The Ascent of Gravity: The Quest to Understand the Force that Explains Everything

The Ascent of Gravity: The Quest to Understand the Force that Explains Everything

Gravity is the weakest force in the everyday world yet it is the strongest force in the universe. It was the first force to be recognized and described yet it is the least understood. It is a "force" that keeps your feet on the ground yet no such force actually exists. Gravity, to steal the words of Winston Churchill, is "a riddle, wrapped in a mystery, inside an enigma." A Gravity is the weakest force in the everyday world yet it is the strongest force in the universe. It was the first ...

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Title:The Ascent of Gravity: The Quest to Understand the Force that Explains Everything
Author:Marcus Chown
Rating:
Genres:Science
ISBN:1681775379
Format Type:Hardcover
Number of Pages:256 pages pages

The Ascent of Gravity: The Quest to Understand the Force that Explains Everything Reviews

  • Ray
    Mar 07, 2018

    This is a highly entertaining history of gravity, full of quite interesting anecdotes and the gradual unfolding of our understanding from Newton through Einstein through our quest to reconcile quantum mechanics with the one aspect we're most familiar with but which we understand the le...

    Marcus Chown is one of the UK's best writers on physics and astronomy - it's excellent to see him back on what he does best. Here we discover our gradual approach to understanding the nature of gravity - the 'ascent' of the title - which, though perhaps slightly overblown in the words ...

    As the story goes, in 1666 Isaac Newton watched an apple fall from a tree, and it was this simple action that gave him the inspiration to develop the theory and the mathematics that was first published in 1687 in Philosophić Naturalis Principia Mathematica (Mathematical Principles of ...

    I did a double review of two books for the Wall Street Journal, so posting it under both titles! The Ascent of Gravity Marcus Chown Pegasus On Gravity A. Zee Princeton Gravity has become a hot topic in science, with the discovery of gravitational waves, ripples in the fabric...

    Not a review but some kind of essay (based on the book)... Gravitational waves are bombarding The Earth from all sides at all times. But you don?t know about it. Or maybe you know, but don?t care. Or simply ? do not feel it. More likely. Ray is going to ask you to stop for...

    From Newton to Einstein to the present theories of cosmology. Chown takes us through a universe which shows itself to be a dichotomy of truths. Everyone knows that gravity is an attractive force..right? Well it appears that it also has a dark side which is helping the universe to expan...

    Not the first time I've read through to the end of a Marcus Chown and realised that, though there are some good stories and some nice linking of events and people, I'm not much better educated about the subject matter than when I started. Perhaps I should stop reading the author! ...

    Gravity is one of those concepts everyone thinks they understand, only occasionally discovering that their notions of gravity are identical to those held in the time of Newton. Curiously enough, just as in every other area of scientific inquiry, there have been significant new discover...

    Growing up in rural Connecticut presented some difficulties, namely, finding anything to do. Reading proved a dependable pastime and mostly I scrounged through whatever books were left laying around by my six older siblings. The Caine Mutiny, comic books, The Oxford Companion to Americ...

    Since the book is written in 2017, it has an advantage of being definite about gravitational waves. It gives the book a promising start and defines its central focus on gravity. It is divided into three parts - first one dealing with classical gravity (aka Newton), second one with spac...

    This book will blow your mind as it tries to explain gravity, quantum physics and associated ideas to the common person. It does a pretty job of it. Any failure is in my lack of understanding. It isn't full of equation that make no sense to the layperson but with analogies and real wor...

    This title is a bit misleading, because it seems to bit off and chew on quite a bit more than just gravity. It's a nice brief overview of the both the history and the current state of discoveries and thinking about large (and small)-scale physics, from Newton and his apple through quan...

    The only downside of this book was the reader (I listened to the audio). When she kept her natural British accent she was fine, but whenever she switched to accents when quoting Einstein (German) or American accents, she sounded ridiculous; that was distracting. Her American accent sou...

    I really enjoyed this read. The first two sections (Newton and Einstein) were really clear and written with humour and I enjoyed the historical context given, but none of it was at the expense of glossing over the science which I really appreciated. It also didn't shy away from discuss...

    In part I, the author explains simple things pretty well, as a Phd in physics, I also learned a thing or two. Then in part 2, he explains things too simple. As far as the part 3, it is a little bit awkward. I got a feeling he trusts Nima too much... Well, I admit I agree with most of w...

    Chown writes about the most brilliant minds in science, especially Newton and Einstein. Those early sections of the book were interesting, reading about who these individuals were, and how they came to the discoveries they made. The later sections, getting into string theory, quantum...

  • Steven
    Jun 15, 2018

    This is a highly entertaining history of gravity, full of quite interesting anecdotes and the gradual unfolding of our understanding from Newton through Einstein through our quest to reconcile quantum mechanics with the one aspect we're most familiar with but which we understand the le...

    Marcus Chown is one of the UK's best writers on physics and astronomy - it's excellent to see him back on what he does best. Here we discover our gradual approach to understanding the nature of gravity - the 'ascent' of the title - which, though perhaps slightly overblown in the words ...

    As the story goes, in 1666 Isaac Newton watched an apple fall from a tree, and it was this simple action that gave him the inspiration to develop the theory and the mathematics that was first published in 1687 in Philosophić Naturalis Principia Mathematica (Mathematical Principles of ...

    I did a double review of two books for the Wall Street Journal, so posting it under both titles! The Ascent of Gravity Marcus Chown Pegasus On Gravity A. Zee Princeton Gravity has become a hot topic in science, with the discovery of gravitational waves, ripples in the fabric...

    Not a review but some kind of essay (based on the book)... Gravitational waves are bombarding The Earth from all sides at all times. But you don?t know about it. Or maybe you know, but don?t care. Or simply ? do not feel it. More likely. Ray is going to ask you to stop for...

    From Newton to Einstein to the present theories of cosmology. Chown takes us through a universe which shows itself to be a dichotomy of truths. Everyone knows that gravity is an attractive force..right? Well it appears that it also has a dark side which is helping the universe to expan...

    Not the first time I've read through to the end of a Marcus Chown and realised that, though there are some good stories and some nice linking of events and people, I'm not much better educated about the subject matter than when I started. Perhaps I should stop reading the author! ...

    Gravity is one of those concepts everyone thinks they understand, only occasionally discovering that their notions of gravity are identical to those held in the time of Newton. Curiously enough, just as in every other area of scientific inquiry, there have been significant new discover...

    Growing up in rural Connecticut presented some difficulties, namely, finding anything to do. Reading proved a dependable pastime and mostly I scrounged through whatever books were left laying around by my six older siblings. The Caine Mutiny, comic books, The Oxford Companion to Americ...

    Since the book is written in 2017, it has an advantage of being definite about gravitational waves. It gives the book a promising start and defines its central focus on gravity. It is divided into three parts - first one dealing with classical gravity (aka Newton), second one with spac...

    This book will blow your mind as it tries to explain gravity, quantum physics and associated ideas to the common person. It does a pretty job of it. Any failure is in my lack of understanding. It isn't full of equation that make no sense to the layperson but with analogies and real wor...

    This title is a bit misleading, because it seems to bit off and chew on quite a bit more than just gravity. It's a nice brief overview of the both the history and the current state of discoveries and thinking about large (and small)-scale physics, from Newton and his apple through quan...

  • Bradley
    Jul 12, 2018

    This is a highly entertaining history of gravity, full of quite interesting anecdotes and the gradual unfolding of our understanding from Newton through Einstein through our quest to reconcile quantum mechanics with the one aspect we're most familiar with but which we understand the le...

  • Dan Cohen
    May 25, 2018

    This is a highly entertaining history of gravity, full of quite interesting anecdotes and the gradual unfolding of our understanding from Newton through Einstein through our quest to reconcile quantum mechanics with the one aspect we're most familiar with but which we understand the le...

    Marcus Chown is one of the UK's best writers on physics and astronomy - it's excellent to see him back on what he does best. Here we discover our gradual approach to understanding the nature of gravity - the 'ascent' of the title - which, though perhaps slightly overblown in the words ...

    As the story goes, in 1666 Isaac Newton watched an apple fall from a tree, and it was this simple action that gave him the inspiration to develop the theory and the mathematics that was first published in 1687 in Philosophić Naturalis Principia Mathematica (Mathematical Principles of ...

    I did a double review of two books for the Wall Street Journal, so posting it under both titles! The Ascent of Gravity Marcus Chown Pegasus On Gravity A. Zee Princeton Gravity has become a hot topic in science, with the discovery of gravitational waves, ripples in the fabric...

    Not a review but some kind of essay (based on the book)... Gravitational waves are bombarding The Earth from all sides at all times. But you don?t know about it. Or maybe you know, but don?t care. Or simply ? do not feel it. More likely. Ray is going to ask you to stop for...

    From Newton to Einstein to the present theories of cosmology. Chown takes us through a universe which shows itself to be a dichotomy of truths. Everyone knows that gravity is an attractive force..right? Well it appears that it also has a dark side which is helping the universe to expan...

    Not the first time I've read through to the end of a Marcus Chown and realised that, though there are some good stories and some nice linking of events and people, I'm not much better educated about the subject matter than when I started. Perhaps I should stop reading the author! ...

    Gravity is one of those concepts everyone thinks they understand, only occasionally discovering that their notions of gravity are identical to those held in the time of Newton. Curiously enough, just as in every other area of scientific inquiry, there have been significant new discover...

    Growing up in rural Connecticut presented some difficulties, namely, finding anything to do. Reading proved a dependable pastime and mostly I scrounged through whatever books were left laying around by my six older siblings. The Caine Mutiny, comic books, The Oxford Companion to Americ...

    Since the book is written in 2017, it has an advantage of being definite about gravitational waves. It gives the book a promising start and defines its central focus on gravity. It is divided into three parts - first one dealing with classical gravity (aka Newton), second one with spac...

    This book will blow your mind as it tries to explain gravity, quantum physics and associated ideas to the common person. It does a pretty job of it. Any failure is in my lack of understanding. It isn't full of equation that make no sense to the layperson but with analogies and real wor...

    This title is a bit misleading, because it seems to bit off and chew on quite a bit more than just gravity. It's a nice brief overview of the both the history and the current state of discoveries and thinking about large (and small)-scale physics, from Newton and his apple through quan...

    The only downside of this book was the reader (I listened to the audio). When she kept her natural British accent she was fine, but whenever she switched to accents when quoting Einstein (German) or American accents, she sounded ridiculous; that was distracting. Her American accent sou...

    I really enjoyed this read. The first two sections (Newton and Einstein) were really clear and written with humour and I enjoyed the historical context given, but none of it was at the expense of glossing over the science which I really appreciated. It also didn't shy away from discuss...

    In part I, the author explains simple things pretty well, as a Phd in physics, I also learned a thing or two. Then in part 2, he explains things too simple. As far as the part 3, it is a little bit awkward. I got a feeling he trusts Nima too much... Well, I admit I agree with most of w...

    Chown writes about the most brilliant minds in science, especially Newton and Einstein. Those early sections of the book were interesting, reading about who these individuals were, and how they came to the discoveries they made. The later sections, getting into string theory, quantum...

    Some concepts required further reading, but otherwise, this is a splendid book that presents a perceptive view into what gravity really is. Highly recommended to anyone who is curious about the major developments and seeking basic explanations regarding this topic - from Newton to Eins...

    The irreverent and informal writing style is grating and doesn't contribute anything (with the bizarre biographical vignettes being the worst). Concentrates on Newton and then rushes through modern physics in a couple of pages. ...

    Audiobook. Read well apart from terrible accents for all quotations. The book itself is a really interesting and engaging summary of Newton and Einstein?s discovery. After that it gets a little esoteric and no real effort is made to make sense of the physics for the reader/listen...

    Good, solid story about gravity, with some quantum mechanics and cosmological problems thrown in. It doesn't electrify the reader - and was not a page-turner. The story of Einstein is compelling though. Also the modern cosmology questions are covered briefly, which make it timely. ...

    Translated and read in the process ...

    Very accessible science history. Chapters are nicely organized in 3 Sections: Newton, Einstein and Beyond Einstein. ...

    A very interesting read. Much was way over my head, but always enjoy the sciences. ...

    Might be interesting for someone more of a novice in physics, but for me NBD. ...

