Feel Free: Essays

Feel Free: Essays

Since she burst spectacularly into view with her debut novel almost two decades ago, Zadie Smith has established herself not just as one of the world's preeminent fiction writers, but also a brilliant and singular essayist. She contributes regularly to The New Yorker and the New York Review of Books on a range of subjects, and each piece of hers is a literary event in its Since she burst spectacularly into view with her debut novel almost two decades ago, Zadie Smith has established herself n...

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Title:Feel Free: Essays
Author:Zadie Smith
Rating:
Genres:Writing
ISBN:B073NNRSYV
Edition Language:English
Format Type:Kindle Edition
Number of Pages:448 pages pages

Feel Free: Essays Reviews

  • Molly Ferguson
    Dec 26, 2017

    2.991 stars - - - i'm free! this was a struggle to continue the more i read. broken into five sections: 'in the world', 'in the audience', 'in the gallery', 'on the bookshelf', and 'feel free', this book covers eclectic material like christian marclay's 24 hr movie, the clock; mark...

    The essays in this book have been published before, mostly in the New York Review of Books and The New Yorker, but it is quite something to see and read them all together. One has the impression of a very talkative, precocious teenager who notices ceaselessly, has opinions on everythi...

    A mixed collection of essays: the best are when Smith is discussing issues of politics (the closure of public libraries, the Brexit vote) where she brings a personal intimacy to national questions. Less enticing are the 'musing' essays where Smith responds to artworks, books, or pl...

    Zadie Smith must have felt freer in writing this book. She deals with a broad range of issues in her essays. There is no single theme that runs through them. There are essays that are quite ordinary. I have expected far more intellectually stimulating stuff from her. For instan...

    There's enough here for any and everybody to enjoy! Brava Queen! ...

    Writing exists (for me) at the intersection of three precarious, uncertain elements: language, the world, the self. The first is never wholly mine; the second I can only ever know in a partial sense; the third is a malleable and improvised response to the previous two. If my writing is...

    So: Zadie Smith, it seems, has replaced David Foster Wallace as my new person-to-aspire-to-be writer. Some pretty major shit going on with that right now. More as the story develops. ...

    Zadie offers up a collection of her essays here but what's interesting it that she notes in the foreword that all of them were written during the Obama presidency and therefore a product of an already bygone world. An interesting prompt for an essay I'd wish she'd written as well. ...

    I absolutely loved this book. My first Zadie Smith, but not my last. I want to be her BFF. Her mind is lively, free-ranging, compassionate, self-effacing... I just love her! (By the way, I read this as an audiobook, which I highly recommend. The reader is great.) ...

    ???.5 The standout aspect of these essays is the writing is always stunning. It is not difficult to understand why Zadie Smith is hailed in all corners of the literary world. There is an essay where she is talking about Joni Mitchell?s music and the passion rising off the page ...

    My association with the works of Zadie Smith started somewhere in 2003, with White Teeth. It was one of those books that are actually unputdownable (I have always been of the opinion that terms such as these are nothing but marketing gimmicks). Since then, Smith has been one of my favo...

    Just gonna say, Some Notes on Attunement is one of the best essays about music I've ever read. I know 100% nothing about Joni Mitchell. I'm sure I've heard something of hers at some point, but I have no idea what, and I've always sort of put her in this camp with U2 and the Beatles a...

    My most anticipated 2018 book! ...

    This was an advance reading copy graciously lent to me. What is truly amazing about Zadie Smith is her ability to go from "low" culture to high art in one sentence - she'll be musing on Key and Peele or Jay-Z and suddenly launch into a deep discussion of Schoepenhauer, Berger, or Bu...

  • Lara
    Nov 16, 2017

    2.991 stars - - - i'm free! this was a struggle to continue the more i read. broken into five sections: 'in the world', 'in the audience', 'in the gallery', 'on the bookshelf', and 'feel free', this book covers eclectic material like christian marclay's 24 hr movie, the clock; mark...

    The essays in this book have been published before, mostly in the New York Review of Books and The New Yorker, but it is quite something to see and read them all together. One has the impression of a very talkative, precocious teenager who notices ceaselessly, has opinions on everythi...

