to storm, blow or thunder," rather than the Hebrew "HYH," "to be." It derives easier, and...

    I usually recoil from reading books about religion written by believers, they do tend to ignore the obvious when it contradicts their belief in scripture or tradition and fall in logical traps that render their reasoning unpalatable. On the other hand, books about religion by non-belie...

  • Daniel
    Nov 19, 2017

    In July, I read a book called Evolving Brains, Emerging Gods: Early Humans and the Origins of Religion by E. Fuller Torrey. It presents the evolutionary theory of the creation of gods by examining the cognitive development of man and I found it truly fascinating. In this short work,...

    5 ? stuff. Many thanks to NetGalley, publisher and author for sharing the ARC. Honestly, my experience with ARCs so far was very disappointing. Also, I haven't encountered Reza Aslan before. So my expectations were pretty low to start with. But then I started reading... and wa...

    Although comparable in scope to Karen Armstrong?s A History of God, this is more of an anthropological and sociological approach to how religion arose. We created God in our image, Aslan argues. Using ?Adam? and ?Eve? as representatives of primitive humans, he explores what s...

    This book is well written and fascinating. As an Iranian, I especially love that he includes the vital history of God and religion that began in Iran. The content however is very similar to Robert Wright?s Evolution is God and Karen Armstrong?s history of God. But I suppose the out...

    This review and others can be found on BW Book Reviews. Thanks to Netgalley and Random House for an advanced copy! All opinions here are my own and are not influenced by them. Admittedly, I do love Reza Aslan, though. I?ve read two of his books and one of them completely change...

    Not bad for looking at theories on how humanity creates its gods. I was interested to note that as Aslan comes out as a pantheist at the end his extreme pantheism isn't all that different from atheism -- one is everything, every moment, every object, every particle is God vs. nothing, ...

    I am, in my essential reality, God made manifest. We all are. So then, worship God not through fear and trembling but through awe and wonder at the workings of the universe ? for the universe is God. Pray to God not to ask for things but to become one with God. Recognize that the kn...

    Each of Reza Aslan?s previous books made a lasting impression on me. God: A Human History is no different. It is an empowering study that relies on impeccable scholarship and yet reads with the lyricism and emotion of great literature. All the while, Aslan maintains a page-turning na...

    The author begins with an illogical premise and spirals downward from there. His original premise ignores the three basic Laws of Thought: the law of identity, the law of excluded middle and the law of non-contradiction. Aslan is an ethical relativist who has never examined his own tho...

    "What is God? That question has been st the center of the human quest to make sense of the divine from the very beginning." This was a lot shorter than I expected, the actual content taking up only about 50% of the book. However, the rest of the book is the authors bibliography, not...

    "All is One, and One is all. It is simply up to the individual to decide what "the One" is: how it should be defined, and how it should be experienced." - Reza Aslan. The author takes us on a journey through history and the evolution of 'God' as Lennon put it 'God is a concept' coming ...

    Aslan reminds me a lot of Harari - both are intelligent, extremely accessible and bold and love to paint with a very broad brush. They also cover some similar ground, although Aslan is more narrowly focused on religious themes. For some reason, I also find him less irritating than Hara...

    For 90+% of this book, I was fascinated. It's an engaging history of the development of humankind's relationship to the divine, from prehistoric (i.e, neanderthal) times up to, roughly, the development and spread of the most recent major western religion, Islam. It ties in psychology a...

    I suppose if you have never considered the case that humans have fashioned the, "divine," in their own image for thousands of years then there may be something interesting here. I suppose if you know nothing of early monotheisms that predate the one you may subscribe to then there m...

    Fascinating and thought provoking, Aslan attempts to trace the development of the concept of a soul throughout human existence, and also of a deity/deities with human attributes and virtues - one who is actively involved in human life. Almost half the book is footnotes and bibliography...

    Reza Aslan is both a brilliant scholar and a skillful storyteller. 'God: A Human History' is fascinating, educational and accessible. It is as much an explanation of the way in which we have given God human qualities as it is a history of the rise of monotheism, two stories which are i...

    God is made in man's image, not the other way around, and Aslan documents this truth from ancient cultures around the world, also showing how and why humans moved from a pantheon of gods to a single God. His book is scholarly/heavily footnoted, but also quite engaging -- and short! Fa...

    Perhaps 'Zealot' set the bar too high for me. While I enjoyed Zealot as a comprehensive, fully-realized vision of Aslan?s interpretation of Jesus, I find 'God' to come up short. Aslan casts too wide of a net, trying to explore the meaning of the world?s great religions in 171 pages...

    I enjoyed this book that details the evolution of religion. What Aslan describes is how throughout history civilizations consistently defined god/gods in their own image, often attributing human traits to those they worship. This led to rituals such as animal sacrifices to fed the gods...

  • Mark Loughridge
    Dec 07, 2017

    In July, I read a book called Evolving Brains, Emerging Gods: Early Humans and the Origins of Religion by E. Fuller Torrey. It presents the evolutionary theory of the creation of gods by examining the cognitive development of man and I found it truly fascinating. In this short work,...

    5 ? stuff. Many thanks to NetGalley, publisher and author for sharing the ARC. Honestly, my experience with ARCs so far was very disappointing. Also, I haven't encountered Reza Aslan before. So my expectations were pretty low to start with. But then I started reading... and wa...

    Although comparable in scope to Karen Armstrong?s A History of God, this is more of an anthropological and sociological approach to how religion arose. We created God in our image, Aslan argues. Using ?Adam? and ?Eve? as representatives of primitive humans, he explores what s...

    This book is well written and fascinating. As an Iranian, I especially love that he includes the vital history of God and religion that began in Iran. The content however is very similar to Robert Wright?s Evolution is God and Karen Armstrong?s history of God. But I suppose the out...

    This review and others can be found on BW Book Reviews. Thanks to Netgalley and Random House for an advanced copy! All opinions here are my own and are not influenced by them. Admittedly, I do love Reza Aslan, though. I?ve read two of his books and one of them completely change...

    Not bad for looking at theories on how humanity creates its gods. I was interested to note that as Aslan comes out as a pantheist at the end his extreme pantheism isn't all that different from atheism -- one is everything, every moment, every object, every particle is God vs. nothing, ...

    I am, in my essential reality, God made manifest. We all are. So then, worship God not through fear and trembling but through awe and wonder at the workings of the universe ? for the universe is God. Pray to God not to ask for things but to become one with God. Recognize that the kn...

    Each of Reza Aslan?s previous books made a lasting impression on me. God: A Human History is no different. It is an empowering study that relies on impeccable scholarship and yet reads with the lyricism and emotion of great literature. All the while, Aslan maintains a page-turning na...

    The author begins with an illogical premise and spirals downward from there. His original premise ignores the three basic Laws of Thought: the law of identity, the law of excluded middle and the law of non-contradiction. Aslan is an ethical relativist who has never examined his own tho...

    "What is God? That question has been st the center of the human quest to make sense of the divine from the very beginning." This was a lot shorter than I expected, the actual content taking up only about 50% of the book. However, the rest of the book is the authors bibliography, not...

    "All is One, and One is all. It is simply up to the individual to decide what "the One" is: how it should be defined, and how it should be experienced." - Reza Aslan. The author takes us on a journey through history and the evolution of 'God' as Lennon put it 'God is a concept' coming ...

    Aslan reminds me a lot of Harari - both are intelligent, extremely accessible and bold and love to paint with a very broad brush. They also cover some similar ground, although Aslan is more narrowly focused on religious themes. For some reason, I also find him less irritating than Hara...