    A reasonable effort to explain the current emphasis on Quantum Gravity. ...

    Review to come ...

    One of the best overviews of the history and laws of physics that I have read. Worth reading again. ...

    Very good book, written in a light and easy style but containing lots of information and insight. ...

  • Brian Clegg
    Mar 30, 2017

    This is a highly entertaining history of gravity, full of quite interesting anecdotes and the gradual unfolding of our understanding from Newton through Einstein through our quest to reconcile quantum mechanics with the one aspect we're most familiar with but which we understand the le...

    Marcus Chown is one of the UK's best writers on physics and astronomy - it's excellent to see him back on what he does best. Here we discover our gradual approach to understanding the nature of gravity - the 'ascent' of the title - which, though perhaps slightly overblown in the words ...

  • John Kaye
    Dec 11, 2017

    This is a highly entertaining history of gravity, full of quite interesting anecdotes and the gradual unfolding of our understanding from Newton through Einstein through our quest to reconcile quantum mechanics with the one aspect we're most familiar with but which we understand the le...

    Marcus Chown is one of the UK's best writers on physics and astronomy - it's excellent to see him back on what he does best. Here we discover our gradual approach to understanding the nature of gravity - the 'ascent' of the title - which, though perhaps slightly overblown in the words ...

    As the story goes, in 1666 Isaac Newton watched an apple fall from a tree, and it was this simple action that gave him the inspiration to develop the theory and the mathematics that was first published in 1687 in Philosophić Naturalis Principia Mathematica (Mathematical Principles of ...

    I did a double review of two books for the Wall Street Journal, so posting it under both titles! The Ascent of Gravity Marcus Chown Pegasus On Gravity A. Zee Princeton Gravity has become a hot topic in science, with the discovery of gravitational waves, ripples in the fabric...

    Not a review but some kind of essay (based on the book)... Gravitational waves are bombarding The Earth from all sides at all times. But you don?t know about it. Or maybe you know, but don?t care. Or simply ? do not feel it. More likely. Ray is going to ask you to stop for...

    From Newton to Einstein to the present theories of cosmology. Chown takes us through a universe which shows itself to be a dichotomy of truths. Everyone knows that gravity is an attractive force..right? Well it appears that it also has a dark side which is helping the universe to expan...

    Not the first time I've read through to the end of a Marcus Chown and realised that, though there are some good stories and some nice linking of events and people, I'm not much better educated about the subject matter than when I started. Perhaps I should stop reading the author! ...

  • Nicholas
    Sep 09, 2018

    This is a highly entertaining history of gravity, full of quite interesting anecdotes and the gradual unfolding of our understanding from Newton through Einstein through our quest to reconcile quantum mechanics with the one aspect we're most familiar with but which we understand the le...

    Marcus Chown is one of the UK's best writers on physics and astronomy - it's excellent to see him back on what he does best. Here we discover our gradual approach to understanding the nature of gravity - the 'ascent' of the title - which, though perhaps slightly overblown in the words ...

    As the story goes, in 1666 Isaac Newton watched an apple fall from a tree, and it was this simple action that gave him the inspiration to develop the theory and the mathematics that was first published in 1687 in Philosophić Naturalis Principia Mathematica (Mathematical Principles of ...

    I did a double review of two books for the Wall Street Journal, so posting it under both titles! The Ascent of Gravity Marcus Chown Pegasus On Gravity A. Zee Princeton Gravity has become a hot topic in science, with the discovery of gravitational waves, ripples in the fabric...

    Not a review but some kind of essay (based on the book)... Gravitational waves are bombarding The Earth from all sides at all times. But you don?t know about it. Or maybe you know, but don?t care. Or simply ? do not feel it. More likely. Ray is going to ask you to stop for...

    From Newton to Einstein to the present theories of cosmology. Chown takes us through a universe which shows itself to be a dichotomy of truths. Everyone knows that gravity is an attractive force..right? Well it appears that it also has a dark side which is helping the universe to expan...

    Not the first time I've read through to the end of a Marcus Chown and realised that, though there are some good stories and some nice linking of events and people, I'm not much better educated about the subject matter than when I started. Perhaps I should stop reading the author! ...

    Gravity is one of those concepts everyone thinks they understand, only occasionally discovering that their notions of gravity are identical to those held in the time of Newton. Curiously enough, just as in every other area of scientific inquiry, there have been significant new discover...

    Growing up in rural Connecticut presented some difficulties, namely, finding anything to do. Reading proved a dependable pastime and mostly I scrounged through whatever books were left laying around by my six older siblings. The Caine Mutiny, comic books, The Oxford Companion to Americ...

    Since the book is written in 2017, it has an advantage of being definite about gravitational waves. It gives the book a promising start and defines its central focus on gravity. It is divided into three parts - first one dealing with classical gravity (aka Newton), second one with spac...

    This book will blow your mind as it tries to explain gravity, quantum physics and associated ideas to the common person. It does a pretty job of it. Any failure is in my lack of understanding. It isn't full of equation that make no sense to the layperson but with analogies and real wor...

    This title is a bit misleading, because it seems to bit off and chew on quite a bit more than just gravity. It's a nice brief overview of the both the history and the current state of discoveries and thinking about large (and small)-scale physics, from Newton and his apple through quan...

    The only downside of this book was the reader (I listened to the audio). When she kept her natural British accent she was fine, but whenever she switched to accents when quoting Einstein (German) or American accents, she sounded ridiculous; that was distracting. Her American accent sou...

    I really enjoyed this read. The first two sections (Newton and Einstein) were really clear and written with humour and I enjoyed the historical context given, but none of it was at the expense of glossing over the science which I really appreciated. It also didn't shy away from discuss...

    In part I, the author explains simple things pretty well, as a Phd in physics, I also learned a thing or two. Then in part 2, he explains things too simple. As far as the part 3, it is a little bit awkward. I got a feeling he trusts Nima too much... Well, I admit I agree with most of w...

    Chown writes about the most brilliant minds in science, especially Newton and Einstein. Those early sections of the book were interesting, reading about who these individuals were, and how they came to the discoveries they made. The later sections, getting into string theory, quantum...

    Some concepts required further reading, but otherwise, this is a splendid book that presents a perceptive view into what gravity really is. Highly recommended to anyone who is curious about the major developments and seeking basic explanations regarding this topic - from Newton to Eins...

    The irreverent and informal writing style is grating and doesn't contribute anything (with the bizarre biographical vignettes being the worst). Concentrates on Newton and then rushes through modern physics in a couple of pages. ...

    Audiobook. Read well apart from terrible accents for all quotations. The book itself is a really interesting and engaging summary of Newton and Einstein?s discovery. After that it gets a little esoteric and no real effort is made to make sense of the physics for the reader/listen...

    Good, solid story about gravity, with some quantum mechanics and cosmological problems thrown in. It doesn't electrify the reader - and was not a page-turner. The story of Einstein is compelling though. Also the modern cosmology questions are covered briefly, which make it timely. ...

    Translated and read in the process ...

    Very accessible science history. Chapters are nicely organized in 3 Sections: Newton, Einstein and Beyond Einstein. ...

    A very interesting read. Much was way over my head, but always enjoy the sciences. ...

    Might be interesting for someone more of a novice in physics, but for me NBD. ...

    A reasonable effort to explain the current emphasis on Quantum Gravity. ...

    Review to come ...

    One of the best overviews of the history and laws of physics that I have read. Worth reading again. ...

    Very good book, written in a light and easy style but containing lots of information and insight. ...

    Mainly a biography of Newton and Einstein and thus less technical than I expected. That's not to say I was disappointed, as it's entertaining and the concepts are presented clearly. ...

  • Rob
    Apr 28, 2018

    This is a highly entertaining history of gravity, full of quite interesting anecdotes and the gradual unfolding of our understanding from Newton through Einstein through our quest to reconcile quantum mechanics with the one aspect we're most familiar with but which we understand the le...

    Marcus Chown is one of the UK's best writers on physics and astronomy - it's excellent to see him back on what he does best. Here we discover our gradual approach to understanding the nature of gravity - the 'ascent' of the title - which, though perhaps slightly overblown in the words ...

    As the story goes, in 1666 Isaac Newton watched an apple fall from a tree, and it was this simple action that gave him the inspiration to develop the theory and the mathematics that was first published in 1687 in Philosophić Naturalis Principia Mathematica (Mathematical Principles of ...

    I did a double review of two books for the Wall Street Journal, so posting it under both titles! The Ascent of Gravity Marcus Chown Pegasus On Gravity A. Zee Princeton Gravity has become a hot topic in science, with the discovery of gravitational waves, ripples in the fabric...

    Not a review but some kind of essay (based on the book)... Gravitational waves are bombarding The Earth from all sides at all times. But you don?t know about it. Or maybe you know, but don?t care. Or simply ? do not feel it. More likely. Ray is going to ask you to stop for...

    From Newton to Einstein to the present theories of cosmology. Chown takes us through a universe which shows itself to be a dichotomy of truths. Everyone knows that gravity is an attractive force..right? Well it appears that it also has a dark side which is helping the universe to expan...

    Not the first time I've read through to the end of a Marcus Chown and realised that, though there are some good stories and some nice linking of events and people, I'm not much better educated about the subject matter than when I started. Perhaps I should stop reading the author! ...

    Gravity is one of those concepts everyone thinks they understand, only occasionally discovering that their notions of gravity are identical to those held in the time of Newton. Curiously enough, just as in every other area of scientific inquiry, there have been significant new discover...

    Growing up in rural Connecticut presented some difficulties, namely, finding anything to do. Reading proved a dependable pastime and mostly I scrounged through whatever books were left laying around by my six older siblings. The Caine Mutiny, comic books, The Oxford Companion to Americ...

    Since the book is written in 2017, it has an advantage of being definite about gravitational waves. It gives the book a promising start and defines its central focus on gravity. It is divided into three parts - first one dealing with classical gravity (aka Newton), second one with spac...

    This book will blow your mind as it tries to explain gravity, quantum physics and associated ideas to the common person. It does a pretty job of it. Any failure is in my lack of understanding. It isn't full of equation that make no sense to the layperson but with analogies and real wor...

    This title is a bit misleading, because it seems to bit off and chew on quite a bit more than just gravity. It's a nice brief overview of the both the history and the current state of discoveries and thinking about large (and small)-scale physics, from Newton and his apple through quan...

    The only downside of this book was the reader (I listened to the audio). When she kept her natural British accent she was fine, but whenever she switched to accents when quoting Einstein (German) or American accents, she sounded ridiculous; that was distracting. Her American accent sou...

    I really enjoyed this read. The first two sections (Newton and Einstein) were really clear and written with humour and I enjoyed the historical context given, but none of it was at the expense of glossing over the science which I really appreciated. It also didn't shy away from discuss...

    In part I, the author explains simple things pretty well, as a Phd in physics, I also learned a thing or two. Then in part 2, he explains things too simple. As far as the part 3, it is a little bit awkward. I got a feeling he trusts Nima too much... Well, I admit I agree with most of w...

    Chown writes about the most brilliant minds in science, especially Newton and Einstein. Those early sections of the book were interesting, reading about who these individuals were, and how they came to the discoveries they made. The later sections, getting into string theory, quantum...

    Some concepts required further reading, but otherwise, this is a splendid book that presents a perceptive view into what gravity really is. Highly recommended to anyone who is curious about the major developments and seeking basic explanations regarding this topic - from Newton to Eins...

    The irreverent and informal writing style is grating and doesn't contribute anything (with the bizarre biographical vignettes being the worst). Concentrates on Newton and then rushes through modern physics in a couple of pages. ...

    Audiobook. Read well apart from terrible accents for all quotations. The book itself is a really interesting and engaging summary of Newton and Einstein?s discovery. After that it gets a little esoteric and no real effort is made to make sense of the physics for the reader/listen...

    Good, solid story about gravity, with some quantum mechanics and cosmological problems thrown in. It doesn't electrify the reader - and was not a page-turner. The story of Einstein is compelling though. Also the modern cosmology questions are covered briefly, which make it timely. ...

    Translated and read in the process ...

    Very accessible science history. Chapters are nicely organized in 3 Sections: Newton, Einstein and Beyond Einstein. ...