    A mixed collection of essays: the best are when Smith is discussing issues of politics (the closure of public libraries, the Brexit vote) where she brings a personal intimacy to national questions. Less enticing are the 'musing' essays where Smith responds to artworks, books, or pl...

    Zadie Smith must have felt freer in writing this book. She deals with a broad range of issues in her essays. There is no single theme that runs through them. There are essays that are quite ordinary. I have expected far more intellectually stimulating stuff from her. For instan...

    There's enough here for any and everybody to enjoy! Brava Queen! ...

    Writing exists (for me) at the intersection of three precarious, uncertain elements: language, the world, the self. The first is never wholly mine; the second I can only ever know in a partial sense; the third is a malleable and improvised response to the previous two. If my writing is...

    So: Zadie Smith, it seems, has replaced David Foster Wallace as my new person-to-aspire-to-be writer. Some pretty major shit going on with that right now. More as the story develops. ...

    Zadie offers up a collection of her essays here but what's interesting it that she notes in the foreword that all of them were written during the Obama presidency and therefore a product of an already bygone world. An interesting prompt for an essay I'd wish she'd written as well. ...

    I absolutely loved this book. My first Zadie Smith, but not my last. I want to be her BFF. Her mind is lively, free-ranging, compassionate, self-effacing... I just love her! (By the way, I read this as an audiobook, which I highly recommend. The reader is great.) ...

    ???.5 The standout aspect of these essays is the writing is always stunning. It is not difficult to understand why Zadie Smith is hailed in all corners of the literary world. There is an essay where she is talking about Joni Mitchell?s music and the passion rising off the page ...

    My association with the works of Zadie Smith started somewhere in 2003, with White Teeth. It was one of those books that are actually unputdownable (I have always been of the opinion that terms such as these are nothing but marketing gimmicks). Since then, Smith has been one of my favo...

    Just gonna say, Some Notes on Attunement is one of the best essays about music I've ever read. I know 100% nothing about Joni Mitchell. I'm sure I've heard something of hers at some point, but I have no idea what, and I've always sort of put her in this camp with U2 and the Beatles a...

  • Laura
    Jun 11, 2018

    2.991 stars - - - i'm free! this was a struggle to continue the more i read. broken into five sections: 'in the world', 'in the audience', 'in the gallery', 'on the bookshelf', and 'feel free', this book covers eclectic material like christian marclay's 24 hr movie, the clock; mark...

    The essays in this book have been published before, mostly in the New York Review of Books and The New Yorker, but it is quite something to see and read them all together. One has the impression of a very talkative, precocious teenager who notices ceaselessly, has opinions on everythi...

    A mixed collection of essays: the best are when Smith is discussing issues of politics (the closure of public libraries, the Brexit vote) where she brings a personal intimacy to national questions. Less enticing are the 'musing' essays where Smith responds to artworks, books, or pl...

    Zadie Smith must have felt freer in writing this book. She deals with a broad range of issues in her essays. There is no single theme that runs through them. There are essays that are quite ordinary. I have expected far more intellectually stimulating stuff from her. For instan...

    There's enough here for any and everybody to enjoy! Brava Queen! ...

    Writing exists (for me) at the intersection of three precarious, uncertain elements: language, the world, the self. The first is never wholly mine; the second I can only ever know in a partial sense; the third is a malleable and improvised response to the previous two. If my writing is...

    So: Zadie Smith, it seems, has replaced David Foster Wallace as my new person-to-aspire-to-be writer. Some pretty major shit going on with that right now. More as the story develops. ...

    Zadie offers up a collection of her essays here but what's interesting it that she notes in the foreword that all of them were written during the Obama presidency and therefore a product of an already bygone world. An interesting prompt for an essay I'd wish she'd written as well. ...

    I absolutely loved this book. My first Zadie Smith, but not my last. I want to be her BFF. Her mind is lively, free-ranging, compassionate, self-effacing... I just love her! (By the way, I read this as an audiobook, which I highly recommend. The reader is great.) ...

    ???.5 The standout aspect of these essays is the writing is always stunning. It is not difficult to understand why Zadie Smith is hailed in all corners of the literary world. There is an essay where she is talking about Joni Mitchell?s music and the passion rising off the page ...

