Swearing Is Good for You: The Amazing Science of Bad Language

Swearing Is Good for You: The Amazing Science of Bad Language

In a sparkling debut in the entertaining pop science vein of Mary Roach, scientist Emma Byrne examines the latest research to show how swearing can be good for you. She reveals how swearing has been around since the earliest humans began to communicate, and has been shown to reduce physical pain, to lower anxiety, to prevent physical violence, to help trauma victims recove In a sparkling debut in the entertaining pop science vein of Mary Roach, scientist Emma Byrne examines the latest researc...

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Title:Swearing Is Good for You: The Amazing Science of Bad Language
Author:Emma Byrne
Rating:
Genres:Nonfiction
ISBN:Swearing Is Good for You: The Amazing Science of Bad Language
ISBN
Edition Language:English
Format Type:Hardcover
Number of Pages:240 pages pages

Swearing Is Good for You: The Amazing Science of Bad Language Reviews

  • Molly
    Apr 25, 2018

    Hell yeah! Finally some fucking proof to what my gut has been declaring for years. There is something exuberantly cathartic and empowering about releasing tension, frustration and any emotion with a string of some salty expletives! Thank you for making it official. ...

    As someone who loves the f-word, I was instantly intrigued by this book. I enjoyed getting various bits of the history of swearing and seeing different scientific experiments and team building activities. I especially enjoyed the chapter on ladies who swear. There were a few se...

    I picked up this book because I honestly talk like a sailor. I say ?fuck? too much and it?s like a second language to me. I was raised in The South and we are taught ladies should not use foul language. Well I say, ?Fuck that shit!? I loved this book because it had history an...

    So firstly, this was fun and liked it and I admire its enthusiasm. Any book that tries to break down the taboo veil surrounding swearing is good in my book. I do not understand the fixation that some people have about swearing, and I probably never will. But this book does a really goo...

    This book is both screamingly funny in parts, a social science observation in parts, and compares swear words in other languages besides English. I found the chapter on Tourette's the most interesting, even if the author says it shouldn't be in the book. I've always had a really lib...

    I received access to this book via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. If you are looking for exciting new swears to use, this is not the book for you - especially since researchers are apparently hesitant to use the *actual* swear words patients employ when writing studies...

  • Kaethe
    May 28, 2018

    Hell yeah! Finally some fucking proof to what my gut has been declaring for years. There is something exuberantly cathartic and empowering about releasing tension, frustration and any emotion with a string of some salty expletives! Thank you for making it official. ...

    As someone who loves the f-word, I was instantly intrigued by this book. I enjoyed getting various bits of the history of swearing and seeing different scientific experiments and team building activities. I especially enjoyed the chapter on ladies who swear. There were a few se...

    I picked up this book because I honestly talk like a sailor. I say ?fuck? too much and it?s like a second language to me. I was raised in The South and we are taught ladies should not use foul language. Well I say, ?Fuck that shit!? I loved this book because it had history an...

    So firstly, this was fun and liked it and I admire its enthusiasm. Any book that tries to break down the taboo veil surrounding swearing is good in my book. I do not understand the fixation that some people have about swearing, and I probably never will. But this book does a really goo...

    This book is both screamingly funny in parts, a social science observation in parts, and compares swear words in other languages besides English. I found the chapter on Tourette's the most interesting, even if the author says it shouldn't be in the book. I've always had a really lib...

    I received access to this book via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. If you are looking for exciting new swears to use, this is not the book for you - especially since researchers are apparently hesitant to use the *actual* swear words patients employ when writing studies...

    I hate it when I start a book that I'm looking forward too only to run into intellectually questionable assertions with no explanation of what the author means. She really ought to stick to robot science rather than delve into generalisations about culture, history, neurology, etc. I p...

    If you are going to "read" this book, I highly recommend the audiobook. I typically don't listen to audiobooks, except for the occasional 5+ hour car ride. Well let me just say, audiobook is the way to go with this one! The first half of the book was not only interesting, but was so mu...

    This is the most hilarious book chock-full of f*cking awesome stories about swearing and human nature. Spontaneous swearing with chimps to a scary as h*ll brain injury this was a wild ride that I didn't want to put down. ...

    Surprisingly, I found Swearing is Good for You: The Amazing Science of Bad Language by Emma Byrne to be a bit of a slog. The subject matter is near and dear to my heart and the introduction is funny and promised a good read but this skinny book (201 pages minus the notes and bibliograp...

    Thank you to Netgalley and W. W. Norton & Company for an E-ARC of this novel. I must say I didn't give this book much credit before I read it because 1) new author (always skeptical) and 2) the title seemed a little hard to believe. Emma Byrne does an excellent job on making a cas...

    Swearing is Good for You is a book on the many largely unknown and underappreciated aspects of swearing and it's adjacent fields of study. The chapters are mostly standalones tied together by the overall theme of the book, and I especially liked the chapters swearing and pain (chapter ...

    ?Swearing is Good for You? surpasses simple humor or personal validation. Emma Byrne has included chapters on; neuroscience, pain perception, Tourette?s syndrome, workplace swearing, other primates that swear, gender differences and swearing in other languages. I found her book t...

    I really enjoyed reading this - it's a nice mix funny anecdotes and clear examples of recent research about swearing, from neuroscience, workplace studies, gender studies and so on. I loved the explanations of why we swear (such as avoiding violence, team-bonding) that go beyond just d...

    Excellent book on the power and utility of swearing. I gave swearing up for awhile when I thought "go away" and "nonsense" were as good as F-off and BS, but there is power in the swears. ...

    This is a really funny, and clever, book. I recently had the pleasure to interview the author, Emma Byrne, for National Geographic's weekly column, Book Talk. And as Emma shows in her book, Swearing Is Good for You: The Amazing Science of Bad Language, far from being simply lazy langua...

    Guard your delicate sensibilities and prepare to expand your vocabulary! Full of foul language and subtle British humor, this book takes an in depth look at swearing with studies I had no idea did or should ever exist. A little dry in the middle, but still amazing. ...

    Funny to read, interesting, very well researched and yet easy to follow. Can't wait to read more from Emma. ...

    I was interested in the research and the title was of interest. The book is slow and hard to get through but interesting. Not a book for people not used to non-fiction. ...

    Bloody hilarious and fucking fascinating. ...

    This is a fascinating book--chock full of surprising research that uses swearing (a convenient inroads into our psyche and emotions) to reveal the inner workings of our brains. I appreciated the demystifying of what swearing is, and how it relates to gender, camraderie, and mental func...

    This brief little book wasn?t just a list of creative ways to swear?which I would have enjoyed?but instead was a fascinating collection of social psychology and neuroscience research about how swearing affects us. Turns out, pretty profoundly (not surprised). And it IS good for y...

    "We will never know for sure where swearing came from, but we do know that we keep reinventing it, just when it seems to be losing its power. We need swearing and, however we might have invented it, I'm fucking glad that we did." What a delightful and informative book! A little bit ...

    This book is definitely a science book and it took me some time to get into the heavy nature of the early chapters but it was worth the time. Fascinating read that looks at swearing in the context of culture, gender, neuroscience, pain management, workplace and other areas of society. ...

    This book was so fucking boring! I thought it was going to be a funny book but it opened with a chapter on neuroscience and swearing. No shit! Then moved on to Tourette?s Syndrome and swearing. You?ve got to be fucking kidding! Then it moved to a few chapters that I thought would b...

    The title is a bit clickbait-y but the content is good. Turns out chimpanzees who have been taught sign language will develop their own curse words, that cursing can act as pain reliever, and that Pulp Fiction was a pain to translate into Spanish. I?m not sure I?m convinced of her ...

    I think as one other reviewer noted, the title is a tease. There is really very little in the book that addresses why it is good for you. As for the science of swearing, most of the content is dedicated to that topic with virtually a whole catalog of studies. Overall pretty tedious rea...

    By?a to naukowa rozprawka o u?yciu epitetow i zale?nosci biochemicznych zachodz?cych w mózgu w czasie ich uzycia lub nie. Spodziewalam sie bardziej podró?y lingwistycznej i historycznej genezy powstania ,znaczenia budowy bluzga I czemu tak czesto siegamy do przecinka . nie op...

    Great book! Lots of interesting information, especially about Tourette's Syndrome. I'm recommending this to pretty much everyone I know. ...

    Reads rather like Mary Roach, which is to say, funny and informal but based on excellent research. Library copy ...

  • Ashley
    Mar 26, 2018

    Hell yeah! Finally some fucking proof to what my gut has been declaring for years. There is something exuberantly cathartic and empowering about releasing tension, frustration and any emotion with a string of some salty expletives! Thank you for making it official. ...

    As someone who loves the f-word, I was instantly intrigued by this book. I enjoyed getting various bits of the history of swearing and seeing different scientific experiments and team building activities. I especially enjoyed the chapter on ladies who swear. There were a few se...

    I picked up this book because I honestly talk like a sailor. I say ?fuck? too much and it?s like a second language to me. I was raised in The South and we are taught ladies should not use foul language. Well I say, ?Fuck that shit!? I loved this book because it had history an...

    So firstly, this was fun and liked it and I admire its enthusiasm. Any book that tries to break down the taboo veil surrounding swearing is good in my book. I do not understand the fixation that some people have about swearing, and I probably never will. But this book does a really goo...

  • Ann
    May 28, 2018

    Hell yeah! Finally some fucking proof to what my gut has been declaring for years. There is something exuberantly cathartic and empowering about releasing tension, frustration and any emotion with a string of some salty expletives! Thank you for making it official. ...

    As someone who loves the f-word, I was instantly intrigued by this book. I enjoyed getting various bits of the history of swearing and seeing different scientific experiments and team building activities. I especially enjoyed the chapter on ladies who swear. There were a few se...

    I picked up this book because I honestly talk like a sailor. I say ?fuck? too much and it?s like a second language to me. I was raised in The South and we are taught ladies should not use foul language. Well I say, ?Fuck that shit!? I loved this book because it had history an...

    So firstly, this was fun and liked it and I admire its enthusiasm. Any book that tries to break down the taboo veil surrounding swearing is good in my book. I do not understand the fixation that some people have about swearing, and I probably never will. But this book does a really goo...

    This book is both screamingly funny in parts, a social science observation in parts, and compares swear words in other languages besides English. I found the chapter on Tourette's the most interesting, even if the author says it shouldn't be in the book. I've always had a really lib...

    I received access to this book via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. If you are looking for exciting new swears to use, this is not the book for you - especially since researchers are apparently hesitant to use the *actual* swear words patients employ when writing studies...

    I hate it when I start a book that I'm looking forward too only to run into intellectually questionable assertions with no explanation of what the author means. She really ought to stick to robot science rather than delve into generalisations about culture, history, neurology, etc. I p...

    If you are going to "read" this book, I highly recommend the audiobook. I typically don't listen to audiobooks, except for the occasional 5+ hour car ride. Well let me just say, audiobook is the way to go with this one! The first half of the book was not only interesting, but was so mu...

    This is the most hilarious book chock-full of f*cking awesome stories about swearing and human nature. Spontaneous swearing with chimps to a scary as h*ll brain injury this was a wild ride that I didn't want to put down. ...

    Surprisingly, I found Swearing is Good for You: The Amazing Science of Bad Language by Emma Byrne to be a bit of a slog. The subject matter is near and dear to my heart and the introduction is funny and promised a good read but this skinny book (201 pages minus the notes and bibliograp...

    Thank you to Netgalley and W. W. Norton & Company for an E-ARC of this novel. I must say I didn't give this book much credit before I read it because 1) new author (always skeptical) and 2) the title seemed a little hard to believe. Emma Byrne does an excellent job on making a cas...

    Swearing is Good for You is a book on the many largely unknown and underappreciated aspects of swearing and it's adjacent fields of study. The chapters are mostly standalones tied together by the overall theme of the book, and I especially liked the chapters swearing and pain (chapter ...

    ?Swearing is Good for You? surpasses simple humor or personal validation. Emma Byrne has included chapters on; neuroscience, pain perception, Tourette?s syndrome, workplace swearing, other primates that swear, gender differences and swearing in other languages. I found her book t...

    I really enjoyed reading this - it's a nice mix funny anecdotes and clear examples of recent research about swearing, from neuroscience, workplace studies, gender studies and so on. I loved the explanations of why we swear (such as avoiding violence, team-bonding) that go beyond just d...