    A very interesting read. Much was way over my head, but always enjoy the sciences. ...

    Might be interesting for someone more of a novice in physics, but for me NBD. ...

    A reasonable effort to explain the current emphasis on Quantum Gravity. ...

    Review to come ...

    One of the best overviews of the history and laws of physics that I have read. Worth reading again. ...

  • Dan Graser
    Jan 06, 2018

    This is a highly entertaining history of gravity, full of quite interesting anecdotes and the gradual unfolding of our understanding from Newton through Einstein through our quest to reconcile quantum mechanics with the one aspect we're most familiar with but which we understand the le...

    Marcus Chown is one of the UK's best writers on physics and astronomy - it's excellent to see him back on what he does best. Here we discover our gradual approach to understanding the nature of gravity - the 'ascent' of the title - which, though perhaps slightly overblown in the words ...

    As the story goes, in 1666 Isaac Newton watched an apple fall from a tree, and it was this simple action that gave him the inspiration to develop the theory and the mathematics that was first published in 1687 in Philosophić Naturalis Principia Mathematica (Mathematical Principles of ...

    I did a double review of two books for the Wall Street Journal, so posting it under both titles! The Ascent of Gravity Marcus Chown Pegasus On Gravity A. Zee Princeton Gravity has become a hot topic in science, with the discovery of gravitational waves, ripples in the fabric...

    Not a review but some kind of essay (based on the book)... Gravitational waves are bombarding The Earth from all sides at all times. But you don?t know about it. Or maybe you know, but don?t care. Or simply ? do not feel it. More likely. Ray is going to ask you to stop for...

    From Newton to Einstein to the present theories of cosmology. Chown takes us through a universe which shows itself to be a dichotomy of truths. Everyone knows that gravity is an attractive force..right? Well it appears that it also has a dark side which is helping the universe to expan...

    Not the first time I've read through to the end of a Marcus Chown and realised that, though there are some good stories and some nice linking of events and people, I'm not much better educated about the subject matter than when I started. Perhaps I should stop reading the author! ...

    Gravity is one of those concepts everyone thinks they understand, only occasionally discovering that their notions of gravity are identical to those held in the time of Newton. Curiously enough, just as in every other area of scientific inquiry, there have been significant new discover...

  • Tara
    Mar 29, 2018

    This is a highly entertaining history of gravity, full of quite interesting anecdotes and the gradual unfolding of our understanding from Newton through Einstein through our quest to reconcile quantum mechanics with the one aspect we're most familiar with but which we understand the le...

    Marcus Chown is one of the UK's best writers on physics and astronomy - it's excellent to see him back on what he does best. Here we discover our gradual approach to understanding the nature of gravity - the 'ascent' of the title - which, though perhaps slightly overblown in the words ...

    As the story goes, in 1666 Isaac Newton watched an apple fall from a tree, and it was this simple action that gave him the inspiration to develop the theory and the mathematics that was first published in 1687 in Philosophić Naturalis Principia Mathematica (Mathematical Principles of ...

    I did a double review of two books for the Wall Street Journal, so posting it under both titles! The Ascent of Gravity Marcus Chown Pegasus On Gravity A. Zee Princeton Gravity has become a hot topic in science, with the discovery of gravitational waves, ripples in the fabric...

    Not a review but some kind of essay (based on the book)... Gravitational waves are bombarding The Earth from all sides at all times. But you don?t know about it. Or maybe you know, but don?t care. Or simply ? do not feel it. More likely. Ray is going to ask you to stop for...

    From Newton to Einstein to the present theories of cosmology. Chown takes us through a universe which shows itself to be a dichotomy of truths. Everyone knows that gravity is an attractive force..right? Well it appears that it also has a dark side which is helping the universe to expan...

    Not the first time I've read through to the end of a Marcus Chown and realised that, though there are some good stories and some nice linking of events and people, I'm not much better educated about the subject matter than when I started. Perhaps I should stop reading the author! ...

    Gravity is one of those concepts everyone thinks they understand, only occasionally discovering that their notions of gravity are identical to those held in the time of Newton. Curiously enough, just as in every other area of scientific inquiry, there have been significant new discover...

    Growing up in rural Connecticut presented some difficulties, namely, finding anything to do. Reading proved a dependable pastime and mostly I scrounged through whatever books were left laying around by my six older siblings. The Caine Mutiny, comic books, The Oxford Companion to Americ...

    Since the book is written in 2017, it has an advantage of being definite about gravitational waves. It gives the book a promising start and defines its central focus on gravity. It is divided into three parts - first one dealing with classical gravity (aka Newton), second one with spac...

    This book will blow your mind as it tries to explain gravity, quantum physics and associated ideas to the common person. It does a pretty job of it. Any failure is in my lack of understanding. It isn't full of equation that make no sense to the layperson but with analogies and real wor...

    This title is a bit misleading, because it seems to bit off and chew on quite a bit more than just gravity. It's a nice brief overview of the both the history and the current state of discoveries and thinking about large (and small)-scale physics, from Newton and his apple through quan...

    The only downside of this book was the reader (I listened to the audio). When she kept her natural British accent she was fine, but whenever she switched to accents when quoting Einstein (German) or American accents, she sounded ridiculous; that was distracting. Her American accent sou...

    I really enjoyed this read. The first two sections (Newton and Einstein) were really clear and written with humour and I enjoyed the historical context given, but none of it was at the expense of glossing over the science which I really appreciated. It also didn't shy away from discuss...

    In part I, the author explains simple things pretty well, as a Phd in physics, I also learned a thing or two. Then in part 2, he explains things too simple. As far as the part 3, it is a little bit awkward. I got a feeling he trusts Nima too much... Well, I admit I agree with most of w...

    Chown writes about the most brilliant minds in science, especially Newton and Einstein. Those early sections of the book were interesting, reading about who these individuals were, and how they came to the discoveries they made. The later sections, getting into string theory, quantum...

    Some concepts required further reading, but otherwise, this is a splendid book that presents a perceptive view into what gravity really is. Highly recommended to anyone who is curious about the major developments and seeking basic explanations regarding this topic - from Newton to Eins...

    The irreverent and informal writing style is grating and doesn't contribute anything (with the bizarre biographical vignettes being the worst). Concentrates on Newton and then rushes through modern physics in a couple of pages. ...

    Audiobook. Read well apart from terrible accents for all quotations. The book itself is a really interesting and engaging summary of Newton and Einstein?s discovery. After that it gets a little esoteric and no real effort is made to make sense of the physics for the reader/listen...

    Good, solid story about gravity, with some quantum mechanics and cosmological problems thrown in. It doesn't electrify the reader - and was not a page-turner. The story of Einstein is compelling though. Also the modern cosmology questions are covered briefly, which make it timely. ...

    Translated and read in the process ...

    Very accessible science history. Chapters are nicely organized in 3 Sections: Newton, Einstein and Beyond Einstein. ...

    A very interesting read. Much was way over my head, but always enjoy the sciences. ...

    Might be interesting for someone more of a novice in physics, but for me NBD. ...

    A reasonable effort to explain the current emphasis on Quantum Gravity. ...

    Review to come ...

    One of the best overviews of the history and laws of physics that I have read. Worth reading again. ...

    Very good book, written in a light and easy style but containing lots of information and insight. ...

    Mainly a biography of Newton and Einstein and thus less technical than I expected. That's not to say I was disappointed, as it's entertaining and the concepts are presented clearly. ...

    Highly recommend the Audible version narrated by Adjoa Andoh - one of my now very favorite audiobook narrators! ...

  • Liuhh
    Oct 13, 2017

    This is a highly entertaining history of gravity, full of quite interesting anecdotes and the gradual unfolding of our understanding from Newton through Einstein through our quest to reconcile quantum mechanics with the one aspect we're most familiar with but which we understand the le...

    Marcus Chown is one of the UK's best writers on physics and astronomy - it's excellent to see him back on what he does best. Here we discover our gradual approach to understanding the nature of gravity - the 'ascent' of the title - which, though perhaps slightly overblown in the words ...

    As the story goes, in 1666 Isaac Newton watched an apple fall from a tree, and it was this simple action that gave him the inspiration to develop the theory and the mathematics that was first published in 1687 in Philosophić Naturalis Principia Mathematica (Mathematical Principles of ...

    I did a double review of two books for the Wall Street Journal, so posting it under both titles! The Ascent of Gravity Marcus Chown Pegasus On Gravity A. Zee Princeton Gravity has become a hot topic in science, with the discovery of gravitational waves, ripples in the fabric...

    Not a review but some kind of essay (based on the book)... Gravitational waves are bombarding The Earth from all sides at all times. But you don?t know about it. Or maybe you know, but don?t care. Or simply ? do not feel it. More likely. Ray is going to ask you to stop for...

    From Newton to Einstein to the present theories of cosmology. Chown takes us through a universe which shows itself to be a dichotomy of truths. Everyone knows that gravity is an attractive force..right? Well it appears that it also has a dark side which is helping the universe to expan...

    Not the first time I've read through to the end of a Marcus Chown and realised that, though there are some good stories and some nice linking of events and people, I'm not much better educated about the subject matter than when I started. Perhaps I should stop reading the author! ...

    Gravity is one of those concepts everyone thinks they understand, only occasionally discovering that their notions of gravity are identical to those held in the time of Newton. Curiously enough, just as in every other area of scientific inquiry, there have been significant new discover...

    Growing up in rural Connecticut presented some difficulties, namely, finding anything to do. Reading proved a dependable pastime and mostly I scrounged through whatever books were left laying around by my six older siblings. The Caine Mutiny, comic books, The Oxford Companion to Americ...

    Since the book is written in 2017, it has an advantage of being definite about gravitational waves. It gives the book a promising start and defines its central focus on gravity. It is divided into three parts - first one dealing with classical gravity (aka Newton), second one with spac...

    This book will blow your mind as it tries to explain gravity, quantum physics and associated ideas to the common person. It does a pretty job of it. Any failure is in my lack of understanding. It isn't full of equation that make no sense to the layperson but with analogies and real wor...

    This title is a bit misleading, because it seems to bit off and chew on quite a bit more than just gravity. It's a nice brief overview of the both the history and the current state of discoveries and thinking about large (and small)-scale physics, from Newton and his apple through quan...

    The only downside of this book was the reader (I listened to the audio). When she kept her natural British accent she was fine, but whenever she switched to accents when quoting Einstein (German) or American accents, she sounded ridiculous; that was distracting. Her American accent sou...

    I really enjoyed this read. The first two sections (Newton and Einstein) were really clear and written with humour and I enjoyed the historical context given, but none of it was at the expense of glossing over the science which I really appreciated. It also didn't shy away from discuss...

    In part I, the author explains simple things pretty well, as a Phd in physics, I also learned a thing or two. Then in part 2, he explains things too simple. As far as the part 3, it is a little bit awkward. I got a feeling he trusts Nima too much... Well, I admit I agree with most of w...

    Chown writes about the most brilliant minds in science, especially Newton and Einstein. Those early sections of the book were interesting, reading about who these individuals were, and how they came to the discoveries they made. The later sections, getting into string theory, quantum...

    Some concepts required further reading, but otherwise, this is a splendid book that presents a perceptive view into what gravity really is. Highly recommended to anyone who is curious about the major developments and seeking basic explanations regarding this topic - from Newton to Eins...

  • Sara
    Sep 04, 2017

    This is a highly entertaining history of gravity, full of quite interesting anecdotes and the gradual unfolding of our understanding from Newton through Einstein through our quest to reconcile quantum mechanics with the one aspect we're most familiar with but which we understand the le...

    Marcus Chown is one of the UK's best writers on physics and astronomy - it's excellent to see him back on what he does best. Here we discover our gradual approach to understanding the nature of gravity - the 'ascent' of the title - which, though perhaps slightly overblown in the words ...

    As the story goes, in 1666 Isaac Newton watched an apple fall from a tree, and it was this simple action that gave him the inspiration to develop the theory and the mathematics that was first published in 1687 in Philosophić Naturalis Principia Mathematica (Mathematical Principles of ...

    I did a double review of two books for the Wall Street Journal, so posting it under both titles! The Ascent of Gravity Marcus Chown Pegasus On Gravity A. Zee Princeton Gravity has become a hot topic in science, with the discovery of gravitational waves, ripples in the fabric...