    My association with the works of Zadie Smith started somewhere in 2003, with White Teeth. It was one of those books that are actually unputdownable (I have always been of the opinion that terms such as these are nothing but marketing gimmicks). Since then, Smith has been one of my favo...

    Just gonna say, Some Notes on Attunement is one of the best essays about music I've ever read. I know 100% nothing about Joni Mitchell. I'm sure I've heard something of hers at some point, but I have no idea what, and I've always sort of put her in this camp with U2 and the Beatles a...

    My most anticipated 2018 book! ...

    This was an advance reading copy graciously lent to me. What is truly amazing about Zadie Smith is her ability to go from "low" culture to high art in one sentence - she'll be musing on Key and Peele or Jay-Z and suddenly launch into a deep discussion of Schoepenhauer, Berger, or Bu...

    This collection of essays spans a diverse range of topics: current events, music, art, books and movies, to name a few of the observations, covering both ends of the cultural spectrum. As an ex-librarian, I especially appreciated the piece on public libraries (?the only thing left on...

    The range of subjects Smith explores is this collection is truly dizzying: from the personal to the political, the philosophical to the physical, Brexit to Justin Bieber, Phillip Roth to Karl Ove Knausgard.Here are essays about her neighborhood library, traveling through Italy with h...

    It seems there are two kinds of readers when it comes to Zadie Smith: those who love and admire her writing and those who dislike and are annoyed by it. I typically fall into the former camp: her gift with prose is deft, her intellect fierce, and I get a kick out of the characters she ...

    I love her essays more than her fiction, and always jump to read a new one -- so I'd read about half of these before. And I'd read them again. She's brilliant, she writes beautifully, and has a charmingly open enthusiastic curiosity for so many different things -- art, politics, dance,...

    I love Zadie Smith's mind. ...

    Average of 2.5. Some essays were a 1 for me (no!); others, a 5 (yes!). Nicely bookended with what turned out to be my favourite essays, "Northwest London Blues" and "Joy" (my absolute favourite of the bunch), the majority of the rest of them - though it absolutely pains me to say it...

    This collection of essays spans a diverse range of topics: current events, music, art, books and movies, to name a few of the observations, covering both ends of the cultural spectrum. As an ex-librarian, I especially appreciated the piece on public libraries (?the only thing left on...

    Read more on Mina's Bookshelf http://minadecaro.blogspot.com/2018/0... "...you can't fight for a freedom you've forgotten how to identify. To the reader still curious about freedom I offer these essays--to be used, changed, dismantled, destroyed or ignored as necessary!"?Zadie Smi...

    From BBC Radio 4 - Book of the week: Zadie Smith reads from her latest essay collection where she offers sharp, and often funny, insights and observations on high culture, pop culture, social change, political debate and the personal. Episode 1 of 5 Today, she reflects on growing...

  • Laura
    Feb 23, 2018

    2.991 stars - - - i'm free! this was a struggle to continue the more i read. broken into five sections: 'in the world', 'in the audience', 'in the gallery', 'on the bookshelf', and 'feel free', this book covers eclectic material like christian marclay's 24 hr movie, the clock; mark...

    The essays in this book have been published before, mostly in the New York Review of Books and The New Yorker, but it is quite something to see and read them all together. One has the impression of a very talkative, precocious teenager who notices ceaselessly, has opinions on everythi...

    A mixed collection of essays: the best are when Smith is discussing issues of politics (the closure of public libraries, the Brexit vote) where she brings a personal intimacy to national questions. Less enticing are the 'musing' essays where Smith responds to artworks, books, or pl...

    Zadie Smith must have felt freer in writing this book. She deals with a broad range of issues in her essays. There is no single theme that runs through them. There are essays that are quite ordinary. I have expected far more intellectually stimulating stuff from her. For instan...

    There's enough here for any and everybody to enjoy! Brava Queen! ...

    Writing exists (for me) at the intersection of three precarious, uncertain elements: language, the world, the self. The first is never wholly mine; the second I can only ever know in a partial sense; the third is a malleable and improvised response to the previous two. If my writing is...

    So: Zadie Smith, it seems, has replaced David Foster Wallace as my new person-to-aspire-to-be writer. Some pretty major shit going on with that right now. More as the story develops. ...

