The Field of Blood: Violence in Congress and the Road to Civil War

The Field of Blood: Violence in Congress and the Road to Civil War

The previously untold story of the violence in Congress that helped spark the Civil War In The Field of Blood, Joanne Freeman recovers the long-lost story of physical violence on the floor of the U.S. Congress. Drawing on an extraordinary range of sources, Freeman shows that the Capitol was rife with conflict in the decades before the Civil War. Legislative sessions often w The previously untold story of the violence in Congress that helped spark the Civil War In The Field of Blood, Joa...

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Title:The Field of Blood: Violence in Congress and the Road to Civil War
Author:Joanne B. Freeman
Rating:
Genres:History
ISBN:The Field of Blood: Violence in Congress and the Road to Civil War
ISBN
Format Type:Hardcover
Number of Pages:480 pages pages

The Field of Blood: Violence in Congress and the Road to Civil War Reviews

  • Bill  Kerwin
    Oct 07, 2018

    I watched every minute of the Kavanaugh hearings, appalled at the procedural bullying of the Republicans, the cries of anguish from the female protestors, and I said to myself: could the atmosphere in Congress ever have been worse than this? It was then that I remembered my history, ...

  • Andrew
    Oct 22, 2018

    I watched every minute of the Kavanaugh hearings, appalled at the procedural bullying of the Republicans, the cries of anguish from the female protestors, and I said to myself: could the atmosphere in Congress ever have been worse than this? It was then that I remembered my history, ...

    Joanne B. Freeman's The Field of Blood: Violence in Congress and the Road to Civil War is an entertaining, well researched, and well-written examination of physical violence in U.S. Congress in the decades leading to the Civil War. Most of it stems from diarist B.B. French, who managed...

    I love reading about the Civil War, but most of my reading takes place primarily through the years 1861-1865, right in the thick of it. It was fascinating to read about the years leading up to the war, starting around the 1830s, tracing significant events of Congressional violence up t...

    So much of what we learn from Dr. Freeman?s ?The Field of Blood: Violence in the Congress and the Road to Civil War? is relevant to today?s Congress that I shudder to think of what could happen were US legislators today allowed to pack guns on their bodies in either the House o...

    A fascinating and -- to me, at least -- troubling book. I was aware of some of the violent outbreaks in Congress in the decades leading up to the Civil War, but I had no idea how common they were -- so many more than I'd thought. The slave states had inordinate power in both houses, pa...

    Joanne B. Freeman deserves credit for wading into the realities of the pre-Civil War Congress to find something beyond the eloquent speeches and forlorn compromises that are dimly remembered precursors to the nation's bloodiest struggle. She began looking into the fascinating duel that...

    This book bills itself as covering violence in Congress from the 1830s until the Civil War and I found this a bit misleading. While it does cover that topic, the book gives a great deal of time to B. B. French, a congressional clerk turned lobbyist who kept extensive diaries of his tim...

    Excellent! Entertaining, multi-faceted, and full of relevance to our current discourse. ...

    utterly without value as anything other than a harebrained topical business decision by fsg ...

    First I would like to state that I received this book through the Goodreads giveaway in exchange for an honest review. I would like to thank the author for giving me this opportunity and honor in being able to read this book. When I received this book I began reading it at once. I real...

    As a public historian/tour guide at the US Capitol, I will cherish this incredibly well-researched book as new foundation stone in my effort to educate the public about the tumultuous history of Congress. ...

    Freeman breathes life into a past all too frequently disconnected, romanticized, and distorted. Her prose moves with easy and while she may have a vast store of insight to drawn from, she keeps her book from every feeling dense or overly academic. Instead, Freeman allows readers to see...

    This is an interesting history of the lead-up to the American Civil War, focused on events in Congress. I liked Freeman's writing style, but the organization of the 1st half of the book was kind of confusing for me. It was not told in a chronological order, which led to a lot of repeti...

    In the early days of our republic, serving as an elected official in either house of Congress could prove to be a mortal hazard. In antebellum America, the carrying of knives and guns on one?s person was common, as was drunkenness and gambling. Add to this already volatile mix the se...

    For a record of the activities of Congress in the period before and leading up to the Civil War, this succeeds in being a breezy and engaging read without sacrificing scholarship along the way. Freeman's contention is that the road to the Civil War was paved with sectional strife t...

    After reading Yale historian Joanne B. Freeman?s magnificent book, ?Field of Blood: Violence in Congress and the Road to Civil War,? I was stunned to learn just how much physical violence took place within the halls of Congress before the Civil War, especially during the 36th Con...

    Joanne Freeman delivers a sweeping, vivid, and colorful history of the bruised and bloody days of the antebellum Congress, stretching from the Jackson years through the firing on Fort Sumter. Relayed through the diary entries and musings, sometimes poetic, of B.B. French, this narrativ...

    I really enjoyed reading this book, and sharing stories from it with my history-buff son and husband. In the pre-Civil War period, Congress (especially the House) was apparently a seething hotbed of violent emotions, violent speechifying, and sometimes outright physical violence. An...

    If you even remotely follow Congressional activity, from elections to speeches on the floor of Congress, you might wonder if any of the verbal attacks might actually result in physical violence. No doubt, the ratings on any of the news networks might spike if suddenly Elizabeth Warren ...

    I received a free Kindle copy of The Field of Blood by Joanne B. Freeman courtesy of Net Galley  and Farrar, Strauss and Giroux, the publisher. It was with the understanding that I would post a review on Net Galley, Goodreads, Amazon, Barnes and Noble and my fiction book review blog...

    Mostly a history of violence in Congress as seen through the eyes of Benjamin Brown French, a Zelig-like figure who seemed to be everywhere from 1833 and the Jacksonian Era to Grant's Reconstruction. The histories of Congress tend to play up the soaring oratory of the antebellum period...

    A scrupulously researched look at violence between members of Congress during the 1830's to the 1860's and the profound effect it had on a nation teetering towards Civil War. These incidents, for the most part, didn't end up in the public record,but most were mentioned in private diari...

    In The Field of Blood, Joanne Freeman traces Congressional violence from the mid-1830's up to the Civil War. Her research is meticulous and her narrative engaging; the voice is distinct and entertaining, pulling the reader into the world of the antebellum Congress, a world much differe...

    Freeman's work is an excellent overview of the violence in Congress in pre-Civil War America, something I deal with on a day to day basis at work. We always knew that this was a rather chaotic era in American politics, but Freeman sheds light on forgotten and often unknown individuals ...

  • Josh Liller
    Jan 23, 2019

    I watched every minute of the Kavanaugh hearings, appalled at the procedural bullying of the Republicans, the cries of anguish from the female protestors, and I said to myself: could the atmosphere in Congress ever have been worse than this? It was then that I remembered my history, ...

    Joanne B. Freeman's The Field of Blood: Violence in Congress and the Road to Civil War is an entertaining, well researched, and well-written examination of physical violence in U.S. Congress in the decades leading to the Civil War. Most of it stems from diarist B.B. French, who managed...

    I love reading about the Civil War, but most of my reading takes place primarily through the years 1861-1865, right in the thick of it. It was fascinating to read about the years leading up to the war, starting around the 1830s, tracing significant events of Congressional violence up t...

    So much of what we learn from Dr. Freeman?s ?The Field of Blood: Violence in the Congress and the Road to Civil War? is relevant to today?s Congress that I shudder to think of what could happen were US legislators today allowed to pack guns on their bodies in either the House o...

    A fascinating and -- to me, at least -- troubling book. I was aware of some of the violent outbreaks in Congress in the decades leading up to the Civil War, but I had no idea how common they were -- so many more than I'd thought. The slave states had inordinate power in both houses, pa...

    Joanne B. Freeman deserves credit for wading into the realities of the pre-Civil War Congress to find something beyond the eloquent speeches and forlorn compromises that are dimly remembered precursors to the nation's bloodiest struggle. She began looking into the fascinating duel that...

    This book bills itself as covering violence in Congress from the 1830s until the Civil War and I found this a bit misleading. While it does cover that topic, the book gives a great deal of time to B. B. French, a congressional clerk turned lobbyist who kept extensive diaries of his tim...

  • Rick
    Feb 06, 2019

    I watched every minute of the Kavanaugh hearings, appalled at the procedural bullying of the Republicans, the cries of anguish from the female protestors, and I said to myself: could the atmosphere in Congress ever have been worse than this? It was then that I remembered my history, ...

    Joanne B. Freeman's The Field of Blood: Violence in Congress and the Road to Civil War is an entertaining, well researched, and well-written examination of physical violence in U.S. Congress in the decades leading to the Civil War. Most of it stems from diarist B.B. French, who managed...

    I love reading about the Civil War, but most of my reading takes place primarily through the years 1861-1865, right in the thick of it. It was fascinating to read about the years leading up to the war, starting around the 1830s, tracing significant events of Congressional violence up t...

    So much of what we learn from Dr. Freeman?s ?The Field of Blood: Violence in the Congress and the Road to Civil War? is relevant to today?s Congress that I shudder to think of what could happen were US legislators today allowed to pack guns on their bodies in either the House o...

    A fascinating and -- to me, at least -- troubling book. I was aware of some of the violent outbreaks in Congress in the decades leading up to the Civil War, but I had no idea how common they were -- so many more than I'd thought. The slave states had inordinate power in both houses, pa...

    Joanne B. Freeman deserves credit for wading into the realities of the pre-Civil War Congress to find something beyond the eloquent speeches and forlorn compromises that are dimly remembered precursors to the nation's bloodiest struggle. She began looking into the fascinating duel that...

    This book bills itself as covering violence in Congress from the 1830s until the Civil War and I found this a bit misleading. While it does cover that topic, the book gives a great deal of time to B. B. French, a congressional clerk turned lobbyist who kept extensive diaries of his tim...

    Excellent! Entertaining, multi-faceted, and full of relevance to our current discourse. ...

    utterly without value as anything other than a harebrained topical business decision by fsg ...

    First I would like to state that I received this book through the Goodreads giveaway in exchange for an honest review. I would like to thank the author for giving me this opportunity and honor in being able to read this book. When I received this book I began reading it at once. I real...

    As a public historian/tour guide at the US Capitol, I will cherish this incredibly well-researched book as new foundation stone in my effort to educate the public about the tumultuous history of Congress. ...

    Freeman breathes life into a past all too frequently disconnected, romanticized, and distorted. Her prose moves with easy and while she may have a vast store of insight to drawn from, she keeps her book from every feeling dense or overly academic. Instead, Freeman allows readers to see...

    This is an interesting history of the lead-up to the American Civil War, focused on events in Congress. I liked Freeman's writing style, but the organization of the 1st half of the book was kind of confusing for me. It was not told in a chronological order, which led to a lot of repeti...

    In the early days of our republic, serving as an elected official in either house of Congress could prove to be a mortal hazard. In antebellum America, the carrying of knives and guns on one?s person was common, as was drunkenness and gambling. Add to this already volatile mix the se...

    For a record of the activities of Congress in the period before and leading up to the Civil War, this succeeds in being a breezy and engaging read without sacrificing scholarship along the way. Freeman's contention is that the road to the Civil War was paved with sectional strife t...

    After reading Yale historian Joanne B. Freeman?s magnificent book, ?Field of Blood: Violence in Congress and the Road to Civil War,? I was stunned to learn just how much physical violence took place within the halls of Congress before the Civil War, especially during the 36th Con...

    Joanne Freeman delivers a sweeping, vivid, and colorful history of the bruised and bloody days of the antebellum Congress, stretching from the Jackson years through the firing on Fort Sumter. Relayed through the diary entries and musings, sometimes poetic, of B.B. French, this narrativ...

    I really enjoyed reading this book, and sharing stories from it with my history-buff son and husband. In the pre-Civil War period, Congress (especially the House) was apparently a seething hotbed of violent emotions, violent speechifying, and sometimes outright physical violence. An...

    If you even remotely follow Congressional activity, from elections to speeches on the floor of Congress, you might wonder if any of the verbal attacks might actually result in physical violence. No doubt, the ratings on any of the news networks might spike if suddenly Elizabeth Warren ...

    I received a free Kindle copy of The Field of Blood by Joanne B. Freeman courtesy of Net Galley  and Farrar, Strauss and Giroux, the publisher. It was with the understanding that I would post a review on Net Galley, Goodreads, Amazon, Barnes and Noble and my fiction book review blog...

    Mostly a history of violence in Congress as seen through the eyes of Benjamin Brown French, a Zelig-like figure who seemed to be everywhere from 1833 and the Jacksonian Era to Grant's Reconstruction. The histories of Congress tend to play up the soaring oratory of the antebellum period...