    For 90+% of this book, I was fascinated. It's an engaging history of the development of humankind's relationship to the divine, from prehistoric (i.e, neanderthal) times up to, roughly, the development and spread of the most recent major western religion, Islam. It ties in psychology a...

    I suppose if you have never considered the case that humans have fashioned the, "divine," in their own image for thousands of years then there may be something interesting here. I suppose if you know nothing of early monotheisms that predate the one you may subscribe to then there m...

    Fascinating and thought provoking, Aslan attempts to trace the development of the concept of a soul throughout human existence, and also of a deity/deities with human attributes and virtues - one who is actively involved in human life. Almost half the book is footnotes and bibliography...

    Reza Aslan is both a brilliant scholar and a skillful storyteller. 'God: A Human History' is fascinating, educational and accessible. It is as much an explanation of the way in which we have given God human qualities as it is a history of the rise of monotheism, two stories which are i...

    God is made in man's image, not the other way around, and Aslan documents this truth from ancient cultures around the world, also showing how and why humans moved from a pantheon of gods to a single God. His book is scholarly/heavily footnoted, but also quite engaging -- and short! Fa...

    Perhaps 'Zealot' set the bar too high for me. While I enjoyed Zealot as a comprehensive, fully-realized vision of Aslan?s interpretation of Jesus, I find 'God' to come up short. Aslan casts too wide of a net, trying to explore the meaning of the world?s great religions in 171 pages...

    I enjoyed this book that details the evolution of religion. What Aslan describes is how throughout history civilizations consistently defined god/gods in their own image, often attributing human traits to those they worship. This led to rituals such as animal sacrifices to fed the gods...

    review to come ...

    This is my third book by Reza Aslan and I've enjoyed them all. His writing is clear and his scholarship is deep and thoughtful. Aslan takes the reader on a quick review of man's history of "deification", starting with ancestor worship and progressing through today's major religions. He...

    Biblical, and using that term generically, texts aside, author-scholar Reza Aslan charts the history ? and the concept ? of God, providing a fascinating follow-up to Zealot, where he de-constructed and then re-constructed a historical look at Jesus the Messiah. Here, Aslan does not...

    Several pages into this book I started to wonder if it was satire. An author whose name is Aslan (the Christ-figure in the Narnia books) writes without any apparent sense of irony, having ignored what the opening chapters of Genesis says about man being made in God's image, "if we are ...

  • Dan
    Nov 16, 2017

    In July, I read a book called Evolving Brains, Emerging Gods: Early Humans and the Origins of Religion by E. Fuller Torrey. It presents the evolutionary theory of the creation of gods by examining the cognitive development of man and I found it truly fascinating. In this short work,...

    5 ? stuff. Many thanks to NetGalley, publisher and author for sharing the ARC. Honestly, my experience with ARCs so far was very disappointing. Also, I haven't encountered Reza Aslan before. So my expectations were pretty low to start with. But then I started reading... and wa...

    Although comparable in scope to Karen Armstrong?s A History of God, this is more of an anthropological and sociological approach to how religion arose. We created God in our image, Aslan argues. Using ?Adam? and ?Eve? as representatives of primitive humans, he explores what s...

    This book is well written and fascinating. As an Iranian, I especially love that he includes the vital history of God and religion that began in Iran. The content however is very similar to Robert Wright?s Evolution is God and Karen Armstrong?s history of God. But I suppose the out...

    This review and others can be found on BW Book Reviews. Thanks to Netgalley and Random House for an advanced copy! All opinions here are my own and are not influenced by them. Admittedly, I do love Reza Aslan, though. I?ve read two of his books and one of them completely change...

    Not bad for looking at theories on how humanity creates its gods. I was interested to note that as Aslan comes out as a pantheist at the end his extreme pantheism isn't all that different from atheism -- one is everything, every moment, every object, every particle is God vs. nothing, ...

    I am, in my essential reality, God made manifest. We all are. So then, worship God not through fear and trembling but through awe and wonder at the workings of the universe ? for the universe is God. Pray to God not to ask for things but to become one with God. Recognize that the kn...

    Each of Reza Aslan?s previous books made a lasting impression on me. God: A Human History is no different. It is an empowering study that relies on impeccable scholarship and yet reads with the lyricism and emotion of great literature. All the while, Aslan maintains a page-turning na...

    The author begins with an illogical premise and spirals downward from there. His original premise ignores the three basic Laws of Thought: the law of identity, the law of excluded middle and the law of non-contradiction. Aslan is an ethical relativist who has never examined his own tho...

    "What is God? That question has been st the center of the human quest to make sense of the divine from the very beginning." This was a lot shorter than I expected, the actual content taking up only about 50% of the book. However, the rest of the book is the authors bibliography, not...

    "All is One, and One is all. It is simply up to the individual to decide what "the One" is: how it should be defined, and how it should be experienced." - Reza Aslan. The author takes us on a journey through history and the evolution of 'God' as Lennon put it 'God is a concept' coming ...

    Aslan reminds me a lot of Harari - both are intelligent, extremely accessible and bold and love to paint with a very broad brush. They also cover some similar ground, although Aslan is more narrowly focused on religious themes. For some reason, I also find him less irritating than Hara...

    For 90+% of this book, I was fascinated. It's an engaging history of the development of humankind's relationship to the divine, from prehistoric (i.e, neanderthal) times up to, roughly, the development and spread of the most recent major western religion, Islam. It ties in psychology a...

  • Phil
    Jan 30, 2018

    In July, I read a book called Evolving Brains, Emerging Gods: Early Humans and the Origins of Religion by E. Fuller Torrey. It presents the evolutionary theory of the creation of gods by examining the cognitive development of man and I found it truly fascinating. In this short work,...

    5 ? stuff. Many thanks to NetGalley, publisher and author for sharing the ARC. Honestly, my experience with ARCs so far was very disappointing. Also, I haven't encountered Reza Aslan before. So my expectations were pretty low to start with. But then I started reading... and wa...

    Although comparable in scope to Karen Armstrong?s A History of God, this is more of an anthropological and sociological approach to how religion arose. We created God in our image, Aslan argues. Using ?Adam? and ?Eve? as representatives of primitive humans, he explores what s...

    This book is well written and fascinating. As an Iranian, I especially love that he includes the vital history of God and religion that began in Iran. The content however is very similar to Robert Wright?s Evolution is God and Karen Armstrong?s history of God. But I suppose the out...

    This review and others can be found on BW Book Reviews. Thanks to Netgalley and Random House for an advanced copy! All opinions here are my own and are not influenced by them. Admittedly, I do love Reza Aslan, though. I?ve read two of his books and one of them completely change...

    Not bad for looking at theories on how humanity creates its gods. I was interested to note that as Aslan comes out as a pantheist at the end his extreme pantheism isn't all that different from atheism -- one is everything, every moment, every object, every particle is God vs. nothing, ...

    I am, in my essential reality, God made manifest. We all are. So then, worship God not through fear and trembling but through awe and wonder at the workings of the universe ? for the universe is God. Pray to God not to ask for things but to become one with God. Recognize that the kn...

    Each of Reza Aslan?s previous books made a lasting impression on me. God: A Human History is no different. It is an empowering study that relies on impeccable scholarship and yet reads with the lyricism and emotion of great literature. All the while, Aslan maintains a page-turning na...

    The author begins with an illogical premise and spirals downward from there. His original premise ignores the three basic Laws of Thought: the law of identity, the law of excluded middle and the law of non-contradiction. Aslan is an ethical relativist who has never examined his own tho...