    Zadie offers up a collection of her essays here but what's interesting it that she notes in the foreword that all of them were written during the Obama presidency and therefore a product of an already bygone world. An interesting prompt for an essay I'd wish she'd written as well. ...

    I absolutely loved this book. My first Zadie Smith, but not my last. I want to be her BFF. Her mind is lively, free-ranging, compassionate, self-effacing... I just love her! (By the way, I read this as an audiobook, which I highly recommend. The reader is great.) ...

    ???.5 The standout aspect of these essays is the writing is always stunning. It is not difficult to understand why Zadie Smith is hailed in all corners of the literary world. There is an essay where she is talking about Joni Mitchell?s music and the passion rising off the page ...

    My association with the works of Zadie Smith started somewhere in 2003, with White Teeth. It was one of those books that are actually unputdownable (I have always been of the opinion that terms such as these are nothing but marketing gimmicks). Since then, Smith has been one of my favo...

    Just gonna say, Some Notes on Attunement is one of the best essays about music I've ever read. I know 100% nothing about Joni Mitchell. I'm sure I've heard something of hers at some point, but I have no idea what, and I've always sort of put her in this camp with U2 and the Beatles a...

    My most anticipated 2018 book! ...

    This was an advance reading copy graciously lent to me. What is truly amazing about Zadie Smith is her ability to go from "low" culture to high art in one sentence - she'll be musing on Key and Peele or Jay-Z and suddenly launch into a deep discussion of Schoepenhauer, Berger, or Bu...

    This collection of essays spans a diverse range of topics: current events, music, art, books and movies, to name a few of the observations, covering both ends of the cultural spectrum. As an ex-librarian, I especially appreciated the piece on public libraries (?the only thing left on...

    The range of subjects Smith explores is this collection is truly dizzying: from the personal to the political, the philosophical to the physical, Brexit to Justin Bieber, Phillip Roth to Karl Ove Knausgard.Here are essays about her neighborhood library, traveling through Italy with h...

  • Julie
    Feb 28, 2018

    2.991 stars - - - i'm free! this was a struggle to continue the more i read. broken into five sections: 'in the world', 'in the audience', 'in the gallery', 'on the bookshelf', and 'feel free', this book covers eclectic material like christian marclay's 24 hr movie, the clock; mark...

    The essays in this book have been published before, mostly in the New York Review of Books and The New Yorker, but it is quite something to see and read them all together. One has the impression of a very talkative, precocious teenager who notices ceaselessly, has opinions on everythi...

    A mixed collection of essays: the best are when Smith is discussing issues of politics (the closure of public libraries, the Brexit vote) where she brings a personal intimacy to national questions. Less enticing are the 'musing' essays where Smith responds to artworks, books, or pl...

    Zadie Smith must have felt freer in writing this book. She deals with a broad range of issues in her essays. There is no single theme that runs through them. There are essays that are quite ordinary. I have expected far more intellectually stimulating stuff from her. For instan...

    There's enough here for any and everybody to enjoy! Brava Queen! ...

    Writing exists (for me) at the intersection of three precarious, uncertain elements: language, the world, the self. The first is never wholly mine; the second I can only ever know in a partial sense; the third is a malleable and improvised response to the previous two. If my writing is...

    So: Zadie Smith, it seems, has replaced David Foster Wallace as my new person-to-aspire-to-be writer. Some pretty major shit going on with that right now. More as the story develops. ...

    Zadie offers up a collection of her essays here but what's interesting it that she notes in the foreword that all of them were written during the Obama presidency and therefore a product of an already bygone world. An interesting prompt for an essay I'd wish she'd written as well. ...

    I absolutely loved this book. My first Zadie Smith, but not my last. I want to be her BFF. Her mind is lively, free-ranging, compassionate, self-effacing... I just love her! (By the way, I read this as an audiobook, which I highly recommend. The reader is great.) ...

    ???.5 The standout aspect of these essays is the writing is always stunning. It is not difficult to understand why Zadie Smith is hailed in all corners of the literary world. There is an essay where she is talking about Joni Mitchell?s music and the passion rising off the page ...