    A scrupulously researched look at violence between members of Congress during the 1830's to the 1860's and the profound effect it had on a nation teetering towards Civil War. These incidents, for the most part, didn't end up in the public record,but most were mentioned in private diari...

    In The Field of Blood, Joanne Freeman traces Congressional violence from the mid-1830's up to the Civil War. Her research is meticulous and her narrative engaging; the voice is distinct and entertaining, pulling the reader into the world of the antebellum Congress, a world much differe...

    Freeman's work is an excellent overview of the violence in Congress in pre-Civil War America, something I deal with on a day to day basis at work. We always knew that this was a rather chaotic era in American politics, but Freeman sheds light on forgotten and often unknown individuals ...

    The instant I heard about this book it landed on my "want to read" list, and it didn't disappoint! A wonderful, richly researched and beautifully written exploration of both the historical record and the messy past that lives between the lines of the historical record. Freeman's cho...

    This book basically follows the journal of Benjamin Brown French during his 40 years in Washington, focusing particularly on the violence in Congress. And boy was there a lot of it, both threatened and actual. Representatives had no compunction, it seems, in stalking across the aisle a...

    Does this sound familiar: It is a time when technological advances were increasing the speed of communication, politics is becoming increasingly divided, hostile, the media is overtly biased, and Congress is becoming increasingly ineffective? The difference is now; Congress members...

    This surprising look at violence that occurred on both floors of Congress (and nearby environs) in the years leading up to the Civil War offers a deeper understanding of how that bloody conflict came to be inevitable. What's remarkable when you read this account is that disunion and wa...

    This highly scholarly book by a Yale history professor shows us how violence prone members of Congress proved to be during the 30 years prior to the civil war. People who rant against our current uncivil political culture should take note of the portrayal of Congress during the mid 180...

  • David Bales
    Oct 22, 2018

    I watched every minute of the Kavanaugh hearings, appalled at the procedural bullying of the Republicans, the cries of anguish from the female protestors, and I said to myself: could the atmosphere in Congress ever have been worse than this? It was then that I remembered my history, ...

    Joanne B. Freeman's The Field of Blood: Violence in Congress and the Road to Civil War is an entertaining, well researched, and well-written examination of physical violence in U.S. Congress in the decades leading to the Civil War. Most of it stems from diarist B.B. French, who managed...

    I love reading about the Civil War, but most of my reading takes place primarily through the years 1861-1865, right in the thick of it. It was fascinating to read about the years leading up to the war, starting around the 1830s, tracing significant events of Congressional violence up t...

    So much of what we learn from Dr. Freeman?s ?The Field of Blood: Violence in the Congress and the Road to Civil War? is relevant to today?s Congress that I shudder to think of what could happen were US legislators today allowed to pack guns on their bodies in either the House o...

    A fascinating and -- to me, at least -- troubling book. I was aware of some of the violent outbreaks in Congress in the decades leading up to the Civil War, but I had no idea how common they were -- so many more than I'd thought. The slave states had inordinate power in both houses, pa...

    Joanne B. Freeman deserves credit for wading into the realities of the pre-Civil War Congress to find something beyond the eloquent speeches and forlorn compromises that are dimly remembered precursors to the nation's bloodiest struggle. She began looking into the fascinating duel that...

    This book bills itself as covering violence in Congress from the 1830s until the Civil War and I found this a bit misleading. While it does cover that topic, the book gives a great deal of time to B. B. French, a congressional clerk turned lobbyist who kept extensive diaries of his tim...

    Excellent! Entertaining, multi-faceted, and full of relevance to our current discourse. ...

    utterly without value as anything other than a harebrained topical business decision by fsg ...

    First I would like to state that I received this book through the Goodreads giveaway in exchange for an honest review. I would like to thank the author for giving me this opportunity and honor in being able to read this book. When I received this book I began reading it at once. I real...

    As a public historian/tour guide at the US Capitol, I will cherish this incredibly well-researched book as new foundation stone in my effort to educate the public about the tumultuous history of Congress. ...

    Freeman breathes life into a past all too frequently disconnected, romanticized, and distorted. Her prose moves with easy and while she may have a vast store of insight to drawn from, she keeps her book from every feeling dense or overly academic. Instead, Freeman allows readers to see...

    This is an interesting history of the lead-up to the American Civil War, focused on events in Congress. I liked Freeman's writing style, but the organization of the 1st half of the book was kind of confusing for me. It was not told in a chronological order, which led to a lot of repeti...

    In the early days of our republic, serving as an elected official in either house of Congress could prove to be a mortal hazard. In antebellum America, the carrying of knives and guns on one?s person was common, as was drunkenness and gambling. Add to this already volatile mix the se...

    For a record of the activities of Congress in the period before and leading up to the Civil War, this succeeds in being a breezy and engaging read without sacrificing scholarship along the way. Freeman's contention is that the road to the Civil War was paved with sectional strife t...

    After reading Yale historian Joanne B. Freeman?s magnificent book, ?Field of Blood: Violence in Congress and the Road to Civil War,? I was stunned to learn just how much physical violence took place within the halls of Congress before the Civil War, especially during the 36th Con...

    Joanne Freeman delivers a sweeping, vivid, and colorful history of the bruised and bloody days of the antebellum Congress, stretching from the Jackson years through the firing on Fort Sumter. Relayed through the diary entries and musings, sometimes poetic, of B.B. French, this narrativ...

    I really enjoyed reading this book, and sharing stories from it with my history-buff son and husband. In the pre-Civil War period, Congress (especially the House) was apparently a seething hotbed of violent emotions, violent speechifying, and sometimes outright physical violence. An...

    If you even remotely follow Congressional activity, from elections to speeches on the floor of Congress, you might wonder if any of the verbal attacks might actually result in physical violence. No doubt, the ratings on any of the news networks might spike if suddenly Elizabeth Warren ...

    I received a free Kindle copy of The Field of Blood by Joanne B. Freeman courtesy of Net Galley  and Farrar, Strauss and Giroux, the publisher. It was with the understanding that I would post a review on Net Galley, Goodreads, Amazon, Barnes and Noble and my fiction book review blog...

    Mostly a history of violence in Congress as seen through the eyes of Benjamin Brown French, a Zelig-like figure who seemed to be everywhere from 1833 and the Jacksonian Era to Grant's Reconstruction. The histories of Congress tend to play up the soaring oratory of the antebellum period...

  • Scott Martin
    Dec 26, 2018

    I watched every minute of the Kavanaugh hearings, appalled at the procedural bullying of the Republicans, the cries of anguish from the female protestors, and I said to myself: could the atmosphere in Congress ever have been worse than this? It was then that I remembered my history, ...

    Joanne B. Freeman's The Field of Blood: Violence in Congress and the Road to Civil War is an entertaining, well researched, and well-written examination of physical violence in U.S. Congress in the decades leading to the Civil War. Most of it stems from diarist B.B. French, who managed...

    I love reading about the Civil War, but most of my reading takes place primarily through the years 1861-1865, right in the thick of it. It was fascinating to read about the years leading up to the war, starting around the 1830s, tracing significant events of Congressional violence up t...

    So much of what we learn from Dr. Freeman?s ?The Field of Blood: Violence in the Congress and the Road to Civil War? is relevant to today?s Congress that I shudder to think of what could happen were US legislators today allowed to pack guns on their bodies in either the House o...

    A fascinating and -- to me, at least -- troubling book. I was aware of some of the violent outbreaks in Congress in the decades leading up to the Civil War, but I had no idea how common they were -- so many more than I'd thought. The slave states had inordinate power in both houses, pa...

    Joanne B. Freeman deserves credit for wading into the realities of the pre-Civil War Congress to find something beyond the eloquent speeches and forlorn compromises that are dimly remembered precursors to the nation's bloodiest struggle. She began looking into the fascinating duel that...

    This book bills itself as covering violence in Congress from the 1830s until the Civil War and I found this a bit misleading. While it does cover that topic, the book gives a great deal of time to B. B. French, a congressional clerk turned lobbyist who kept extensive diaries of his tim...

    Excellent! Entertaining, multi-faceted, and full of relevance to our current discourse. ...

    utterly without value as anything other than a harebrained topical business decision by fsg ...

    First I would like to state that I received this book through the Goodreads giveaway in exchange for an honest review. I would like to thank the author for giving me this opportunity and honor in being able to read this book. When I received this book I began reading it at once. I real...

    As a public historian/tour guide at the US Capitol, I will cherish this incredibly well-researched book as new foundation stone in my effort to educate the public about the tumultuous history of Congress. ...

    Freeman breathes life into a past all too frequently disconnected, romanticized, and distorted. Her prose moves with easy and while she may have a vast store of insight to drawn from, she keeps her book from every feeling dense or overly academic. Instead, Freeman allows readers to see...

    This is an interesting history of the lead-up to the American Civil War, focused on events in Congress. I liked Freeman's writing style, but the organization of the 1st half of the book was kind of confusing for me. It was not told in a chronological order, which led to a lot of repeti...

    In the early days of our republic, serving as an elected official in either house of Congress could prove to be a mortal hazard. In antebellum America, the carrying of knives and guns on one?s person was common, as was drunkenness and gambling. Add to this already volatile mix the se...

    For a record of the activities of Congress in the period before and leading up to the Civil War, this succeeds in being a breezy and engaging read without sacrificing scholarship along the way. Freeman's contention is that the road to the Civil War was paved with sectional strife t...

    After reading Yale historian Joanne B. Freeman?s magnificent book, ?Field of Blood: Violence in Congress and the Road to Civil War,? I was stunned to learn just how much physical violence took place within the halls of Congress before the Civil War, especially during the 36th Con...

    Joanne Freeman delivers a sweeping, vivid, and colorful history of the bruised and bloody days of the antebellum Congress, stretching from the Jackson years through the firing on Fort Sumter. Relayed through the diary entries and musings, sometimes poetic, of B.B. French, this narrativ...

    I really enjoyed reading this book, and sharing stories from it with my history-buff son and husband. In the pre-Civil War period, Congress (especially the House) was apparently a seething hotbed of violent emotions, violent speechifying, and sometimes outright physical violence. An...

    If you even remotely follow Congressional activity, from elections to speeches on the floor of Congress, you might wonder if any of the verbal attacks might actually result in physical violence. No doubt, the ratings on any of the news networks might spike if suddenly Elizabeth Warren ...

  • Janet
    Nov 04, 2018

    I watched every minute of the Kavanaugh hearings, appalled at the procedural bullying of the Republicans, the cries of anguish from the female protestors, and I said to myself: could the atmosphere in Congress ever have been worse than this? It was then that I remembered my history, ...

    Joanne B. Freeman's The Field of Blood: Violence in Congress and the Road to Civil War is an entertaining, well researched, and well-written examination of physical violence in U.S. Congress in the decades leading to the Civil War. Most of it stems from diarist B.B. French, who managed...

    I love reading about the Civil War, but most of my reading takes place primarily through the years 1861-1865, right in the thick of it. It was fascinating to read about the years leading up to the war, starting around the 1830s, tracing significant events of Congressional violence up t...

    So much of what we learn from Dr. Freeman?s ?The Field of Blood: Violence in the Congress and the Road to Civil War? is relevant to today?s Congress that I shudder to think of what could happen were US legislators today allowed to pack guns on their bodies in either the House o...

    A fascinating and -- to me, at least -- troubling book. I was aware of some of the violent outbreaks in Congress in the decades leading up to the Civil War, but I had no idea how common they were -- so many more than I'd thought. The slave states had inordinate power in both houses, pa...

    Joanne B. Freeman deserves credit for wading into the realities of the pre-Civil War Congress to find something beyond the eloquent speeches and forlorn compromises that are dimly remembered precursors to the nation's bloodiest struggle. She began looking into the fascinating duel that...

    This book bills itself as covering violence in Congress from the 1830s until the Civil War and I found this a bit misleading. While it does cover that topic, the book gives a great deal of time to B. B. French, a congressional clerk turned lobbyist who kept extensive diaries of his tim...

    Excellent! Entertaining, multi-faceted, and full of relevance to our current discourse. ...

    utterly without value as anything other than a harebrained topical business decision by fsg ...

    First I would like to state that I received this book through the Goodreads giveaway in exchange for an honest review. I would like to thank the author for giving me this opportunity and honor in being able to read this book. When I received this book I began reading it at once. I real...

    As a public historian/tour guide at the US Capitol, I will cherish this incredibly well-researched book as new foundation stone in my effort to educate the public about the tumultuous history of Congress. ...

    Freeman breathes life into a past all too frequently disconnected, romanticized, and distorted. Her prose moves with easy and while she may have a vast store of insight to drawn from, she keeps her book from every feeling dense or overly academic. Instead, Freeman allows readers to see...