    Excellent book on the power and utility of swearing. I gave swearing up for awhile when I thought "go away" and "nonsense" were as good as F-off and BS, but there is power in the swears. ...

    This is a really funny, and clever, book. I recently had the pleasure to interview the author, Emma Byrne, for National Geographic's weekly column, Book Talk. And as Emma shows in her book, Swearing Is Good for You: The Amazing Science of Bad Language, far from being simply lazy langua...

    Guard your delicate sensibilities and prepare to expand your vocabulary! Full of foul language and subtle British humor, this book takes an in depth look at swearing with studies I had no idea did or should ever exist. A little dry in the middle, but still amazing. ...

    Funny to read, interesting, very well researched and yet easy to follow. Can't wait to read more from Emma. ...

    I was interested in the research and the title was of interest. The book is slow and hard to get through but interesting. Not a book for people not used to non-fiction. ...

    Bloody hilarious and fucking fascinating. ...

    This is a fascinating book--chock full of surprising research that uses swearing (a convenient inroads into our psyche and emotions) to reveal the inner workings of our brains. I appreciated the demystifying of what swearing is, and how it relates to gender, camraderie, and mental func...

    This brief little book wasn?t just a list of creative ways to swear?which I would have enjoyed?but instead was a fascinating collection of social psychology and neuroscience research about how swearing affects us. Turns out, pretty profoundly (not surprised). And it IS good for y...

    "We will never know for sure where swearing came from, but we do know that we keep reinventing it, just when it seems to be losing its power. We need swearing and, however we might have invented it, I'm fucking glad that we did." What a delightful and informative book! A little bit ...

    This book is definitely a science book and it took me some time to get into the heavy nature of the early chapters but it was worth the time. Fascinating read that looks at swearing in the context of culture, gender, neuroscience, pain management, workplace and other areas of society. ...

  • Alisse
    Jul 26, 2018

    Hell yeah! Finally some fucking proof to what my gut has been declaring for years. There is something exuberantly cathartic and empowering about releasing tension, frustration and any emotion with a string of some salty expletives! Thank you for making it official. ...

    As someone who loves the f-word, I was instantly intrigued by this book. I enjoyed getting various bits of the history of swearing and seeing different scientific experiments and team building activities. I especially enjoyed the chapter on ladies who swear. There were a few se...

    I picked up this book because I honestly talk like a sailor. I say ?fuck? too much and it?s like a second language to me. I was raised in The South and we are taught ladies should not use foul language. Well I say, ?Fuck that shit!? I loved this book because it had history an...

    So firstly, this was fun and liked it and I admire its enthusiasm. Any book that tries to break down the taboo veil surrounding swearing is good in my book. I do not understand the fixation that some people have about swearing, and I probably never will. But this book does a really goo...

    This book is both screamingly funny in parts, a social science observation in parts, and compares swear words in other languages besides English. I found the chapter on Tourette's the most interesting, even if the author says it shouldn't be in the book. I've always had a really lib...

    I received access to this book via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. If you are looking for exciting new swears to use, this is not the book for you - especially since researchers are apparently hesitant to use the *actual* swear words patients employ when writing studies...

    I hate it when I start a book that I'm looking forward too only to run into intellectually questionable assertions with no explanation of what the author means. She really ought to stick to robot science rather than delve into generalisations about culture, history, neurology, etc. I p...

    If you are going to "read" this book, I highly recommend the audiobook. I typically don't listen to audiobooks, except for the occasional 5+ hour car ride. Well let me just say, audiobook is the way to go with this one! The first half of the book was not only interesting, but was so mu...

    This is the most hilarious book chock-full of f*cking awesome stories about swearing and human nature. Spontaneous swearing with chimps to a scary as h*ll brain injury this was a wild ride that I didn't want to put down. ...

    Surprisingly, I found Swearing is Good for You: The Amazing Science of Bad Language by Emma Byrne to be a bit of a slog. The subject matter is near and dear to my heart and the introduction is funny and promised a good read but this skinny book (201 pages minus the notes and bibliograp...

    Thank you to Netgalley and W. W. Norton & Company for an E-ARC of this novel. I must say I didn't give this book much credit before I read it because 1) new author (always skeptical) and 2) the title seemed a little hard to believe. Emma Byrne does an excellent job on making a cas...

    Swearing is Good for You is a book on the many largely unknown and underappreciated aspects of swearing and it's adjacent fields of study. The chapters are mostly standalones tied together by the overall theme of the book, and I especially liked the chapters swearing and pain (chapter ...

    ?Swearing is Good for You? surpasses simple humor or personal validation. Emma Byrne has included chapters on; neuroscience, pain perception, Tourette?s syndrome, workplace swearing, other primates that swear, gender differences and swearing in other languages. I found her book t...

    I really enjoyed reading this - it's a nice mix funny anecdotes and clear examples of recent research about swearing, from neuroscience, workplace studies, gender studies and so on. I loved the explanations of why we swear (such as avoiding violence, team-bonding) that go beyond just d...

    Excellent book on the power and utility of swearing. I gave swearing up for awhile when I thought "go away" and "nonsense" were as good as F-off and BS, but there is power in the swears. ...

    This is a really funny, and clever, book. I recently had the pleasure to interview the author, Emma Byrne, for National Geographic's weekly column, Book Talk. And as Emma shows in her book, Swearing Is Good for You: The Amazing Science of Bad Language, far from being simply lazy langua...

    Guard your delicate sensibilities and prepare to expand your vocabulary! Full of foul language and subtle British humor, this book takes an in depth look at swearing with studies I had no idea did or should ever exist. A little dry in the middle, but still amazing. ...

    Funny to read, interesting, very well researched and yet easy to follow. Can't wait to read more from Emma. ...

    I was interested in the research and the title was of interest. The book is slow and hard to get through but interesting. Not a book for people not used to non-fiction. ...

    Bloody hilarious and fucking fascinating. ...

    This is a fascinating book--chock full of surprising research that uses swearing (a convenient inroads into our psyche and emotions) to reveal the inner workings of our brains. I appreciated the demystifying of what swearing is, and how it relates to gender, camraderie, and mental func...

    This brief little book wasn?t just a list of creative ways to swear?which I would have enjoyed?but instead was a fascinating collection of social psychology and neuroscience research about how swearing affects us. Turns out, pretty profoundly (not surprised). And it IS good for y...

  • Kristina
    Jun 25, 2018

    Hell yeah! Finally some fucking proof to what my gut has been declaring for years. There is something exuberantly cathartic and empowering about releasing tension, frustration and any emotion with a string of some salty expletives! Thank you for making it official. ...

    As someone who loves the f-word, I was instantly intrigued by this book. I enjoyed getting various bits of the history of swearing and seeing different scientific experiments and team building activities. I especially enjoyed the chapter on ladies who swear. There were a few se...

    I picked up this book because I honestly talk like a sailor. I say ?fuck? too much and it?s like a second language to me. I was raised in The South and we are taught ladies should not use foul language. Well I say, ?Fuck that shit!? I loved this book because it had history an...

    So firstly, this was fun and liked it and I admire its enthusiasm. Any book that tries to break down the taboo veil surrounding swearing is good in my book. I do not understand the fixation that some people have about swearing, and I probably never will. But this book does a really goo...

    This book is both screamingly funny in parts, a social science observation in parts, and compares swear words in other languages besides English. I found the chapter on Tourette's the most interesting, even if the author says it shouldn't be in the book. I've always had a really lib...

    I received access to this book via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. If you are looking for exciting new swears to use, this is not the book for you - especially since researchers are apparently hesitant to use the *actual* swear words patients employ when writing studies...

    I hate it when I start a book that I'm looking forward too only to run into intellectually questionable assertions with no explanation of what the author means. She really ought to stick to robot science rather than delve into generalisations about culture, history, neurology, etc. I p...

    If you are going to "read" this book, I highly recommend the audiobook. I typically don't listen to audiobooks, except for the occasional 5+ hour car ride. Well let me just say, audiobook is the way to go with this one! The first half of the book was not only interesting, but was so mu...

    This is the most hilarious book chock-full of f*cking awesome stories about swearing and human nature. Spontaneous swearing with chimps to a scary as h*ll brain injury this was a wild ride that I didn't want to put down. ...

    Surprisingly, I found Swearing is Good for You: The Amazing Science of Bad Language by Emma Byrne to be a bit of a slog. The subject matter is near and dear to my heart and the introduction is funny and promised a good read but this skinny book (201 pages minus the notes and bibliograp...

  • Traci
    Feb 22, 2018

    Hell yeah! Finally some fucking proof to what my gut has been declaring for years. There is something exuberantly cathartic and empowering about releasing tension, frustration and any emotion with a string of some salty expletives! Thank you for making it official. ...

    As someone who loves the f-word, I was instantly intrigued by this book. I enjoyed getting various bits of the history of swearing and seeing different scientific experiments and team building activities. I especially enjoyed the chapter on ladies who swear. There were a few se...

    I picked up this book because I honestly talk like a sailor. I say ?fuck? too much and it?s like a second language to me. I was raised in The South and we are taught ladies should not use foul language. Well I say, ?Fuck that shit!? I loved this book because it had history an...

    So firstly, this was fun and liked it and I admire its enthusiasm. Any book that tries to break down the taboo veil surrounding swearing is good in my book. I do not understand the fixation that some people have about swearing, and I probably never will. But this book does a really goo...

    This book is both screamingly funny in parts, a social science observation in parts, and compares swear words in other languages besides English. I found the chapter on Tourette's the most interesting, even if the author says it shouldn't be in the book. I've always had a really lib...

    I received access to this book via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. If you are looking for exciting new swears to use, this is not the book for you - especially since researchers are apparently hesitant to use the *actual* swear words patients employ when writing studies...

    I hate it when I start a book that I'm looking forward too only to run into intellectually questionable assertions with no explanation of what the author means. She really ought to stick to robot science rather than delve into generalisations about culture, history, neurology, etc. I p...

    If you are going to "read" this book, I highly recommend the audiobook. I typically don't listen to audiobooks, except for the occasional 5+ hour car ride. Well let me just say, audiobook is the way to go with this one! The first half of the book was not only interesting, but was so mu...

    This is the most hilarious book chock-full of f*cking awesome stories about swearing and human nature. Spontaneous swearing with chimps to a scary as h*ll brain injury this was a wild ride that I didn't want to put down. ...

    Surprisingly, I found Swearing is Good for You: The Amazing Science of Bad Language by Emma Byrne to be a bit of a slog. The subject matter is near and dear to my heart and the introduction is funny and promised a good read but this skinny book (201 pages minus the notes and bibliograp...

    Thank you to Netgalley and W. W. Norton & Company for an E-ARC of this novel. I must say I didn't give this book much credit before I read it because 1) new author (always skeptical) and 2) the title seemed a little hard to believe. Emma Byrne does an excellent job on making a cas...

    Swearing is Good for You is a book on the many largely unknown and underappreciated aspects of swearing and it's adjacent fields of study. The chapters are mostly standalones tied together by the overall theme of the book, and I especially liked the chapters swearing and pain (chapter ...

    ?Swearing is Good for You? surpasses simple humor or personal validation. Emma Byrne has included chapters on; neuroscience, pain perception, Tourette?s syndrome, workplace swearing, other primates that swear, gender differences and swearing in other languages. I found her book t...

    I really enjoyed reading this - it's a nice mix funny anecdotes and clear examples of recent research about swearing, from neuroscience, workplace studies, gender studies and so on. I loved the explanations of why we swear (such as avoiding violence, team-bonding) that go beyond just d...

    Excellent book on the power and utility of swearing. I gave swearing up for awhile when I thought "go away" and "nonsense" were as good as F-off and BS, but there is power in the swears. ...

    This is a really funny, and clever, book. I recently had the pleasure to interview the author, Emma Byrne, for National Geographic's weekly column, Book Talk. And as Emma shows in her book, Swearing Is Good for You: The Amazing Science of Bad Language, far from being simply lazy langua...

    Guard your delicate sensibilities and prepare to expand your vocabulary! Full of foul language and subtle British humor, this book takes an in depth look at swearing with studies I had no idea did or should ever exist. A little dry in the middle, but still amazing. ...

    Funny to read, interesting, very well researched and yet easy to follow. Can't wait to read more from Emma. ...

    I was interested in the research and the title was of interest. The book is slow and hard to get through but interesting. Not a book for people not used to non-fiction. ...