    Not a review but some kind of essay (based on the book)... Gravitational waves are bombarding The Earth from all sides at all times. But you don?t know about it. Or maybe you know, but don?t care. Or simply ? do not feel it. More likely. Ray is going to ask you to stop for...

    From Newton to Einstein to the present theories of cosmology. Chown takes us through a universe which shows itself to be a dichotomy of truths. Everyone knows that gravity is an attractive force..right? Well it appears that it also has a dark side which is helping the universe to expan...

    Not the first time I've read through to the end of a Marcus Chown and realised that, though there are some good stories and some nice linking of events and people, I'm not much better educated about the subject matter than when I started. Perhaps I should stop reading the author! ...

    Gravity is one of those concepts everyone thinks they understand, only occasionally discovering that their notions of gravity are identical to those held in the time of Newton. Curiously enough, just as in every other area of scientific inquiry, there have been significant new discover...

    Growing up in rural Connecticut presented some difficulties, namely, finding anything to do. Reading proved a dependable pastime and mostly I scrounged through whatever books were left laying around by my six older siblings. The Caine Mutiny, comic books, The Oxford Companion to Americ...

    Since the book is written in 2017, it has an advantage of being definite about gravitational waves. It gives the book a promising start and defines its central focus on gravity. It is divided into three parts - first one dealing with classical gravity (aka Newton), second one with spac...

    This book will blow your mind as it tries to explain gravity, quantum physics and associated ideas to the common person. It does a pretty job of it. Any failure is in my lack of understanding. It isn't full of equation that make no sense to the layperson but with analogies and real wor...

    This title is a bit misleading, because it seems to bit off and chew on quite a bit more than just gravity. It's a nice brief overview of the both the history and the current state of discoveries and thinking about large (and small)-scale physics, from Newton and his apple through quan...

    The only downside of this book was the reader (I listened to the audio). When she kept her natural British accent she was fine, but whenever she switched to accents when quoting Einstein (German) or American accents, she sounded ridiculous; that was distracting. Her American accent sou...

    I really enjoyed this read. The first two sections (Newton and Einstein) were really clear and written with humour and I enjoyed the historical context given, but none of it was at the expense of glossing over the science which I really appreciated. It also didn't shy away from discuss...

    In part I, the author explains simple things pretty well, as a Phd in physics, I also learned a thing or two. Then in part 2, he explains things too simple. As far as the part 3, it is a little bit awkward. I got a feeling he trusts Nima too much... Well, I admit I agree with most of w...

    Chown writes about the most brilliant minds in science, especially Newton and Einstein. Those early sections of the book were interesting, reading about who these individuals were, and how they came to the discoveries they made. The later sections, getting into string theory, quantum...

    Some concepts required further reading, but otherwise, this is a splendid book that presents a perceptive view into what gravity really is. Highly recommended to anyone who is curious about the major developments and seeking basic explanations regarding this topic - from Newton to Eins...

    The irreverent and informal writing style is grating and doesn't contribute anything (with the bizarre biographical vignettes being the worst). Concentrates on Newton and then rushes through modern physics in a couple of pages. ...

    Audiobook. Read well apart from terrible accents for all quotations. The book itself is a really interesting and engaging summary of Newton and Einstein?s discovery. After that it gets a little esoteric and no real effort is made to make sense of the physics for the reader/listen...

    Good, solid story about gravity, with some quantum mechanics and cosmological problems thrown in. It doesn't electrify the reader - and was not a page-turner. The story of Einstein is compelling though. Also the modern cosmology questions are covered briefly, which make it timely. ...

    Translated and read in the process ...

    Very accessible science history. Chapters are nicely organized in 3 Sections: Newton, Einstein and Beyond Einstein. ...

  • Alex
    Jun 08, 2018

    This is a highly entertaining history of gravity, full of quite interesting anecdotes and the gradual unfolding of our understanding from Newton through Einstein through our quest to reconcile quantum mechanics with the one aspect we're most familiar with but which we understand the le...

    Marcus Chown is one of the UK's best writers on physics and astronomy - it's excellent to see him back on what he does best. Here we discover our gradual approach to understanding the nature of gravity - the 'ascent' of the title - which, though perhaps slightly overblown in the words ...

    As the story goes, in 1666 Isaac Newton watched an apple fall from a tree, and it was this simple action that gave him the inspiration to develop the theory and the mathematics that was first published in 1687 in Philosophić Naturalis Principia Mathematica (Mathematical Principles of ...

    I did a double review of two books for the Wall Street Journal, so posting it under both titles! The Ascent of Gravity Marcus Chown Pegasus On Gravity A. Zee Princeton Gravity has become a hot topic in science, with the discovery of gravitational waves, ripples in the fabric...

    Not a review but some kind of essay (based on the book)... Gravitational waves are bombarding The Earth from all sides at all times. But you don?t know about it. Or maybe you know, but don?t care. Or simply ? do not feel it. More likely. Ray is going to ask you to stop for...

    From Newton to Einstein to the present theories of cosmology. Chown takes us through a universe which shows itself to be a dichotomy of truths. Everyone knows that gravity is an attractive force..right? Well it appears that it also has a dark side which is helping the universe to expan...

    Not the first time I've read through to the end of a Marcus Chown and realised that, though there are some good stories and some nice linking of events and people, I'm not much better educated about the subject matter than when I started. Perhaps I should stop reading the author! ...

    Gravity is one of those concepts everyone thinks they understand, only occasionally discovering that their notions of gravity are identical to those held in the time of Newton. Curiously enough, just as in every other area of scientific inquiry, there have been significant new discover...

    Growing up in rural Connecticut presented some difficulties, namely, finding anything to do. Reading proved a dependable pastime and mostly I scrounged through whatever books were left laying around by my six older siblings. The Caine Mutiny, comic books, The Oxford Companion to Americ...

    Since the book is written in 2017, it has an advantage of being definite about gravitational waves. It gives the book a promising start and defines its central focus on gravity. It is divided into three parts - first one dealing with classical gravity (aka Newton), second one with spac...

    This book will blow your mind as it tries to explain gravity, quantum physics and associated ideas to the common person. It does a pretty job of it. Any failure is in my lack of understanding. It isn't full of equation that make no sense to the layperson but with analogies and real wor...

    This title is a bit misleading, because it seems to bit off and chew on quite a bit more than just gravity. It's a nice brief overview of the both the history and the current state of discoveries and thinking about large (and small)-scale physics, from Newton and his apple through quan...

    The only downside of this book was the reader (I listened to the audio). When she kept her natural British accent she was fine, but whenever she switched to accents when quoting Einstein (German) or American accents, she sounded ridiculous; that was distracting. Her American accent sou...

    I really enjoyed this read. The first two sections (Newton and Einstein) were really clear and written with humour and I enjoyed the historical context given, but none of it was at the expense of glossing over the science which I really appreciated. It also didn't shy away from discuss...

    In part I, the author explains simple things pretty well, as a Phd in physics, I also learned a thing or two. Then in part 2, he explains things too simple. As far as the part 3, it is a little bit awkward. I got a feeling he trusts Nima too much... Well, I admit I agree with most of w...

    Chown writes about the most brilliant minds in science, especially Newton and Einstein. Those early sections of the book were interesting, reading about who these individuals were, and how they came to the discoveries they made. The later sections, getting into string theory, quantum...

    Some concepts required further reading, but otherwise, this is a splendid book that presents a perceptive view into what gravity really is. Highly recommended to anyone who is curious about the major developments and seeking basic explanations regarding this topic - from Newton to Eins...

    The irreverent and informal writing style is grating and doesn't contribute anything (with the bizarre biographical vignettes being the worst). Concentrates on Newton and then rushes through modern physics in a couple of pages. ...

    Audiobook. Read well apart from terrible accents for all quotations. The book itself is a really interesting and engaging summary of Newton and Einstein?s discovery. After that it gets a little esoteric and no real effort is made to make sense of the physics for the reader/listen...

    Good, solid story about gravity, with some quantum mechanics and cosmological problems thrown in. It doesn't electrify the reader - and was not a page-turner. The story of Einstein is compelling though. Also the modern cosmology questions are covered briefly, which make it timely. ...

    Translated and read in the process ...

    Very accessible science history. Chapters are nicely organized in 3 Sections: Newton, Einstein and Beyond Einstein. ...

    A very interesting read. Much was way over my head, but always enjoy the sciences. ...

    Might be interesting for someone more of a novice in physics, but for me NBD. ...

    A reasonable effort to explain the current emphasis on Quantum Gravity. ...

  • Maria
    Jun 21, 2018

    This is a highly entertaining history of gravity, full of quite interesting anecdotes and the gradual unfolding of our understanding from Newton through Einstein through our quest to reconcile quantum mechanics with the one aspect we're most familiar with but which we understand the le...

    Marcus Chown is one of the UK's best writers on physics and astronomy - it's excellent to see him back on what he does best. Here we discover our gradual approach to understanding the nature of gravity - the 'ascent' of the title - which, though perhaps slightly overblown in the words ...

    As the story goes, in 1666 Isaac Newton watched an apple fall from a tree, and it was this simple action that gave him the inspiration to develop the theory and the mathematics that was first published in 1687 in Philosophić Naturalis Principia Mathematica (Mathematical Principles of ...

    I did a double review of two books for the Wall Street Journal, so posting it under both titles! The Ascent of Gravity Marcus Chown Pegasus On Gravity A. Zee Princeton Gravity has become a hot topic in science, with the discovery of gravitational waves, ripples in the fabric...

    Not a review but some kind of essay (based on the book)... Gravitational waves are bombarding The Earth from all sides at all times. But you don?t know about it. Or maybe you know, but don?t care. Or simply ? do not feel it. More likely. Ray is going to ask you to stop for...

    From Newton to Einstein to the present theories of cosmology. Chown takes us through a universe which shows itself to be a dichotomy of truths. Everyone knows that gravity is an attractive force..right? Well it appears that it also has a dark side which is helping the universe to expan...

    Not the first time I've read through to the end of a Marcus Chown and realised that, though there are some good stories and some nice linking of events and people, I'm not much better educated about the subject matter than when I started. Perhaps I should stop reading the author! ...

    Gravity is one of those concepts everyone thinks they understand, only occasionally discovering that their notions of gravity are identical to those held in the time of Newton. Curiously enough, just as in every other area of scientific inquiry, there have been significant new discover...

    Growing up in rural Connecticut presented some difficulties, namely, finding anything to do. Reading proved a dependable pastime and mostly I scrounged through whatever books were left laying around by my six older siblings. The Caine Mutiny, comic books, The Oxford Companion to Americ...

    Since the book is written in 2017, it has an advantage of being definite about gravitational waves. It gives the book a promising start and defines its central focus on gravity. It is divided into three parts - first one dealing with classical gravity (aka Newton), second one with spac...

    This book will blow your mind as it tries to explain gravity, quantum physics and associated ideas to the common person. It does a pretty job of it. Any failure is in my lack of understanding. It isn't full of equation that make no sense to the layperson but with analogies and real wor...

    This title is a bit misleading, because it seems to bit off and chew on quite a bit more than just gravity. It's a nice brief overview of the both the history and the current state of discoveries and thinking about large (and small)-scale physics, from Newton and his apple through quan...

    The only downside of this book was the reader (I listened to the audio). When she kept her natural British accent she was fine, but whenever she switched to accents when quoting Einstein (German) or American accents, she sounded ridiculous; that was distracting. Her American accent sou...

    I really enjoyed this read. The first two sections (Newton and Einstein) were really clear and written with humour and I enjoyed the historical context given, but none of it was at the expense of glossing over the science which I really appreciated. It also didn't shy away from discuss...

    In part I, the author explains simple things pretty well, as a Phd in physics, I also learned a thing or two. Then in part 2, he explains things too simple. As far as the part 3, it is a little bit awkward. I got a feeling he trusts Nima too much... Well, I admit I agree with most of w...

    Chown writes about the most brilliant minds in science, especially Newton and Einstein. Those early sections of the book were interesting, reading about who these individuals were, and how they came to the discoveries they made. The later sections, getting into string theory, quantum...