    This is an interesting history of the lead-up to the American Civil War, focused on events in Congress. I liked Freeman's writing style, but the organization of the 1st half of the book was kind of confusing for me. It was not told in a chronological order, which led to a lot of repeti...

  • Douglas Armstrong
    Nov 20, 2018

    I watched every minute of the Kavanaugh hearings, appalled at the procedural bullying of the Republicans, the cries of anguish from the female protestors, and I said to myself: could the atmosphere in Congress ever have been worse than this? It was then that I remembered my history, ...

    Joanne B. Freeman's The Field of Blood: Violence in Congress and the Road to Civil War is an entertaining, well researched, and well-written examination of physical violence in U.S. Congress in the decades leading to the Civil War. Most of it stems from diarist B.B. French, who managed...

    I love reading about the Civil War, but most of my reading takes place primarily through the years 1861-1865, right in the thick of it. It was fascinating to read about the years leading up to the war, starting around the 1830s, tracing significant events of Congressional violence up t...

    So much of what we learn from Dr. Freeman?s ?The Field of Blood: Violence in the Congress and the Road to Civil War? is relevant to today?s Congress that I shudder to think of what could happen were US legislators today allowed to pack guns on their bodies in either the House o...

    A fascinating and -- to me, at least -- troubling book. I was aware of some of the violent outbreaks in Congress in the decades leading up to the Civil War, but I had no idea how common they were -- so many more than I'd thought. The slave states had inordinate power in both houses, pa...

    Joanne B. Freeman deserves credit for wading into the realities of the pre-Civil War Congress to find something beyond the eloquent speeches and forlorn compromises that are dimly remembered precursors to the nation's bloodiest struggle. She began looking into the fascinating duel that...

    This book bills itself as covering violence in Congress from the 1830s until the Civil War and I found this a bit misleading. While it does cover that topic, the book gives a great deal of time to B. B. French, a congressional clerk turned lobbyist who kept extensive diaries of his tim...

    Excellent! Entertaining, multi-faceted, and full of relevance to our current discourse. ...

    utterly without value as anything other than a harebrained topical business decision by fsg ...

    First I would like to state that I received this book through the Goodreads giveaway in exchange for an honest review. I would like to thank the author for giving me this opportunity and honor in being able to read this book. When I received this book I began reading it at once. I real...

    As a public historian/tour guide at the US Capitol, I will cherish this incredibly well-researched book as new foundation stone in my effort to educate the public about the tumultuous history of Congress. ...

    Freeman breathes life into a past all too frequently disconnected, romanticized, and distorted. Her prose moves with easy and while she may have a vast store of insight to drawn from, she keeps her book from every feeling dense or overly academic. Instead, Freeman allows readers to see...

    This is an interesting history of the lead-up to the American Civil War, focused on events in Congress. I liked Freeman's writing style, but the organization of the 1st half of the book was kind of confusing for me. It was not told in a chronological order, which led to a lot of repeti...

    In the early days of our republic, serving as an elected official in either house of Congress could prove to be a mortal hazard. In antebellum America, the carrying of knives and guns on one?s person was common, as was drunkenness and gambling. Add to this already volatile mix the se...

    For a record of the activities of Congress in the period before and leading up to the Civil War, this succeeds in being a breezy and engaging read without sacrificing scholarship along the way. Freeman's contention is that the road to the Civil War was paved with sectional strife t...

    After reading Yale historian Joanne B. Freeman?s magnificent book, ?Field of Blood: Violence in Congress and the Road to Civil War,? I was stunned to learn just how much physical violence took place within the halls of Congress before the Civil War, especially during the 36th Con...

    Joanne Freeman delivers a sweeping, vivid, and colorful history of the bruised and bloody days of the antebellum Congress, stretching from the Jackson years through the firing on Fort Sumter. Relayed through the diary entries and musings, sometimes poetic, of B.B. French, this narrativ...

    I really enjoyed reading this book, and sharing stories from it with my history-buff son and husband. In the pre-Civil War period, Congress (especially the House) was apparently a seething hotbed of violent emotions, violent speechifying, and sometimes outright physical violence. An...

    If you even remotely follow Congressional activity, from elections to speeches on the floor of Congress, you might wonder if any of the verbal attacks might actually result in physical violence. No doubt, the ratings on any of the news networks might spike if suddenly Elizabeth Warren ...

    I received a free Kindle copy of The Field of Blood by Joanne B. Freeman courtesy of Net Galley  and Farrar, Strauss and Giroux, the publisher. It was with the understanding that I would post a review on Net Galley, Goodreads, Amazon, Barnes and Noble and my fiction book review blog...

    Mostly a history of violence in Congress as seen through the eyes of Benjamin Brown French, a Zelig-like figure who seemed to be everywhere from 1833 and the Jacksonian Era to Grant's Reconstruction. The histories of Congress tend to play up the soaring oratory of the antebellum period...

    A scrupulously researched look at violence between members of Congress during the 1830's to the 1860's and the profound effect it had on a nation teetering towards Civil War. These incidents, for the most part, didn't end up in the public record,but most were mentioned in private diari...

    In The Field of Blood, Joanne Freeman traces Congressional violence from the mid-1830's up to the Civil War. Her research is meticulous and her narrative engaging; the voice is distinct and entertaining, pulling the reader into the world of the antebellum Congress, a world much differe...

    Freeman's work is an excellent overview of the violence in Congress in pre-Civil War America, something I deal with on a day to day basis at work. We always knew that this was a rather chaotic era in American politics, but Freeman sheds light on forgotten and often unknown individuals ...

    The instant I heard about this book it landed on my "want to read" list, and it didn't disappoint! A wonderful, richly researched and beautifully written exploration of both the historical record and the messy past that lives between the lines of the historical record. Freeman's cho...

    This book basically follows the journal of Benjamin Brown French during his 40 years in Washington, focusing particularly on the violence in Congress. And boy was there a lot of it, both threatened and actual. Representatives had no compunction, it seems, in stalking across the aisle a...

    Does this sound familiar: It is a time when technological advances were increasing the speed of communication, politics is becoming increasingly divided, hostile, the media is overtly biased, and Congress is becoming increasingly ineffective? The difference is now; Congress members...

    This surprising look at violence that occurred on both floors of Congress (and nearby environs) in the years leading up to the Civil War offers a deeper understanding of how that bloody conflict came to be inevitable. What's remarkable when you read this account is that disunion and wa...

  • Myles
    Oct 24, 2018

    I watched every minute of the Kavanaugh hearings, appalled at the procedural bullying of the Republicans, the cries of anguish from the female protestors, and I said to myself: could the atmosphere in Congress ever have been worse than this? It was then that I remembered my history, ...

    Joanne B. Freeman's The Field of Blood: Violence in Congress and the Road to Civil War is an entertaining, well researched, and well-written examination of physical violence in U.S. Congress in the decades leading to the Civil War. Most of it stems from diarist B.B. French, who managed...

    I love reading about the Civil War, but most of my reading takes place primarily through the years 1861-1865, right in the thick of it. It was fascinating to read about the years leading up to the war, starting around the 1830s, tracing significant events of Congressional violence up t...

    So much of what we learn from Dr. Freeman?s ?The Field of Blood: Violence in the Congress and the Road to Civil War? is relevant to today?s Congress that I shudder to think of what could happen were US legislators today allowed to pack guns on their bodies in either the House o...

  • Katie
    Jan 20, 2019

    I watched every minute of the Kavanaugh hearings, appalled at the procedural bullying of the Republicans, the cries of anguish from the female protestors, and I said to myself: could the atmosphere in Congress ever have been worse than this? It was then that I remembered my history, ...

    Joanne B. Freeman's The Field of Blood: Violence in Congress and the Road to Civil War is an entertaining, well researched, and well-written examination of physical violence in U.S. Congress in the decades leading to the Civil War. Most of it stems from diarist B.B. French, who managed...

    I love reading about the Civil War, but most of my reading takes place primarily through the years 1861-1865, right in the thick of it. It was fascinating to read about the years leading up to the war, starting around the 1830s, tracing significant events of Congressional violence up t...

    So much of what we learn from Dr. Freeman?s ?The Field of Blood: Violence in the Congress and the Road to Civil War? is relevant to today?s Congress that I shudder to think of what could happen were US legislators today allowed to pack guns on their bodies in either the House o...

    A fascinating and -- to me, at least -- troubling book. I was aware of some of the violent outbreaks in Congress in the decades leading up to the Civil War, but I had no idea how common they were -- so many more than I'd thought. The slave states had inordinate power in both houses, pa...

    Joanne B. Freeman deserves credit for wading into the realities of the pre-Civil War Congress to find something beyond the eloquent speeches and forlorn compromises that are dimly remembered precursors to the nation's bloodiest struggle. She began looking into the fascinating duel that...

    This book bills itself as covering violence in Congress from the 1830s until the Civil War and I found this a bit misleading. While it does cover that topic, the book gives a great deal of time to B. B. French, a congressional clerk turned lobbyist who kept extensive diaries of his tim...

    Excellent! Entertaining, multi-faceted, and full of relevance to our current discourse. ...

  • Stephen Morrissey
    Oct 15, 2018

    I watched every minute of the Kavanaugh hearings, appalled at the procedural bullying of the Republicans, the cries of anguish from the female protestors, and I said to myself: could the atmosphere in Congress ever have been worse than this? It was then that I remembered my history, ...

    Joanne B. Freeman's The Field of Blood: Violence in Congress and the Road to Civil War is an entertaining, well researched, and well-written examination of physical violence in U.S. Congress in the decades leading to the Civil War. Most of it stems from diarist B.B. French, who managed...

    I love reading about the Civil War, but most of my reading takes place primarily through the years 1861-1865, right in the thick of it. It was fascinating to read about the years leading up to the war, starting around the 1830s, tracing significant events of Congressional violence up t...

    So much of what we learn from Dr. Freeman?s ?The Field of Blood: Violence in the Congress and the Road to Civil War? is relevant to today?s Congress that I shudder to think of what could happen were US legislators today allowed to pack guns on their bodies in either the House o...

    A fascinating and -- to me, at least -- troubling book. I was aware of some of the violent outbreaks in Congress in the decades leading up to the Civil War, but I had no idea how common they were -- so many more than I'd thought. The slave states had inordinate power in both houses, pa...

    Joanne B. Freeman deserves credit for wading into the realities of the pre-Civil War Congress to find something beyond the eloquent speeches and forlorn compromises that are dimly remembered precursors to the nation's bloodiest struggle. She began looking into the fascinating duel that...

    This book bills itself as covering violence in Congress from the 1830s until the Civil War and I found this a bit misleading. While it does cover that topic, the book gives a great deal of time to B. B. French, a congressional clerk turned lobbyist who kept extensive diaries of his tim...

    Excellent! Entertaining, multi-faceted, and full of relevance to our current discourse. ...

    utterly without value as anything other than a harebrained topical business decision by fsg ...

    First I would like to state that I received this book through the Goodreads giveaway in exchange for an honest review. I would like to thank the author for giving me this opportunity and honor in being able to read this book. When I received this book I began reading it at once. I real...

    As a public historian/tour guide at the US Capitol, I will cherish this incredibly well-researched book as new foundation stone in my effort to educate the public about the tumultuous history of Congress. ...

    Freeman breathes life into a past all too frequently disconnected, romanticized, and distorted. Her prose moves with easy and while she may have a vast store of insight to drawn from, she keeps her book from every feeling dense or overly academic. Instead, Freeman allows readers to see...

    This is an interesting history of the lead-up to the American Civil War, focused on events in Congress. I liked Freeman's writing style, but the organization of the 1st half of the book was kind of confusing for me. It was not told in a chronological order, which led to a lot of repeti...

    In the early days of our republic, serving as an elected official in either house of Congress could prove to be a mortal hazard. In antebellum America, the carrying of knives and guns on one?s person was common, as was drunkenness and gambling. Add to this already volatile mix the se...

    For a record of the activities of Congress in the period before and leading up to the Civil War, this succeeds in being a breezy and engaging read without sacrificing scholarship along the way. Freeman's contention is that the road to the Civil War was paved with sectional strife t...

    After reading Yale historian Joanne B. Freeman?s magnificent book, ?Field of Blood: Violence in Congress and the Road to Civil War,? I was stunned to learn just how much physical violence took place within the halls of Congress before the Civil War, especially during the 36th Con...

    Joanne Freeman delivers a sweeping, vivid, and colorful history of the bruised and bloody days of the antebellum Congress, stretching from the Jackson years through the firing on Fort Sumter. Relayed through the diary entries and musings, sometimes poetic, of B.B. French, this narrativ...