    My association with the works of Zadie Smith started somewhere in 2003, with White Teeth. It was one of those books that are actually unputdownable (I have always been of the opinion that terms such as these are nothing but marketing gimmicks). Since then, Smith has been one of my favo...

    Just gonna say, Some Notes on Attunement is one of the best essays about music I've ever read. I know 100% nothing about Joni Mitchell. I'm sure I've heard something of hers at some point, but I have no idea what, and I've always sort of put her in this camp with U2 and the Beatles a...

    My most anticipated 2018 book! ...

    This was an advance reading copy graciously lent to me. What is truly amazing about Zadie Smith is her ability to go from "low" culture to high art in one sentence - she'll be musing on Key and Peele or Jay-Z and suddenly launch into a deep discussion of Schoepenhauer, Berger, or Bu...

    This collection of essays spans a diverse range of topics: current events, music, art, books and movies, to name a few of the observations, covering both ends of the cultural spectrum. As an ex-librarian, I especially appreciated the piece on public libraries (?the only thing left on...

    The range of subjects Smith explores is this collection is truly dizzying: from the personal to the political, the philosophical to the physical, Brexit to Justin Bieber, Phillip Roth to Karl Ove Knausgard.Here are essays about her neighborhood library, traveling through Italy with h...

    It seems there are two kinds of readers when it comes to Zadie Smith: those who love and admire her writing and those who dislike and are annoyed by it. I typically fall into the former camp: her gift with prose is deft, her intellect fierce, and I get a kick out of the characters she ...

    I love her essays more than her fiction, and always jump to read a new one -- so I'd read about half of these before. And I'd read them again. She's brilliant, she writes beautifully, and has a charmingly open enthusiastic curiosity for so many different things -- art, politics, dance,...

    I love Zadie Smith's mind. ...

    Average of 2.5. Some essays were a 1 for me (no!); others, a 5 (yes!). Nicely bookended with what turned out to be my favourite essays, "Northwest London Blues" and "Joy" (my absolute favourite of the bunch), the majority of the rest of them - though it absolutely pains me to say it...

    This collection of essays spans a diverse range of topics: current events, music, art, books and movies, to name a few of the observations, covering both ends of the cultural spectrum. As an ex-librarian, I especially appreciated the piece on public libraries (?the only thing left on...

    Read more on Mina's Bookshelf http://minadecaro.blogspot.com/2018/0... "...you can't fight for a freedom you've forgotten how to identify. To the reader still curious about freedom I offer these essays--to be used, changed, dismantled, destroyed or ignored as necessary!"?Zadie Smi...

    From BBC Radio 4 - Book of the week: Zadie Smith reads from her latest essay collection where she offers sharp, and often funny, insights and observations on high culture, pop culture, social change, political debate and the personal. Episode 1 of 5 Today, she reflects on growing...

    The key to my four star rating is hidden in the detail - an intriguing essay title, a short quippy sentence, the way words role off the tongue if you read a paragraph out loud, self-sufficient segments that you want to put speech bubbles around and quote, a pop of surprising humour, a ...

    Is there anything Zadie Smith can?t do? Following her last novel (?Swing Time? ? nominated for the Man Booker Prize, no less) ?Feel Free? is a collection of essays, ranging from the intimately personal to the critically topical. She opens with a nostalgic reminiscence of he...

    Phew! I feel like I have learned. These essays were insightful and intelligent and beautifully written and basically solidified Zadie Smith as writer goals. I look up to Smith and with everything she publishes I?m inspired by her. I enjoyed all these essays even the ones I di...

    I love Zadie Smith and I love essay collections. I figured this book would be a 5 star read, easy. It wasn't such a slam dunk. Some of the essays are phenomenal and others I left pretty lukewarm about. I could've done without almost a hundred pages of her Harpers column, but overall ...

    Zadie Smith has a vast collection of published essays, which are collected in this wonderful book. Some topics may appeal more than others, but even if a subject may not suit the reader, Smith's writing is so elegant and thoughtful, that you can't resist reading- such as her essay on J...