    Bloody hilarious and fucking fascinating. ...

    This is a fascinating book--chock full of surprising research that uses swearing (a convenient inroads into our psyche and emotions) to reveal the inner workings of our brains. I appreciated the demystifying of what swearing is, and how it relates to gender, camraderie, and mental func...

    This brief little book wasn?t just a list of creative ways to swear?which I would have enjoyed?but instead was a fascinating collection of social psychology and neuroscience research about how swearing affects us. Turns out, pretty profoundly (not surprised). And it IS good for y...

    "We will never know for sure where swearing came from, but we do know that we keep reinventing it, just when it seems to be losing its power. We need swearing and, however we might have invented it, I'm fucking glad that we did." What a delightful and informative book! A little bit ...

    This book is definitely a science book and it took me some time to get into the heavy nature of the early chapters but it was worth the time. Fascinating read that looks at swearing in the context of culture, gender, neuroscience, pain management, workplace and other areas of society. ...

    This book was so fucking boring! I thought it was going to be a funny book but it opened with a chapter on neuroscience and swearing. No shit! Then moved on to Tourette?s Syndrome and swearing. You?ve got to be fucking kidding! Then it moved to a few chapters that I thought would b...

    The title is a bit clickbait-y but the content is good. Turns out chimpanzees who have been taught sign language will develop their own curse words, that cursing can act as pain reliever, and that Pulp Fiction was a pain to translate into Spanish. I?m not sure I?m convinced of her ...

    I think as one other reviewer noted, the title is a tease. There is really very little in the book that addresses why it is good for you. As for the science of swearing, most of the content is dedicated to that topic with virtually a whole catalog of studies. Overall pretty tedious rea...

    By?a to naukowa rozprawka o u?yciu epitetow i zale?nosci biochemicznych zachodz?cych w mózgu w czasie ich uzycia lub nie. Spodziewalam sie bardziej podró?y lingwistycznej i historycznej genezy powstania ,znaczenia budowy bluzga I czemu tak czesto siegamy do przecinka . nie op...

    Great book! Lots of interesting information, especially about Tourette's Syndrome. I'm recommending this to pretty much everyone I know. ...

  • victor harris
    May 18, 2018

    Hell yeah! Finally some fucking proof to what my gut has been declaring for years. There is something exuberantly cathartic and empowering about releasing tension, frustration and any emotion with a string of some salty expletives! Thank you for making it official. ...

    As someone who loves the f-word, I was instantly intrigued by this book. I enjoyed getting various bits of the history of swearing and seeing different scientific experiments and team building activities. I especially enjoyed the chapter on ladies who swear. There were a few se...

    I picked up this book because I honestly talk like a sailor. I say ?fuck? too much and it?s like a second language to me. I was raised in The South and we are taught ladies should not use foul language. Well I say, ?Fuck that shit!? I loved this book because it had history an...

    So firstly, this was fun and liked it and I admire its enthusiasm. Any book that tries to break down the taboo veil surrounding swearing is good in my book. I do not understand the fixation that some people have about swearing, and I probably never will. But this book does a really goo...

    This book is both screamingly funny in parts, a social science observation in parts, and compares swear words in other languages besides English. I found the chapter on Tourette's the most interesting, even if the author says it shouldn't be in the book. I've always had a really lib...

    I received access to this book via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. If you are looking for exciting new swears to use, this is not the book for you - especially since researchers are apparently hesitant to use the *actual* swear words patients employ when writing studies...

    I hate it when I start a book that I'm looking forward too only to run into intellectually questionable assertions with no explanation of what the author means. She really ought to stick to robot science rather than delve into generalisations about culture, history, neurology, etc. I p...

    If you are going to "read" this book, I highly recommend the audiobook. I typically don't listen to audiobooks, except for the occasional 5+ hour car ride. Well let me just say, audiobook is the way to go with this one! The first half of the book was not only interesting, but was so mu...

    This is the most hilarious book chock-full of f*cking awesome stories about swearing and human nature. Spontaneous swearing with chimps to a scary as h*ll brain injury this was a wild ride that I didn't want to put down. ...

    Surprisingly, I found Swearing is Good for You: The Amazing Science of Bad Language by Emma Byrne to be a bit of a slog. The subject matter is near and dear to my heart and the introduction is funny and promised a good read but this skinny book (201 pages minus the notes and bibliograp...

    Thank you to Netgalley and W. W. Norton & Company for an E-ARC of this novel. I must say I didn't give this book much credit before I read it because 1) new author (always skeptical) and 2) the title seemed a little hard to believe. Emma Byrne does an excellent job on making a cas...

    Swearing is Good for You is a book on the many largely unknown and underappreciated aspects of swearing and it's adjacent fields of study. The chapters are mostly standalones tied together by the overall theme of the book, and I especially liked the chapters swearing and pain (chapter ...

    ?Swearing is Good for You? surpasses simple humor or personal validation. Emma Byrne has included chapters on; neuroscience, pain perception, Tourette?s syndrome, workplace swearing, other primates that swear, gender differences and swearing in other languages. I found her book t...

    I really enjoyed reading this - it's a nice mix funny anecdotes and clear examples of recent research about swearing, from neuroscience, workplace studies, gender studies and so on. I loved the explanations of why we swear (such as avoiding violence, team-bonding) that go beyond just d...

    Excellent book on the power and utility of swearing. I gave swearing up for awhile when I thought "go away" and "nonsense" were as good as F-off and BS, but there is power in the swears. ...

    This is a really funny, and clever, book. I recently had the pleasure to interview the author, Emma Byrne, for National Geographic's weekly column, Book Talk. And as Emma shows in her book, Swearing Is Good for You: The Amazing Science of Bad Language, far from being simply lazy langua...

    Guard your delicate sensibilities and prepare to expand your vocabulary! Full of foul language and subtle British humor, this book takes an in depth look at swearing with studies I had no idea did or should ever exist. A little dry in the middle, but still amazing. ...

    Funny to read, interesting, very well researched and yet easy to follow. Can't wait to read more from Emma. ...

    I was interested in the research and the title was of interest. The book is slow and hard to get through but interesting. Not a book for people not used to non-fiction. ...

    Bloody hilarious and fucking fascinating. ...

    This is a fascinating book--chock full of surprising research that uses swearing (a convenient inroads into our psyche and emotions) to reveal the inner workings of our brains. I appreciated the demystifying of what swearing is, and how it relates to gender, camraderie, and mental func...

    This brief little book wasn?t just a list of creative ways to swear?which I would have enjoyed?but instead was a fascinating collection of social psychology and neuroscience research about how swearing affects us. Turns out, pretty profoundly (not surprised). And it IS good for y...

    "We will never know for sure where swearing came from, but we do know that we keep reinventing it, just when it seems to be losing its power. We need swearing and, however we might have invented it, I'm fucking glad that we did." What a delightful and informative book! A little bit ...

    This book is definitely a science book and it took me some time to get into the heavy nature of the early chapters but it was worth the time. Fascinating read that looks at swearing in the context of culture, gender, neuroscience, pain management, workplace and other areas of society. ...

    This book was so fucking boring! I thought it was going to be a funny book but it opened with a chapter on neuroscience and swearing. No shit! Then moved on to Tourette?s Syndrome and swearing. You?ve got to be fucking kidding! Then it moved to a few chapters that I thought would b...

    The title is a bit clickbait-y but the content is good. Turns out chimpanzees who have been taught sign language will develop their own curse words, that cursing can act as pain reliever, and that Pulp Fiction was a pain to translate into Spanish. I?m not sure I?m convinced of her ...

    I think as one other reviewer noted, the title is a tease. There is really very little in the book that addresses why it is good for you. As for the science of swearing, most of the content is dedicated to that topic with virtually a whole catalog of studies. Overall pretty tedious rea...

  • Stacee
    Dec 10, 2017

    Hell yeah! Finally some fucking proof to what my gut has been declaring for years. There is something exuberantly cathartic and empowering about releasing tension, frustration and any emotion with a string of some salty expletives! Thank you for making it official. ...

    As someone who loves the f-word, I was instantly intrigued by this book. I enjoyed getting various bits of the history of swearing and seeing different scientific experiments and team building activities. I especially enjoyed the chapter on ladies who swear. There were a few se...

  • Perry
    Sep 07, 2017

    Hell yeah! Finally some fucking proof to what my gut has been declaring for years. There is something exuberantly cathartic and empowering about releasing tension, frustration and any emotion with a string of some salty expletives! Thank you for making it official. ...

    As someone who loves the f-word, I was instantly intrigued by this book. I enjoyed getting various bits of the history of swearing and seeing different scientific experiments and team building activities. I especially enjoyed the chapter on ladies who swear. There were a few se...

    I picked up this book because I honestly talk like a sailor. I say ?fuck? too much and it?s like a second language to me. I was raised in The South and we are taught ladies should not use foul language. Well I say, ?Fuck that shit!? I loved this book because it had history an...

    So firstly, this was fun and liked it and I admire its enthusiasm. Any book that tries to break down the taboo veil surrounding swearing is good in my book. I do not understand the fixation that some people have about swearing, and I probably never will. But this book does a really goo...

    This book is both screamingly funny in parts, a social science observation in parts, and compares swear words in other languages besides English. I found the chapter on Tourette's the most interesting, even if the author says it shouldn't be in the book. I've always had a really lib...

    I received access to this book via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. If you are looking for exciting new swears to use, this is not the book for you - especially since researchers are apparently hesitant to use the *actual* swear words patients employ when writing studies...

    I hate it when I start a book that I'm looking forward too only to run into intellectually questionable assertions with no explanation of what the author means. She really ought to stick to robot science rather than delve into generalisations about culture, history, neurology, etc. I p...

    If you are going to "read" this book, I highly recommend the audiobook. I typically don't listen to audiobooks, except for the occasional 5+ hour car ride. Well let me just say, audiobook is the way to go with this one! The first half of the book was not only interesting, but was so mu...

    This is the most hilarious book chock-full of f*cking awesome stories about swearing and human nature. Spontaneous swearing with chimps to a scary as h*ll brain injury this was a wild ride that I didn't want to put down. ...

    Surprisingly, I found Swearing is Good for You: The Amazing Science of Bad Language by Emma Byrne to be a bit of a slog. The subject matter is near and dear to my heart and the introduction is funny and promised a good read but this skinny book (201 pages minus the notes and bibliograp...

    Thank you to Netgalley and W. W. Norton & Company for an E-ARC of this novel. I must say I didn't give this book much credit before I read it because 1) new author (always skeptical) and 2) the title seemed a little hard to believe. Emma Byrne does an excellent job on making a cas...

    Swearing is Good for You is a book on the many largely unknown and underappreciated aspects of swearing and it's adjacent fields of study. The chapters are mostly standalones tied together by the overall theme of the book, and I especially liked the chapters swearing and pain (chapter ...

    ?Swearing is Good for You? surpasses simple humor or personal validation. Emma Byrne has included chapters on; neuroscience, pain perception, Tourette?s syndrome, workplace swearing, other primates that swear, gender differences and swearing in other languages. I found her book t...

    I really enjoyed reading this - it's a nice mix funny anecdotes and clear examples of recent research about swearing, from neuroscience, workplace studies, gender studies and so on. I loved the explanations of why we swear (such as avoiding violence, team-bonding) that go beyond just d...

    Excellent book on the power and utility of swearing. I gave swearing up for awhile when I thought "go away" and "nonsense" were as good as F-off and BS, but there is power in the swears. ...

  • Kat
    Sep 16, 2017

    Hell yeah! Finally some fucking proof to what my gut has been declaring for years. There is something exuberantly cathartic and empowering about releasing tension, frustration and any emotion with a string of some salty expletives! Thank you for making it official. ...

    As someone who loves the f-word, I was instantly intrigued by this book. I enjoyed getting various bits of the history of swearing and seeing different scientific experiments and team building activities. I especially enjoyed the chapter on ladies who swear. There were a few se...

    I picked up this book because I honestly talk like a sailor. I say ?fuck? too much and it?s like a second language to me. I was raised in The South and we are taught ladies should not use foul language. Well I say, ?Fuck that shit!? I loved this book because it had history an...

    So firstly, this was fun and liked it and I admire its enthusiasm. Any book that tries to break down the taboo veil surrounding swearing is good in my book. I do not understand the fixation that some people have about swearing, and I probably never will. But this book does a really goo...