  • Kristin Strong
    Jan 18, 2019

    I watched every minute of the Kavanaugh hearings, appalled at the procedural bullying of the Republicans, the cries of anguish from the female protestors, and I said to myself: could the atmosphere in Congress ever have been worse than this? It was then that I remembered my history, ...

    Joanne B. Freeman's The Field of Blood: Violence in Congress and the Road to Civil War is an entertaining, well researched, and well-written examination of physical violence in U.S. Congress in the decades leading to the Civil War. Most of it stems from diarist B.B. French, who managed...

    I love reading about the Civil War, but most of my reading takes place primarily through the years 1861-1865, right in the thick of it. It was fascinating to read about the years leading up to the war, starting around the 1830s, tracing significant events of Congressional violence up t...

    So much of what we learn from Dr. Freeman?s ?The Field of Blood: Violence in the Congress and the Road to Civil War? is relevant to today?s Congress that I shudder to think of what could happen were US legislators today allowed to pack guns on their bodies in either the House o...

    A fascinating and -- to me, at least -- troubling book. I was aware of some of the violent outbreaks in Congress in the decades leading up to the Civil War, but I had no idea how common they were -- so many more than I'd thought. The slave states had inordinate power in both houses, pa...

    Joanne B. Freeman deserves credit for wading into the realities of the pre-Civil War Congress to find something beyond the eloquent speeches and forlorn compromises that are dimly remembered precursors to the nation's bloodiest struggle. She began looking into the fascinating duel that...

    This book bills itself as covering violence in Congress from the 1830s until the Civil War and I found this a bit misleading. While it does cover that topic, the book gives a great deal of time to B. B. French, a congressional clerk turned lobbyist who kept extensive diaries of his tim...

    Excellent! Entertaining, multi-faceted, and full of relevance to our current discourse. ...

    utterly without value as anything other than a harebrained topical business decision by fsg ...

    First I would like to state that I received this book through the Goodreads giveaway in exchange for an honest review. I would like to thank the author for giving me this opportunity and honor in being able to read this book. When I received this book I began reading it at once. I real...

    As a public historian/tour guide at the US Capitol, I will cherish this incredibly well-researched book as new foundation stone in my effort to educate the public about the tumultuous history of Congress. ...

    Freeman breathes life into a past all too frequently disconnected, romanticized, and distorted. Her prose moves with easy and while she may have a vast store of insight to drawn from, she keeps her book from every feeling dense or overly academic. Instead, Freeman allows readers to see...

    This is an interesting history of the lead-up to the American Civil War, focused on events in Congress. I liked Freeman's writing style, but the organization of the 1st half of the book was kind of confusing for me. It was not told in a chronological order, which led to a lot of repeti...

    In the early days of our republic, serving as an elected official in either house of Congress could prove to be a mortal hazard. In antebellum America, the carrying of knives and guns on one?s person was common, as was drunkenness and gambling. Add to this already volatile mix the se...

    For a record of the activities of Congress in the period before and leading up to the Civil War, this succeeds in being a breezy and engaging read without sacrificing scholarship along the way. Freeman's contention is that the road to the Civil War was paved with sectional strife t...

    After reading Yale historian Joanne B. Freeman?s magnificent book, ?Field of Blood: Violence in Congress and the Road to Civil War,? I was stunned to learn just how much physical violence took place within the halls of Congress before the Civil War, especially during the 36th Con...

    Joanne Freeman delivers a sweeping, vivid, and colorful history of the bruised and bloody days of the antebellum Congress, stretching from the Jackson years through the firing on Fort Sumter. Relayed through the diary entries and musings, sometimes poetic, of B.B. French, this narrativ...

    I really enjoyed reading this book, and sharing stories from it with my history-buff son and husband. In the pre-Civil War period, Congress (especially the House) was apparently a seething hotbed of violent emotions, violent speechifying, and sometimes outright physical violence. An...

  • Jill
    Nov 12, 2018

    I watched every minute of the Kavanaugh hearings, appalled at the procedural bullying of the Republicans, the cries of anguish from the female protestors, and I said to myself: could the atmosphere in Congress ever have been worse than this? It was then that I remembered my history, ...

    Joanne B. Freeman's The Field of Blood: Violence in Congress and the Road to Civil War is an entertaining, well researched, and well-written examination of physical violence in U.S. Congress in the decades leading to the Civil War. Most of it stems from diarist B.B. French, who managed...

    I love reading about the Civil War, but most of my reading takes place primarily through the years 1861-1865, right in the thick of it. It was fascinating to read about the years leading up to the war, starting around the 1830s, tracing significant events of Congressional violence up t...

    So much of what we learn from Dr. Freeman?s ?The Field of Blood: Violence in the Congress and the Road to Civil War? is relevant to today?s Congress that I shudder to think of what could happen were US legislators today allowed to pack guns on their bodies in either the House o...

    A fascinating and -- to me, at least -- troubling book. I was aware of some of the violent outbreaks in Congress in the decades leading up to the Civil War, but I had no idea how common they were -- so many more than I'd thought. The slave states had inordinate power in both houses, pa...

    Joanne B. Freeman deserves credit for wading into the realities of the pre-Civil War Congress to find something beyond the eloquent speeches and forlorn compromises that are dimly remembered precursors to the nation's bloodiest struggle. She began looking into the fascinating duel that...

    This book bills itself as covering violence in Congress from the 1830s until the Civil War and I found this a bit misleading. While it does cover that topic, the book gives a great deal of time to B. B. French, a congressional clerk turned lobbyist who kept extensive diaries of his tim...

    Excellent! Entertaining, multi-faceted, and full of relevance to our current discourse. ...

    utterly without value as anything other than a harebrained topical business decision by fsg ...

    First I would like to state that I received this book through the Goodreads giveaway in exchange for an honest review. I would like to thank the author for giving me this opportunity and honor in being able to read this book. When I received this book I began reading it at once. I real...

    As a public historian/tour guide at the US Capitol, I will cherish this incredibly well-researched book as new foundation stone in my effort to educate the public about the tumultuous history of Congress. ...

    Freeman breathes life into a past all too frequently disconnected, romanticized, and distorted. Her prose moves with easy and while she may have a vast store of insight to drawn from, she keeps her book from every feeling dense or overly academic. Instead, Freeman allows readers to see...

    This is an interesting history of the lead-up to the American Civil War, focused on events in Congress. I liked Freeman's writing style, but the organization of the 1st half of the book was kind of confusing for me. It was not told in a chronological order, which led to a lot of repeti...

    In the early days of our republic, serving as an elected official in either house of Congress could prove to be a mortal hazard. In antebellum America, the carrying of knives and guns on one?s person was common, as was drunkenness and gambling. Add to this already volatile mix the se...

  • Kate Schlesinger
    Jan 15, 2019

    I watched every minute of the Kavanaugh hearings, appalled at the procedural bullying of the Republicans, the cries of anguish from the female protestors, and I said to myself: could the atmosphere in Congress ever have been worse than this? It was then that I remembered my history, ...

    Joanne B. Freeman's The Field of Blood: Violence in Congress and the Road to Civil War is an entertaining, well researched, and well-written examination of physical violence in U.S. Congress in the decades leading to the Civil War. Most of it stems from diarist B.B. French, who managed...

    I love reading about the Civil War, but most of my reading takes place primarily through the years 1861-1865, right in the thick of it. It was fascinating to read about the years leading up to the war, starting around the 1830s, tracing significant events of Congressional violence up t...

    So much of what we learn from Dr. Freeman?s ?The Field of Blood: Violence in the Congress and the Road to Civil War? is relevant to today?s Congress that I shudder to think of what could happen were US legislators today allowed to pack guns on their bodies in either the House o...

    A fascinating and -- to me, at least -- troubling book. I was aware of some of the violent outbreaks in Congress in the decades leading up to the Civil War, but I had no idea how common they were -- so many more than I'd thought. The slave states had inordinate power in both houses, pa...

    Joanne B. Freeman deserves credit for wading into the realities of the pre-Civil War Congress to find something beyond the eloquent speeches and forlorn compromises that are dimly remembered precursors to the nation's bloodiest struggle. She began looking into the fascinating duel that...

    This book bills itself as covering violence in Congress from the 1830s until the Civil War and I found this a bit misleading. While it does cover that topic, the book gives a great deal of time to B. B. French, a congressional clerk turned lobbyist who kept extensive diaries of his tim...

    Excellent! Entertaining, multi-faceted, and full of relevance to our current discourse. ...

    utterly without value as anything other than a harebrained topical business decision by fsg ...

    First I would like to state that I received this book through the Goodreads giveaway in exchange for an honest review. I would like to thank the author for giving me this opportunity and honor in being able to read this book. When I received this book I began reading it at once. I real...

    As a public historian/tour guide at the US Capitol, I will cherish this incredibly well-researched book as new foundation stone in my effort to educate the public about the tumultuous history of Congress. ...

    Freeman breathes life into a past all too frequently disconnected, romanticized, and distorted. Her prose moves with easy and while she may have a vast store of insight to drawn from, she keeps her book from every feeling dense or overly academic. Instead, Freeman allows readers to see...

    This is an interesting history of the lead-up to the American Civil War, focused on events in Congress. I liked Freeman's writing style, but the organization of the 1st half of the book was kind of confusing for me. It was not told in a chronological order, which led to a lot of repeti...

    In the early days of our republic, serving as an elected official in either house of Congress could prove to be a mortal hazard. In antebellum America, the carrying of knives and guns on one?s person was common, as was drunkenness and gambling. Add to this already volatile mix the se...

    For a record of the activities of Congress in the period before and leading up to the Civil War, this succeeds in being a breezy and engaging read without sacrificing scholarship along the way. Freeman's contention is that the road to the Civil War was paved with sectional strife t...

    After reading Yale historian Joanne B. Freeman?s magnificent book, ?Field of Blood: Violence in Congress and the Road to Civil War,? I was stunned to learn just how much physical violence took place within the halls of Congress before the Civil War, especially during the 36th Con...

    Joanne Freeman delivers a sweeping, vivid, and colorful history of the bruised and bloody days of the antebellum Congress, stretching from the Jackson years through the firing on Fort Sumter. Relayed through the diary entries and musings, sometimes poetic, of B.B. French, this narrativ...

    I really enjoyed reading this book, and sharing stories from it with my history-buff son and husband. In the pre-Civil War period, Congress (especially the House) was apparently a seething hotbed of violent emotions, violent speechifying, and sometimes outright physical violence. An...

    If you even remotely follow Congressional activity, from elections to speeches on the floor of Congress, you might wonder if any of the verbal attacks might actually result in physical violence. No doubt, the ratings on any of the news networks might spike if suddenly Elizabeth Warren ...

    I received a free Kindle copy of The Field of Blood by Joanne B. Freeman courtesy of Net Galley  and Farrar, Strauss and Giroux, the publisher. It was with the understanding that I would post a review on Net Galley, Goodreads, Amazon, Barnes and Noble and my fiction book review blog...

    Mostly a history of violence in Congress as seen through the eyes of Benjamin Brown French, a Zelig-like figure who seemed to be everywhere from 1833 and the Jacksonian Era to Grant's Reconstruction. The histories of Congress tend to play up the soaring oratory of the antebellum period...

    A scrupulously researched look at violence between members of Congress during the 1830's to the 1860's and the profound effect it had on a nation teetering towards Civil War. These incidents, for the most part, didn't end up in the public record,but most were mentioned in private diari...

    In The Field of Blood, Joanne Freeman traces Congressional violence from the mid-1830's up to the Civil War. Her research is meticulous and her narrative engaging; the voice is distinct and entertaining, pulling the reader into the world of the antebellum Congress, a world much differe...

  • Casey Wheeler
    Aug 19, 2018

    I watched every minute of the Kavanaugh hearings, appalled at the procedural bullying of the Republicans, the cries of anguish from the female protestors, and I said to myself: could the atmosphere in Congress ever have been worse than this? It was then that I remembered my history, ...

    Joanne B. Freeman's The Field of Blood: Violence in Congress and the Road to Civil War is an entertaining, well researched, and well-written examination of physical violence in U.S. Congress in the decades leading to the Civil War. Most of it stems from diarist B.B. French, who managed...

    I love reading about the Civil War, but most of my reading takes place primarily through the years 1861-1865, right in the thick of it. It was fascinating to read about the years leading up to the war, starting around the 1830s, tracing significant events of Congressional violence up t...

    So much of what we learn from Dr. Freeman?s ?The Field of Blood: Violence in the Congress and the Road to Civil War? is relevant to today?s Congress that I shudder to think of what could happen were US legislators today allowed to pack guns on their bodies in either the House o...