    Some concepts required further reading, but otherwise, this is a splendid book that presents a perceptive view into what gravity really is. Highly recommended to anyone who is curious about the major developments and seeking basic explanations regarding this topic - from Newton to Eins...

    The irreverent and informal writing style is grating and doesn't contribute anything (with the bizarre biographical vignettes being the worst). Concentrates on Newton and then rushes through modern physics in a couple of pages. ...

    Audiobook. Read well apart from terrible accents for all quotations. The book itself is a really interesting and engaging summary of Newton and Einstein?s discovery. After that it gets a little esoteric and no real effort is made to make sense of the physics for the reader/listen...

    Good, solid story about gravity, with some quantum mechanics and cosmological problems thrown in. It doesn't electrify the reader - and was not a page-turner. The story of Einstein is compelling though. Also the modern cosmology questions are covered briefly, which make it timely. ...

    Translated and read in the process ...

  • Paul
    Mar 06, 2018

    This is a highly entertaining history of gravity, full of quite interesting anecdotes and the gradual unfolding of our understanding from Newton through Einstein through our quest to reconcile quantum mechanics with the one aspect we're most familiar with but which we understand the le...

    Marcus Chown is one of the UK's best writers on physics and astronomy - it's excellent to see him back on what he does best. Here we discover our gradual approach to understanding the nature of gravity - the 'ascent' of the title - which, though perhaps slightly overblown in the words ...

    As the story goes, in 1666 Isaac Newton watched an apple fall from a tree, and it was this simple action that gave him the inspiration to develop the theory and the mathematics that was first published in 1687 in Philosophić Naturalis Principia Mathematica (Mathematical Principles of ...

  • Paul
    May 30, 2018

    This is a highly entertaining history of gravity, full of quite interesting anecdotes and the gradual unfolding of our understanding from Newton through Einstein through our quest to reconcile quantum mechanics with the one aspect we're most familiar with but which we understand the le...

    Marcus Chown is one of the UK's best writers on physics and astronomy - it's excellent to see him back on what he does best. Here we discover our gradual approach to understanding the nature of gravity - the 'ascent' of the title - which, though perhaps slightly overblown in the words ...

    As the story goes, in 1666 Isaac Newton watched an apple fall from a tree, and it was this simple action that gave him the inspiration to develop the theory and the mathematics that was first published in 1687 in Philosophić Naturalis Principia Mathematica (Mathematical Principles of ...

    I did a double review of two books for the Wall Street Journal, so posting it under both titles! The Ascent of Gravity Marcus Chown Pegasus On Gravity A. Zee Princeton Gravity has become a hot topic in science, with the discovery of gravitational waves, ripples in the fabric...

    Not a review but some kind of essay (based on the book)... Gravitational waves are bombarding The Earth from all sides at all times. But you don?t know about it. Or maybe you know, but don?t care. Or simply ? do not feel it. More likely. Ray is going to ask you to stop for...

    From Newton to Einstein to the present theories of cosmology. Chown takes us through a universe which shows itself to be a dichotomy of truths. Everyone knows that gravity is an attractive force..right? Well it appears that it also has a dark side which is helping the universe to expan...

    Not the first time I've read through to the end of a Marcus Chown and realised that, though there are some good stories and some nice linking of events and people, I'm not much better educated about the subject matter than when I started. Perhaps I should stop reading the author! ...

    Gravity is one of those concepts everyone thinks they understand, only occasionally discovering that their notions of gravity are identical to those held in the time of Newton. Curiously enough, just as in every other area of scientific inquiry, there have been significant new discover...

    Growing up in rural Connecticut presented some difficulties, namely, finding anything to do. Reading proved a dependable pastime and mostly I scrounged through whatever books were left laying around by my six older siblings. The Caine Mutiny, comic books, The Oxford Companion to Americ...

    Since the book is written in 2017, it has an advantage of being definite about gravitational waves. It gives the book a promising start and defines its central focus on gravity. It is divided into three parts - first one dealing with classical gravity (aka Newton), second one with spac...

    This book will blow your mind as it tries to explain gravity, quantum physics and associated ideas to the common person. It does a pretty job of it. Any failure is in my lack of understanding. It isn't full of equation that make no sense to the layperson but with analogies and real wor...

    This title is a bit misleading, because it seems to bit off and chew on quite a bit more than just gravity. It's a nice brief overview of the both the history and the current state of discoveries and thinking about large (and small)-scale physics, from Newton and his apple through quan...

    The only downside of this book was the reader (I listened to the audio). When she kept her natural British accent she was fine, but whenever she switched to accents when quoting Einstein (German) or American accents, she sounded ridiculous; that was distracting. Her American accent sou...

    I really enjoyed this read. The first two sections (Newton and Einstein) were really clear and written with humour and I enjoyed the historical context given, but none of it was at the expense of glossing over the science which I really appreciated. It also didn't shy away from discuss...

    In part I, the author explains simple things pretty well, as a Phd in physics, I also learned a thing or two. Then in part 2, he explains things too simple. As far as the part 3, it is a little bit awkward. I got a feeling he trusts Nima too much... Well, I admit I agree with most of w...

    Chown writes about the most brilliant minds in science, especially Newton and Einstein. Those early sections of the book were interesting, reading about who these individuals were, and how they came to the discoveries they made. The later sections, getting into string theory, quantum...

    Some concepts required further reading, but otherwise, this is a splendid book that presents a perceptive view into what gravity really is. Highly recommended to anyone who is curious about the major developments and seeking basic explanations regarding this topic - from Newton to Eins...

    The irreverent and informal writing style is grating and doesn't contribute anything (with the bizarre biographical vignettes being the worst). Concentrates on Newton and then rushes through modern physics in a couple of pages. ...

  • Ray NotBradbury
    Jul 22, 2018

    This is a highly entertaining history of gravity, full of quite interesting anecdotes and the gradual unfolding of our understanding from Newton through Einstein through our quest to reconcile quantum mechanics with the one aspect we're most familiar with but which we understand the le...

    Marcus Chown is one of the UK's best writers on physics and astronomy - it's excellent to see him back on what he does best. Here we discover our gradual approach to understanding the nature of gravity - the 'ascent' of the title - which, though perhaps slightly overblown in the words ...

    As the story goes, in 1666 Isaac Newton watched an apple fall from a tree, and it was this simple action that gave him the inspiration to develop the theory and the mathematics that was first published in 1687 in Philosophić Naturalis Principia Mathematica (Mathematical Principles of ...

    I did a double review of two books for the Wall Street Journal, so posting it under both titles! The Ascent of Gravity Marcus Chown Pegasus On Gravity A. Zee Princeton Gravity has become a hot topic in science, with the discovery of gravitational waves, ripples in the fabric...

    Not a review but some kind of essay (based on the book)... Gravitational waves are bombarding The Earth from all sides at all times. But you don?t know about it. Or maybe you know, but don?t care. Or simply ? do not feel it. More likely. Ray is going to ask you to stop for...

  • Rizwan
    Jun 04, 2018

    This is a highly entertaining history of gravity, full of quite interesting anecdotes and the gradual unfolding of our understanding from Newton through Einstein through our quest to reconcile quantum mechanics with the one aspect we're most familiar with but which we understand the le...

    Marcus Chown is one of the UK's best writers on physics and astronomy - it's excellent to see him back on what he does best. Here we discover our gradual approach to understanding the nature of gravity - the 'ascent' of the title - which, though perhaps slightly overblown in the words ...

    As the story goes, in 1666 Isaac Newton watched an apple fall from a tree, and it was this simple action that gave him the inspiration to develop the theory and the mathematics that was first published in 1687 in Philosophić Naturalis Principia Mathematica (Mathematical Principles of ...

    I did a double review of two books for the Wall Street Journal, so posting it under both titles! The Ascent of Gravity Marcus Chown Pegasus On Gravity A. Zee Princeton Gravity has become a hot topic in science, with the discovery of gravitational waves, ripples in the fabric...

    Not a review but some kind of essay (based on the book)... Gravitational waves are bombarding The Earth from all sides at all times. But you don?t know about it. Or maybe you know, but don?t care. Or simply ? do not feel it. More likely. Ray is going to ask you to stop for...

    From Newton to Einstein to the present theories of cosmology. Chown takes us through a universe which shows itself to be a dichotomy of truths. Everyone knows that gravity is an attractive force..right? Well it appears that it also has a dark side which is helping the universe to expan...

    Not the first time I've read through to the end of a Marcus Chown and realised that, though there are some good stories and some nice linking of events and people, I'm not much better educated about the subject matter than when I started. Perhaps I should stop reading the author! ...

    Gravity is one of those concepts everyone thinks they understand, only occasionally discovering that their notions of gravity are identical to those held in the time of Newton. Curiously enough, just as in every other area of scientific inquiry, there have been significant new discover...

    Growing up in rural Connecticut presented some difficulties, namely, finding anything to do. Reading proved a dependable pastime and mostly I scrounged through whatever books were left laying around by my six older siblings. The Caine Mutiny, comic books, The Oxford Companion to Americ...

    Since the book is written in 2017, it has an advantage of being definite about gravitational waves. It gives the book a promising start and defines its central focus on gravity. It is divided into three parts - first one dealing with classical gravity (aka Newton), second one with spac...

    This book will blow your mind as it tries to explain gravity, quantum physics and associated ideas to the common person. It does a pretty job of it. Any failure is in my lack of understanding. It isn't full of equation that make no sense to the layperson but with analogies and real wor...

    This title is a bit misleading, because it seems to bit off and chew on quite a bit more than just gravity. It's a nice brief overview of the both the history and the current state of discoveries and thinking about large (and small)-scale physics, from Newton and his apple through quan...

    The only downside of this book was the reader (I listened to the audio). When she kept her natural British accent she was fine, but whenever she switched to accents when quoting Einstein (German) or American accents, she sounded ridiculous; that was distracting. Her American accent sou...

    I really enjoyed this read. The first two sections (Newton and Einstein) were really clear and written with humour and I enjoyed the historical context given, but none of it was at the expense of glossing over the science which I really appreciated. It also didn't shy away from discuss...

    In part I, the author explains simple things pretty well, as a Phd in physics, I also learned a thing or two. Then in part 2, he explains things too simple. As far as the part 3, it is a little bit awkward. I got a feeling he trusts Nima too much... Well, I admit I agree with most of w...

    Chown writes about the most brilliant minds in science, especially Newton and Einstein. Those early sections of the book were interesting, reading about who these individuals were, and how they came to the discoveries they made. The later sections, getting into string theory, quantum...

    Some concepts required further reading, but otherwise, this is a splendid book that presents a perceptive view into what gravity really is. Highly recommended to anyone who is curious about the major developments and seeking basic explanations regarding this topic - from Newton to Eins...

    The irreverent and informal writing style is grating and doesn't contribute anything (with the bizarre biographical vignettes being the worst). Concentrates on Newton and then rushes through modern physics in a couple of pages. ...

    Audiobook. Read well apart from terrible accents for all quotations. The book itself is a really interesting and engaging summary of Newton and Einstein?s discovery. After that it gets a little esoteric and no real effort is made to make sense of the physics for the reader/listen...

  • Rachel Parrott
    Oct 10, 2017

    This is a highly entertaining history of gravity, full of quite interesting anecdotes and the gradual unfolding of our understanding from Newton through Einstein through our quest to reconcile quantum mechanics with the one aspect we're most familiar with but which we understand the le...

    Marcus Chown is one of the UK's best writers on physics and astronomy - it's excellent to see him back on what he does best. Here we discover our gradual approach to understanding the nature of gravity - the 'ascent' of the title - which, though perhaps slightly overblown in the words ...

    As the story goes, in 1666 Isaac Newton watched an apple fall from a tree, and it was this simple action that gave him the inspiration to develop the theory and the mathematics that was first published in 1687 in Philosophić Naturalis Principia Mathematica (Mathematical Principles of ...

    I did a double review of two books for the Wall Street Journal, so posting it under both titles! The Ascent of Gravity Marcus Chown Pegasus On Gravity A. Zee Princeton Gravity has become a hot topic in science, with the discovery of gravitational waves, ripples in the fabric...

    Not a review but some kind of essay (based on the book)... Gravitational waves are bombarding The Earth from all sides at all times. But you don?t know about it. Or maybe you know, but don?t care. Or simply ? do not feel it. More likely. Ray is going to ask you to stop for...