    This book is both screamingly funny in parts, a social science observation in parts, and compares swear words in other languages besides English. I found the chapter on Tourette's the most interesting, even if the author says it shouldn't be in the book. I've always had a really lib...

    I received access to this book via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. If you are looking for exciting new swears to use, this is not the book for you - especially since researchers are apparently hesitant to use the *actual* swear words patients employ when writing studies...

    I hate it when I start a book that I'm looking forward too only to run into intellectually questionable assertions with no explanation of what the author means. She really ought to stick to robot science rather than delve into generalisations about culture, history, neurology, etc. I p...

    If you are going to "read" this book, I highly recommend the audiobook. I typically don't listen to audiobooks, except for the occasional 5+ hour car ride. Well let me just say, audiobook is the way to go with this one! The first half of the book was not only interesting, but was so mu...

    This is the most hilarious book chock-full of f*cking awesome stories about swearing and human nature. Spontaneous swearing with chimps to a scary as h*ll brain injury this was a wild ride that I didn't want to put down. ...

    Surprisingly, I found Swearing is Good for You: The Amazing Science of Bad Language by Emma Byrne to be a bit of a slog. The subject matter is near and dear to my heart and the introduction is funny and promised a good read but this skinny book (201 pages minus the notes and bibliograp...

    Thank you to Netgalley and W. W. Norton & Company for an E-ARC of this novel. I must say I didn't give this book much credit before I read it because 1) new author (always skeptical) and 2) the title seemed a little hard to believe. Emma Byrne does an excellent job on making a cas...

  • Reem Mohsen
    Feb 01, 2018

    Hell yeah! Finally some fucking proof to what my gut has been declaring for years. There is something exuberantly cathartic and empowering about releasing tension, frustration and any emotion with a string of some salty expletives! Thank you for making it official. ...

    As someone who loves the f-word, I was instantly intrigued by this book. I enjoyed getting various bits of the history of swearing and seeing different scientific experiments and team building activities. I especially enjoyed the chapter on ladies who swear. There were a few se...

    I picked up this book because I honestly talk like a sailor. I say ?fuck? too much and it?s like a second language to me. I was raised in The South and we are taught ladies should not use foul language. Well I say, ?Fuck that shit!? I loved this book because it had history an...

    So firstly, this was fun and liked it and I admire its enthusiasm. Any book that tries to break down the taboo veil surrounding swearing is good in my book. I do not understand the fixation that some people have about swearing, and I probably never will. But this book does a really goo...

    This book is both screamingly funny in parts, a social science observation in parts, and compares swear words in other languages besides English. I found the chapter on Tourette's the most interesting, even if the author says it shouldn't be in the book. I've always had a really lib...

    I received access to this book via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. If you are looking for exciting new swears to use, this is not the book for you - especially since researchers are apparently hesitant to use the *actual* swear words patients employ when writing studies...

    I hate it when I start a book that I'm looking forward too only to run into intellectually questionable assertions with no explanation of what the author means. She really ought to stick to robot science rather than delve into generalisations about culture, history, neurology, etc. I p...

    If you are going to "read" this book, I highly recommend the audiobook. I typically don't listen to audiobooks, except for the occasional 5+ hour car ride. Well let me just say, audiobook is the way to go with this one! The first half of the book was not only interesting, but was so mu...

    This is the most hilarious book chock-full of f*cking awesome stories about swearing and human nature. Spontaneous swearing with chimps to a scary as h*ll brain injury this was a wild ride that I didn't want to put down. ...

    Surprisingly, I found Swearing is Good for You: The Amazing Science of Bad Language by Emma Byrne to be a bit of a slog. The subject matter is near and dear to my heart and the introduction is funny and promised a good read but this skinny book (201 pages minus the notes and bibliograp...

    Thank you to Netgalley and W. W. Norton & Company for an E-ARC of this novel. I must say I didn't give this book much credit before I read it because 1) new author (always skeptical) and 2) the title seemed a little hard to believe. Emma Byrne does an excellent job on making a cas...

    Swearing is Good for You is a book on the many largely unknown and underappreciated aspects of swearing and it's adjacent fields of study. The chapters are mostly standalones tied together by the overall theme of the book, and I especially liked the chapters swearing and pain (chapter ...

    ?Swearing is Good for You? surpasses simple humor or personal validation. Emma Byrne has included chapters on; neuroscience, pain perception, Tourette?s syndrome, workplace swearing, other primates that swear, gender differences and swearing in other languages. I found her book t...

    I really enjoyed reading this - it's a nice mix funny anecdotes and clear examples of recent research about swearing, from neuroscience, workplace studies, gender studies and so on. I loved the explanations of why we swear (such as avoiding violence, team-bonding) that go beyond just d...

    Excellent book on the power and utility of swearing. I gave swearing up for awhile when I thought "go away" and "nonsense" were as good as F-off and BS, but there is power in the swears. ...

    This is a really funny, and clever, book. I recently had the pleasure to interview the author, Emma Byrne, for National Geographic's weekly column, Book Talk. And as Emma shows in her book, Swearing Is Good for You: The Amazing Science of Bad Language, far from being simply lazy langua...

    Guard your delicate sensibilities and prepare to expand your vocabulary! Full of foul language and subtle British humor, this book takes an in depth look at swearing with studies I had no idea did or should ever exist. A little dry in the middle, but still amazing. ...

    Funny to read, interesting, very well researched and yet easy to follow. Can't wait to read more from Emma. ...

    I was interested in the research and the title was of interest. The book is slow and hard to get through but interesting. Not a book for people not used to non-fiction. ...

  • Karen Ashmore
    May 03, 2018

    Hell yeah! Finally some fucking proof to what my gut has been declaring for years. There is something exuberantly cathartic and empowering about releasing tension, frustration and any emotion with a string of some salty expletives! Thank you for making it official. ...

    As someone who loves the f-word, I was instantly intrigued by this book. I enjoyed getting various bits of the history of swearing and seeing different scientific experiments and team building activities. I especially enjoyed the chapter on ladies who swear. There were a few se...

    I picked up this book because I honestly talk like a sailor. I say ?fuck? too much and it?s like a second language to me. I was raised in The South and we are taught ladies should not use foul language. Well I say, ?Fuck that shit!? I loved this book because it had history an...

    So firstly, this was fun and liked it and I admire its enthusiasm. Any book that tries to break down the taboo veil surrounding swearing is good in my book. I do not understand the fixation that some people have about swearing, and I probably never will. But this book does a really goo...

    This book is both screamingly funny in parts, a social science observation in parts, and compares swear words in other languages besides English. I found the chapter on Tourette's the most interesting, even if the author says it shouldn't be in the book. I've always had a really lib...

    I received access to this book via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. If you are looking for exciting new swears to use, this is not the book for you - especially since researchers are apparently hesitant to use the *actual* swear words patients employ when writing studies...

    I hate it when I start a book that I'm looking forward too only to run into intellectually questionable assertions with no explanation of what the author means. She really ought to stick to robot science rather than delve into generalisations about culture, history, neurology, etc. I p...

    If you are going to "read" this book, I highly recommend the audiobook. I typically don't listen to audiobooks, except for the occasional 5+ hour car ride. Well let me just say, audiobook is the way to go with this one! The first half of the book was not only interesting, but was so mu...

    This is the most hilarious book chock-full of f*cking awesome stories about swearing and human nature. Spontaneous swearing with chimps to a scary as h*ll brain injury this was a wild ride that I didn't want to put down. ...

    Surprisingly, I found Swearing is Good for You: The Amazing Science of Bad Language by Emma Byrne to be a bit of a slog. The subject matter is near and dear to my heart and the introduction is funny and promised a good read but this skinny book (201 pages minus the notes and bibliograp...

    Thank you to Netgalley and W. W. Norton & Company for an E-ARC of this novel. I must say I didn't give this book much credit before I read it because 1) new author (always skeptical) and 2) the title seemed a little hard to believe. Emma Byrne does an excellent job on making a cas...

    Swearing is Good for You is a book on the many largely unknown and underappreciated aspects of swearing and it's adjacent fields of study. The chapters are mostly standalones tied together by the overall theme of the book, and I especially liked the chapters swearing and pain (chapter ...

    ?Swearing is Good for You? surpasses simple humor or personal validation. Emma Byrne has included chapters on; neuroscience, pain perception, Tourette?s syndrome, workplace swearing, other primates that swear, gender differences and swearing in other languages. I found her book t...

    I really enjoyed reading this - it's a nice mix funny anecdotes and clear examples of recent research about swearing, from neuroscience, workplace studies, gender studies and so on. I loved the explanations of why we swear (such as avoiding violence, team-bonding) that go beyond just d...

    Excellent book on the power and utility of swearing. I gave swearing up for awhile when I thought "go away" and "nonsense" were as good as F-off and BS, but there is power in the swears. ...

    This is a really funny, and clever, book. I recently had the pleasure to interview the author, Emma Byrne, for National Geographic's weekly column, Book Talk. And as Emma shows in her book, Swearing Is Good for You: The Amazing Science of Bad Language, far from being simply lazy langua...

    Guard your delicate sensibilities and prepare to expand your vocabulary! Full of foul language and subtle British humor, this book takes an in depth look at swearing with studies I had no idea did or should ever exist. A little dry in the middle, but still amazing. ...

    Funny to read, interesting, very well researched and yet easy to follow. Can't wait to read more from Emma. ...

    I was interested in the research and the title was of interest. The book is slow and hard to get through but interesting. Not a book for people not used to non-fiction. ...

    Bloody hilarious and fucking fascinating. ...

    This is a fascinating book--chock full of surprising research that uses swearing (a convenient inroads into our psyche and emotions) to reveal the inner workings of our brains. I appreciated the demystifying of what swearing is, and how it relates to gender, camraderie, and mental func...

    This brief little book wasn?t just a list of creative ways to swear?which I would have enjoyed?but instead was a fascinating collection of social psychology and neuroscience research about how swearing affects us. Turns out, pretty profoundly (not surprised). And it IS good for y...

    "We will never know for sure where swearing came from, but we do know that we keep reinventing it, just when it seems to be losing its power. We need swearing and, however we might have invented it, I'm fucking glad that we did." What a delightful and informative book! A little bit ...

    This book is definitely a science book and it took me some time to get into the heavy nature of the early chapters but it was worth the time. Fascinating read that looks at swearing in the context of culture, gender, neuroscience, pain management, workplace and other areas of society. ...

    This book was so fucking boring! I thought it was going to be a funny book but it opened with a chapter on neuroscience and swearing. No shit! Then moved on to Tourette?s Syndrome and swearing. You?ve got to be fucking kidding! Then it moved to a few chapters that I thought would b...

  • Carol
    Feb 25, 2018

    Hell yeah! Finally some fucking proof to what my gut has been declaring for years. There is something exuberantly cathartic and empowering about releasing tension, frustration and any emotion with a string of some salty expletives! Thank you for making it official. ...

    As someone who loves the f-word, I was instantly intrigued by this book. I enjoyed getting various bits of the history of swearing and seeing different scientific experiments and team building activities. I especially enjoyed the chapter on ladies who swear. There were a few se...

    I picked up this book because I honestly talk like a sailor. I say ?fuck? too much and it?s like a second language to me. I was raised in The South and we are taught ladies should not use foul language. Well I say, ?Fuck that shit!? I loved this book because it had history an...

    So firstly, this was fun and liked it and I admire its enthusiasm. Any book that tries to break down the taboo veil surrounding swearing is good in my book. I do not understand the fixation that some people have about swearing, and I probably never will. But this book does a really goo...

    This book is both screamingly funny in parts, a social science observation in parts, and compares swear words in other languages besides English. I found the chapter on Tourette's the most interesting, even if the author says it shouldn't be in the book. I've always had a really lib...

    I received access to this book via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. If you are looking for exciting new swears to use, this is not the book for you - especially since researchers are apparently hesitant to use the *actual* swear words patients employ when writing studies...

    I hate it when I start a book that I'm looking forward too only to run into intellectually questionable assertions with no explanation of what the author means. She really ought to stick to robot science rather than delve into generalisations about culture, history, neurology, etc. I p...

    If you are going to "read" this book, I highly recommend the audiobook. I typically don't listen to audiobooks, except for the occasional 5+ hour car ride. Well let me just say, audiobook is the way to go with this one! The first half of the book was not only interesting, but was so mu...