    A fascinating and -- to me, at least -- troubling book. I was aware of some of the violent outbreaks in Congress in the decades leading up to the Civil War, but I had no idea how common they were -- so many more than I'd thought. The slave states had inordinate power in both houses, pa...

    Joanne B. Freeman deserves credit for wading into the realities of the pre-Civil War Congress to find something beyond the eloquent speeches and forlorn compromises that are dimly remembered precursors to the nation's bloodiest struggle. She began looking into the fascinating duel that...

    This book bills itself as covering violence in Congress from the 1830s until the Civil War and I found this a bit misleading. While it does cover that topic, the book gives a great deal of time to B. B. French, a congressional clerk turned lobbyist who kept extensive diaries of his tim...

    Excellent! Entertaining, multi-faceted, and full of relevance to our current discourse. ...

    utterly without value as anything other than a harebrained topical business decision by fsg ...

    First I would like to state that I received this book through the Goodreads giveaway in exchange for an honest review. I would like to thank the author for giving me this opportunity and honor in being able to read this book. When I received this book I began reading it at once. I real...

    As a public historian/tour guide at the US Capitol, I will cherish this incredibly well-researched book as new foundation stone in my effort to educate the public about the tumultuous history of Congress. ...

    Freeman breathes life into a past all too frequently disconnected, romanticized, and distorted. Her prose moves with easy and while she may have a vast store of insight to drawn from, she keeps her book from every feeling dense or overly academic. Instead, Freeman allows readers to see...

    This is an interesting history of the lead-up to the American Civil War, focused on events in Congress. I liked Freeman's writing style, but the organization of the 1st half of the book was kind of confusing for me. It was not told in a chronological order, which led to a lot of repeti...

    In the early days of our republic, serving as an elected official in either house of Congress could prove to be a mortal hazard. In antebellum America, the carrying of knives and guns on one?s person was common, as was drunkenness and gambling. Add to this already volatile mix the se...

    For a record of the activities of Congress in the period before and leading up to the Civil War, this succeeds in being a breezy and engaging read without sacrificing scholarship along the way. Freeman's contention is that the road to the Civil War was paved with sectional strife t...

    After reading Yale historian Joanne B. Freeman?s magnificent book, ?Field of Blood: Violence in Congress and the Road to Civil War,? I was stunned to learn just how much physical violence took place within the halls of Congress before the Civil War, especially during the 36th Con...

    Joanne Freeman delivers a sweeping, vivid, and colorful history of the bruised and bloody days of the antebellum Congress, stretching from the Jackson years through the firing on Fort Sumter. Relayed through the diary entries and musings, sometimes poetic, of B.B. French, this narrativ...

    I really enjoyed reading this book, and sharing stories from it with my history-buff son and husband. In the pre-Civil War period, Congress (especially the House) was apparently a seething hotbed of violent emotions, violent speechifying, and sometimes outright physical violence. An...

    If you even remotely follow Congressional activity, from elections to speeches on the floor of Congress, you might wonder if any of the verbal attacks might actually result in physical violence. No doubt, the ratings on any of the news networks might spike if suddenly Elizabeth Warren ...

    I received a free Kindle copy of The Field of Blood by Joanne B. Freeman courtesy of Net Galley  and Farrar, Strauss and Giroux, the publisher. It was with the understanding that I would post a review on Net Galley, Goodreads, Amazon, Barnes and Noble and my fiction book review blog...

  • Carl
    Jan 14, 2019

    I watched every minute of the Kavanaugh hearings, appalled at the procedural bullying of the Republicans, the cries of anguish from the female protestors, and I said to myself: could the atmosphere in Congress ever have been worse than this? It was then that I remembered my history, ...

    Joanne B. Freeman's The Field of Blood: Violence in Congress and the Road to Civil War is an entertaining, well researched, and well-written examination of physical violence in U.S. Congress in the decades leading to the Civil War. Most of it stems from diarist B.B. French, who managed...

    I love reading about the Civil War, but most of my reading takes place primarily through the years 1861-1865, right in the thick of it. It was fascinating to read about the years leading up to the war, starting around the 1830s, tracing significant events of Congressional violence up t...

    So much of what we learn from Dr. Freeman?s ?The Field of Blood: Violence in the Congress and the Road to Civil War? is relevant to today?s Congress that I shudder to think of what could happen were US legislators today allowed to pack guns on their bodies in either the House o...

    A fascinating and -- to me, at least -- troubling book. I was aware of some of the violent outbreaks in Congress in the decades leading up to the Civil War, but I had no idea how common they were -- so many more than I'd thought. The slave states had inordinate power in both houses, pa...

    Joanne B. Freeman deserves credit for wading into the realities of the pre-Civil War Congress to find something beyond the eloquent speeches and forlorn compromises that are dimly remembered precursors to the nation's bloodiest struggle. She began looking into the fascinating duel that...

    This book bills itself as covering violence in Congress from the 1830s until the Civil War and I found this a bit misleading. While it does cover that topic, the book gives a great deal of time to B. B. French, a congressional clerk turned lobbyist who kept extensive diaries of his tim...

    Excellent! Entertaining, multi-faceted, and full of relevance to our current discourse. ...

    utterly without value as anything other than a harebrained topical business decision by fsg ...

    First I would like to state that I received this book through the Goodreads giveaway in exchange for an honest review. I would like to thank the author for giving me this opportunity and honor in being able to read this book. When I received this book I began reading it at once. I real...

    As a public historian/tour guide at the US Capitol, I will cherish this incredibly well-researched book as new foundation stone in my effort to educate the public about the tumultuous history of Congress. ...

    Freeman breathes life into a past all too frequently disconnected, romanticized, and distorted. Her prose moves with easy and while she may have a vast store of insight to drawn from, she keeps her book from every feeling dense or overly academic. Instead, Freeman allows readers to see...

    This is an interesting history of the lead-up to the American Civil War, focused on events in Congress. I liked Freeman's writing style, but the organization of the 1st half of the book was kind of confusing for me. It was not told in a chronological order, which led to a lot of repeti...

    In the early days of our republic, serving as an elected official in either house of Congress could prove to be a mortal hazard. In antebellum America, the carrying of knives and guns on one?s person was common, as was drunkenness and gambling. Add to this already volatile mix the se...

    For a record of the activities of Congress in the period before and leading up to the Civil War, this succeeds in being a breezy and engaging read without sacrificing scholarship along the way. Freeman's contention is that the road to the Civil War was paved with sectional strife t...

    After reading Yale historian Joanne B. Freeman?s magnificent book, ?Field of Blood: Violence in Congress and the Road to Civil War,? I was stunned to learn just how much physical violence took place within the halls of Congress before the Civil War, especially during the 36th Con...

    Joanne Freeman delivers a sweeping, vivid, and colorful history of the bruised and bloody days of the antebellum Congress, stretching from the Jackson years through the firing on Fort Sumter. Relayed through the diary entries and musings, sometimes poetic, of B.B. French, this narrativ...

    I really enjoyed reading this book, and sharing stories from it with my history-buff son and husband. In the pre-Civil War period, Congress (especially the House) was apparently a seething hotbed of violent emotions, violent speechifying, and sometimes outright physical violence. An...

    If you even remotely follow Congressional activity, from elections to speeches on the floor of Congress, you might wonder if any of the verbal attacks might actually result in physical violence. No doubt, the ratings on any of the news networks might spike if suddenly Elizabeth Warren ...

    I received a free Kindle copy of The Field of Blood by Joanne B. Freeman courtesy of Net Galley  and Farrar, Strauss and Giroux, the publisher. It was with the understanding that I would post a review on Net Galley, Goodreads, Amazon, Barnes and Noble and my fiction book review blog...

    Mostly a history of violence in Congress as seen through the eyes of Benjamin Brown French, a Zelig-like figure who seemed to be everywhere from 1833 and the Jacksonian Era to Grant's Reconstruction. The histories of Congress tend to play up the soaring oratory of the antebellum period...

    A scrupulously researched look at violence between members of Congress during the 1830's to the 1860's and the profound effect it had on a nation teetering towards Civil War. These incidents, for the most part, didn't end up in the public record,but most were mentioned in private diari...

  • Jessica Stokes
    Nov 26, 2018

    I watched every minute of the Kavanaugh hearings, appalled at the procedural bullying of the Republicans, the cries of anguish from the female protestors, and I said to myself: could the atmosphere in Congress ever have been worse than this? It was then that I remembered my history, ...

    Joanne B. Freeman's The Field of Blood: Violence in Congress and the Road to Civil War is an entertaining, well researched, and well-written examination of physical violence in U.S. Congress in the decades leading to the Civil War. Most of it stems from diarist B.B. French, who managed...

    I love reading about the Civil War, but most of my reading takes place primarily through the years 1861-1865, right in the thick of it. It was fascinating to read about the years leading up to the war, starting around the 1830s, tracing significant events of Congressional violence up t...

    So much of what we learn from Dr. Freeman?s ?The Field of Blood: Violence in the Congress and the Road to Civil War? is relevant to today?s Congress that I shudder to think of what could happen were US legislators today allowed to pack guns on their bodies in either the House o...

    A fascinating and -- to me, at least -- troubling book. I was aware of some of the violent outbreaks in Congress in the decades leading up to the Civil War, but I had no idea how common they were -- so many more than I'd thought. The slave states had inordinate power in both houses, pa...

    Joanne B. Freeman deserves credit for wading into the realities of the pre-Civil War Congress to find something beyond the eloquent speeches and forlorn compromises that are dimly remembered precursors to the nation's bloodiest struggle. She began looking into the fascinating duel that...

    This book bills itself as covering violence in Congress from the 1830s until the Civil War and I found this a bit misleading. While it does cover that topic, the book gives a great deal of time to B. B. French, a congressional clerk turned lobbyist who kept extensive diaries of his tim...

    Excellent! Entertaining, multi-faceted, and full of relevance to our current discourse. ...

    utterly without value as anything other than a harebrained topical business decision by fsg ...

    First I would like to state that I received this book through the Goodreads giveaway in exchange for an honest review. I would like to thank the author for giving me this opportunity and honor in being able to read this book. When I received this book I began reading it at once. I real...

    As a public historian/tour guide at the US Capitol, I will cherish this incredibly well-researched book as new foundation stone in my effort to educate the public about the tumultuous history of Congress. ...

    Freeman breathes life into a past all too frequently disconnected, romanticized, and distorted. Her prose moves with easy and while she may have a vast store of insight to drawn from, she keeps her book from every feeling dense or overly academic. Instead, Freeman allows readers to see...

    This is an interesting history of the lead-up to the American Civil War, focused on events in Congress. I liked Freeman's writing style, but the organization of the 1st half of the book was kind of confusing for me. It was not told in a chronological order, which led to a lot of repeti...

    In the early days of our republic, serving as an elected official in either house of Congress could prove to be a mortal hazard. In antebellum America, the carrying of knives and guns on one?s person was common, as was drunkenness and gambling. Add to this already volatile mix the se...

    For a record of the activities of Congress in the period before and leading up to the Civil War, this succeeds in being a breezy and engaging read without sacrificing scholarship along the way. Freeman's contention is that the road to the Civil War was paved with sectional strife t...

    After reading Yale historian Joanne B. Freeman?s magnificent book, ?Field of Blood: Violence in Congress and the Road to Civil War,? I was stunned to learn just how much physical violence took place within the halls of Congress before the Civil War, especially during the 36th Con...

    Joanne Freeman delivers a sweeping, vivid, and colorful history of the bruised and bloody days of the antebellum Congress, stretching from the Jackson years through the firing on Fort Sumter. Relayed through the diary entries and musings, sometimes poetic, of B.B. French, this narrativ...

    I really enjoyed reading this book, and sharing stories from it with my history-buff son and husband. In the pre-Civil War period, Congress (especially the House) was apparently a seething hotbed of violent emotions, violent speechifying, and sometimes outright physical violence. An...

    If you even remotely follow Congressional activity, from elections to speeches on the floor of Congress, you might wonder if any of the verbal attacks might actually result in physical violence. No doubt, the ratings on any of the news networks might spike if suddenly Elizabeth Warren ...

    I received a free Kindle copy of The Field of Blood by Joanne B. Freeman courtesy of Net Galley  and Farrar, Strauss and Giroux, the publisher. It was with the understanding that I would post a review on Net Galley, Goodreads, Amazon, Barnes and Noble and my fiction book review blog...