    "What is God? That question has been st the center of the human quest to make sense of the divine from the very beginning." This was a lot shorter than I expected, the actual content taking up only about 50% of the book. However, the rest of the book is the authors bibliography, not...

    "All is One, and One is all. It is simply up to the individual to decide what "the One" is: how it should be defined, and how it should be experienced." - Reza Aslan. The author takes us on a journey through history and the evolution of 'God' as Lennon put it 'God is a concept' coming ...

    Aslan reminds me a lot of Harari - both are intelligent, extremely accessible and bold and love to paint with a very broad brush. They also cover some similar ground, although Aslan is more narrowly focused on religious themes. For some reason, I also find him less irritating than Hara...

    For 90+% of this book, I was fascinated. It's an engaging history of the development of humankind's relationship to the divine, from prehistoric (i.e, neanderthal) times up to, roughly, the development and spread of the most recent major western religion, Islam. It ties in psychology a...

    I suppose if you have never considered the case that humans have fashioned the, "divine," in their own image for thousands of years then there may be something interesting here. I suppose if you know nothing of early monotheisms that predate the one you may subscribe to then there m...

    Fascinating and thought provoking, Aslan attempts to trace the development of the concept of a soul throughout human existence, and also of a deity/deities with human attributes and virtues - one who is actively involved in human life. Almost half the book is footnotes and bibliography...

    Reza Aslan is both a brilliant scholar and a skillful storyteller. 'God: A Human History' is fascinating, educational and accessible. It is as much an explanation of the way in which we have given God human qualities as it is a history of the rise of monotheism, two stories which are i...

    God is made in man's image, not the other way around, and Aslan documents this truth from ancient cultures around the world, also showing how and why humans moved from a pantheon of gods to a single God. His book is scholarly/heavily footnoted, but also quite engaging -- and short! Fa...

    Perhaps 'Zealot' set the bar too high for me. While I enjoyed Zealot as a comprehensive, fully-realized vision of Aslan?s interpretation of Jesus, I find 'God' to come up short. Aslan casts too wide of a net, trying to explore the meaning of the world?s great religions in 171 pages...

  • Annikky
    Nov 02, 2017

    In July, I read a book called Evolving Brains, Emerging Gods: Early Humans and the Origins of Religion by E. Fuller Torrey. It presents the evolutionary theory of the creation of gods by examining the cognitive development of man and I found it truly fascinating. In this short work,...

    5 ? stuff. Many thanks to NetGalley, publisher and author for sharing the ARC. Honestly, my experience with ARCs so far was very disappointing. Also, I haven't encountered Reza Aslan before. So my expectations were pretty low to start with. But then I started reading... and wa...

    Although comparable in scope to Karen Armstrong?s A History of God, this is more of an anthropological and sociological approach to how religion arose. We created God in our image, Aslan argues. Using ?Adam? and ?Eve? as representatives of primitive humans, he explores what s...

    This book is well written and fascinating. As an Iranian, I especially love that he includes the vital history of God and religion that began in Iran. The content however is very similar to Robert Wright?s Evolution is God and Karen Armstrong?s history of God. But I suppose the out...

    This review and others can be found on BW Book Reviews. Thanks to Netgalley and Random House for an advanced copy! All opinions here are my own and are not influenced by them. Admittedly, I do love Reza Aslan, though. I?ve read two of his books and one of them completely change...

    Not bad for looking at theories on how humanity creates its gods. I was interested to note that as Aslan comes out as a pantheist at the end his extreme pantheism isn't all that different from atheism -- one is everything, every moment, every object, every particle is God vs. nothing, ...

    I am, in my essential reality, God made manifest. We all are. So then, worship God not through fear and trembling but through awe and wonder at the workings of the universe ? for the universe is God. Pray to God not to ask for things but to become one with God. Recognize that the kn...

    Each of Reza Aslan?s previous books made a lasting impression on me. God: A Human History is no different. It is an empowering study that relies on impeccable scholarship and yet reads with the lyricism and emotion of great literature. All the while, Aslan maintains a page-turning na...

    The author begins with an illogical premise and spirals downward from there. His original premise ignores the three basic Laws of Thought: the law of identity, the law of excluded middle and the law of non-contradiction. Aslan is an ethical relativist who has never examined his own tho...

    "What is God? That question has been st the center of the human quest to make sense of the divine from the very beginning." This was a lot shorter than I expected, the actual content taking up only about 50% of the book. However, the rest of the book is the authors bibliography, not...

    "All is One, and One is all. It is simply up to the individual to decide what "the One" is: how it should be defined, and how it should be experienced." - Reza Aslan. The author takes us on a journey through history and the evolution of 'God' as Lennon put it 'God is a concept' coming ...

    Aslan reminds me a lot of Harari - both are intelligent, extremely accessible and bold and love to paint with a very broad brush. They also cover some similar ground, although Aslan is more narrowly focused on religious themes. For some reason, I also find him less irritating than Hara...

  • Caidyn (BW Book Reviews; he/him/his)
    Oct 20, 2017

    In July, I read a book called Evolving Brains, Emerging Gods: Early Humans and the Origins of Religion by E. Fuller Torrey. It presents the evolutionary theory of the creation of gods by examining the cognitive development of man and I found it truly fascinating. In this short work,...

    5 ? stuff. Many thanks to NetGalley, publisher and author for sharing the ARC. Honestly, my experience with ARCs so far was very disappointing. Also, I haven't encountered Reza Aslan before. So my expectations were pretty low to start with. But then I started reading... and wa...

    Although comparable in scope to Karen Armstrong?s A History of God, this is more of an anthropological and sociological approach to how religion arose. We created God in our image, Aslan argues. Using ?Adam? and ?Eve? as representatives of primitive humans, he explores what s...

    This book is well written and fascinating. As an Iranian, I especially love that he includes the vital history of God and religion that began in Iran. The content however is very similar to Robert Wright?s Evolution is God and Karen Armstrong?s history of God. But I suppose the out...

    This review and others can be found on BW Book Reviews. Thanks to Netgalley and Random House for an advanced copy! All opinions here are my own and are not influenced by them. Admittedly, I do love Reza Aslan, though. I?ve read two of his books and one of them completely change...

  • Jennie
    Jan 20, 2018

    In July, I read a book called Evolving Brains, Emerging Gods: Early Humans and the Origins of Religion by E. Fuller Torrey. It presents the evolutionary theory of the creation of gods by examining the cognitive development of man and I found it truly fascinating. In this short work,...

    5 ? stuff. Many thanks to NetGalley, publisher and author for sharing the ARC. Honestly, my experience with ARCs so far was very disappointing. Also, I haven't encountered Reza Aslan before. So my expectations were pretty low to start with. But then I started reading... and wa...

    Although comparable in scope to Karen Armstrong?s A History of God, this is more of an anthropological and sociological approach to how religion arose. We created God in our image, Aslan argues. Using ?Adam? and ?Eve? as representatives of primitive humans, he explores what s...

    This book is well written and fascinating. As an Iranian, I especially love that he includes the vital history of God and religion that began in Iran. The content however is very similar to Robert Wright?s Evolution is God and Karen Armstrong?s history of God. But I suppose the out...

    This review and others can be found on BW Book Reviews. Thanks to Netgalley and Random House for an advanced copy! All opinions here are my own and are not influenced by them. Admittedly, I do love Reza Aslan, though. I?ve read two of his books and one of them completely change...