    This is the most hilarious book chock-full of f*cking awesome stories about swearing and human nature. Spontaneous swearing with chimps to a scary as h*ll brain injury this was a wild ride that I didn't want to put down. ...

    Surprisingly, I found Swearing is Good for You: The Amazing Science of Bad Language by Emma Byrne to be a bit of a slog. The subject matter is near and dear to my heart and the introduction is funny and promised a good read but this skinny book (201 pages minus the notes and bibliograp...

    Thank you to Netgalley and W. W. Norton & Company for an E-ARC of this novel. I must say I didn't give this book much credit before I read it because 1) new author (always skeptical) and 2) the title seemed a little hard to believe. Emma Byrne does an excellent job on making a cas...

    Swearing is Good for You is a book on the many largely unknown and underappreciated aspects of swearing and it's adjacent fields of study. The chapters are mostly standalones tied together by the overall theme of the book, and I especially liked the chapters swearing and pain (chapter ...

    ?Swearing is Good for You? surpasses simple humor or personal validation. Emma Byrne has included chapters on; neuroscience, pain perception, Tourette?s syndrome, workplace swearing, other primates that swear, gender differences and swearing in other languages. I found her book t...

    I really enjoyed reading this - it's a nice mix funny anecdotes and clear examples of recent research about swearing, from neuroscience, workplace studies, gender studies and so on. I loved the explanations of why we swear (such as avoiding violence, team-bonding) that go beyond just d...

    Excellent book on the power and utility of swearing. I gave swearing up for awhile when I thought "go away" and "nonsense" were as good as F-off and BS, but there is power in the swears. ...

    This is a really funny, and clever, book. I recently had the pleasure to interview the author, Emma Byrne, for National Geographic's weekly column, Book Talk. And as Emma shows in her book, Swearing Is Good for You: The Amazing Science of Bad Language, far from being simply lazy langua...

    Guard your delicate sensibilities and prepare to expand your vocabulary! Full of foul language and subtle British humor, this book takes an in depth look at swearing with studies I had no idea did or should ever exist. A little dry in the middle, but still amazing. ...

  • MaƂgorzata SkwarczyƄska
    Jul 07, 2018

    Hell yeah! Finally some fucking proof to what my gut has been declaring for years. There is something exuberantly cathartic and empowering about releasing tension, frustration and any emotion with a string of some salty expletives! Thank you for making it official. ...

    As someone who loves the f-word, I was instantly intrigued by this book. I enjoyed getting various bits of the history of swearing and seeing different scientific experiments and team building activities. I especially enjoyed the chapter on ladies who swear. There were a few se...

    I picked up this book because I honestly talk like a sailor. I say ?fuck? too much and it?s like a second language to me. I was raised in The South and we are taught ladies should not use foul language. Well I say, ?Fuck that shit!? I loved this book because it had history an...

    So firstly, this was fun and liked it and I admire its enthusiasm. Any book that tries to break down the taboo veil surrounding swearing is good in my book. I do not understand the fixation that some people have about swearing, and I probably never will. But this book does a really goo...

    This book is both screamingly funny in parts, a social science observation in parts, and compares swear words in other languages besides English. I found the chapter on Tourette's the most interesting, even if the author says it shouldn't be in the book. I've always had a really lib...

    I received access to this book via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. If you are looking for exciting new swears to use, this is not the book for you - especially since researchers are apparently hesitant to use the *actual* swear words patients employ when writing studies...

    I hate it when I start a book that I'm looking forward too only to run into intellectually questionable assertions with no explanation of what the author means. She really ought to stick to robot science rather than delve into generalisations about culture, history, neurology, etc. I p...

    If you are going to "read" this book, I highly recommend the audiobook. I typically don't listen to audiobooks, except for the occasional 5+ hour car ride. Well let me just say, audiobook is the way to go with this one! The first half of the book was not only interesting, but was so mu...

    This is the most hilarious book chock-full of f*cking awesome stories about swearing and human nature. Spontaneous swearing with chimps to a scary as h*ll brain injury this was a wild ride that I didn't want to put down. ...

    Surprisingly, I found Swearing is Good for You: The Amazing Science of Bad Language by Emma Byrne to be a bit of a slog. The subject matter is near and dear to my heart and the introduction is funny and promised a good read but this skinny book (201 pages minus the notes and bibliograp...

    Thank you to Netgalley and W. W. Norton & Company for an E-ARC of this novel. I must say I didn't give this book much credit before I read it because 1) new author (always skeptical) and 2) the title seemed a little hard to believe. Emma Byrne does an excellent job on making a cas...

    Swearing is Good for You is a book on the many largely unknown and underappreciated aspects of swearing and it's adjacent fields of study. The chapters are mostly standalones tied together by the overall theme of the book, and I especially liked the chapters swearing and pain (chapter ...

    ?Swearing is Good for You? surpasses simple humor or personal validation. Emma Byrne has included chapters on; neuroscience, pain perception, Tourette?s syndrome, workplace swearing, other primates that swear, gender differences and swearing in other languages. I found her book t...

    I really enjoyed reading this - it's a nice mix funny anecdotes and clear examples of recent research about swearing, from neuroscience, workplace studies, gender studies and so on. I loved the explanations of why we swear (such as avoiding violence, team-bonding) that go beyond just d...

    Excellent book on the power and utility of swearing. I gave swearing up for awhile when I thought "go away" and "nonsense" were as good as F-off and BS, but there is power in the swears. ...

    This is a really funny, and clever, book. I recently had the pleasure to interview the author, Emma Byrne, for National Geographic's weekly column, Book Talk. And as Emma shows in her book, Swearing Is Good for You: The Amazing Science of Bad Language, far from being simply lazy langua...

    Guard your delicate sensibilities and prepare to expand your vocabulary! Full of foul language and subtle British humor, this book takes an in depth look at swearing with studies I had no idea did or should ever exist. A little dry in the middle, but still amazing. ...

    Funny to read, interesting, very well researched and yet easy to follow. Can't wait to read more from Emma. ...

    I was interested in the research and the title was of interest. The book is slow and hard to get through but interesting. Not a book for people not used to non-fiction. ...

    Bloody hilarious and fucking fascinating. ...

    This is a fascinating book--chock full of surprising research that uses swearing (a convenient inroads into our psyche and emotions) to reveal the inner workings of our brains. I appreciated the demystifying of what swearing is, and how it relates to gender, camraderie, and mental func...

    This brief little book wasn?t just a list of creative ways to swear?which I would have enjoyed?but instead was a fascinating collection of social psychology and neuroscience research about how swearing affects us. Turns out, pretty profoundly (not surprised). And it IS good for y...

    "We will never know for sure where swearing came from, but we do know that we keep reinventing it, just when it seems to be losing its power. We need swearing and, however we might have invented it, I'm fucking glad that we did." What a delightful and informative book! A little bit ...

    This book is definitely a science book and it took me some time to get into the heavy nature of the early chapters but it was worth the time. Fascinating read that looks at swearing in the context of culture, gender, neuroscience, pain management, workplace and other areas of society. ...

    This book was so fucking boring! I thought it was going to be a funny book but it opened with a chapter on neuroscience and swearing. No shit! Then moved on to Tourette?s Syndrome and swearing. You?ve got to be fucking kidding! Then it moved to a few chapters that I thought would b...

    The title is a bit clickbait-y but the content is good. Turns out chimpanzees who have been taught sign language will develop their own curse words, that cursing can act as pain reliever, and that Pulp Fiction was a pain to translate into Spanish. I?m not sure I?m convinced of her ...

    I think as one other reviewer noted, the title is a tease. There is really very little in the book that addresses why it is good for you. As for the science of swearing, most of the content is dedicated to that topic with virtually a whole catalog of studies. Overall pretty tedious rea...

    By?a to naukowa rozprawka o u?yciu epitetow i zale?nosci biochemicznych zachodz?cych w mózgu w czasie ich uzycia lub nie. Spodziewalam sie bardziej podró?y lingwistycznej i historycznej genezy powstania ,znaczenia budowy bluzga I czemu tak czesto siegamy do przecinka . nie op...

  • Heather Caliri
    Aug 27, 2018

    Hell yeah! Finally some fucking proof to what my gut has been declaring for years. There is something exuberantly cathartic and empowering about releasing tension, frustration and any emotion with a string of some salty expletives! Thank you for making it official. ...

    As someone who loves the f-word, I was instantly intrigued by this book. I enjoyed getting various bits of the history of swearing and seeing different scientific experiments and team building activities. I especially enjoyed the chapter on ladies who swear. There were a few se...

    I picked up this book because I honestly talk like a sailor. I say ?fuck? too much and it?s like a second language to me. I was raised in The South and we are taught ladies should not use foul language. Well I say, ?Fuck that shit!? I loved this book because it had history an...

    So firstly, this was fun and liked it and I admire its enthusiasm. Any book that tries to break down the taboo veil surrounding swearing is good in my book. I do not understand the fixation that some people have about swearing, and I probably never will. But this book does a really goo...

    This book is both screamingly funny in parts, a social science observation in parts, and compares swear words in other languages besides English. I found the chapter on Tourette's the most interesting, even if the author says it shouldn't be in the book. I've always had a really lib...

    I received access to this book via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. If you are looking for exciting new swears to use, this is not the book for you - especially since researchers are apparently hesitant to use the *actual* swear words patients employ when writing studies...

    I hate it when I start a book that I'm looking forward too only to run into intellectually questionable assertions with no explanation of what the author means. She really ought to stick to robot science rather than delve into generalisations about culture, history, neurology, etc. I p...

    If you are going to "read" this book, I highly recommend the audiobook. I typically don't listen to audiobooks, except for the occasional 5+ hour car ride. Well let me just say, audiobook is the way to go with this one! The first half of the book was not only interesting, but was so mu...

    This is the most hilarious book chock-full of f*cking awesome stories about swearing and human nature. Spontaneous swearing with chimps to a scary as h*ll brain injury this was a wild ride that I didn't want to put down. ...

    Surprisingly, I found Swearing is Good for You: The Amazing Science of Bad Language by Emma Byrne to be a bit of a slog. The subject matter is near and dear to my heart and the introduction is funny and promised a good read but this skinny book (201 pages minus the notes and bibliograp...

    Thank you to Netgalley and W. W. Norton & Company for an E-ARC of this novel. I must say I didn't give this book much credit before I read it because 1) new author (always skeptical) and 2) the title seemed a little hard to believe. Emma Byrne does an excellent job on making a cas...

    Swearing is Good for You is a book on the many largely unknown and underappreciated aspects of swearing and it's adjacent fields of study. The chapters are mostly standalones tied together by the overall theme of the book, and I especially liked the chapters swearing and pain (chapter ...

    ?Swearing is Good for You? surpasses simple humor or personal validation. Emma Byrne has included chapters on; neuroscience, pain perception, Tourette?s syndrome, workplace swearing, other primates that swear, gender differences and swearing in other languages. I found her book t...

    I really enjoyed reading this - it's a nice mix funny anecdotes and clear examples of recent research about swearing, from neuroscience, workplace studies, gender studies and so on. I loved the explanations of why we swear (such as avoiding violence, team-bonding) that go beyond just d...

    Excellent book on the power and utility of swearing. I gave swearing up for awhile when I thought "go away" and "nonsense" were as good as F-off and BS, but there is power in the swears. ...

    This is a really funny, and clever, book. I recently had the pleasure to interview the author, Emma Byrne, for National Geographic's weekly column, Book Talk. And as Emma shows in her book, Swearing Is Good for You: The Amazing Science of Bad Language, far from being simply lazy langua...

    Guard your delicate sensibilities and prepare to expand your vocabulary! Full of foul language and subtle British humor, this book takes an in depth look at swearing with studies I had no idea did or should ever exist. A little dry in the middle, but still amazing. ...

    Funny to read, interesting, very well researched and yet easy to follow. Can't wait to read more from Emma. ...

    I was interested in the research and the title was of interest. The book is slow and hard to get through but interesting. Not a book for people not used to non-fiction. ...

    Bloody hilarious and fucking fascinating. ...

    This is a fascinating book--chock full of surprising research that uses swearing (a convenient inroads into our psyche and emotions) to reveal the inner workings of our brains. I appreciated the demystifying of what swearing is, and how it relates to gender, camraderie, and mental func...

  • Candice
    Nov 09, 2017

    Hell yeah! Finally some fucking proof to what my gut has been declaring for years. There is something exuberantly cathartic and empowering about releasing tension, frustration and any emotion with a string of some salty expletives! Thank you for making it official. ...