    Mostly a history of violence in Congress as seen through the eyes of Benjamin Brown French, a Zelig-like figure who seemed to be everywhere from 1833 and the Jacksonian Era to Grant's Reconstruction. The histories of Congress tend to play up the soaring oratory of the antebellum period...

    A scrupulously researched look at violence between members of Congress during the 1830's to the 1860's and the profound effect it had on a nation teetering towards Civil War. These incidents, for the most part, didn't end up in the public record,but most were mentioned in private diari...

    In The Field of Blood, Joanne Freeman traces Congressional violence from the mid-1830's up to the Civil War. Her research is meticulous and her narrative engaging; the voice is distinct and entertaining, pulling the reader into the world of the antebellum Congress, a world much differe...

    Freeman's work is an excellent overview of the violence in Congress in pre-Civil War America, something I deal with on a day to day basis at work. We always knew that this was a rather chaotic era in American politics, but Freeman sheds light on forgotten and often unknown individuals ...

    The instant I heard about this book it landed on my "want to read" list, and it didn't disappoint! A wonderful, richly researched and beautifully written exploration of both the historical record and the messy past that lives between the lines of the historical record. Freeman's cho...

    This book basically follows the journal of Benjamin Brown French during his 40 years in Washington, focusing particularly on the violence in Congress. And boy was there a lot of it, both threatened and actual. Representatives had no compunction, it seems, in stalking across the aisle a...

    Does this sound familiar: It is a time when technological advances were increasing the speed of communication, politics is becoming increasingly divided, hostile, the media is overtly biased, and Congress is becoming increasingly ineffective? The difference is now; Congress members...

    This surprising look at violence that occurred on both floors of Congress (and nearby environs) in the years leading up to the Civil War offers a deeper understanding of how that bloody conflict came to be inevitable. What's remarkable when you read this account is that disunion and wa...

    This highly scholarly book by a Yale history professor shows us how violence prone members of Congress proved to be during the 30 years prior to the civil war. People who rant against our current uncivil political culture should take note of the portrayal of Congress during the mid 180...

    I listened to Joanne Freeman read this book and basked in the enthusiasm of her voice, the unfolding of her narrative, and the depth of her research. I want to meet Benjamin French! Through his eyes, I now understand sectionalism and John Quincy Adams much better. Through his diaries, ...

  • Sasha
    Sep 12, 2018

    I watched every minute of the Kavanaugh hearings, appalled at the procedural bullying of the Republicans, the cries of anguish from the female protestors, and I said to myself: could the atmosphere in Congress ever have been worse than this? It was then that I remembered my history, ...

    Joanne B. Freeman's The Field of Blood: Violence in Congress and the Road to Civil War is an entertaining, well researched, and well-written examination of physical violence in U.S. Congress in the decades leading to the Civil War. Most of it stems from diarist B.B. French, who managed...

    I love reading about the Civil War, but most of my reading takes place primarily through the years 1861-1865, right in the thick of it. It was fascinating to read about the years leading up to the war, starting around the 1830s, tracing significant events of Congressional violence up t...

    So much of what we learn from Dr. Freeman?s ?The Field of Blood: Violence in the Congress and the Road to Civil War? is relevant to today?s Congress that I shudder to think of what could happen were US legislators today allowed to pack guns on their bodies in either the House o...

    A fascinating and -- to me, at least -- troubling book. I was aware of some of the violent outbreaks in Congress in the decades leading up to the Civil War, but I had no idea how common they were -- so many more than I'd thought. The slave states had inordinate power in both houses, pa...

    Joanne B. Freeman deserves credit for wading into the realities of the pre-Civil War Congress to find something beyond the eloquent speeches and forlorn compromises that are dimly remembered precursors to the nation's bloodiest struggle. She began looking into the fascinating duel that...

    This book bills itself as covering violence in Congress from the 1830s until the Civil War and I found this a bit misleading. While it does cover that topic, the book gives a great deal of time to B. B. French, a congressional clerk turned lobbyist who kept extensive diaries of his tim...

    Excellent! Entertaining, multi-faceted, and full of relevance to our current discourse. ...

    utterly without value as anything other than a harebrained topical business decision by fsg ...

    First I would like to state that I received this book through the Goodreads giveaway in exchange for an honest review. I would like to thank the author for giving me this opportunity and honor in being able to read this book. When I received this book I began reading it at once. I real...

  • Sarah
    Dec 20, 2018

    I watched every minute of the Kavanaugh hearings, appalled at the procedural bullying of the Republicans, the cries of anguish from the female protestors, and I said to myself: could the atmosphere in Congress ever have been worse than this? It was then that I remembered my history, ...

    Joanne B. Freeman's The Field of Blood: Violence in Congress and the Road to Civil War is an entertaining, well researched, and well-written examination of physical violence in U.S. Congress in the decades leading to the Civil War. Most of it stems from diarist B.B. French, who managed...

    I love reading about the Civil War, but most of my reading takes place primarily through the years 1861-1865, right in the thick of it. It was fascinating to read about the years leading up to the war, starting around the 1830s, tracing significant events of Congressional violence up t...

  • E
    Dec 31, 2018

    I watched every minute of the Kavanaugh hearings, appalled at the procedural bullying of the Republicans, the cries of anguish from the female protestors, and I said to myself: could the atmosphere in Congress ever have been worse than this? It was then that I remembered my history, ...

    Joanne B. Freeman's The Field of Blood: Violence in Congress and the Road to Civil War is an entertaining, well researched, and well-written examination of physical violence in U.S. Congress in the decades leading to the Civil War. Most of it stems from diarist B.B. French, who managed...

    I love reading about the Civil War, but most of my reading takes place primarily through the years 1861-1865, right in the thick of it. It was fascinating to read about the years leading up to the war, starting around the 1830s, tracing significant events of Congressional violence up t...

    So much of what we learn from Dr. Freeman?s ?The Field of Blood: Violence in the Congress and the Road to Civil War? is relevant to today?s Congress that I shudder to think of what could happen were US legislators today allowed to pack guns on their bodies in either the House o...

    A fascinating and -- to me, at least -- troubling book. I was aware of some of the violent outbreaks in Congress in the decades leading up to the Civil War, but I had no idea how common they were -- so many more than I'd thought. The slave states had inordinate power in both houses, pa...

    Joanne B. Freeman deserves credit for wading into the realities of the pre-Civil War Congress to find something beyond the eloquent speeches and forlorn compromises that are dimly remembered precursors to the nation's bloodiest struggle. She began looking into the fascinating duel that...

    This book bills itself as covering violence in Congress from the 1830s until the Civil War and I found this a bit misleading. While it does cover that topic, the book gives a great deal of time to B. B. French, a congressional clerk turned lobbyist who kept extensive diaries of his tim...

    Excellent! Entertaining, multi-faceted, and full of relevance to our current discourse. ...

    utterly without value as anything other than a harebrained topical business decision by fsg ...

    First I would like to state that I received this book through the Goodreads giveaway in exchange for an honest review. I would like to thank the author for giving me this opportunity and honor in being able to read this book. When I received this book I began reading it at once. I real...

    As a public historian/tour guide at the US Capitol, I will cherish this incredibly well-researched book as new foundation stone in my effort to educate the public about the tumultuous history of Congress. ...

    Freeman breathes life into a past all too frequently disconnected, romanticized, and distorted. Her prose moves with easy and while she may have a vast store of insight to drawn from, she keeps her book from every feeling dense or overly academic. Instead, Freeman allows readers to see...

    This is an interesting history of the lead-up to the American Civil War, focused on events in Congress. I liked Freeman's writing style, but the organization of the 1st half of the book was kind of confusing for me. It was not told in a chronological order, which led to a lot of repeti...

    In the early days of our republic, serving as an elected official in either house of Congress could prove to be a mortal hazard. In antebellum America, the carrying of knives and guns on one?s person was common, as was drunkenness and gambling. Add to this already volatile mix the se...

    For a record of the activities of Congress in the period before and leading up to the Civil War, this succeeds in being a breezy and engaging read without sacrificing scholarship along the way. Freeman's contention is that the road to the Civil War was paved with sectional strife t...

    After reading Yale historian Joanne B. Freeman?s magnificent book, ?Field of Blood: Violence in Congress and the Road to Civil War,? I was stunned to learn just how much physical violence took place within the halls of Congress before the Civil War, especially during the 36th Con...

    Joanne Freeman delivers a sweeping, vivid, and colorful history of the bruised and bloody days of the antebellum Congress, stretching from the Jackson years through the firing on Fort Sumter. Relayed through the diary entries and musings, sometimes poetic, of B.B. French, this narrativ...

    I really enjoyed reading this book, and sharing stories from it with my history-buff son and husband. In the pre-Civil War period, Congress (especially the House) was apparently a seething hotbed of violent emotions, violent speechifying, and sometimes outright physical violence. An...

    If you even remotely follow Congressional activity, from elections to speeches on the floor of Congress, you might wonder if any of the verbal attacks might actually result in physical violence. No doubt, the ratings on any of the news networks might spike if suddenly Elizabeth Warren ...

    I received a free Kindle copy of The Field of Blood by Joanne B. Freeman courtesy of Net Galley  and Farrar, Strauss and Giroux, the publisher. It was with the understanding that I would post a review on Net Galley, Goodreads, Amazon, Barnes and Noble and my fiction book review blog...

    Mostly a history of violence in Congress as seen through the eyes of Benjamin Brown French, a Zelig-like figure who seemed to be everywhere from 1833 and the Jacksonian Era to Grant's Reconstruction. The histories of Congress tend to play up the soaring oratory of the antebellum period...

    A scrupulously researched look at violence between members of Congress during the 1830's to the 1860's and the profound effect it had on a nation teetering towards Civil War. These incidents, for the most part, didn't end up in the public record,but most were mentioned in private diari...

    In The Field of Blood, Joanne Freeman traces Congressional violence from the mid-1830's up to the Civil War. Her research is meticulous and her narrative engaging; the voice is distinct and entertaining, pulling the reader into the world of the antebellum Congress, a world much differe...

    Freeman's work is an excellent overview of the violence in Congress in pre-Civil War America, something I deal with on a day to day basis at work. We always knew that this was a rather chaotic era in American politics, but Freeman sheds light on forgotten and often unknown individuals ...

    The instant I heard about this book it landed on my "want to read" list, and it didn't disappoint! A wonderful, richly researched and beautifully written exploration of both the historical record and the messy past that lives between the lines of the historical record. Freeman's cho...

    This book basically follows the journal of Benjamin Brown French during his 40 years in Washington, focusing particularly on the violence in Congress. And boy was there a lot of it, both threatened and actual. Representatives had no compunction, it seems, in stalking across the aisle a...

  • Daniel Casey
    Aug 20, 2018

    I watched every minute of the Kavanaugh hearings, appalled at the procedural bullying of the Republicans, the cries of anguish from the female protestors, and I said to myself: could the atmosphere in Congress ever have been worse than this? It was then that I remembered my history, ...

    Joanne B. Freeman's The Field of Blood: Violence in Congress and the Road to Civil War is an entertaining, well researched, and well-written examination of physical violence in U.S. Congress in the decades leading to the Civil War. Most of it stems from diarist B.B. French, who managed...

    I love reading about the Civil War, but most of my reading takes place primarily through the years 1861-1865, right in the thick of it. It was fascinating to read about the years leading up to the war, starting around the 1830s, tracing significant events of Congressional violence up t...

    So much of what we learn from Dr. Freeman?s ?The Field of Blood: Violence in the Congress and the Road to Civil War? is relevant to today?s Congress that I shudder to think of what could happen were US legislators today allowed to pack guns on their bodies in either the House o...

    A fascinating and -- to me, at least -- troubling book. I was aware of some of the violent outbreaks in Congress in the decades leading up to the Civil War, but I had no idea how common they were -- so many more than I'd thought. The slave states had inordinate power in both houses, pa...

    Joanne B. Freeman deserves credit for wading into the realities of the pre-Civil War Congress to find something beyond the eloquent speeches and forlorn compromises that are dimly remembered precursors to the nation's bloodiest struggle. She began looking into the fascinating duel that...

    This book bills itself as covering violence in Congress from the 1830s until the Civil War and I found this a bit misleading. While it does cover that topic, the book gives a great deal of time to B. B. French, a congressional clerk turned lobbyist who kept extensive diaries of his tim...

    Excellent! Entertaining, multi-faceted, and full of relevance to our current discourse. ...

    utterly without value as anything other than a harebrained topical business decision by fsg ...

    First I would like to state that I received this book through the Goodreads giveaway in exchange for an honest review. I would like to thank the author for giving me this opportunity and honor in being able to read this book. When I received this book I began reading it at once. I real...