    Not bad for looking at theories on how humanity creates its gods. I was interested to note that as Aslan comes out as a pantheist at the end his extreme pantheism isn't all that different from atheism -- one is everything, every moment, every object, every particle is God vs. nothing, ...

    I am, in my essential reality, God made manifest. We all are. So then, worship God not through fear and trembling but through awe and wonder at the workings of the universe ? for the universe is God. Pray to God not to ask for things but to become one with God. Recognize that the kn...

    Each of Reza Aslan?s previous books made a lasting impression on me. God: A Human History is no different. It is an empowering study that relies on impeccable scholarship and yet reads with the lyricism and emotion of great literature. All the while, Aslan maintains a page-turning na...

    The author begins with an illogical premise and spirals downward from there. His original premise ignores the three basic Laws of Thought: the law of identity, the law of excluded middle and the law of non-contradiction. Aslan is an ethical relativist who has never examined his own tho...

    "What is God? That question has been st the center of the human quest to make sense of the divine from the very beginning." This was a lot shorter than I expected, the actual content taking up only about 50% of the book. However, the rest of the book is the authors bibliography, not...

    "All is One, and One is all. It is simply up to the individual to decide what "the One" is: how it should be defined, and how it should be experienced." - Reza Aslan. The author takes us on a journey through history and the evolution of 'God' as Lennon put it 'God is a concept' coming ...

    Aslan reminds me a lot of Harari - both are intelligent, extremely accessible and bold and love to paint with a very broad brush. They also cover some similar ground, although Aslan is more narrowly focused on religious themes. For some reason, I also find him less irritating than Hara...

    For 90+% of this book, I was fascinated. It's an engaging history of the development of humankind's relationship to the divine, from prehistoric (i.e, neanderthal) times up to, roughly, the development and spread of the most recent major western religion, Islam. It ties in psychology a...

    I suppose if you have never considered the case that humans have fashioned the, "divine," in their own image for thousands of years then there may be something interesting here. I suppose if you know nothing of early monotheisms that predate the one you may subscribe to then there m...

    Fascinating and thought provoking, Aslan attempts to trace the development of the concept of a soul throughout human existence, and also of a deity/deities with human attributes and virtues - one who is actively involved in human life. Almost half the book is footnotes and bibliography...

    Reza Aslan is both a brilliant scholar and a skillful storyteller. 'God: A Human History' is fascinating, educational and accessible. It is as much an explanation of the way in which we have given God human qualities as it is a history of the rise of monotheism, two stories which are i...

    God is made in man's image, not the other way around, and Aslan documents this truth from ancient cultures around the world, also showing how and why humans moved from a pantheon of gods to a single God. His book is scholarly/heavily footnoted, but also quite engaging -- and short! Fa...

    Perhaps 'Zealot' set the bar too high for me. While I enjoyed Zealot as a comprehensive, fully-realized vision of Aslan?s interpretation of Jesus, I find 'God' to come up short. Aslan casts too wide of a net, trying to explore the meaning of the world?s great religions in 171 pages...

    I enjoyed this book that details the evolution of religion. What Aslan describes is how throughout history civilizations consistently defined god/gods in their own image, often attributing human traits to those they worship. This led to rituals such as animal sacrifices to fed the gods...

    review to come ...

    This is my third book by Reza Aslan and I've enjoyed them all. His writing is clear and his scholarship is deep and thoughtful. Aslan takes the reader on a quick review of man's history of "deification", starting with ancestor worship and progressing through today's major religions. He...

    Biblical, and using that term generically, texts aside, author-scholar Reza Aslan charts the history ? and the concept ? of God, providing a fascinating follow-up to Zealot, where he de-constructed and then re-constructed a historical look at Jesus the Messiah. Here, Aslan does not...

    Several pages into this book I started to wonder if it was satire. An author whose name is Aslan (the Christ-figure in the Narnia books) writes without any apparent sense of irony, having ignored what the opening chapters of Genesis says about man being made in God's image, "if we are ...

    A quick, interesting read. I didn't love it as much as I loved Zealot, but Aslan still puts forth a lot of interesting religious history. The history in this book is what I really enjoyed, however he comes at this topic with his opinions about what God is and why our interpretations of...

  • Marilynn Spiegel
    Nov 22, 2017

    In July, I read a book called Evolving Brains, Emerging Gods: Early Humans and the Origins of Religion by E. Fuller Torrey. It presents the evolutionary theory of the creation of gods by examining the cognitive development of man and I found it truly fascinating. In this short work,...

    5 ? stuff. Many thanks to NetGalley, publisher and author for sharing the ARC. Honestly, my experience with ARCs so far was very disappointing. Also, I haven't encountered Reza Aslan before. So my expectations were pretty low to start with. But then I started reading... and wa...

    Although comparable in scope to Karen Armstrong?s A History of God, this is more of an anthropological and sociological approach to how religion arose. We created God in our image, Aslan argues. Using ?Adam? and ?Eve? as representatives of primitive humans, he explores what s...

    This book is well written and fascinating. As an Iranian, I especially love that he includes the vital history of God and religion that began in Iran. The content however is very similar to Robert Wright?s Evolution is God and Karen Armstrong?s history of God. But I suppose the out...

    This review and others can be found on BW Book Reviews. Thanks to Netgalley and Random House for an advanced copy! All opinions here are my own and are not influenced by them. Admittedly, I do love Reza Aslan, though. I?ve read two of his books and one of them completely change...

    Not bad for looking at theories on how humanity creates its gods. I was interested to note that as Aslan comes out as a pantheist at the end his extreme pantheism isn't all that different from atheism -- one is everything, every moment, every object, every particle is God vs. nothing, ...

    I am, in my essential reality, God made manifest. We all are. So then, worship God not through fear and trembling but through awe and wonder at the workings of the universe ? for the universe is God. Pray to God not to ask for things but to become one with God. Recognize that the kn...

    Each of Reza Aslan?s previous books made a lasting impression on me. God: A Human History is no different. It is an empowering study that relies on impeccable scholarship and yet reads with the lyricism and emotion of great literature. All the while, Aslan maintains a page-turning na...

    The author begins with an illogical premise and spirals downward from there. His original premise ignores the three basic Laws of Thought: the law of identity, the law of excluded middle and the law of non-contradiction. Aslan is an ethical relativist who has never examined his own tho...

  • Anton
    Sep 27, 2017

    In July, I read a book called Evolving Brains, Emerging Gods: Early Humans and the Origins of Religion by E. Fuller Torrey. It presents the evolutionary theory of the creation of gods by examining the cognitive development of man and I found it truly fascinating. In this short work,...

    5 ? stuff. Many thanks to NetGalley, publisher and author for sharing the ARC. Honestly, my experience with ARCs so far was very disappointing. Also, I haven't encountered Reza Aslan before. So my expectations were pretty low to start with. But then I started reading... and wa...

  • Shawn Yoder
    Feb 14, 2018

    In July, I read a book called Evolving Brains, Emerging Gods: Early Humans and the Origins of Religion by E. Fuller Torrey. It presents the evolutionary theory of the creation of gods by examining the cognitive development of man and I found it truly fascinating. In this short work,...

    5 ? stuff. Many thanks to NetGalley, publisher and author for sharing the ARC. Honestly, my experience with ARCs so far was very disappointing. Also, I haven't encountered Reza Aslan before. So my expectations were pretty low to start with. But then I started reading... and wa...

    Although comparable in scope to Karen Armstrong?s A History of God, this is more of an anthropological and sociological approach to how religion arose. We created God in our image, Aslan argues. Using ?Adam? and ?Eve? as representatives of primitive humans, he explores what s...