    As someone who loves the f-word, I was instantly intrigued by this book. I enjoyed getting various bits of the history of swearing and seeing different scientific experiments and team building activities. I especially enjoyed the chapter on ladies who swear. There were a few se...

    I picked up this book because I honestly talk like a sailor. I say ?fuck? too much and it?s like a second language to me. I was raised in The South and we are taught ladies should not use foul language. Well I say, ?Fuck that shit!? I loved this book because it had history an...

    So firstly, this was fun and liked it and I admire its enthusiasm. Any book that tries to break down the taboo veil surrounding swearing is good in my book. I do not understand the fixation that some people have about swearing, and I probably never will. But this book does a really goo...

    This book is both screamingly funny in parts, a social science observation in parts, and compares swear words in other languages besides English. I found the chapter on Tourette's the most interesting, even if the author says it shouldn't be in the book. I've always had a really lib...

    I received access to this book via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. If you are looking for exciting new swears to use, this is not the book for you - especially since researchers are apparently hesitant to use the *actual* swear words patients employ when writing studies...

    I hate it when I start a book that I'm looking forward too only to run into intellectually questionable assertions with no explanation of what the author means. She really ought to stick to robot science rather than delve into generalisations about culture, history, neurology, etc. I p...

    If you are going to "read" this book, I highly recommend the audiobook. I typically don't listen to audiobooks, except for the occasional 5+ hour car ride. Well let me just say, audiobook is the way to go with this one! The first half of the book was not only interesting, but was so mu...

    This is the most hilarious book chock-full of f*cking awesome stories about swearing and human nature. Spontaneous swearing with chimps to a scary as h*ll brain injury this was a wild ride that I didn't want to put down. ...

    Surprisingly, I found Swearing is Good for You: The Amazing Science of Bad Language by Emma Byrne to be a bit of a slog. The subject matter is near and dear to my heart and the introduction is funny and promised a good read but this skinny book (201 pages minus the notes and bibliograp...

    Thank you to Netgalley and W. W. Norton & Company for an E-ARC of this novel. I must say I didn't give this book much credit before I read it because 1) new author (always skeptical) and 2) the title seemed a little hard to believe. Emma Byrne does an excellent job on making a cas...

    Swearing is Good for You is a book on the many largely unknown and underappreciated aspects of swearing and it's adjacent fields of study. The chapters are mostly standalones tied together by the overall theme of the book, and I especially liked the chapters swearing and pain (chapter ...

    ?Swearing is Good for You? surpasses simple humor or personal validation. Emma Byrne has included chapters on; neuroscience, pain perception, Tourette?s syndrome, workplace swearing, other primates that swear, gender differences and swearing in other languages. I found her book t...

  • Matt
    Feb 27, 2018

    Hell yeah! Finally some fucking proof to what my gut has been declaring for years. There is something exuberantly cathartic and empowering about releasing tension, frustration and any emotion with a string of some salty expletives! Thank you for making it official. ...

    As someone who loves the f-word, I was instantly intrigued by this book. I enjoyed getting various bits of the history of swearing and seeing different scientific experiments and team building activities. I especially enjoyed the chapter on ladies who swear. There were a few se...

    I picked up this book because I honestly talk like a sailor. I say ?fuck? too much and it?s like a second language to me. I was raised in The South and we are taught ladies should not use foul language. Well I say, ?Fuck that shit!? I loved this book because it had history an...

    So firstly, this was fun and liked it and I admire its enthusiasm. Any book that tries to break down the taboo veil surrounding swearing is good in my book. I do not understand the fixation that some people have about swearing, and I probably never will. But this book does a really goo...

    This book is both screamingly funny in parts, a social science observation in parts, and compares swear words in other languages besides English. I found the chapter on Tourette's the most interesting, even if the author says it shouldn't be in the book. I've always had a really lib...

    I received access to this book via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. If you are looking for exciting new swears to use, this is not the book for you - especially since researchers are apparently hesitant to use the *actual* swear words patients employ when writing studies...

    I hate it when I start a book that I'm looking forward too only to run into intellectually questionable assertions with no explanation of what the author means. She really ought to stick to robot science rather than delve into generalisations about culture, history, neurology, etc. I p...

    If you are going to "read" this book, I highly recommend the audiobook. I typically don't listen to audiobooks, except for the occasional 5+ hour car ride. Well let me just say, audiobook is the way to go with this one! The first half of the book was not only interesting, but was so mu...

    This is the most hilarious book chock-full of f*cking awesome stories about swearing and human nature. Spontaneous swearing with chimps to a scary as h*ll brain injury this was a wild ride that I didn't want to put down. ...

    Surprisingly, I found Swearing is Good for You: The Amazing Science of Bad Language by Emma Byrne to be a bit of a slog. The subject matter is near and dear to my heart and the introduction is funny and promised a good read but this skinny book (201 pages minus the notes and bibliograp...

    Thank you to Netgalley and W. W. Norton & Company for an E-ARC of this novel. I must say I didn't give this book much credit before I read it because 1) new author (always skeptical) and 2) the title seemed a little hard to believe. Emma Byrne does an excellent job on making a cas...

    Swearing is Good for You is a book on the many largely unknown and underappreciated aspects of swearing and it's adjacent fields of study. The chapters are mostly standalones tied together by the overall theme of the book, and I especially liked the chapters swearing and pain (chapter ...

    ?Swearing is Good for You? surpasses simple humor or personal validation. Emma Byrne has included chapters on; neuroscience, pain perception, Tourette?s syndrome, workplace swearing, other primates that swear, gender differences and swearing in other languages. I found her book t...

    I really enjoyed reading this - it's a nice mix funny anecdotes and clear examples of recent research about swearing, from neuroscience, workplace studies, gender studies and so on. I loved the explanations of why we swear (such as avoiding violence, team-bonding) that go beyond just d...

    Excellent book on the power and utility of swearing. I gave swearing up for awhile when I thought "go away" and "nonsense" were as good as F-off and BS, but there is power in the swears. ...

    This is a really funny, and clever, book. I recently had the pleasure to interview the author, Emma Byrne, for National Geographic's weekly column, Book Talk. And as Emma shows in her book, Swearing Is Good for You: The Amazing Science of Bad Language, far from being simply lazy langua...

    Guard your delicate sensibilities and prepare to expand your vocabulary! Full of foul language and subtle British humor, this book takes an in depth look at swearing with studies I had no idea did or should ever exist. A little dry in the middle, but still amazing. ...

    Funny to read, interesting, very well researched and yet easy to follow. Can't wait to read more from Emma. ...

    I was interested in the research and the title was of interest. The book is slow and hard to get through but interesting. Not a book for people not used to non-fiction. ...

    Bloody hilarious and fucking fascinating. ...

    This is a fascinating book--chock full of surprising research that uses swearing (a convenient inroads into our psyche and emotions) to reveal the inner workings of our brains. I appreciated the demystifying of what swearing is, and how it relates to gender, camraderie, and mental func...

    This brief little book wasn?t just a list of creative ways to swear?which I would have enjoyed?but instead was a fascinating collection of social psychology and neuroscience research about how swearing affects us. Turns out, pretty profoundly (not surprised). And it IS good for y...

    "We will never know for sure where swearing came from, but we do know that we keep reinventing it, just when it seems to be losing its power. We need swearing and, however we might have invented it, I'm fucking glad that we did." What a delightful and informative book! A little bit ...

    This book is definitely a science book and it took me some time to get into the heavy nature of the early chapters but it was worth the time. Fascinating read that looks at swearing in the context of culture, gender, neuroscience, pain management, workplace and other areas of society. ...

    This book was so fucking boring! I thought it was going to be a funny book but it opened with a chapter on neuroscience and swearing. No shit! Then moved on to Tourette?s Syndrome and swearing. You?ve got to be fucking kidding! Then it moved to a few chapters that I thought would b...

    The title is a bit clickbait-y but the content is good. Turns out chimpanzees who have been taught sign language will develop their own curse words, that cursing can act as pain reliever, and that Pulp Fiction was a pain to translate into Spanish. I?m not sure I?m convinced of her ...

  • Michele Long
    Feb 07, 2018

    Hell yeah! Finally some fucking proof to what my gut has been declaring for years. There is something exuberantly cathartic and empowering about releasing tension, frustration and any emotion with a string of some salty expletives! Thank you for making it official. ...

    As someone who loves the f-word, I was instantly intrigued by this book. I enjoyed getting various bits of the history of swearing and seeing different scientific experiments and team building activities. I especially enjoyed the chapter on ladies who swear. There were a few se...

    I picked up this book because I honestly talk like a sailor. I say ?fuck? too much and it?s like a second language to me. I was raised in The South and we are taught ladies should not use foul language. Well I say, ?Fuck that shit!? I loved this book because it had history an...

    So firstly, this was fun and liked it and I admire its enthusiasm. Any book that tries to break down the taboo veil surrounding swearing is good in my book. I do not understand the fixation that some people have about swearing, and I probably never will. But this book does a really goo...

    This book is both screamingly funny in parts, a social science observation in parts, and compares swear words in other languages besides English. I found the chapter on Tourette's the most interesting, even if the author says it shouldn't be in the book. I've always had a really lib...

    I received access to this book via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. If you are looking for exciting new swears to use, this is not the book for you - especially since researchers are apparently hesitant to use the *actual* swear words patients employ when writing studies...

    I hate it when I start a book that I'm looking forward too only to run into intellectually questionable assertions with no explanation of what the author means. She really ought to stick to robot science rather than delve into generalisations about culture, history, neurology, etc. I p...

    If you are going to "read" this book, I highly recommend the audiobook. I typically don't listen to audiobooks, except for the occasional 5+ hour car ride. Well let me just say, audiobook is the way to go with this one! The first half of the book was not only interesting, but was so mu...

  • LC
    Mar 04, 2018

    Hell yeah! Finally some fucking proof to what my gut has been declaring for years. There is something exuberantly cathartic and empowering about releasing tension, frustration and any emotion with a string of some salty expletives! Thank you for making it official. ...

    As someone who loves the f-word, I was instantly intrigued by this book. I enjoyed getting various bits of the history of swearing and seeing different scientific experiments and team building activities. I especially enjoyed the chapter on ladies who swear. There were a few se...

    I picked up this book because I honestly talk like a sailor. I say ?fuck? too much and it?s like a second language to me. I was raised in The South and we are taught ladies should not use foul language. Well I say, ?Fuck that shit!? I loved this book because it had history an...

    So firstly, this was fun and liked it and I admire its enthusiasm. Any book that tries to break down the taboo veil surrounding swearing is good in my book. I do not understand the fixation that some people have about swearing, and I probably never will. But this book does a really goo...

    This book is both screamingly funny in parts, a social science observation in parts, and compares swear words in other languages besides English. I found the chapter on Tourette's the most interesting, even if the author says it shouldn't be in the book. I've always had a really lib...

    I received access to this book via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. If you are looking for exciting new swears to use, this is not the book for you - especially since researchers are apparently hesitant to use the *actual* swear words patients employ when writing studies...

    I hate it when I start a book that I'm looking forward too only to run into intellectually questionable assertions with no explanation of what the author means. She really ought to stick to robot science rather than delve into generalisations about culture, history, neurology, etc. I p...

    If you are going to "read" this book, I highly recommend the audiobook. I typically don't listen to audiobooks, except for the occasional 5+ hour car ride. Well let me just say, audiobook is the way to go with this one! The first half of the book was not only interesting, but was so mu...

    This is the most hilarious book chock-full of f*cking awesome stories about swearing and human nature. Spontaneous swearing with chimps to a scary as h*ll brain injury this was a wild ride that I didn't want to put down. ...

    Surprisingly, I found Swearing is Good for You: The Amazing Science of Bad Language by Emma Byrne to be a bit of a slog. The subject matter is near and dear to my heart and the introduction is funny and promised a good read but this skinny book (201 pages minus the notes and bibliograp...

    Thank you to Netgalley and W. W. Norton & Company for an E-ARC of this novel. I must say I didn't give this book much credit before I read it because 1) new author (always skeptical) and 2) the title seemed a little hard to believe. Emma Byrne does an excellent job on making a cas...

    Swearing is Good for You is a book on the many largely unknown and underappreciated aspects of swearing and it's adjacent fields of study. The chapters are mostly standalones tied together by the overall theme of the book, and I especially liked the chapters swearing and pain (chapter ...