  • Trish
    May 27, 2018

    2.991 stars - - - i'm free! this was a struggle to continue the more i read. broken into five sections: 'in the world', 'in the audience', 'in the gallery', 'on the bookshelf', and 'feel free', this book covers eclectic material like christian marclay's 24 hr movie, the clock; mark...

    The essays in this book have been published before, mostly in the New York Review of Books and The New Yorker, but it is quite something to see and read them all together. One has the impression of a very talkative, precocious teenager who notices ceaselessly, has opinions on everythi...

  • Christy Childers
    Jul 27, 2017

    2.991 stars - - - i'm free! this was a struggle to continue the more i read. broken into five sections: 'in the world', 'in the audience', 'in the gallery', 'on the bookshelf', and 'feel free', this book covers eclectic material like christian marclay's 24 hr movie, the clock; mark...

    The essays in this book have been published before, mostly in the New York Review of Books and The New Yorker, but it is quite something to see and read them all together. One has the impression of a very talkative, precocious teenager who notices ceaselessly, has opinions on everythi...

    A mixed collection of essays: the best are when Smith is discussing issues of politics (the closure of public libraries, the Brexit vote) where she brings a personal intimacy to national questions. Less enticing are the 'musing' essays where Smith responds to artworks, books, or pl...

    Zadie Smith must have felt freer in writing this book. She deals with a broad range of issues in her essays. There is no single theme that runs through them. There are essays that are quite ordinary. I have expected far more intellectually stimulating stuff from her. For instan...

    There's enough here for any and everybody to enjoy! Brava Queen! ...

    Writing exists (for me) at the intersection of three precarious, uncertain elements: language, the world, the self. The first is never wholly mine; the second I can only ever know in a partial sense; the third is a malleable and improvised response to the previous two. If my writing is...

    So: Zadie Smith, it seems, has replaced David Foster Wallace as my new person-to-aspire-to-be writer. Some pretty major shit going on with that right now. More as the story develops. ...

    Zadie offers up a collection of her essays here but what's interesting it that she notes in the foreword that all of them were written during the Obama presidency and therefore a product of an already bygone world. An interesting prompt for an essay I'd wish she'd written as well. ...

    I absolutely loved this book. My first Zadie Smith, but not my last. I want to be her BFF. Her mind is lively, free-ranging, compassionate, self-effacing... I just love her! (By the way, I read this as an audiobook, which I highly recommend. The reader is great.) ...

    ???.5 The standout aspect of these essays is the writing is always stunning. It is not difficult to understand why Zadie Smith is hailed in all corners of the literary world. There is an essay where she is talking about Joni Mitchell?s music and the passion rising off the page ...

    My association with the works of Zadie Smith started somewhere in 2003, with White Teeth. It was one of those books that are actually unputdownable (I have always been of the opinion that terms such as these are nothing but marketing gimmicks). Since then, Smith has been one of my favo...

    Just gonna say, Some Notes on Attunement is one of the best essays about music I've ever read. I know 100% nothing about Joni Mitchell. I'm sure I've heard something of hers at some point, but I have no idea what, and I've always sort of put her in this camp with U2 and the Beatles a...

    My most anticipated 2018 book! ...

  • Vivek Tejuja
    Jan 18, 2018

    2.991 stars - - - i'm free! this was a struggle to continue the more i read. broken into five sections: 'in the world', 'in the audience', 'in the gallery', 'on the bookshelf', and 'feel free', this book covers eclectic material like christian marclay's 24 hr movie, the clock; mark...

    The essays in this book have been published before, mostly in the New York Review of Books and The New Yorker, but it is quite something to see and read them all together. One has the impression of a very talkative, precocious teenager who notices ceaselessly, has opinions on everythi...

    A mixed collection of essays: the best are when Smith is discussing issues of politics (the closure of public libraries, the Brexit vote) where she brings a personal intimacy to national questions. Less enticing are the 'musing' essays where Smith responds to artworks, books, or pl...

    Zadie Smith must have felt freer in writing this book. She deals with a broad range of issues in her essays. There is no single theme that runs through them. There are essays that are quite ordinary. I have expected far more intellectually stimulating stuff from her. For instan...

    There's enough here for any and everybody to enjoy! Brava Queen! ...