    This book is well written and fascinating. As an Iranian, I especially love that he includes the vital history of God and religion that began in Iran. The content however is very similar to Robert Wright?s Evolution is God and Karen Armstrong?s history of God. But I suppose the out...

    This review and others can be found on BW Book Reviews. Thanks to Netgalley and Random House for an advanced copy! All opinions here are my own and are not influenced by them. Admittedly, I do love Reza Aslan, though. I?ve read two of his books and one of them completely change...

    Not bad for looking at theories on how humanity creates its gods. I was interested to note that as Aslan comes out as a pantheist at the end his extreme pantheism isn't all that different from atheism -- one is everything, every moment, every object, every particle is God vs. nothing, ...

    I am, in my essential reality, God made manifest. We all are. So then, worship God not through fear and trembling but through awe and wonder at the workings of the universe ? for the universe is God. Pray to God not to ask for things but to become one with God. Recognize that the kn...

    Each of Reza Aslan?s previous books made a lasting impression on me. God: A Human History is no different. It is an empowering study that relies on impeccable scholarship and yet reads with the lyricism and emotion of great literature. All the while, Aslan maintains a page-turning na...

    The author begins with an illogical premise and spirals downward from there. His original premise ignores the three basic Laws of Thought: the law of identity, the law of excluded middle and the law of non-contradiction. Aslan is an ethical relativist who has never examined his own tho...

    "What is God? That question has been st the center of the human quest to make sense of the divine from the very beginning." This was a lot shorter than I expected, the actual content taking up only about 50% of the book. However, the rest of the book is the authors bibliography, not...

    "All is One, and One is all. It is simply up to the individual to decide what "the One" is: how it should be defined, and how it should be experienced." - Reza Aslan. The author takes us on a journey through history and the evolution of 'God' as Lennon put it 'God is a concept' coming ...

    Aslan reminds me a lot of Harari - both are intelligent, extremely accessible and bold and love to paint with a very broad brush. They also cover some similar ground, although Aslan is more narrowly focused on religious themes. For some reason, I also find him less irritating than Hara...

    For 90+% of this book, I was fascinated. It's an engaging history of the development of humankind's relationship to the divine, from prehistoric (i.e, neanderthal) times up to, roughly, the development and spread of the most recent major western religion, Islam. It ties in psychology a...

    I suppose if you have never considered the case that humans have fashioned the, "divine," in their own image for thousands of years then there may be something interesting here. I suppose if you know nothing of early monotheisms that predate the one you may subscribe to then there m...

    Fascinating and thought provoking, Aslan attempts to trace the development of the concept of a soul throughout human existence, and also of a deity/deities with human attributes and virtues - one who is actively involved in human life. Almost half the book is footnotes and bibliography...

    Reza Aslan is both a brilliant scholar and a skillful storyteller. 'God: A Human History' is fascinating, educational and accessible. It is as much an explanation of the way in which we have given God human qualities as it is a history of the rise of monotheism, two stories which are i...

    God is made in man's image, not the other way around, and Aslan documents this truth from ancient cultures around the world, also showing how and why humans moved from a pantheon of gods to a single God. His book is scholarly/heavily footnoted, but also quite engaging -- and short! Fa...

    Perhaps 'Zealot' set the bar too high for me. While I enjoyed Zealot as a comprehensive, fully-realized vision of Aslan?s interpretation of Jesus, I find 'God' to come up short. Aslan casts too wide of a net, trying to explore the meaning of the world?s great religions in 171 pages...

    I enjoyed this book that details the evolution of religion. What Aslan describes is how throughout history civilizations consistently defined god/gods in their own image, often attributing human traits to those they worship. This led to rituals such as animal sacrifices to fed the gods...

    review to come ...

    This is my third book by Reza Aslan and I've enjoyed them all. His writing is clear and his scholarship is deep and thoughtful. Aslan takes the reader on a quick review of man's history of "deification", starting with ancestor worship and progressing through today's major religions. He...

    Biblical, and using that term generically, texts aside, author-scholar Reza Aslan charts the history ? and the concept ? of God, providing a fascinating follow-up to Zealot, where he de-constructed and then re-constructed a historical look at Jesus the Messiah. Here, Aslan does not...

    Several pages into this book I started to wonder if it was satire. An author whose name is Aslan (the Christ-figure in the Narnia books) writes without any apparent sense of irony, having ignored what the opening chapters of Genesis says about man being made in God's image, "if we are ...

    A quick, interesting read. I didn't love it as much as I loved Zealot, but Aslan still puts forth a lot of interesting religious history. The history in this book is what I really enjoyed, however he comes at this topic with his opinions about what God is and why our interpretations of...

    Better than much previous That said, while better than most, it's not perfect. I ? even if a majority of Torah scholars disagree ? think Yahweh comes from the MIdianiate "HWY," which is "to storm, blow or thunder," rather than the Hebrew "HYH," "to be." It derives easier, and...

    I usually recoil from reading books about religion written by believers, they do tend to ignore the obvious when it contradicts their belief in scripture or tradition and fall in logical traps that render their reasoning unpalatable. On the other hand, books about religion by non-belie...

    An absolutely pleasurable read. A beautifully crafted story of God through an anthropological, sociological, psychological and historical lens. "As a believer and a pantheist, I worship God not through fear and trembling but through awe and wonder at the workings of the universe -...

    This was a fascinating read. Aslan is excellent at explaining very complicated philosophical and theological ideas. He leads us on a journey through the origins and development of religion to what current faiths represent (and how they got there); and miraculously this very long journe...

    Reza is a pantheist and writes from that perspective. I am a Christian pastor, so I do not at all agree with his conclusions or his reasoning. However, I found this book fascinating on many different levels. First of all, Reza is a great writer (and I listened to the audiobook which wa...

  • Mehwish Mughal
    Jan 11, 2018

    In July, I read a book called Evolving Brains, Emerging Gods: Early Humans and the Origins of Religion by E. Fuller Torrey. It presents the evolutionary theory of the creation of gods by examining the cognitive development of man and I found it truly fascinating. In this short work,...

    5 ? stuff. Many thanks to NetGalley, publisher and author for sharing the ARC. Honestly, my experience with ARCs so far was very disappointing. Also, I haven't encountered Reza Aslan before. So my expectations were pretty low to start with. But then I started reading... and wa...

    Although comparable in scope to Karen Armstrong?s A History of God, this is more of an anthropological and sociological approach to how religion arose. We created God in our image, Aslan argues. Using ?Adam? and ?Eve? as representatives of primitive humans, he explores what s...

    This book is well written and fascinating. As an Iranian, I especially love that he includes the vital history of God and religion that began in Iran. The content however is very similar to Robert Wright?s Evolution is God and Karen Armstrong?s history of God. But I suppose the out...

    This review and others can be found on BW Book Reviews. Thanks to Netgalley and Random House for an advanced copy! All opinions here are my own and are not influenced by them. Admittedly, I do love Reza Aslan, though. I?ve read two of his books and one of them completely change...

    Not bad for looking at theories on how humanity creates its gods. I was interested to note that as Aslan comes out as a pantheist at the end his extreme pantheism isn't all that different from atheism -- one is everything, every moment, every object, every particle is God vs. nothing, ...

    I am, in my essential reality, God made manifest. We all are. So then, worship God not through fear and trembling but through awe and wonder at the workings of the universe ? for the universe is God. Pray to God not to ask for things but to become one with God. Recognize that the kn...