    ?Swearing is Good for You? surpasses simple humor or personal validation. Emma Byrne has included chapters on; neuroscience, pain perception, Tourette?s syndrome, workplace swearing, other primates that swear, gender differences and swearing in other languages. I found her book t...

    I really enjoyed reading this - it's a nice mix funny anecdotes and clear examples of recent research about swearing, from neuroscience, workplace studies, gender studies and so on. I loved the explanations of why we swear (such as avoiding violence, team-bonding) that go beyond just d...

    Excellent book on the power and utility of swearing. I gave swearing up for awhile when I thought "go away" and "nonsense" were as good as F-off and BS, but there is power in the swears. ...

    This is a really funny, and clever, book. I recently had the pleasure to interview the author, Emma Byrne, for National Geographic's weekly column, Book Talk. And as Emma shows in her book, Swearing Is Good for You: The Amazing Science of Bad Language, far from being simply lazy langua...

    Guard your delicate sensibilities and prepare to expand your vocabulary! Full of foul language and subtle British humor, this book takes an in depth look at swearing with studies I had no idea did or should ever exist. A little dry in the middle, but still amazing. ...

    Funny to read, interesting, very well researched and yet easy to follow. Can't wait to read more from Emma. ...

    I was interested in the research and the title was of interest. The book is slow and hard to get through but interesting. Not a book for people not used to non-fiction. ...

    Bloody hilarious and fucking fascinating. ...

  • Becky
    May 26, 2018

    Hell yeah! Finally some fucking proof to what my gut has been declaring for years. There is something exuberantly cathartic and empowering about releasing tension, frustration and any emotion with a string of some salty expletives! Thank you for making it official. ...

    As someone who loves the f-word, I was instantly intrigued by this book. I enjoyed getting various bits of the history of swearing and seeing different scientific experiments and team building activities. I especially enjoyed the chapter on ladies who swear. There were a few se...

    I picked up this book because I honestly talk like a sailor. I say ?fuck? too much and it?s like a second language to me. I was raised in The South and we are taught ladies should not use foul language. Well I say, ?Fuck that shit!? I loved this book because it had history an...

    So firstly, this was fun and liked it and I admire its enthusiasm. Any book that tries to break down the taboo veil surrounding swearing is good in my book. I do not understand the fixation that some people have about swearing, and I probably never will. But this book does a really goo...

    This book is both screamingly funny in parts, a social science observation in parts, and compares swear words in other languages besides English. I found the chapter on Tourette's the most interesting, even if the author says it shouldn't be in the book. I've always had a really lib...

    I received access to this book via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. If you are looking for exciting new swears to use, this is not the book for you - especially since researchers are apparently hesitant to use the *actual* swear words patients employ when writing studies...

    I hate it when I start a book that I'm looking forward too only to run into intellectually questionable assertions with no explanation of what the author means. She really ought to stick to robot science rather than delve into generalisations about culture, history, neurology, etc. I p...

    If you are going to "read" this book, I highly recommend the audiobook. I typically don't listen to audiobooks, except for the occasional 5+ hour car ride. Well let me just say, audiobook is the way to go with this one! The first half of the book was not only interesting, but was so mu...

    This is the most hilarious book chock-full of f*cking awesome stories about swearing and human nature. Spontaneous swearing with chimps to a scary as h*ll brain injury this was a wild ride that I didn't want to put down. ...

  • Paul
    Apr 06, 2018

    Hell yeah! Finally some fucking proof to what my gut has been declaring for years. There is something exuberantly cathartic and empowering about releasing tension, frustration and any emotion with a string of some salty expletives! Thank you for making it official. ...

    As someone who loves the f-word, I was instantly intrigued by this book. I enjoyed getting various bits of the history of swearing and seeing different scientific experiments and team building activities. I especially enjoyed the chapter on ladies who swear. There were a few se...

    I picked up this book because I honestly talk like a sailor. I say ?fuck? too much and it?s like a second language to me. I was raised in The South and we are taught ladies should not use foul language. Well I say, ?Fuck that shit!? I loved this book because it had history an...

    So firstly, this was fun and liked it and I admire its enthusiasm. Any book that tries to break down the taboo veil surrounding swearing is good in my book. I do not understand the fixation that some people have about swearing, and I probably never will. But this book does a really goo...

    This book is both screamingly funny in parts, a social science observation in parts, and compares swear words in other languages besides English. I found the chapter on Tourette's the most interesting, even if the author says it shouldn't be in the book. I've always had a really lib...

  • S C Worrall
    Jan 29, 2018

    Hell yeah! Finally some fucking proof to what my gut has been declaring for years. There is something exuberantly cathartic and empowering about releasing tension, frustration and any emotion with a string of some salty expletives! Thank you for making it official. ...

    As someone who loves the f-word, I was instantly intrigued by this book. I enjoyed getting various bits of the history of swearing and seeing different scientific experiments and team building activities. I especially enjoyed the chapter on ladies who swear. There were a few se...

    I picked up this book because I honestly talk like a sailor. I say ?fuck? too much and it?s like a second language to me. I was raised in The South and we are taught ladies should not use foul language. Well I say, ?Fuck that shit!? I loved this book because it had history an...

    So firstly, this was fun and liked it and I admire its enthusiasm. Any book that tries to break down the taboo veil surrounding swearing is good in my book. I do not understand the fixation that some people have about swearing, and I probably never will. But this book does a really goo...

    This book is both screamingly funny in parts, a social science observation in parts, and compares swear words in other languages besides English. I found the chapter on Tourette's the most interesting, even if the author says it shouldn't be in the book. I've always had a really lib...

    I received access to this book via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. If you are looking for exciting new swears to use, this is not the book for you - especially since researchers are apparently hesitant to use the *actual* swear words patients employ when writing studies...

    I hate it when I start a book that I'm looking forward too only to run into intellectually questionable assertions with no explanation of what the author means. She really ought to stick to robot science rather than delve into generalisations about culture, history, neurology, etc. I p...

    If you are going to "read" this book, I highly recommend the audiobook. I typically don't listen to audiobooks, except for the occasional 5+ hour car ride. Well let me just say, audiobook is the way to go with this one! The first half of the book was not only interesting, but was so mu...

    This is the most hilarious book chock-full of f*cking awesome stories about swearing and human nature. Spontaneous swearing with chimps to a scary as h*ll brain injury this was a wild ride that I didn't want to put down. ...

    Surprisingly, I found Swearing is Good for You: The Amazing Science of Bad Language by Emma Byrne to be a bit of a slog. The subject matter is near and dear to my heart and the introduction is funny and promised a good read but this skinny book (201 pages minus the notes and bibliograp...

    Thank you to Netgalley and W. W. Norton & Company for an E-ARC of this novel. I must say I didn't give this book much credit before I read it because 1) new author (always skeptical) and 2) the title seemed a little hard to believe. Emma Byrne does an excellent job on making a cas...

    Swearing is Good for You is a book on the many largely unknown and underappreciated aspects of swearing and it's adjacent fields of study. The chapters are mostly standalones tied together by the overall theme of the book, and I especially liked the chapters swearing and pain (chapter ...

    ?Swearing is Good for You? surpasses simple humor or personal validation. Emma Byrne has included chapters on; neuroscience, pain perception, Tourette?s syndrome, workplace swearing, other primates that swear, gender differences and swearing in other languages. I found her book t...

    I really enjoyed reading this - it's a nice mix funny anecdotes and clear examples of recent research about swearing, from neuroscience, workplace studies, gender studies and so on. I loved the explanations of why we swear (such as avoiding violence, team-bonding) that go beyond just d...

    Excellent book on the power and utility of swearing. I gave swearing up for awhile when I thought "go away" and "nonsense" were as good as F-off and BS, but there is power in the swears. ...

    This is a really funny, and clever, book. I recently had the pleasure to interview the author, Emma Byrne, for National Geographic's weekly column, Book Talk. And as Emma shows in her book, Swearing Is Good for You: The Amazing Science of Bad Language, far from being simply lazy langua...

  • Alex Meeks
    Sep 17, 2018

    Hell yeah! Finally some fucking proof to what my gut has been declaring for years. There is something exuberantly cathartic and empowering about releasing tension, frustration and any emotion with a string of some salty expletives! Thank you for making it official. ...

    As someone who loves the f-word, I was instantly intrigued by this book. I enjoyed getting various bits of the history of swearing and seeing different scientific experiments and team building activities. I especially enjoyed the chapter on ladies who swear. There were a few se...

    I picked up this book because I honestly talk like a sailor. I say ?fuck? too much and it?s like a second language to me. I was raised in The South and we are taught ladies should not use foul language. Well I say, ?Fuck that shit!? I loved this book because it had history an...

    So firstly, this was fun and liked it and I admire its enthusiasm. Any book that tries to break down the taboo veil surrounding swearing is good in my book. I do not understand the fixation that some people have about swearing, and I probably never will. But this book does a really goo...

    This book is both screamingly funny in parts, a social science observation in parts, and compares swear words in other languages besides English. I found the chapter on Tourette's the most interesting, even if the author says it shouldn't be in the book. I've always had a really lib...

    I received access to this book via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. If you are looking for exciting new swears to use, this is not the book for you - especially since researchers are apparently hesitant to use the *actual* swear words patients employ when writing studies...

    I hate it when I start a book that I'm looking forward too only to run into intellectually questionable assertions with no explanation of what the author means. She really ought to stick to robot science rather than delve into generalisations about culture, history, neurology, etc. I p...

    If you are going to "read" this book, I highly recommend the audiobook. I typically don't listen to audiobooks, except for the occasional 5+ hour car ride. Well let me just say, audiobook is the way to go with this one! The first half of the book was not only interesting, but was so mu...

    This is the most hilarious book chock-full of f*cking awesome stories about swearing and human nature. Spontaneous swearing with chimps to a scary as h*ll brain injury this was a wild ride that I didn't want to put down. ...

    Surprisingly, I found Swearing is Good for You: The Amazing Science of Bad Language by Emma Byrne to be a bit of a slog. The subject matter is near and dear to my heart and the introduction is funny and promised a good read but this skinny book (201 pages minus the notes and bibliograp...

    Thank you to Netgalley and W. W. Norton & Company for an E-ARC of this novel. I must say I didn't give this book much credit before I read it because 1) new author (always skeptical) and 2) the title seemed a little hard to believe. Emma Byrne does an excellent job on making a cas...

    Swearing is Good for You is a book on the many largely unknown and underappreciated aspects of swearing and it's adjacent fields of study. The chapters are mostly standalones tied together by the overall theme of the book, and I especially liked the chapters swearing and pain (chapter ...

    ?Swearing is Good for You? surpasses simple humor or personal validation. Emma Byrne has included chapters on; neuroscience, pain perception, Tourette?s syndrome, workplace swearing, other primates that swear, gender differences and swearing in other languages. I found her book t...

    I really enjoyed reading this - it's a nice mix funny anecdotes and clear examples of recent research about swearing, from neuroscience, workplace studies, gender studies and so on. I loved the explanations of why we swear (such as avoiding violence, team-bonding) that go beyond just d...

    Excellent book on the power and utility of swearing. I gave swearing up for awhile when I thought "go away" and "nonsense" were as good as F-off and BS, but there is power in the swears. ...

    This is a really funny, and clever, book. I recently had the pleasure to interview the author, Emma Byrne, for National Geographic's weekly column, Book Talk. And as Emma shows in her book, Swearing Is Good for You: The Amazing Science of Bad Language, far from being simply lazy langua...

    Guard your delicate sensibilities and prepare to expand your vocabulary! Full of foul language and subtle British humor, this book takes an in depth look at swearing with studies I had no idea did or should ever exist. A little dry in the middle, but still amazing. ...

    Funny to read, interesting, very well researched and yet easy to follow. Can't wait to read more from Emma. ...

    I was interested in the research and the title was of interest. The book is slow and hard to get through but interesting. Not a book for people not used to non-fiction. ...

    Bloody hilarious and fucking fascinating. ...

    This is a fascinating book--chock full of surprising research that uses swearing (a convenient inroads into our psyche and emotions) to reveal the inner workings of our brains. I appreciated the demystifying of what swearing is, and how it relates to gender, camraderie, and mental func...

    This brief little book wasn?t just a list of creative ways to swear?which I would have enjoyed?but instead was a fascinating collection of social psychology and neuroscience research about how swearing affects us. Turns out, pretty profoundly (not surprised). And it IS good for y...