    As a public historian/tour guide at the US Capitol, I will cherish this incredibly well-researched book as new foundation stone in my effort to educate the public about the tumultuous history of Congress. ...

    Freeman breathes life into a past all too frequently disconnected, romanticized, and distorted. Her prose moves with easy and while she may have a vast store of insight to drawn from, she keeps her book from every feeling dense or overly academic. Instead, Freeman allows readers to see...

  • Katie Bee
    Nov 27, 2018

    I watched every minute of the Kavanaugh hearings, appalled at the procedural bullying of the Republicans, the cries of anguish from the female protestors, and I said to myself: could the atmosphere in Congress ever have been worse than this? It was then that I remembered my history, ...

    Joanne B. Freeman's The Field of Blood: Violence in Congress and the Road to Civil War is an entertaining, well researched, and well-written examination of physical violence in U.S. Congress in the decades leading to the Civil War. Most of it stems from diarist B.B. French, who managed...

    I love reading about the Civil War, but most of my reading takes place primarily through the years 1861-1865, right in the thick of it. It was fascinating to read about the years leading up to the war, starting around the 1830s, tracing significant events of Congressional violence up t...

    So much of what we learn from Dr. Freeman?s ?The Field of Blood: Violence in the Congress and the Road to Civil War? is relevant to today?s Congress that I shudder to think of what could happen were US legislators today allowed to pack guns on their bodies in either the House o...

    A fascinating and -- to me, at least -- troubling book. I was aware of some of the violent outbreaks in Congress in the decades leading up to the Civil War, but I had no idea how common they were -- so many more than I'd thought. The slave states had inordinate power in both houses, pa...

    Joanne B. Freeman deserves credit for wading into the realities of the pre-Civil War Congress to find something beyond the eloquent speeches and forlorn compromises that are dimly remembered precursors to the nation's bloodiest struggle. She began looking into the fascinating duel that...

    This book bills itself as covering violence in Congress from the 1830s until the Civil War and I found this a bit misleading. While it does cover that topic, the book gives a great deal of time to B. B. French, a congressional clerk turned lobbyist who kept extensive diaries of his tim...

    Excellent! Entertaining, multi-faceted, and full of relevance to our current discourse. ...

    utterly without value as anything other than a harebrained topical business decision by fsg ...

    First I would like to state that I received this book through the Goodreads giveaway in exchange for an honest review. I would like to thank the author for giving me this opportunity and honor in being able to read this book. When I received this book I began reading it at once. I real...

    As a public historian/tour guide at the US Capitol, I will cherish this incredibly well-researched book as new foundation stone in my effort to educate the public about the tumultuous history of Congress. ...

    Freeman breathes life into a past all too frequently disconnected, romanticized, and distorted. Her prose moves with easy and while she may have a vast store of insight to drawn from, she keeps her book from every feeling dense or overly academic. Instead, Freeman allows readers to see...

    This is an interesting history of the lead-up to the American Civil War, focused on events in Congress. I liked Freeman's writing style, but the organization of the 1st half of the book was kind of confusing for me. It was not told in a chronological order, which led to a lot of repeti...

    In the early days of our republic, serving as an elected official in either house of Congress could prove to be a mortal hazard. In antebellum America, the carrying of knives and guns on one?s person was common, as was drunkenness and gambling. Add to this already volatile mix the se...

    For a record of the activities of Congress in the period before and leading up to the Civil War, this succeeds in being a breezy and engaging read without sacrificing scholarship along the way. Freeman's contention is that the road to the Civil War was paved with sectional strife t...

    After reading Yale historian Joanne B. Freeman?s magnificent book, ?Field of Blood: Violence in Congress and the Road to Civil War,? I was stunned to learn just how much physical violence took place within the halls of Congress before the Civil War, especially during the 36th Con...

    Joanne Freeman delivers a sweeping, vivid, and colorful history of the bruised and bloody days of the antebellum Congress, stretching from the Jackson years through the firing on Fort Sumter. Relayed through the diary entries and musings, sometimes poetic, of B.B. French, this narrativ...

    I really enjoyed reading this book, and sharing stories from it with my history-buff son and husband. In the pre-Civil War period, Congress (especially the House) was apparently a seething hotbed of violent emotions, violent speechifying, and sometimes outright physical violence. An...

    If you even remotely follow Congressional activity, from elections to speeches on the floor of Congress, you might wonder if any of the verbal attacks might actually result in physical violence. No doubt, the ratings on any of the news networks might spike if suddenly Elizabeth Warren ...

    I received a free Kindle copy of The Field of Blood by Joanne B. Freeman courtesy of Net Galley  and Farrar, Strauss and Giroux, the publisher. It was with the understanding that I would post a review on Net Galley, Goodreads, Amazon, Barnes and Noble and my fiction book review blog...

    Mostly a history of violence in Congress as seen through the eyes of Benjamin Brown French, a Zelig-like figure who seemed to be everywhere from 1833 and the Jacksonian Era to Grant's Reconstruction. The histories of Congress tend to play up the soaring oratory of the antebellum period...

    A scrupulously researched look at violence between members of Congress during the 1830's to the 1860's and the profound effect it had on a nation teetering towards Civil War. These incidents, for the most part, didn't end up in the public record,but most were mentioned in private diari...

    In The Field of Blood, Joanne Freeman traces Congressional violence from the mid-1830's up to the Civil War. Her research is meticulous and her narrative engaging; the voice is distinct and entertaining, pulling the reader into the world of the antebellum Congress, a world much differe...

    Freeman's work is an excellent overview of the violence in Congress in pre-Civil War America, something I deal with on a day to day basis at work. We always knew that this was a rather chaotic era in American politics, but Freeman sheds light on forgotten and often unknown individuals ...

    The instant I heard about this book it landed on my "want to read" list, and it didn't disappoint! A wonderful, richly researched and beautifully written exploration of both the historical record and the messy past that lives between the lines of the historical record. Freeman's cho...

  • Bruce Katz
    Feb 17, 2019

    I watched every minute of the Kavanaugh hearings, appalled at the procedural bullying of the Republicans, the cries of anguish from the female protestors, and I said to myself: could the atmosphere in Congress ever have been worse than this? It was then that I remembered my history, ...

    Joanne B. Freeman's The Field of Blood: Violence in Congress and the Road to Civil War is an entertaining, well researched, and well-written examination of physical violence in U.S. Congress in the decades leading to the Civil War. Most of it stems from diarist B.B. French, who managed...

    I love reading about the Civil War, but most of my reading takes place primarily through the years 1861-1865, right in the thick of it. It was fascinating to read about the years leading up to the war, starting around the 1830s, tracing significant events of Congressional violence up t...

    So much of what we learn from Dr. Freeman?s ?The Field of Blood: Violence in the Congress and the Road to Civil War? is relevant to today?s Congress that I shudder to think of what could happen were US legislators today allowed to pack guns on their bodies in either the House o...

    A fascinating and -- to me, at least -- troubling book. I was aware of some of the violent outbreaks in Congress in the decades leading up to the Civil War, but I had no idea how common they were -- so many more than I'd thought. The slave states had inordinate power in both houses, pa...

  • Justin Phillips
    Feb 06, 2019

    I watched every minute of the Kavanaugh hearings, appalled at the procedural bullying of the Republicans, the cries of anguish from the female protestors, and I said to myself: could the atmosphere in Congress ever have been worse than this? It was then that I remembered my history, ...

    Joanne B. Freeman's The Field of Blood: Violence in Congress and the Road to Civil War is an entertaining, well researched, and well-written examination of physical violence in U.S. Congress in the decades leading to the Civil War. Most of it stems from diarist B.B. French, who managed...

    I love reading about the Civil War, but most of my reading takes place primarily through the years 1861-1865, right in the thick of it. It was fascinating to read about the years leading up to the war, starting around the 1830s, tracing significant events of Congressional violence up t...

    So much of what we learn from Dr. Freeman?s ?The Field of Blood: Violence in the Congress and the Road to Civil War? is relevant to today?s Congress that I shudder to think of what could happen were US legislators today allowed to pack guns on their bodies in either the House o...

    A fascinating and -- to me, at least -- troubling book. I was aware of some of the violent outbreaks in Congress in the decades leading up to the Civil War, but I had no idea how common they were -- so many more than I'd thought. The slave states had inordinate power in both houses, pa...

    Joanne B. Freeman deserves credit for wading into the realities of the pre-Civil War Congress to find something beyond the eloquent speeches and forlorn compromises that are dimly remembered precursors to the nation's bloodiest struggle. She began looking into the fascinating duel that...

    This book bills itself as covering violence in Congress from the 1830s until the Civil War and I found this a bit misleading. While it does cover that topic, the book gives a great deal of time to B. B. French, a congressional clerk turned lobbyist who kept extensive diaries of his tim...

    Excellent! Entertaining, multi-faceted, and full of relevance to our current discourse. ...

    utterly without value as anything other than a harebrained topical business decision by fsg ...

    First I would like to state that I received this book through the Goodreads giveaway in exchange for an honest review. I would like to thank the author for giving me this opportunity and honor in being able to read this book. When I received this book I began reading it at once. I real...

    As a public historian/tour guide at the US Capitol, I will cherish this incredibly well-researched book as new foundation stone in my effort to educate the public about the tumultuous history of Congress. ...

    Freeman breathes life into a past all too frequently disconnected, romanticized, and distorted. Her prose moves with easy and while she may have a vast store of insight to drawn from, she keeps her book from every feeling dense or overly academic. Instead, Freeman allows readers to see...

    This is an interesting history of the lead-up to the American Civil War, focused on events in Congress. I liked Freeman's writing style, but the organization of the 1st half of the book was kind of confusing for me. It was not told in a chronological order, which led to a lot of repeti...

    In the early days of our republic, serving as an elected official in either house of Congress could prove to be a mortal hazard. In antebellum America, the carrying of knives and guns on one?s person was common, as was drunkenness and gambling. Add to this already volatile mix the se...

    For a record of the activities of Congress in the period before and leading up to the Civil War, this succeeds in being a breezy and engaging read without sacrificing scholarship along the way. Freeman's contention is that the road to the Civil War was paved with sectional strife t...

    After reading Yale historian Joanne B. Freeman?s magnificent book, ?Field of Blood: Violence in Congress and the Road to Civil War,? I was stunned to learn just how much physical violence took place within the halls of Congress before the Civil War, especially during the 36th Con...

    Joanne Freeman delivers a sweeping, vivid, and colorful history of the bruised and bloody days of the antebellum Congress, stretching from the Jackson years through the firing on Fort Sumter. Relayed through the diary entries and musings, sometimes poetic, of B.B. French, this narrativ...

    I really enjoyed reading this book, and sharing stories from it with my history-buff son and husband. In the pre-Civil War period, Congress (especially the House) was apparently a seething hotbed of violent emotions, violent speechifying, and sometimes outright physical violence. An...

    If you even remotely follow Congressional activity, from elections to speeches on the floor of Congress, you might wonder if any of the verbal attacks might actually result in physical violence. No doubt, the ratings on any of the news networks might spike if suddenly Elizabeth Warren ...

    I received a free Kindle copy of The Field of Blood by Joanne B. Freeman courtesy of Net Galley  and Farrar, Strauss and Giroux, the publisher. It was with the understanding that I would post a review on Net Galley, Goodreads, Amazon, Barnes and Noble and my fiction book review blog...

    Mostly a history of violence in Congress as seen through the eyes of Benjamin Brown French, a Zelig-like figure who seemed to be everywhere from 1833 and the Jacksonian Era to Grant's Reconstruction. The histories of Congress tend to play up the soaring oratory of the antebellum period...

    A scrupulously researched look at violence between members of Congress during the 1830's to the 1860's and the profound effect it had on a nation teetering towards Civil War. These incidents, for the most part, didn't end up in the public record,but most were mentioned in private diari...

    In The Field of Blood, Joanne Freeman traces Congressional violence from the mid-1830's up to the Civil War. Her research is meticulous and her narrative engaging; the voice is distinct and entertaining, pulling the reader into the world of the antebellum Congress, a world much differe...

    Freeman's work is an excellent overview of the violence in Congress in pre-Civil War America, something I deal with on a day to day basis at work. We always knew that this was a rather chaotic era in American politics, but Freeman sheds light on forgotten and often unknown individuals ...

    The instant I heard about this book it landed on my "want to read" list, and it didn't disappoint! A wonderful, richly researched and beautifully written exploration of both the historical record and the messy past that lives between the lines of the historical record. Freeman's cho...

    This book basically follows the journal of Benjamin Brown French during his 40 years in Washington, focusing particularly on the violence in Congress. And boy was there a lot of it, both threatened and actual. Representatives had no compunction, it seems, in stalking across the aisle a...