    Writing exists (for me) at the intersection of three precarious, uncertain elements: language, the world, the self. The first is never wholly mine; the second I can only ever know in a partial sense; the third is a malleable and improvised response to the previous two. If my writing is...

    So: Zadie Smith, it seems, has replaced David Foster Wallace as my new person-to-aspire-to-be writer. Some pretty major shit going on with that right now. More as the story develops. ...

    Zadie offers up a collection of her essays here but what's interesting it that she notes in the foreword that all of them were written during the Obama presidency and therefore a product of an already bygone world. An interesting prompt for an essay I'd wish she'd written as well. ...

    I absolutely loved this book. My first Zadie Smith, but not my last. I want to be her BFF. Her mind is lively, free-ranging, compassionate, self-effacing... I just love her! (By the way, I read this as an audiobook, which I highly recommend. The reader is great.) ...

    ???.5 The standout aspect of these essays is the writing is always stunning. It is not difficult to understand why Zadie Smith is hailed in all corners of the literary world. There is an essay where she is talking about Joni Mitchell?s music and the passion rising off the page ...

    My association with the works of Zadie Smith started somewhere in 2003, with White Teeth. It was one of those books that are actually unputdownable (I have always been of the opinion that terms such as these are nothing but marketing gimmicks). Since then, Smith has been one of my favo...

  • Diane
    Mar 12, 2018

    2.991 stars - - - i'm free! this was a struggle to continue the more i read. broken into five sections: 'in the world', 'in the audience', 'in the gallery', 'on the bookshelf', and 'feel free', this book covers eclectic material like christian marclay's 24 hr movie, the clock; mark...

    The essays in this book have been published before, mostly in the New York Review of Books and The New Yorker, but it is quite something to see and read them all together. One has the impression of a very talkative, precocious teenager who notices ceaselessly, has opinions on everythi...

    A mixed collection of essays: the best are when Smith is discussing issues of politics (the closure of public libraries, the Brexit vote) where she brings a personal intimacy to national questions. Less enticing are the 'musing' essays where Smith responds to artworks, books, or pl...

    Zadie Smith must have felt freer in writing this book. She deals with a broad range of issues in her essays. There is no single theme that runs through them. There are essays that are quite ordinary. I have expected far more intellectually stimulating stuff from her. For instan...

    There's enough here for any and everybody to enjoy! Brava Queen! ...

    Writing exists (for me) at the intersection of three precarious, uncertain elements: language, the world, the self. The first is never wholly mine; the second I can only ever know in a partial sense; the third is a malleable and improvised response to the previous two. If my writing is...

    So: Zadie Smith, it seems, has replaced David Foster Wallace as my new person-to-aspire-to-be writer. Some pretty major shit going on with that right now. More as the story develops. ...

    Zadie offers up a collection of her essays here but what's interesting it that she notes in the foreword that all of them were written during the Obama presidency and therefore a product of an already bygone world. An interesting prompt for an essay I'd wish she'd written as well. ...

    I absolutely loved this book. My first Zadie Smith, but not my last. I want to be her BFF. Her mind is lively, free-ranging, compassionate, self-effacing... I just love her! (By the way, I read this as an audiobook, which I highly recommend. The reader is great.) ...

  • Krista
    Mar 03, 2018

    2.991 stars - - - i'm free! this was a struggle to continue the more i read. broken into five sections: 'in the world', 'in the audience', 'in the gallery', 'on the bookshelf', and 'feel free', this book covers eclectic material like christian marclay's 24 hr movie, the clock; mark...

    The essays in this book have been published before, mostly in the New York Review of Books and The New Yorker, but it is quite something to see and read them all together. One has the impression of a very talkative, precocious teenager who notices ceaselessly, has opinions on everythi...

    A mixed collection of essays: the best are when Smith is discussing issues of politics (the closure of public libraries, the Brexit vote) where she brings a personal intimacy to national questions. Less enticing are the 'musing' essays where Smith responds to artworks, books, or pl...

    Zadie Smith must have felt freer in writing this book. She deals with a broad range of issues in her essays. There is no single theme that runs through them. There are essays that are quite ordinary. I have expected far more intellectually stimulating stuff from her. For instan...

    There's enough here for any and everybody to enjoy! Brava Queen! ...