    "We will never know for sure where swearing came from, but we do know that we keep reinventing it, just when it seems to be losing its power. We need swearing and, however we might have invented it, I'm fucking glad that we did." What a delightful and informative book! A little bit ...

  • Dcorney
    Nov 14, 2017

    Hell yeah! Finally some fucking proof to what my gut has been declaring for years. There is something exuberantly cathartic and empowering about releasing tension, frustration and any emotion with a string of some salty expletives! Thank you for making it official. ...

    As someone who loves the f-word, I was instantly intrigued by this book. I enjoyed getting various bits of the history of swearing and seeing different scientific experiments and team building activities. I especially enjoyed the chapter on ladies who swear. There were a few se...

    I picked up this book because I honestly talk like a sailor. I say ?fuck? too much and it?s like a second language to me. I was raised in The South and we are taught ladies should not use foul language. Well I say, ?Fuck that shit!? I loved this book because it had history an...

    So firstly, this was fun and liked it and I admire its enthusiasm. Any book that tries to break down the taboo veil surrounding swearing is good in my book. I do not understand the fixation that some people have about swearing, and I probably never will. But this book does a really goo...

    This book is both screamingly funny in parts, a social science observation in parts, and compares swear words in other languages besides English. I found the chapter on Tourette's the most interesting, even if the author says it shouldn't be in the book. I've always had a really lib...

    I received access to this book via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. If you are looking for exciting new swears to use, this is not the book for you - especially since researchers are apparently hesitant to use the *actual* swear words patients employ when writing studies...

    I hate it when I start a book that I'm looking forward too only to run into intellectually questionable assertions with no explanation of what the author means. She really ought to stick to robot science rather than delve into generalisations about culture, history, neurology, etc. I p...

    If you are going to "read" this book, I highly recommend the audiobook. I typically don't listen to audiobooks, except for the occasional 5+ hour car ride. Well let me just say, audiobook is the way to go with this one! The first half of the book was not only interesting, but was so mu...

    This is the most hilarious book chock-full of f*cking awesome stories about swearing and human nature. Spontaneous swearing with chimps to a scary as h*ll brain injury this was a wild ride that I didn't want to put down. ...

    Surprisingly, I found Swearing is Good for You: The Amazing Science of Bad Language by Emma Byrne to be a bit of a slog. The subject matter is near and dear to my heart and the introduction is funny and promised a good read but this skinny book (201 pages minus the notes and bibliograp...

    Thank you to Netgalley and W. W. Norton & Company for an E-ARC of this novel. I must say I didn't give this book much credit before I read it because 1) new author (always skeptical) and 2) the title seemed a little hard to believe. Emma Byrne does an excellent job on making a cas...

    Swearing is Good for You is a book on the many largely unknown and underappreciated aspects of swearing and it's adjacent fields of study. The chapters are mostly standalones tied together by the overall theme of the book, and I especially liked the chapters swearing and pain (chapter ...

    ?Swearing is Good for You? surpasses simple humor or personal validation. Emma Byrne has included chapters on; neuroscience, pain perception, Tourette?s syndrome, workplace swearing, other primates that swear, gender differences and swearing in other languages. I found her book t...

    I really enjoyed reading this - it's a nice mix funny anecdotes and clear examples of recent research about swearing, from neuroscience, workplace studies, gender studies and so on. I loved the explanations of why we swear (such as avoiding violence, team-bonding) that go beyond just d...

  • Hernan
    Jan 07, 2018

    Hell yeah! Finally some fucking proof to what my gut has been declaring for years. There is something exuberantly cathartic and empowering about releasing tension, frustration and any emotion with a string of some salty expletives! Thank you for making it official. ...

    As someone who loves the f-word, I was instantly intrigued by this book. I enjoyed getting various bits of the history of swearing and seeing different scientific experiments and team building activities. I especially enjoyed the chapter on ladies who swear. There were a few se...

    I picked up this book because I honestly talk like a sailor. I say ?fuck? too much and it?s like a second language to me. I was raised in The South and we are taught ladies should not use foul language. Well I say, ?Fuck that shit!? I loved this book because it had history an...

    So firstly, this was fun and liked it and I admire its enthusiasm. Any book that tries to break down the taboo veil surrounding swearing is good in my book. I do not understand the fixation that some people have about swearing, and I probably never will. But this book does a really goo...

    This book is both screamingly funny in parts, a social science observation in parts, and compares swear words in other languages besides English. I found the chapter on Tourette's the most interesting, even if the author says it shouldn't be in the book. I've always had a really lib...

    I received access to this book via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. If you are looking for exciting new swears to use, this is not the book for you - especially since researchers are apparently hesitant to use the *actual* swear words patients employ when writing studies...

    I hate it when I start a book that I'm looking forward too only to run into intellectually questionable assertions with no explanation of what the author means. She really ought to stick to robot science rather than delve into generalisations about culture, history, neurology, etc. I p...

    If you are going to "read" this book, I highly recommend the audiobook. I typically don't listen to audiobooks, except for the occasional 5+ hour car ride. Well let me just say, audiobook is the way to go with this one! The first half of the book was not only interesting, but was so mu...

    This is the most hilarious book chock-full of f*cking awesome stories about swearing and human nature. Spontaneous swearing with chimps to a scary as h*ll brain injury this was a wild ride that I didn't want to put down. ...

    Surprisingly, I found Swearing is Good for You: The Amazing Science of Bad Language by Emma Byrne to be a bit of a slog. The subject matter is near and dear to my heart and the introduction is funny and promised a good read but this skinny book (201 pages minus the notes and bibliograp...

    Thank you to Netgalley and W. W. Norton & Company for an E-ARC of this novel. I must say I didn't give this book much credit before I read it because 1) new author (always skeptical) and 2) the title seemed a little hard to believe. Emma Byrne does an excellent job on making a cas...

    Swearing is Good for You is a book on the many largely unknown and underappreciated aspects of swearing and it's adjacent fields of study. The chapters are mostly standalones tied together by the overall theme of the book, and I especially liked the chapters swearing and pain (chapter ...

    ?Swearing is Good for You? surpasses simple humor or personal validation. Emma Byrne has included chapters on; neuroscience, pain perception, Tourette?s syndrome, workplace swearing, other primates that swear, gender differences and swearing in other languages. I found her book t...

    I really enjoyed reading this - it's a nice mix funny anecdotes and clear examples of recent research about swearing, from neuroscience, workplace studies, gender studies and so on. I loved the explanations of why we swear (such as avoiding violence, team-bonding) that go beyond just d...

    Excellent book on the power and utility of swearing. I gave swearing up for awhile when I thought "go away" and "nonsense" were as good as F-off and BS, but there is power in the swears. ...

    This is a really funny, and clever, book. I recently had the pleasure to interview the author, Emma Byrne, for National Geographic's weekly column, Book Talk. And as Emma shows in her book, Swearing Is Good for You: The Amazing Science of Bad Language, far from being simply lazy langua...

    Guard your delicate sensibilities and prepare to expand your vocabulary! Full of foul language and subtle British humor, this book takes an in depth look at swearing with studies I had no idea did or should ever exist. A little dry in the middle, but still amazing. ...

    Funny to read, interesting, very well researched and yet easy to follow. Can't wait to read more from Emma. ...

  • Kevin
    Dec 29, 2017

    Hell yeah! Finally some fucking proof to what my gut has been declaring for years. There is something exuberantly cathartic and empowering about releasing tension, frustration and any emotion with a string of some salty expletives! Thank you for making it official. ...

    As someone who loves the f-word, I was instantly intrigued by this book. I enjoyed getting various bits of the history of swearing and seeing different scientific experiments and team building activities. I especially enjoyed the chapter on ladies who swear. There were a few se...

    I picked up this book because I honestly talk like a sailor. I say ?fuck? too much and it?s like a second language to me. I was raised in The South and we are taught ladies should not use foul language. Well I say, ?Fuck that shit!? I loved this book because it had history an...

    So firstly, this was fun and liked it and I admire its enthusiasm. Any book that tries to break down the taboo veil surrounding swearing is good in my book. I do not understand the fixation that some people have about swearing, and I probably never will. But this book does a really goo...

    This book is both screamingly funny in parts, a social science observation in parts, and compares swear words in other languages besides English. I found the chapter on Tourette's the most interesting, even if the author says it shouldn't be in the book. I've always had a really lib...

    I received access to this book via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. If you are looking for exciting new swears to use, this is not the book for you - especially since researchers are apparently hesitant to use the *actual* swear words patients employ when writing studies...

    I hate it when I start a book that I'm looking forward too only to run into intellectually questionable assertions with no explanation of what the author means. She really ought to stick to robot science rather than delve into generalisations about culture, history, neurology, etc. I p...

  • Amy
    Apr 01, 2018

    Hell yeah! Finally some fucking proof to what my gut has been declaring for years. There is something exuberantly cathartic and empowering about releasing tension, frustration and any emotion with a string of some salty expletives! Thank you for making it official. ...

    As someone who loves the f-word, I was instantly intrigued by this book. I enjoyed getting various bits of the history of swearing and seeing different scientific experiments and team building activities. I especially enjoyed the chapter on ladies who swear. There were a few se...

    I picked up this book because I honestly talk like a sailor. I say ?fuck? too much and it?s like a second language to me. I was raised in The South and we are taught ladies should not use foul language. Well I say, ?Fuck that shit!? I loved this book because it had history an...

    So firstly, this was fun and liked it and I admire its enthusiasm. Any book that tries to break down the taboo veil surrounding swearing is good in my book. I do not understand the fixation that some people have about swearing, and I probably never will. But this book does a really goo...

    This book is both screamingly funny in parts, a social science observation in parts, and compares swear words in other languages besides English. I found the chapter on Tourette's the most interesting, even if the author says it shouldn't be in the book. I've always had a really lib...

    I received access to this book via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. If you are looking for exciting new swears to use, this is not the book for you - especially since researchers are apparently hesitant to use the *actual* swear words patients employ when writing studies...

    I hate it when I start a book that I'm looking forward too only to run into intellectually questionable assertions with no explanation of what the author means. She really ought to stick to robot science rather than delve into generalisations about culture, history, neurology, etc. I p...

    If you are going to "read" this book, I highly recommend the audiobook. I typically don't listen to audiobooks, except for the occasional 5+ hour car ride. Well let me just say, audiobook is the way to go with this one! The first half of the book was not only interesting, but was so mu...

    This is the most hilarious book chock-full of f*cking awesome stories about swearing and human nature. Spontaneous swearing with chimps to a scary as h*ll brain injury this was a wild ride that I didn't want to put down. ...

    Surprisingly, I found Swearing is Good for You: The Amazing Science of Bad Language by Emma Byrne to be a bit of a slog. The subject matter is near and dear to my heart and the introduction is funny and promised a good read but this skinny book (201 pages minus the notes and bibliograp...

    Thank you to Netgalley and W. W. Norton & Company for an E-ARC of this novel. I must say I didn't give this book much credit before I read it because 1) new author (always skeptical) and 2) the title seemed a little hard to believe. Emma Byrne does an excellent job on making a cas...

    Swearing is Good for You is a book on the many largely unknown and underappreciated aspects of swearing and it's adjacent fields of study. The chapters are mostly standalones tied together by the overall theme of the book, and I especially liked the chapters swearing and pain (chapter ...

  • ☆Dani☆ ☆Touch My Spine Book Reviews☆
    Jan 31, 2018

    Hell yeah! Finally some fucking proof to what my gut has been declaring for years. There is something exuberantly cathartic and empowering about releasing tension, frustration and any emotion with a string of some salty expletives! Thank you for making it official. ...

    As someone who loves the f-word, I was instantly intrigued by this book. I enjoyed getting various bits of the history of swearing and seeing different scientific experiments and team building activities. I especially enjoyed the chapter on ladies who swear. There were a few se...

    I picked up this book because I honestly talk like a sailor. I say ?fuck? too much and it?s like a second language to me. I was raised in The South and we are taught ladies should not use foul language. Well I say, ?Fuck that shit!? I loved this book because it had history an...

  • Jesica DeHart
    Dec 05, 2017

    Hell yeah! Finally some fucking proof to what my gut has been declaring for years. There is something exuberantly cathartic and empowering about releasing tension, frustration and any emotion with a string of some salty expletives! Thank you for making it official. ...