    Each of Reza Aslan?s previous books made a lasting impression on me. God: A Human History is no different. It is an empowering study that relies on impeccable scholarship and yet reads with the lyricism and emotion of great literature. All the while, Aslan maintains a page-turning na...

    The author begins with an illogical premise and spirals downward from there. His original premise ignores the three basic Laws of Thought: the law of identity, the law of excluded middle and the law of non-contradiction. Aslan is an ethical relativist who has never examined his own tho...

    "What is God? That question has been st the center of the human quest to make sense of the divine from the very beginning." This was a lot shorter than I expected, the actual content taking up only about 50% of the book. However, the rest of the book is the authors bibliography, not...

    "All is One, and One is all. It is simply up to the individual to decide what "the One" is: how it should be defined, and how it should be experienced." - Reza Aslan. The author takes us on a journey through history and the evolution of 'God' as Lennon put it 'God is a concept' coming ...

    Aslan reminds me a lot of Harari - both are intelligent, extremely accessible and bold and love to paint with a very broad brush. They also cover some similar ground, although Aslan is more narrowly focused on religious themes. For some reason, I also find him less irritating than Hara...

    For 90+% of this book, I was fascinated. It's an engaging history of the development of humankind's relationship to the divine, from prehistoric (i.e, neanderthal) times up to, roughly, the development and spread of the most recent major western religion, Islam. It ties in psychology a...

    I suppose if you have never considered the case that humans have fashioned the, "divine," in their own image for thousands of years then there may be something interesting here. I suppose if you know nothing of early monotheisms that predate the one you may subscribe to then there m...

    Fascinating and thought provoking, Aslan attempts to trace the development of the concept of a soul throughout human existence, and also of a deity/deities with human attributes and virtues - one who is actively involved in human life. Almost half the book is footnotes and bibliography...

    Reza Aslan is both a brilliant scholar and a skillful storyteller. 'God: A Human History' is fascinating, educational and accessible. It is as much an explanation of the way in which we have given God human qualities as it is a history of the rise of monotheism, two stories which are i...

    God is made in man's image, not the other way around, and Aslan documents this truth from ancient cultures around the world, also showing how and why humans moved from a pantheon of gods to a single God. His book is scholarly/heavily footnoted, but also quite engaging -- and short! Fa...

    Perhaps 'Zealot' set the bar too high for me. While I enjoyed Zealot as a comprehensive, fully-realized vision of Aslan?s interpretation of Jesus, I find 'God' to come up short. Aslan casts too wide of a net, trying to explore the meaning of the world?s great religions in 171 pages...

    I enjoyed this book that details the evolution of religion. What Aslan describes is how throughout history civilizations consistently defined god/gods in their own image, often attributing human traits to those they worship. This led to rituals such as animal sacrifices to fed the gods...

    review to come ...

    This is my third book by Reza Aslan and I've enjoyed them all. His writing is clear and his scholarship is deep and thoughtful. Aslan takes the reader on a quick review of man's history of "deification", starting with ancestor worship and progressing through today's major religions. He...

    Biblical, and using that term generically, texts aside, author-scholar Reza Aslan charts the history ? and the concept ? of God, providing a fascinating follow-up to Zealot, where he de-constructed and then re-constructed a historical look at Jesus the Messiah. Here, Aslan does not...

    Several pages into this book I started to wonder if it was satire. An author whose name is Aslan (the Christ-figure in the Narnia books) writes without any apparent sense of irony, having ignored what the opening chapters of Genesis says about man being made in God's image, "if we are ...

    A quick, interesting read. I didn't love it as much as I loved Zealot, but Aslan still puts forth a lot of interesting religious history. The history in this book is what I really enjoyed, however he comes at this topic with his opinions about what God is and why our interpretations of...

    Better than much previous That said, while better than most, it's not perfect. I ? even if a majority of Torah scholars disagree ? think Yahweh comes from the MIdianiate "HWY," which is "to storm, blow or thunder," rather than the Hebrew "HYH," "to be." It derives easier, and...

    I usually recoil from reading books about religion written by believers, they do tend to ignore the obvious when it contradicts their belief in scripture or tradition and fall in logical traps that render their reasoning unpalatable. On the other hand, books about religion by non-belie...

    An absolutely pleasurable read. A beautifully crafted story of God through an anthropological, sociological, psychological and historical lens. "As a believer and a pantheist, I worship God not through fear and trembling but through awe and wonder at the workings of the universe -...

  • Joe Kucharski
    Nov 20, 2017

    In July, I read a book called Evolving Brains, Emerging Gods: Early Humans and the Origins of Religion by E. Fuller Torrey. It presents the evolutionary theory of the creation of gods by examining the cognitive development of man and I found it truly fascinating. In this short work,...

    5 ? stuff. Many thanks to NetGalley, publisher and author for sharing the ARC. Honestly, my experience with ARCs so far was very disappointing. Also, I haven't encountered Reza Aslan before. So my expectations were pretty low to start with. But then I started reading... and wa...

    Although comparable in scope to Karen Armstrong?s A History of God, this is more of an anthropological and sociological approach to how religion arose. We created God in our image, Aslan argues. Using ?Adam? and ?Eve? as representatives of primitive humans, he explores what s...

    This book is well written and fascinating. As an Iranian, I especially love that he includes the vital history of God and religion that began in Iran. The content however is very similar to Robert Wright?s Evolution is God and Karen Armstrong?s history of God. But I suppose the out...

    This review and others can be found on BW Book Reviews. Thanks to Netgalley and Random House for an advanced copy! All opinions here are my own and are not influenced by them. Admittedly, I do love Reza Aslan, though. I?ve read two of his books and one of them completely change...

    Not bad for looking at theories on how humanity creates its gods. I was interested to note that as Aslan comes out as a pantheist at the end his extreme pantheism isn't all that different from atheism -- one is everything, every moment, every object, every particle is God vs. nothing, ...

    I am, in my essential reality, God made manifest. We all are. So then, worship God not through fear and trembling but through awe and wonder at the workings of the universe ? for the universe is God. Pray to God not to ask for things but to become one with God. Recognize that the kn...

    Each of Reza Aslan?s previous books made a lasting impression on me. God: A Human History is no different. It is an empowering study that relies on impeccable scholarship and yet reads with the lyricism and emotion of great literature. All the while, Aslan maintains a page-turning na...

    The author begins with an illogical premise and spirals downward from there. His original premise ignores the three basic Laws of Thought: the law of identity, the law of excluded middle and the law of non-contradiction. Aslan is an ethical relativist who has never examined his own tho...

    "What is God? That question has been st the center of the human quest to make sense of the divine from the very beginning." This was a lot shorter than I expected, the actual content taking up only about 50% of the book. However, the rest of the book is the authors bibliography, not...

    "All is One, and One is all. It is simply up to the individual to decide what "the One" is: how it should be defined, and how it should be experienced." - Reza Aslan. The author takes us on a journey through history and the evolution of 'God' as Lennon put it 'God is a concept' coming ...

    Aslan reminds me a lot of Harari - both are intelligent, extremely accessible and bold and love to paint with a very broad brush. They also cover some similar ground, although Aslan is more narrowly focused on religious themes. For some reason, I also find him less irritating than Hara...

    For 90+% of this book, I was fascinated. It's an engaging history of the development of humankind's relationship to the divine, from prehistoric (i.e, neanderthal) times up to, roughly, the development and spread of the most recent major western religion, Islam. It ties in psychology a...

    I suppose if you have never considered the case that humans have fashioned the, "divine," in their own image for thousands of years then there may be something interesting here. I suppose if you know nothing of early monotheisms that predate the one you may subscribe to then there m...