    From Newton to Einstein to the present theories of cosmology. Chown takes us through a universe which shows itself to be a dichotomy of truths. Everyone knows that gravity is an attractive force..right? Well it appears that it also has a dark side which is helping the universe to expan...

    Not the first time I've read through to the end of a Marcus Chown and realised that, though there are some good stories and some nice linking of events and people, I'm not much better educated about the subject matter than when I started. Perhaps I should stop reading the author! ...

    Gravity is one of those concepts everyone thinks they understand, only occasionally discovering that their notions of gravity are identical to those held in the time of Newton. Curiously enough, just as in every other area of scientific inquiry, there have been significant new discover...

    Growing up in rural Connecticut presented some difficulties, namely, finding anything to do. Reading proved a dependable pastime and mostly I scrounged through whatever books were left laying around by my six older siblings. The Caine Mutiny, comic books, The Oxford Companion to Americ...

    Since the book is written in 2017, it has an advantage of being definite about gravitational waves. It gives the book a promising start and defines its central focus on gravity. It is divided into three parts - first one dealing with classical gravity (aka Newton), second one with spac...

    This book will blow your mind as it tries to explain gravity, quantum physics and associated ideas to the common person. It does a pretty job of it. Any failure is in my lack of understanding. It isn't full of equation that make no sense to the layperson but with analogies and real wor...

    This title is a bit misleading, because it seems to bit off and chew on quite a bit more than just gravity. It's a nice brief overview of the both the history and the current state of discoveries and thinking about large (and small)-scale physics, from Newton and his apple through quan...

    The only downside of this book was the reader (I listened to the audio). When she kept her natural British accent she was fine, but whenever she switched to accents when quoting Einstein (German) or American accents, she sounded ridiculous; that was distracting. Her American accent sou...

    I really enjoyed this read. The first two sections (Newton and Einstein) were really clear and written with humour and I enjoyed the historical context given, but none of it was at the expense of glossing over the science which I really appreciated. It also didn't shy away from discuss...

    In part I, the author explains simple things pretty well, as a Phd in physics, I also learned a thing or two. Then in part 2, he explains things too simple. As far as the part 3, it is a little bit awkward. I got a feeling he trusts Nima too much... Well, I admit I agree with most of w...

    Chown writes about the most brilliant minds in science, especially Newton and Einstein. Those early sections of the book were interesting, reading about who these individuals were, and how they came to the discoveries they made. The later sections, getting into string theory, quantum...

    Some concepts required further reading, but otherwise, this is a splendid book that presents a perceptive view into what gravity really is. Highly recommended to anyone who is curious about the major developments and seeking basic explanations regarding this topic - from Newton to Eins...

    The irreverent and informal writing style is grating and doesn't contribute anything (with the bizarre biographical vignettes being the worst). Concentrates on Newton and then rushes through modern physics in a couple of pages. ...

    Audiobook. Read well apart from terrible accents for all quotations. The book itself is a really interesting and engaging summary of Newton and Einstein?s discovery. After that it gets a little esoteric and no real effort is made to make sense of the physics for the reader/listen...

    Good, solid story about gravity, with some quantum mechanics and cosmological problems thrown in. It doesn't electrify the reader - and was not a page-turner. The story of Einstein is compelling though. Also the modern cosmology questions are covered briefly, which make it timely. ...

    Translated and read in the process ...

    Very accessible science history. Chapters are nicely organized in 3 Sections: Newton, Einstein and Beyond Einstein. ...

    A very interesting read. Much was way over my head, but always enjoy the sciences. ...

    Might be interesting for someone more of a novice in physics, but for me NBD. ...

    A reasonable effort to explain the current emphasis on Quantum Gravity. ...

    Review to come ...

  • Fred P
    Feb 20, 2018

    This is a highly entertaining history of gravity, full of quite interesting anecdotes and the gradual unfolding of our understanding from Newton through Einstein through our quest to reconcile quantum mechanics with the one aspect we're most familiar with but which we understand the le...

    Marcus Chown is one of the UK's best writers on physics and astronomy - it's excellent to see him back on what he does best. Here we discover our gradual approach to understanding the nature of gravity - the 'ascent' of the title - which, though perhaps slightly overblown in the words ...

    As the story goes, in 1666 Isaac Newton watched an apple fall from a tree, and it was this simple action that gave him the inspiration to develop the theory and the mathematics that was first published in 1687 in Philosophić Naturalis Principia Mathematica (Mathematical Principles of ...

    I did a double review of two books for the Wall Street Journal, so posting it under both titles! The Ascent of Gravity Marcus Chown Pegasus On Gravity A. Zee Princeton Gravity has become a hot topic in science, with the discovery of gravitational waves, ripples in the fabric...

    Not a review but some kind of essay (based on the book)... Gravitational waves are bombarding The Earth from all sides at all times. But you don?t know about it. Or maybe you know, but don?t care. Or simply ? do not feel it. More likely. Ray is going to ask you to stop for...

    From Newton to Einstein to the present theories of cosmology. Chown takes us through a universe which shows itself to be a dichotomy of truths. Everyone knows that gravity is an attractive force..right? Well it appears that it also has a dark side which is helping the universe to expan...

    Not the first time I've read through to the end of a Marcus Chown and realised that, though there are some good stories and some nice linking of events and people, I'm not much better educated about the subject matter than when I started. Perhaps I should stop reading the author! ...

    Gravity is one of those concepts everyone thinks they understand, only occasionally discovering that their notions of gravity are identical to those held in the time of Newton. Curiously enough, just as in every other area of scientific inquiry, there have been significant new discover...

    Growing up in rural Connecticut presented some difficulties, namely, finding anything to do. Reading proved a dependable pastime and mostly I scrounged through whatever books were left laying around by my six older siblings. The Caine Mutiny, comic books, The Oxford Companion to Americ...

    Since the book is written in 2017, it has an advantage of being definite about gravitational waves. It gives the book a promising start and defines its central focus on gravity. It is divided into three parts - first one dealing with classical gravity (aka Newton), second one with spac...

    This book will blow your mind as it tries to explain gravity, quantum physics and associated ideas to the common person. It does a pretty job of it. Any failure is in my lack of understanding. It isn't full of equation that make no sense to the layperson but with analogies and real wor...

    This title is a bit misleading, because it seems to bit off and chew on quite a bit more than just gravity. It's a nice brief overview of the both the history and the current state of discoveries and thinking about large (and small)-scale physics, from Newton and his apple through quan...

    The only downside of this book was the reader (I listened to the audio). When she kept her natural British accent she was fine, but whenever she switched to accents when quoting Einstein (German) or American accents, she sounded ridiculous; that was distracting. Her American accent sou...

    I really enjoyed this read. The first two sections (Newton and Einstein) were really clear and written with humour and I enjoyed the historical context given, but none of it was at the expense of glossing over the science which I really appreciated. It also didn't shy away from discuss...

    In part I, the author explains simple things pretty well, as a Phd in physics, I also learned a thing or two. Then in part 2, he explains things too simple. As far as the part 3, it is a little bit awkward. I got a feeling he trusts Nima too much... Well, I admit I agree with most of w...

    Chown writes about the most brilliant minds in science, especially Newton and Einstein. Those early sections of the book were interesting, reading about who these individuals were, and how they came to the discoveries they made. The later sections, getting into string theory, quantum...

    Some concepts required further reading, but otherwise, this is a splendid book that presents a perceptive view into what gravity really is. Highly recommended to anyone who is curious about the major developments and seeking basic explanations regarding this topic - from Newton to Eins...

    The irreverent and informal writing style is grating and doesn't contribute anything (with the bizarre biographical vignettes being the worst). Concentrates on Newton and then rushes through modern physics in a couple of pages. ...

    Audiobook. Read well apart from terrible accents for all quotations. The book itself is a really interesting and engaging summary of Newton and Einstein?s discovery. After that it gets a little esoteric and no real effort is made to make sense of the physics for the reader/listen...

    Good, solid story about gravity, with some quantum mechanics and cosmological problems thrown in. It doesn't electrify the reader - and was not a page-turner. The story of Einstein is compelling though. Also the modern cosmology questions are covered briefly, which make it timely. ...

  • Greg Cantrell
    Feb 14, 2018

    This is a highly entertaining history of gravity, full of quite interesting anecdotes and the gradual unfolding of our understanding from Newton through Einstein through our quest to reconcile quantum mechanics with the one aspect we're most familiar with but which we understand the le...

    Marcus Chown is one of the UK's best writers on physics and astronomy - it's excellent to see him back on what he does best. Here we discover our gradual approach to understanding the nature of gravity - the 'ascent' of the title - which, though perhaps slightly overblown in the words ...

    As the story goes, in 1666 Isaac Newton watched an apple fall from a tree, and it was this simple action that gave him the inspiration to develop the theory and the mathematics that was first published in 1687 in Philosophić Naturalis Principia Mathematica (Mathematical Principles of ...

    I did a double review of two books for the Wall Street Journal, so posting it under both titles! The Ascent of Gravity Marcus Chown Pegasus On Gravity A. Zee Princeton Gravity has become a hot topic in science, with the discovery of gravitational waves, ripples in the fabric...

    Not a review but some kind of essay (based on the book)... Gravitational waves are bombarding The Earth from all sides at all times. But you don?t know about it. Or maybe you know, but don?t care. Or simply ? do not feel it. More likely. Ray is going to ask you to stop for...

    From Newton to Einstein to the present theories of cosmology. Chown takes us through a universe which shows itself to be a dichotomy of truths. Everyone knows that gravity is an attractive force..right? Well it appears that it also has a dark side which is helping the universe to expan...

    Not the first time I've read through to the end of a Marcus Chown and realised that, though there are some good stories and some nice linking of events and people, I'm not much better educated about the subject matter than when I started. Perhaps I should stop reading the author! ...

    Gravity is one of those concepts everyone thinks they understand, only occasionally discovering that their notions of gravity are identical to those held in the time of Newton. Curiously enough, just as in every other area of scientific inquiry, there have been significant new discover...

    Growing up in rural Connecticut presented some difficulties, namely, finding anything to do. Reading proved a dependable pastime and mostly I scrounged through whatever books were left laying around by my six older siblings. The Caine Mutiny, comic books, The Oxford Companion to Americ...

    Since the book is written in 2017, it has an advantage of being definite about gravitational waves. It gives the book a promising start and defines its central focus on gravity. It is divided into three parts - first one dealing with classical gravity (aka Newton), second one with spac...

    This book will blow your mind as it tries to explain gravity, quantum physics and associated ideas to the common person. It does a pretty job of it. Any failure is in my lack of understanding. It isn't full of equation that make no sense to the layperson but with analogies and real wor...

    This title is a bit misleading, because it seems to bit off and chew on quite a bit more than just gravity. It's a nice brief overview of the both the history and the current state of discoveries and thinking about large (and small)-scale physics, from Newton and his apple through quan...

    The only downside of this book was the reader (I listened to the audio). When she kept her natural British accent she was fine, but whenever she switched to accents when quoting Einstein (German) or American accents, she sounded ridiculous; that was distracting. Her American accent sou...

    I really enjoyed this read. The first two sections (Newton and Einstein) were really clear and written with humour and I enjoyed the historical context given, but none of it was at the expense of glossing over the science which I really appreciated. It also didn't shy away from discuss...

    In part I, the author explains simple things pretty well, as a Phd in physics, I also learned a thing or two. Then in part 2, he explains things too simple. As far as the part 3, it is a little bit awkward. I got a feeling he trusts Nima too much... Well, I admit I agree with most of w...

    Chown writes about the most brilliant minds in science, especially Newton and Einstein. Those early sections of the book were interesting, reading about who these individuals were, and how they came to the discoveries they made. The later sections, getting into string theory, quantum...

    Some concepts required further reading, but otherwise, this is a splendid book that presents a perceptive view into what gravity really is. Highly recommended to anyone who is curious about the major developments and seeking basic explanations regarding this topic - from Newton to Eins...

    The irreverent and informal writing style is grating and doesn't contribute anything (with the bizarre biographical vignettes being the worst). Concentrates on Newton and then rushes through modern physics in a couple of pages. ...