    Does this sound familiar: It is a time when technological advances were increasing the speed of communication, politics is becoming increasingly divided, hostile, the media is overtly biased, and Congress is becoming increasingly ineffective? The difference is now; Congress members...

  • Will Drickey
    Feb 01, 2019

    I watched every minute of the Kavanaugh hearings, appalled at the procedural bullying of the Republicans, the cries of anguish from the female protestors, and I said to myself: could the atmosphere in Congress ever have been worse than this? It was then that I remembered my history, ...

    Joanne B. Freeman's The Field of Blood: Violence in Congress and the Road to Civil War is an entertaining, well researched, and well-written examination of physical violence in U.S. Congress in the decades leading to the Civil War. Most of it stems from diarist B.B. French, who managed...

    I love reading about the Civil War, but most of my reading takes place primarily through the years 1861-1865, right in the thick of it. It was fascinating to read about the years leading up to the war, starting around the 1830s, tracing significant events of Congressional violence up t...

    So much of what we learn from Dr. Freeman?s ?The Field of Blood: Violence in the Congress and the Road to Civil War? is relevant to today?s Congress that I shudder to think of what could happen were US legislators today allowed to pack guns on their bodies in either the House o...

    A fascinating and -- to me, at least -- troubling book. I was aware of some of the violent outbreaks in Congress in the decades leading up to the Civil War, but I had no idea how common they were -- so many more than I'd thought. The slave states had inordinate power in both houses, pa...

    Joanne B. Freeman deserves credit for wading into the realities of the pre-Civil War Congress to find something beyond the eloquent speeches and forlorn compromises that are dimly remembered precursors to the nation's bloodiest struggle. She began looking into the fascinating duel that...

    This book bills itself as covering violence in Congress from the 1830s until the Civil War and I found this a bit misleading. While it does cover that topic, the book gives a great deal of time to B. B. French, a congressional clerk turned lobbyist who kept extensive diaries of his tim...

    Excellent! Entertaining, multi-faceted, and full of relevance to our current discourse. ...

    utterly without value as anything other than a harebrained topical business decision by fsg ...

  • Jessica Jackson
    Sep 25, 2018

    I watched every minute of the Kavanaugh hearings, appalled at the procedural bullying of the Republicans, the cries of anguish from the female protestors, and I said to myself: could the atmosphere in Congress ever have been worse than this? It was then that I remembered my history, ...

    Joanne B. Freeman's The Field of Blood: Violence in Congress and the Road to Civil War is an entertaining, well researched, and well-written examination of physical violence in U.S. Congress in the decades leading to the Civil War. Most of it stems from diarist B.B. French, who managed...

    I love reading about the Civil War, but most of my reading takes place primarily through the years 1861-1865, right in the thick of it. It was fascinating to read about the years leading up to the war, starting around the 1830s, tracing significant events of Congressional violence up t...

    So much of what we learn from Dr. Freeman?s ?The Field of Blood: Violence in the Congress and the Road to Civil War? is relevant to today?s Congress that I shudder to think of what could happen were US legislators today allowed to pack guns on their bodies in either the House o...

    A fascinating and -- to me, at least -- troubling book. I was aware of some of the violent outbreaks in Congress in the decades leading up to the Civil War, but I had no idea how common they were -- so many more than I'd thought. The slave states had inordinate power in both houses, pa...

    Joanne B. Freeman deserves credit for wading into the realities of the pre-Civil War Congress to find something beyond the eloquent speeches and forlorn compromises that are dimly remembered precursors to the nation's bloodiest struggle. She began looking into the fascinating duel that...

    This book bills itself as covering violence in Congress from the 1830s until the Civil War and I found this a bit misleading. While it does cover that topic, the book gives a great deal of time to B. B. French, a congressional clerk turned lobbyist who kept extensive diaries of his tim...

    Excellent! Entertaining, multi-faceted, and full of relevance to our current discourse. ...

    utterly without value as anything other than a harebrained topical business decision by fsg ...

    First I would like to state that I received this book through the Goodreads giveaway in exchange for an honest review. I would like to thank the author for giving me this opportunity and honor in being able to read this book. When I received this book I began reading it at once. I real...

    As a public historian/tour guide at the US Capitol, I will cherish this incredibly well-researched book as new foundation stone in my effort to educate the public about the tumultuous history of Congress. ...

  • Anne Morgan
    Aug 11, 2018

    I watched every minute of the Kavanaugh hearings, appalled at the procedural bullying of the Republicans, the cries of anguish from the female protestors, and I said to myself: could the atmosphere in Congress ever have been worse than this? It was then that I remembered my history, ...

    Joanne B. Freeman's The Field of Blood: Violence in Congress and the Road to Civil War is an entertaining, well researched, and well-written examination of physical violence in U.S. Congress in the decades leading to the Civil War. Most of it stems from diarist B.B. French, who managed...

  • Bill Lucey
    Oct 31, 2018

    I watched every minute of the Kavanaugh hearings, appalled at the procedural bullying of the Republicans, the cries of anguish from the female protestors, and I said to myself: could the atmosphere in Congress ever have been worse than this? It was then that I remembered my history, ...

    Joanne B. Freeman's The Field of Blood: Violence in Congress and the Road to Civil War is an entertaining, well researched, and well-written examination of physical violence in U.S. Congress in the decades leading to the Civil War. Most of it stems from diarist B.B. French, who managed...

    I love reading about the Civil War, but most of my reading takes place primarily through the years 1861-1865, right in the thick of it. It was fascinating to read about the years leading up to the war, starting around the 1830s, tracing significant events of Congressional violence up t...

    So much of what we learn from Dr. Freeman?s ?The Field of Blood: Violence in the Congress and the Road to Civil War? is relevant to today?s Congress that I shudder to think of what could happen were US legislators today allowed to pack guns on their bodies in either the House o...

    A fascinating and -- to me, at least -- troubling book. I was aware of some of the violent outbreaks in Congress in the decades leading up to the Civil War, but I had no idea how common they were -- so many more than I'd thought. The slave states had inordinate power in both houses, pa...

    Joanne B. Freeman deserves credit for wading into the realities of the pre-Civil War Congress to find something beyond the eloquent speeches and forlorn compromises that are dimly remembered precursors to the nation's bloodiest struggle. She began looking into the fascinating duel that...

    This book bills itself as covering violence in Congress from the 1830s until the Civil War and I found this a bit misleading. While it does cover that topic, the book gives a great deal of time to B. B. French, a congressional clerk turned lobbyist who kept extensive diaries of his tim...

    Excellent! Entertaining, multi-faceted, and full of relevance to our current discourse. ...

    utterly without value as anything other than a harebrained topical business decision by fsg ...

    First I would like to state that I received this book through the Goodreads giveaway in exchange for an honest review. I would like to thank the author for giving me this opportunity and honor in being able to read this book. When I received this book I began reading it at once. I real...

    As a public historian/tour guide at the US Capitol, I will cherish this incredibly well-researched book as new foundation stone in my effort to educate the public about the tumultuous history of Congress. ...

    Freeman breathes life into a past all too frequently disconnected, romanticized, and distorted. Her prose moves with easy and while she may have a vast store of insight to drawn from, she keeps her book from every feeling dense or overly academic. Instead, Freeman allows readers to see...

    This is an interesting history of the lead-up to the American Civil War, focused on events in Congress. I liked Freeman's writing style, but the organization of the 1st half of the book was kind of confusing for me. It was not told in a chronological order, which led to a lot of repeti...

    In the early days of our republic, serving as an elected official in either house of Congress could prove to be a mortal hazard. In antebellum America, the carrying of knives and guns on one?s person was common, as was drunkenness and gambling. Add to this already volatile mix the se...

    For a record of the activities of Congress in the period before and leading up to the Civil War, this succeeds in being a breezy and engaging read without sacrificing scholarship along the way. Freeman's contention is that the road to the Civil War was paved with sectional strife t...

    After reading Yale historian Joanne B. Freeman?s magnificent book, ?Field of Blood: Violence in Congress and the Road to Civil War,? I was stunned to learn just how much physical violence took place within the halls of Congress before the Civil War, especially during the 36th Con...

  • Steve Majerus-Collins
    Oct 28, 2018

    I watched every minute of the Kavanaugh hearings, appalled at the procedural bullying of the Republicans, the cries of anguish from the female protestors, and I said to myself: could the atmosphere in Congress ever have been worse than this? It was then that I remembered my history, ...

    Joanne B. Freeman's The Field of Blood: Violence in Congress and the Road to Civil War is an entertaining, well researched, and well-written examination of physical violence in U.S. Congress in the decades leading to the Civil War. Most of it stems from diarist B.B. French, who managed...

    I love reading about the Civil War, but most of my reading takes place primarily through the years 1861-1865, right in the thick of it. It was fascinating to read about the years leading up to the war, starting around the 1830s, tracing significant events of Congressional violence up t...

    So much of what we learn from Dr. Freeman?s ?The Field of Blood: Violence in the Congress and the Road to Civil War? is relevant to today?s Congress that I shudder to think of what could happen were US legislators today allowed to pack guns on their bodies in either the House o...

    A fascinating and -- to me, at least -- troubling book. I was aware of some of the violent outbreaks in Congress in the decades leading up to the Civil War, but I had no idea how common they were -- so many more than I'd thought. The slave states had inordinate power in both houses, pa...

    Joanne B. Freeman deserves credit for wading into the realities of the pre-Civil War Congress to find something beyond the eloquent speeches and forlorn compromises that are dimly remembered precursors to the nation's bloodiest struggle. She began looking into the fascinating duel that...

  • Michael Webb
    Oct 18, 2018

    I watched every minute of the Kavanaugh hearings, appalled at the procedural bullying of the Republicans, the cries of anguish from the female protestors, and I said to myself: could the atmosphere in Congress ever have been worse than this? It was then that I remembered my history, ...

    Joanne B. Freeman's The Field of Blood: Violence in Congress and the Road to Civil War is an entertaining, well researched, and well-written examination of physical violence in U.S. Congress in the decades leading to the Civil War. Most of it stems from diarist B.B. French, who managed...

    I love reading about the Civil War, but most of my reading takes place primarily through the years 1861-1865, right in the thick of it. It was fascinating to read about the years leading up to the war, starting around the 1830s, tracing significant events of Congressional violence up t...

    So much of what we learn from Dr. Freeman?s ?The Field of Blood: Violence in the Congress and the Road to Civil War? is relevant to today?s Congress that I shudder to think of what could happen were US legislators today allowed to pack guns on their bodies in either the House o...

    A fascinating and -- to me, at least -- troubling book. I was aware of some of the violent outbreaks in Congress in the decades leading up to the Civil War, but I had no idea how common they were -- so many more than I'd thought. The slave states had inordinate power in both houses, pa...

    Joanne B. Freeman deserves credit for wading into the realities of the pre-Civil War Congress to find something beyond the eloquent speeches and forlorn compromises that are dimly remembered precursors to the nation's bloodiest struggle. She began looking into the fascinating duel that...

    This book bills itself as covering violence in Congress from the 1830s until the Civil War and I found this a bit misleading. While it does cover that topic, the book gives a great deal of time to B. B. French, a congressional clerk turned lobbyist who kept extensive diaries of his tim...

    Excellent! Entertaining, multi-faceted, and full of relevance to our current discourse. ...

    utterly without value as anything other than a harebrained topical business decision by fsg ...

    First I would like to state that I received this book through the Goodreads giveaway in exchange for an honest review. I would like to thank the author for giving me this opportunity and honor in being able to read this book. When I received this book I began reading it at once. I real...

    As a public historian/tour guide at the US Capitol, I will cherish this incredibly well-researched book as new foundation stone in my effort to educate the public about the tumultuous history of Congress. ...

    Freeman breathes life into a past all too frequently disconnected, romanticized, and distorted. Her prose moves with easy and while she may have a vast store of insight to drawn from, she keeps her book from every feeling dense or overly academic. Instead, Freeman allows readers to see...

    This is an interesting history of the lead-up to the American Civil War, focused on events in Congress. I liked Freeman's writing style, but the organization of the 1st half of the book was kind of confusing for me. It was not told in a chronological order, which led to a lot of repeti...

    In the early days of our republic, serving as an elected official in either house of Congress could prove to be a mortal hazard. In antebellum America, the carrying of knives and guns on one?s person was common, as was drunkenness and gambling. Add to this already volatile mix the se...

    For a record of the activities of Congress in the period before and leading up to the Civil War, this succeeds in being a breezy and engaging read without sacrificing scholarship along the way. Freeman's contention is that the road to the Civil War was paved with sectional strife t...