    Fascinating and thought provoking, Aslan attempts to trace the development of the concept of a soul throughout human existence, and also of a deity/deities with human attributes and virtues - one who is actively involved in human life. Almost half the book is footnotes and bibliography...

    Reza Aslan is both a brilliant scholar and a skillful storyteller. 'God: A Human History' is fascinating, educational and accessible. It is as much an explanation of the way in which we have given God human qualities as it is a history of the rise of monotheism, two stories which are i...

    God is made in man's image, not the other way around, and Aslan documents this truth from ancient cultures around the world, also showing how and why humans moved from a pantheon of gods to a single God. His book is scholarly/heavily footnoted, but also quite engaging -- and short! Fa...

    Perhaps 'Zealot' set the bar too high for me. While I enjoyed Zealot as a comprehensive, fully-realized vision of Aslan?s interpretation of Jesus, I find 'God' to come up short. Aslan casts too wide of a net, trying to explore the meaning of the world?s great religions in 171 pages...

    I enjoyed this book that details the evolution of religion. What Aslan describes is how throughout history civilizations consistently defined god/gods in their own image, often attributing human traits to those they worship. This led to rituals such as animal sacrifices to fed the gods...

    review to come ...

    This is my third book by Reza Aslan and I've enjoyed them all. His writing is clear and his scholarship is deep and thoughtful. Aslan takes the reader on a quick review of man's history of "deification", starting with ancestor worship and progressing through today's major religions. He...

    Biblical, and using that term generically, texts aside, author-scholar Reza Aslan charts the history ? and the concept ? of God, providing a fascinating follow-up to Zealot, where he de-constructed and then re-constructed a historical look at Jesus the Messiah. Here, Aslan does not...

  • Dave
    Nov 23, 2017

    In July, I read a book called Evolving Brains, Emerging Gods: Early Humans and the Origins of Religion by E. Fuller Torrey. It presents the evolutionary theory of the creation of gods by examining the cognitive development of man and I found it truly fascinating. In this short work,...

    5 ? stuff. Many thanks to NetGalley, publisher and author for sharing the ARC. Honestly, my experience with ARCs so far was very disappointing. Also, I haven't encountered Reza Aslan before. So my expectations were pretty low to start with. But then I started reading... and wa...

    Although comparable in scope to Karen Armstrong?s A History of God, this is more of an anthropological and sociological approach to how religion arose. We created God in our image, Aslan argues. Using ?Adam? and ?Eve? as representatives of primitive humans, he explores what s...

    This book is well written and fascinating. As an Iranian, I especially love that he includes the vital history of God and religion that began in Iran. The content however is very similar to Robert Wright?s Evolution is God and Karen Armstrong?s history of God. But I suppose the out...

    This review and others can be found on BW Book Reviews. Thanks to Netgalley and Random House for an advanced copy! All opinions here are my own and are not influenced by them. Admittedly, I do love Reza Aslan, though. I?ve read two of his books and one of them completely change...

    Not bad for looking at theories on how humanity creates its gods. I was interested to note that as Aslan comes out as a pantheist at the end his extreme pantheism isn't all that different from atheism -- one is everything, every moment, every object, every particle is God vs. nothing, ...

    I am, in my essential reality, God made manifest. We all are. So then, worship God not through fear and trembling but through awe and wonder at the workings of the universe ? for the universe is God. Pray to God not to ask for things but to become one with God. Recognize that the kn...

    Each of Reza Aslan?s previous books made a lasting impression on me. God: A Human History is no different. It is an empowering study that relies on impeccable scholarship and yet reads with the lyricism and emotion of great literature. All the while, Aslan maintains a page-turning na...

    The author begins with an illogical premise and spirals downward from there. His original premise ignores the three basic Laws of Thought: the law of identity, the law of excluded middle and the law of non-contradiction. Aslan is an ethical relativist who has never examined his own tho...

    "What is God? That question has been st the center of the human quest to make sense of the divine from the very beginning." This was a lot shorter than I expected, the actual content taking up only about 50% of the book. However, the rest of the book is the authors bibliography, not...

    "All is One, and One is all. It is simply up to the individual to decide what "the One" is: how it should be defined, and how it should be experienced." - Reza Aslan. The author takes us on a journey through history and the evolution of 'God' as Lennon put it 'God is a concept' coming ...

    Aslan reminds me a lot of Harari - both are intelligent, extremely accessible and bold and love to paint with a very broad brush. They also cover some similar ground, although Aslan is more narrowly focused on religious themes. For some reason, I also find him less irritating than Hara...

    For 90+% of this book, I was fascinated. It's an engaging history of the development of humankind's relationship to the divine, from prehistoric (i.e, neanderthal) times up to, roughly, the development and spread of the most recent major western religion, Islam. It ties in psychology a...

    I suppose if you have never considered the case that humans have fashioned the, "divine," in their own image for thousands of years then there may be something interesting here. I suppose if you know nothing of early monotheisms that predate the one you may subscribe to then there m...

    Fascinating and thought provoking, Aslan attempts to trace the development of the concept of a soul throughout human existence, and also of a deity/deities with human attributes and virtues - one who is actively involved in human life. Almost half the book is footnotes and bibliography...

    Reza Aslan is both a brilliant scholar and a skillful storyteller. 'God: A Human History' is fascinating, educational and accessible. It is as much an explanation of the way in which we have given God human qualities as it is a history of the rise of monotheism, two stories which are i...

    God is made in man's image, not the other way around, and Aslan documents this truth from ancient cultures around the world, also showing how and why humans moved from a pantheon of gods to a single God. His book is scholarly/heavily footnoted, but also quite engaging -- and short! Fa...

    Perhaps 'Zealot' set the bar too high for me. While I enjoyed Zealot as a comprehensive, fully-realized vision of Aslan?s interpretation of Jesus, I find 'God' to come up short. Aslan casts too wide of a net, trying to explore the meaning of the world?s great religions in 171 pages...

    I enjoyed this book that details the evolution of religion. What Aslan describes is how throughout history civilizations consistently defined god/gods in their own image, often attributing human traits to those they worship. This led to rituals such as animal sacrifices to fed the gods...

    review to come ...

    This is my third book by Reza Aslan and I've enjoyed them all. His writing is clear and his scholarship is deep and thoughtful. Aslan takes the reader on a quick review of man's history of "deification", starting with ancestor worship and progressing through today's major religions. He...

  • Kristy K
    Oct 18, 2017

    In July, I read a book called Evolving Brains, Emerging Gods: Early Humans and the Origins of Religion by E. Fuller Torrey. It presents the evolutionary theory of the creation of gods by examining the cognitive development of man and I found it truly fascinating. In this short work,...

    5 ? stuff. Many thanks to NetGalley, publisher and author for sharing the ARC. Honestly, my experience with ARCs so far was very disappointing. Also, I haven't encountered Reza Aslan before. So my expectations were pretty low to start with. But then I started reading... and wa...

    Although comparable in scope to Karen Armstrong?s A History of God, this is more of an anthropological and sociological approach to how religion arose. We created God in our image, Aslan argues. Using ?Adam? and ?Eve? as representatives of primitive humans, he explores what s...

    This book is well written and fascinating. As an Iranian, I especially love that he includes the vital history of God and religion that began in Iran. The content however is very similar to Robert Wright?s Evolution is God and Karen Armstrong?s history of God. But I suppose the out...