    Audiobook. Read well apart from terrible accents for all quotations. The book itself is a really interesting and engaging summary of Newton and Einstein?s discovery. After that it gets a little esoteric and no real effort is made to make sense of the physics for the reader/listen...

    Good, solid story about gravity, with some quantum mechanics and cosmological problems thrown in. It doesn't electrify the reader - and was not a page-turner. The story of Einstein is compelling though. Also the modern cosmology questions are covered briefly, which make it timely. ...

    Translated and read in the process ...

    Very accessible science history. Chapters are nicely organized in 3 Sections: Newton, Einstein and Beyond Einstein. ...

    A very interesting read. Much was way over my head, but always enjoy the sciences. ...

  • Douglas Lord
    Dec 05, 2017

    This is a highly entertaining history of gravity, full of quite interesting anecdotes and the gradual unfolding of our understanding from Newton through Einstein through our quest to reconcile quantum mechanics with the one aspect we're most familiar with but which we understand the le...

    Marcus Chown is one of the UK's best writers on physics and astronomy - it's excellent to see him back on what he does best. Here we discover our gradual approach to understanding the nature of gravity - the 'ascent' of the title - which, though perhaps slightly overblown in the words ...

    As the story goes, in 1666 Isaac Newton watched an apple fall from a tree, and it was this simple action that gave him the inspiration to develop the theory and the mathematics that was first published in 1687 in Philosophić Naturalis Principia Mathematica (Mathematical Principles of ...

    I did a double review of two books for the Wall Street Journal, so posting it under both titles! The Ascent of Gravity Marcus Chown Pegasus On Gravity A. Zee Princeton Gravity has become a hot topic in science, with the discovery of gravitational waves, ripples in the fabric...

    Not a review but some kind of essay (based on the book)... Gravitational waves are bombarding The Earth from all sides at all times. But you don?t know about it. Or maybe you know, but don?t care. Or simply ? do not feel it. More likely. Ray is going to ask you to stop for...

    From Newton to Einstein to the present theories of cosmology. Chown takes us through a universe which shows itself to be a dichotomy of truths. Everyone knows that gravity is an attractive force..right? Well it appears that it also has a dark side which is helping the universe to expan...

    Not the first time I've read through to the end of a Marcus Chown and realised that, though there are some good stories and some nice linking of events and people, I'm not much better educated about the subject matter than when I started. Perhaps I should stop reading the author! ...

    Gravity is one of those concepts everyone thinks they understand, only occasionally discovering that their notions of gravity are identical to those held in the time of Newton. Curiously enough, just as in every other area of scientific inquiry, there have been significant new discover...

    Growing up in rural Connecticut presented some difficulties, namely, finding anything to do. Reading proved a dependable pastime and mostly I scrounged through whatever books were left laying around by my six older siblings. The Caine Mutiny, comic books, The Oxford Companion to Americ...

  • John Gribbin
    May 13, 2018

    This is a highly entertaining history of gravity, full of quite interesting anecdotes and the gradual unfolding of our understanding from Newton through Einstein through our quest to reconcile quantum mechanics with the one aspect we're most familiar with but which we understand the le...

    Marcus Chown is one of the UK's best writers on physics and astronomy - it's excellent to see him back on what he does best. Here we discover our gradual approach to understanding the nature of gravity - the 'ascent' of the title - which, though perhaps slightly overblown in the words ...

    As the story goes, in 1666 Isaac Newton watched an apple fall from a tree, and it was this simple action that gave him the inspiration to develop the theory and the mathematics that was first published in 1687 in Philosophić Naturalis Principia Mathematica (Mathematical Principles of ...

    I did a double review of two books for the Wall Street Journal, so posting it under both titles! The Ascent of Gravity Marcus Chown Pegasus On Gravity A. Zee Princeton Gravity has become a hot topic in science, with the discovery of gravitational waves, ripples in the fabric...

  • Bree
    Apr 21, 2018

    This is a highly entertaining history of gravity, full of quite interesting anecdotes and the gradual unfolding of our understanding from Newton through Einstein through our quest to reconcile quantum mechanics with the one aspect we're most familiar with but which we understand the le...

    Marcus Chown is one of the UK's best writers on physics and astronomy - it's excellent to see him back on what he does best. Here we discover our gradual approach to understanding the nature of gravity - the 'ascent' of the title - which, though perhaps slightly overblown in the words ...

    As the story goes, in 1666 Isaac Newton watched an apple fall from a tree, and it was this simple action that gave him the inspiration to develop the theory and the mathematics that was first published in 1687 in Philosophić Naturalis Principia Mathematica (Mathematical Principles of ...

    I did a double review of two books for the Wall Street Journal, so posting it under both titles! The Ascent of Gravity Marcus Chown Pegasus On Gravity A. Zee Princeton Gravity has become a hot topic in science, with the discovery of gravitational waves, ripples in the fabric...

    Not a review but some kind of essay (based on the book)... Gravitational waves are bombarding The Earth from all sides at all times. But you don?t know about it. Or maybe you know, but don?t care. Or simply ? do not feel it. More likely. Ray is going to ask you to stop for...

    From Newton to Einstein to the present theories of cosmology. Chown takes us through a universe which shows itself to be a dichotomy of truths. Everyone knows that gravity is an attractive force..right? Well it appears that it also has a dark side which is helping the universe to expan...

    Not the first time I've read through to the end of a Marcus Chown and realised that, though there are some good stories and some nice linking of events and people, I'm not much better educated about the subject matter than when I started. Perhaps I should stop reading the author! ...

    Gravity is one of those concepts everyone thinks they understand, only occasionally discovering that their notions of gravity are identical to those held in the time of Newton. Curiously enough, just as in every other area of scientific inquiry, there have been significant new discover...

    Growing up in rural Connecticut presented some difficulties, namely, finding anything to do. Reading proved a dependable pastime and mostly I scrounged through whatever books were left laying around by my six older siblings. The Caine Mutiny, comic books, The Oxford Companion to Americ...

    Since the book is written in 2017, it has an advantage of being definite about gravitational waves. It gives the book a promising start and defines its central focus on gravity. It is divided into three parts - first one dealing with classical gravity (aka Newton), second one with spac...

    This book will blow your mind as it tries to explain gravity, quantum physics and associated ideas to the common person. It does a pretty job of it. Any failure is in my lack of understanding. It isn't full of equation that make no sense to the layperson but with analogies and real wor...

    This title is a bit misleading, because it seems to bit off and chew on quite a bit more than just gravity. It's a nice brief overview of the both the history and the current state of discoveries and thinking about large (and small)-scale physics, from Newton and his apple through quan...

    The only downside of this book was the reader (I listened to the audio). When she kept her natural British accent she was fine, but whenever she switched to accents when quoting Einstein (German) or American accents, she sounded ridiculous; that was distracting. Her American accent sou...

    I really enjoyed this read. The first two sections (Newton and Einstein) were really clear and written with humour and I enjoyed the historical context given, but none of it was at the expense of glossing over the science which I really appreciated. It also didn't shy away from discuss...

  • Jingsheng
    Aug 27, 2018

    This is a highly entertaining history of gravity, full of quite interesting anecdotes and the gradual unfolding of our understanding from Newton through Einstein through our quest to reconcile quantum mechanics with the one aspect we're most familiar with but which we understand the le...

    Marcus Chown is one of the UK's best writers on physics and astronomy - it's excellent to see him back on what he does best. Here we discover our gradual approach to understanding the nature of gravity - the 'ascent' of the title - which, though perhaps slightly overblown in the words ...

    As the story goes, in 1666 Isaac Newton watched an apple fall from a tree, and it was this simple action that gave him the inspiration to develop the theory and the mathematics that was first published in 1687 in Philosophić Naturalis Principia Mathematica (Mathematical Principles of ...

    I did a double review of two books for the Wall Street Journal, so posting it under both titles! The Ascent of Gravity Marcus Chown Pegasus On Gravity A. Zee Princeton Gravity has become a hot topic in science, with the discovery of gravitational waves, ripples in the fabric...

    Not a review but some kind of essay (based on the book)... Gravitational waves are bombarding The Earth from all sides at all times. But you don?t know about it. Or maybe you know, but don?t care. Or simply ? do not feel it. More likely. Ray is going to ask you to stop for...

    From Newton to Einstein to the present theories of cosmology. Chown takes us through a universe which shows itself to be a dichotomy of truths. Everyone knows that gravity is an attractive force..right? Well it appears that it also has a dark side which is helping the universe to expan...

    Not the first time I've read through to the end of a Marcus Chown and realised that, though there are some good stories and some nice linking of events and people, I'm not much better educated about the subject matter than when I started. Perhaps I should stop reading the author! ...

    Gravity is one of those concepts everyone thinks they understand, only occasionally discovering that their notions of gravity are identical to those held in the time of Newton. Curiously enough, just as in every other area of scientific inquiry, there have been significant new discover...

    Growing up in rural Connecticut presented some difficulties, namely, finding anything to do. Reading proved a dependable pastime and mostly I scrounged through whatever books were left laying around by my six older siblings. The Caine Mutiny, comic books, The Oxford Companion to Americ...

    Since the book is written in 2017, it has an advantage of being definite about gravitational waves. It gives the book a promising start and defines its central focus on gravity. It is divided into three parts - first one dealing with classical gravity (aka Newton), second one with spac...

    This book will blow your mind as it tries to explain gravity, quantum physics and associated ideas to the common person. It does a pretty job of it. Any failure is in my lack of understanding. It isn't full of equation that make no sense to the layperson but with analogies and real wor...

    This title is a bit misleading, because it seems to bit off and chew on quite a bit more than just gravity. It's a nice brief overview of the both the history and the current state of discoveries and thinking about large (and small)-scale physics, from Newton and his apple through quan...

    The only downside of this book was the reader (I listened to the audio). When she kept her natural British accent she was fine, but whenever she switched to accents when quoting Einstein (German) or American accents, she sounded ridiculous; that was distracting. Her American accent sou...

    I really enjoyed this read. The first two sections (Newton and Einstein) were really clear and written with humour and I enjoyed the historical context given, but none of it was at the expense of glossing over the science which I really appreciated. It also didn't shy away from discuss...

    In part I, the author explains simple things pretty well, as a Phd in physics, I also learned a thing or two. Then in part 2, he explains things too simple. As far as the part 3, it is a little bit awkward. I got a feeling he trusts Nima too much... Well, I admit I agree with most of w...

  • Sam
    Jul 22, 2017

    This is a highly entertaining history of gravity, full of quite interesting anecdotes and the gradual unfolding of our understanding from Newton through Einstein through our quest to reconcile quantum mechanics with the one aspect we're most familiar with but which we understand the le...

    Marcus Chown is one of the UK's best writers on physics and astronomy - it's excellent to see him back on what he does best. Here we discover our gradual approach to understanding the nature of gravity - the 'ascent' of the title - which, though perhaps slightly overblown in the words ...

    As the story goes, in 1666 Isaac Newton watched an apple fall from a tree, and it was this simple action that gave him the inspiration to develop the theory and the mathematics that was first published in 1687 in Philosophić Naturalis Principia Mathematica (Mathematical Principles of ...

    I did a double review of two books for the Wall Street Journal, so posting it under both titles! The Ascent of Gravity Marcus Chown Pegasus On Gravity A. Zee Princeton Gravity has become a hot topic in science, with the discovery of gravitational waves, ripples in the fabric...

    Not a review but some kind of essay (based on the book)... Gravitational waves are bombarding The Earth from all sides at all times. But you don?t know about it. Or maybe you know, but don?t care. Or simply ? do not feel it. More likely. Ray is going to ask you to stop for...

    From Newton to Einstein to the present theories of cosmology. Chown takes us through a universe which shows itself to be a dichotomy of truths. Everyone knows that gravity is an attractive force..right? Well it appears that it also has a dark side which is helping the universe to expan...

  • Joseph Williams
    May 09, 2018

    This is a highly entertaining history of gravity, full of quite interesting anecdotes and the gradual unfolding of our understanding from Newton through Einstein through our quest to reconcile quantum mechanics with the one aspect we're most familiar with but which we understand the le...

    Marcus Chown is one of the UK's best writers on physics and astronomy - it's excellent to see him back on what he does best. Here we discover our gradual approach to understanding the nature of gravity - the 'ascent' of the title - which, though perhaps slightly overblown in the words ...