    This review and others can be found on BW Book Reviews. Thanks to Netgalley and Random House for an advanced copy! All opinions here are my own and are not influenced by them. Admittedly, I do love Reza Aslan, though. I?ve read two of his books and one of them completely change...

    Not bad for looking at theories on how humanity creates its gods. I was interested to note that as Aslan comes out as a pantheist at the end his extreme pantheism isn't all that different from atheism -- one is everything, every moment, every object, every particle is God vs. nothing, ...

    I am, in my essential reality, God made manifest. We all are. So then, worship God not through fear and trembling but through awe and wonder at the workings of the universe ? for the universe is God. Pray to God not to ask for things but to become one with God. Recognize that the kn...

    Each of Reza Aslan?s previous books made a lasting impression on me. God: A Human History is no different. It is an empowering study that relies on impeccable scholarship and yet reads with the lyricism and emotion of great literature. All the while, Aslan maintains a page-turning na...

    The author begins with an illogical premise and spirals downward from there. His original premise ignores the three basic Laws of Thought: the law of identity, the law of excluded middle and the law of non-contradiction. Aslan is an ethical relativist who has never examined his own tho...

    "What is God? That question has been st the center of the human quest to make sense of the divine from the very beginning." This was a lot shorter than I expected, the actual content taking up only about 50% of the book. However, the rest of the book is the authors bibliography, not...

  • Nicole
    Nov 18, 2017

    In July, I read a book called Evolving Brains, Emerging Gods: Early Humans and the Origins of Religion by E. Fuller Torrey. It presents the evolutionary theory of the creation of gods by examining the cognitive development of man and I found it truly fascinating. In this short work,...

    5 ? stuff. Many thanks to NetGalley, publisher and author for sharing the ARC. Honestly, my experience with ARCs so far was very disappointing. Also, I haven't encountered Reza Aslan before. So my expectations were pretty low to start with. But then I started reading... and wa...

    Although comparable in scope to Karen Armstrong?s A History of God, this is more of an anthropological and sociological approach to how religion arose. We created God in our image, Aslan argues. Using ?Adam? and ?Eve? as representatives of primitive humans, he explores what s...

    This book is well written and fascinating. As an Iranian, I especially love that he includes the vital history of God and religion that began in Iran. The content however is very similar to Robert Wright?s Evolution is God and Karen Armstrong?s history of God. But I suppose the out...

    This review and others can be found on BW Book Reviews. Thanks to Netgalley and Random House for an advanced copy! All opinions here are my own and are not influenced by them. Admittedly, I do love Reza Aslan, though. I?ve read two of his books and one of them completely change...

    Not bad for looking at theories on how humanity creates its gods. I was interested to note that as Aslan comes out as a pantheist at the end his extreme pantheism isn't all that different from atheism -- one is everything, every moment, every object, every particle is God vs. nothing, ...

    I am, in my essential reality, God made manifest. We all are. So then, worship God not through fear and trembling but through awe and wonder at the workings of the universe ? for the universe is God. Pray to God not to ask for things but to become one with God. Recognize that the kn...

    Each of Reza Aslan?s previous books made a lasting impression on me. God: A Human History is no different. It is an empowering study that relies on impeccable scholarship and yet reads with the lyricism and emotion of great literature. All the while, Aslan maintains a page-turning na...

    The author begins with an illogical premise and spirals downward from there. His original premise ignores the three basic Laws of Thought: the law of identity, the law of excluded middle and the law of non-contradiction. Aslan is an ethical relativist who has never examined his own tho...

    "What is God? That question has been st the center of the human quest to make sense of the divine from the very beginning." This was a lot shorter than I expected, the actual content taking up only about 50% of the book. However, the rest of the book is the authors bibliography, not...

    "All is One, and One is all. It is simply up to the individual to decide what "the One" is: how it should be defined, and how it should be experienced." - Reza Aslan. The author takes us on a journey through history and the evolution of 'God' as Lennon put it 'God is a concept' coming ...

    Aslan reminds me a lot of Harari - both are intelligent, extremely accessible and bold and love to paint with a very broad brush. They also cover some similar ground, although Aslan is more narrowly focused on religious themes. For some reason, I also find him less irritating than Hara...

    For 90+% of this book, I was fascinated. It's an engaging history of the development of humankind's relationship to the divine, from prehistoric (i.e, neanderthal) times up to, roughly, the development and spread of the most recent major western religion, Islam. It ties in psychology a...

    I suppose if you have never considered the case that humans have fashioned the, "divine," in their own image for thousands of years then there may be something interesting here. I suppose if you know nothing of early monotheisms that predate the one you may subscribe to then there m...

    Fascinating and thought provoking, Aslan attempts to trace the development of the concept of a soul throughout human existence, and also of a deity/deities with human attributes and virtues - one who is actively involved in human life. Almost half the book is footnotes and bibliography...

    Reza Aslan is both a brilliant scholar and a skillful storyteller. 'God: A Human History' is fascinating, educational and accessible. It is as much an explanation of the way in which we have given God human qualities as it is a history of the rise of monotheism, two stories which are i...

  • Haroon
    Jan 12, 2018

    In July, I read a book called Evolving Brains, Emerging Gods: Early Humans and the Origins of Religion by E. Fuller Torrey. It presents the evolutionary theory of the creation of gods by examining the cognitive development of man and I found it truly fascinating. In this short work,...

    5 ? stuff. Many thanks to NetGalley, publisher and author for sharing the ARC. Honestly, my experience with ARCs so far was very disappointing. Also, I haven't encountered Reza Aslan before. So my expectations were pretty low to start with. But then I started reading... and wa...

    Although comparable in scope to Karen Armstrong?s A History of God, this is more of an anthropological and sociological approach to how religion arose. We created God in our image, Aslan argues. Using ?Adam? and ?Eve? as representatives of primitive humans, he explores what s...

    This book is well written and fascinating. As an Iranian, I especially love that he includes the vital history of God and religion that began in Iran. The content however is very similar to Robert Wright?s Evolution is God and Karen Armstrong?s history of God. But I suppose the out...

    This review and others can be found on BW Book Reviews. Thanks to Netgalley and Random House for an advanced copy! All opinions here are my own and are not influenced by them. Admittedly, I do love Reza Aslan, though. I?ve read two of his books and one of them completely change...

    Not bad for looking at theories on how humanity creates its gods. I was interested to note that as Aslan comes out as a pantheist at the end his extreme pantheism isn't all that different from atheism -- one is everything, every moment, every object, every particle is God vs. nothing, ...

    I am, in my essential reality, God made manifest. We all are. So then, worship God not through fear and trembling but through awe and wonder at the workings of the universe ? for the universe is God. Pray to God not to ask for things but to become one with God. Recognize that the kn...

    Each of Reza Aslan?s previous books made a lasting impression on me. God: A Human History is no different. It is an empowering study that relies on impeccable scholarship and yet reads with the lyricism and emotion of great literature. All the while, Aslan maintains a page-turning na...

    The author begins with an illogical premise and spirals downward from there. His original premise ignores the three basic Laws of Thought: the law of identity, the law of excluded middle and the law of non-contradiction. Aslan is an ethical relativist who has never examined his own tho...

    "What is God? That question has been st the center of the human quest to make sense of the divine from the very beginning." This was a lot shorter than I expected, the actual content taking up only about 50% of the book. However, the rest of the book is the authors bibliography, not...

    "All is One, and One is all. It is simply up to the individual to decide what "the One" is: how it should be defined, and how it should be experienced." - Reza Aslan. The author takes us on a journey through history and the evolution of 'God' as Lennon put it 'God is a concept' coming ...