    As the story goes, in 1666 Isaac Newton watched an apple fall from a tree, and it was this simple action that gave him the inspiration to develop the theory and the mathematics that was first published in 1687 in Philosophić Naturalis Principia Mathematica (Mathematical Principles of ...

    I did a double review of two books for the Wall Street Journal, so posting it under both titles! The Ascent of Gravity Marcus Chown Pegasus On Gravity A. Zee Princeton Gravity has become a hot topic in science, with the discovery of gravitational waves, ripples in the fabric...

    Not a review but some kind of essay (based on the book)... Gravitational waves are bombarding The Earth from all sides at all times. But you don?t know about it. Or maybe you know, but don?t care. Or simply ? do not feel it. More likely. Ray is going to ask you to stop for...

    From Newton to Einstein to the present theories of cosmology. Chown takes us through a universe which shows itself to be a dichotomy of truths. Everyone knows that gravity is an attractive force..right? Well it appears that it also has a dark side which is helping the universe to expan...

    Not the first time I've read through to the end of a Marcus Chown and realised that, though there are some good stories and some nice linking of events and people, I'm not much better educated about the subject matter than when I started. Perhaps I should stop reading the author! ...

    Gravity is one of those concepts everyone thinks they understand, only occasionally discovering that their notions of gravity are identical to those held in the time of Newton. Curiously enough, just as in every other area of scientific inquiry, there have been significant new discover...

    Growing up in rural Connecticut presented some difficulties, namely, finding anything to do. Reading proved a dependable pastime and mostly I scrounged through whatever books were left laying around by my six older siblings. The Caine Mutiny, comic books, The Oxford Companion to Americ...

    Since the book is written in 2017, it has an advantage of being definite about gravitational waves. It gives the book a promising start and defines its central focus on gravity. It is divided into three parts - first one dealing with classical gravity (aka Newton), second one with spac...

    This book will blow your mind as it tries to explain gravity, quantum physics and associated ideas to the common person. It does a pretty job of it. Any failure is in my lack of understanding. It isn't full of equation that make no sense to the layperson but with analogies and real wor...

    This title is a bit misleading, because it seems to bit off and chew on quite a bit more than just gravity. It's a nice brief overview of the both the history and the current state of discoveries and thinking about large (and small)-scale physics, from Newton and his apple through quan...

    The only downside of this book was the reader (I listened to the audio). When she kept her natural British accent she was fine, but whenever she switched to accents when quoting Einstein (German) or American accents, she sounded ridiculous; that was distracting. Her American accent sou...

  • Deepak Saxena
    Apr 13, 2018

    This is a highly entertaining history of gravity, full of quite interesting anecdotes and the gradual unfolding of our understanding from Newton through Einstein through our quest to reconcile quantum mechanics with the one aspect we're most familiar with but which we understand the le...

    Marcus Chown is one of the UK's best writers on physics and astronomy - it's excellent to see him back on what he does best. Here we discover our gradual approach to understanding the nature of gravity - the 'ascent' of the title - which, though perhaps slightly overblown in the words ...

    As the story goes, in 1666 Isaac Newton watched an apple fall from a tree, and it was this simple action that gave him the inspiration to develop the theory and the mathematics that was first published in 1687 in Philosophić Naturalis Principia Mathematica (Mathematical Principles of ...

    I did a double review of two books for the Wall Street Journal, so posting it under both titles! The Ascent of Gravity Marcus Chown Pegasus On Gravity A. Zee Princeton Gravity has become a hot topic in science, with the discovery of gravitational waves, ripples in the fabric...

    Not a review but some kind of essay (based on the book)... Gravitational waves are bombarding The Earth from all sides at all times. But you don?t know about it. Or maybe you know, but don?t care. Or simply ? do not feel it. More likely. Ray is going to ask you to stop for...

    From Newton to Einstein to the present theories of cosmology. Chown takes us through a universe which shows itself to be a dichotomy of truths. Everyone knows that gravity is an attractive force..right? Well it appears that it also has a dark side which is helping the universe to expan...

    Not the first time I've read through to the end of a Marcus Chown and realised that, though there are some good stories and some nice linking of events and people, I'm not much better educated about the subject matter than when I started. Perhaps I should stop reading the author! ...

    Gravity is one of those concepts everyone thinks they understand, only occasionally discovering that their notions of gravity are identical to those held in the time of Newton. Curiously enough, just as in every other area of scientific inquiry, there have been significant new discover...

    Growing up in rural Connecticut presented some difficulties, namely, finding anything to do. Reading proved a dependable pastime and mostly I scrounged through whatever books were left laying around by my six older siblings. The Caine Mutiny, comic books, The Oxford Companion to Americ...

    Since the book is written in 2017, it has an advantage of being definite about gravitational waves. It gives the book a promising start and defines its central focus on gravity. It is divided into three parts - first one dealing with classical gravity (aka Newton), second one with spac...

  • Lawrence
    Jul 08, 2017

    This is a highly entertaining history of gravity, full of quite interesting anecdotes and the gradual unfolding of our understanding from Newton through Einstein through our quest to reconcile quantum mechanics with the one aspect we're most familiar with but which we understand the le...

    Marcus Chown is one of the UK's best writers on physics and astronomy - it's excellent to see him back on what he does best. Here we discover our gradual approach to understanding the nature of gravity - the 'ascent' of the title - which, though perhaps slightly overblown in the words ...

    As the story goes, in 1666 Isaac Newton watched an apple fall from a tree, and it was this simple action that gave him the inspiration to develop the theory and the mathematics that was first published in 1687 in Philosophić Naturalis Principia Mathematica (Mathematical Principles of ...

    I did a double review of two books for the Wall Street Journal, so posting it under both titles! The Ascent of Gravity Marcus Chown Pegasus On Gravity A. Zee Princeton Gravity has become a hot topic in science, with the discovery of gravitational waves, ripples in the fabric...

    Not a review but some kind of essay (based on the book)... Gravitational waves are bombarding The Earth from all sides at all times. But you don?t know about it. Or maybe you know, but don?t care. Or simply ? do not feel it. More likely. Ray is going to ask you to stop for...

    From Newton to Einstein to the present theories of cosmology. Chown takes us through a universe which shows itself to be a dichotomy of truths. Everyone knows that gravity is an attractive force..right? Well it appears that it also has a dark side which is helping the universe to expan...

    Not the first time I've read through to the end of a Marcus Chown and realised that, though there are some good stories and some nice linking of events and people, I'm not much better educated about the subject matter than when I started. Perhaps I should stop reading the author! ...

    Gravity is one of those concepts everyone thinks they understand, only occasionally discovering that their notions of gravity are identical to those held in the time of Newton. Curiously enough, just as in every other area of scientific inquiry, there have been significant new discover...

    Growing up in rural Connecticut presented some difficulties, namely, finding anything to do. Reading proved a dependable pastime and mostly I scrounged through whatever books were left laying around by my six older siblings. The Caine Mutiny, comic books, The Oxford Companion to Americ...

    Since the book is written in 2017, it has an advantage of being definite about gravitational waves. It gives the book a promising start and defines its central focus on gravity. It is divided into three parts - first one dealing with classical gravity (aka Newton), second one with spac...

    This book will blow your mind as it tries to explain gravity, quantum physics and associated ideas to the common person. It does a pretty job of it. Any failure is in my lack of understanding. It isn't full of equation that make no sense to the layperson but with analogies and real wor...

    This title is a bit misleading, because it seems to bit off and chew on quite a bit more than just gravity. It's a nice brief overview of the both the history and the current state of discoveries and thinking about large (and small)-scale physics, from Newton and his apple through quan...

    The only downside of this book was the reader (I listened to the audio). When she kept her natural British accent she was fine, but whenever she switched to accents when quoting Einstein (German) or American accents, she sounded ridiculous; that was distracting. Her American accent sou...

    I really enjoyed this read. The first two sections (Newton and Einstein) were really clear and written with humour and I enjoyed the historical context given, but none of it was at the expense of glossing over the science which I really appreciated. It also didn't shy away from discuss...

    In part I, the author explains simple things pretty well, as a Phd in physics, I also learned a thing or two. Then in part 2, he explains things too simple. As far as the part 3, it is a little bit awkward. I got a feeling he trusts Nima too much... Well, I admit I agree with most of w...

    Chown writes about the most brilliant minds in science, especially Newton and Einstein. Those early sections of the book were interesting, reading about who these individuals were, and how they came to the discoveries they made. The later sections, getting into string theory, quantum...

    Some concepts required further reading, but otherwise, this is a splendid book that presents a perceptive view into what gravity really is. Highly recommended to anyone who is curious about the major developments and seeking basic explanations regarding this topic - from Newton to Eins...

    The irreverent and informal writing style is grating and doesn't contribute anything (with the bizarre biographical vignettes being the worst). Concentrates on Newton and then rushes through modern physics in a couple of pages. ...

    Audiobook. Read well apart from terrible accents for all quotations. The book itself is a really interesting and engaging summary of Newton and Einstein?s discovery. After that it gets a little esoteric and no real effort is made to make sense of the physics for the reader/listen...

    Good, solid story about gravity, with some quantum mechanics and cosmological problems thrown in. It doesn't electrify the reader - and was not a page-turner. The story of Einstein is compelling though. Also the modern cosmology questions are covered briefly, which make it timely. ...

    Translated and read in the process ...

    Very accessible science history. Chapters are nicely organized in 3 Sections: Newton, Einstein and Beyond Einstein. ...

    A very interesting read. Much was way over my head, but always enjoy the sciences. ...

    Might be interesting for someone more of a novice in physics, but for me NBD. ...

  • Vintagebooklvr
    Aug 13, 2018

    This is a highly entertaining history of gravity, full of quite interesting anecdotes and the gradual unfolding of our understanding from Newton through Einstein through our quest to reconcile quantum mechanics with the one aspect we're most familiar with but which we understand the le...

    Marcus Chown is one of the UK's best writers on physics and astronomy - it's excellent to see him back on what he does best. Here we discover our gradual approach to understanding the nature of gravity - the 'ascent' of the title - which, though perhaps slightly overblown in the words ...

    As the story goes, in 1666 Isaac Newton watched an apple fall from a tree, and it was this simple action that gave him the inspiration to develop the theory and the mathematics that was first published in 1687 in Philosophić Naturalis Principia Mathematica (Mathematical Principles of ...

    I did a double review of two books for the Wall Street Journal, so posting it under both titles! The Ascent of Gravity Marcus Chown Pegasus On Gravity A. Zee Princeton Gravity has become a hot topic in science, with the discovery of gravitational waves, ripples in the fabric...

    Not a review but some kind of essay (based on the book)... Gravitational waves are bombarding The Earth from all sides at all times. But you don?t know about it. Or maybe you know, but don?t care. Or simply ? do not feel it. More likely. Ray is going to ask you to stop for...

    From Newton to Einstein to the present theories of cosmology. Chown takes us through a universe which shows itself to be a dichotomy of truths. Everyone knows that gravity is an attractive force..right? Well it appears that it also has a dark side which is helping the universe to expan...

    Not the first time I've read through to the end of a Marcus Chown and realised that, though there are some good stories and some nice linking of events and people, I'm not much better educated about the subject matter than when I started. Perhaps I should stop reading the author! ...

    Gravity is one of those concepts everyone thinks they understand, only occasionally discovering that their notions of gravity are identical to those held in the time of Newton. Curiously enough, just as in every other area of scientific inquiry, there have been significant new discover...

    Growing up in rural Connecticut presented some difficulties, namely, finding anything to do. Reading proved a dependable pastime and mostly I scrounged through whatever books were left laying around by my six older siblings. The Caine Mutiny, comic books, The Oxford Companion to Americ...

    Since the book is written in 2017, it has an advantage of being definite about gravitational waves. It gives the book a promising start and defines its central focus on gravity. It is divided into three parts - first one dealing with classical gravity (aka Newton), second one with spac...

    This book will blow your mind as it tries to explain gravity, quantum physics and associated ideas to the common person. It does a pretty job of it. Any failure is in my lack of understanding. It isn't full of equation that make no sense to the layperson but with analogies and real wor...