    Writing exists (for me) at the intersection of three precarious, uncertain elements: language, the world, the self. The first is never wholly mine; the second I can only ever know in a partial sense; the third is a malleable and improvised response to the previous two. If my writing is...

  • Pete
    Feb 26, 2018

    2.991 stars - - - i'm free! this was a struggle to continue the more i read. broken into five sections: 'in the world', 'in the audience', 'in the gallery', 'on the bookshelf', and 'feel free', this book covers eclectic material like christian marclay's 24 hr movie, the clock; mark...

    The essays in this book have been published before, mostly in the New York Review of Books and The New Yorker, but it is quite something to see and read them all together. One has the impression of a very talkative, precocious teenager who notices ceaselessly, has opinions on everythi...

    A mixed collection of essays: the best are when Smith is discussing issues of politics (the closure of public libraries, the Brexit vote) where she brings a personal intimacy to national questions. Less enticing are the 'musing' essays where Smith responds to artworks, books, or pl...

    Zadie Smith must have felt freer in writing this book. She deals with a broad range of issues in her essays. There is no single theme that runs through them. There are essays that are quite ordinary. I have expected far more intellectually stimulating stuff from her. For instan...

    There's enough here for any and everybody to enjoy! Brava Queen! ...

    Writing exists (for me) at the intersection of three precarious, uncertain elements: language, the world, the self. The first is never wholly mine; the second I can only ever know in a partial sense; the third is a malleable and improvised response to the previous two. If my writing is...

    So: Zadie Smith, it seems, has replaced David Foster Wallace as my new person-to-aspire-to-be writer. Some pretty major shit going on with that right now. More as the story develops. ...

    Zadie offers up a collection of her essays here but what's interesting it that she notes in the foreword that all of them were written during the Obama presidency and therefore a product of an already bygone world. An interesting prompt for an essay I'd wish she'd written as well. ...

    I absolutely loved this book. My first Zadie Smith, but not my last. I want to be her BFF. Her mind is lively, free-ranging, compassionate, self-effacing... I just love her! (By the way, I read this as an audiobook, which I highly recommend. The reader is great.) ...

    ???.5 The standout aspect of these essays is the writing is always stunning. It is not difficult to understand why Zadie Smith is hailed in all corners of the literary world. There is an essay where she is talking about Joni Mitchell?s music and the passion rising off the page ...

    My association with the works of Zadie Smith started somewhere in 2003, with White Teeth. It was one of those books that are actually unputdownable (I have always been of the opinion that terms such as these are nothing but marketing gimmicks). Since then, Smith has been one of my favo...

    Just gonna say, Some Notes on Attunement is one of the best essays about music I've ever read. I know 100% nothing about Joni Mitchell. I'm sure I've heard something of hers at some point, but I have no idea what, and I've always sort of put her in this camp with U2 and the Beatles a...

    My most anticipated 2018 book! ...

    This was an advance reading copy graciously lent to me. What is truly amazing about Zadie Smith is her ability to go from "low" culture to high art in one sentence - she'll be musing on Key and Peele or Jay-Z and suddenly launch into a deep discussion of Schoepenhauer, Berger, or Bu...

    This collection of essays spans a diverse range of topics: current events, music, art, books and movies, to name a few of the observations, covering both ends of the cultural spectrum. As an ex-librarian, I especially appreciated the piece on public libraries (?the only thing left on...

    The range of subjects Smith explores is this collection is truly dizzying: from the personal to the political, the philosophical to the physical, Brexit to Justin Bieber, Phillip Roth to Karl Ove Knausgard.Here are essays about her neighborhood library, traveling through Italy with h...

    It seems there are two kinds of readers when it comes to Zadie Smith: those who love and admire her writing and those who dislike and are annoyed by it. I typically fall into the former camp: her gift with prose is deft, her intellect fierce, and I get a kick out of the characters she ...

    I love her essays more than her fiction, and always jump to read a new one -- so I'd read about half of these before. And I'd read them again. She's brilliant, she writes beautifully, and has a charmingly open enthusiastic curiosity for so many different things -- art, politics, dance,...

    I love Zadie Smith's mind. ...

  • David Yoon
    Mar 27, 2018

    2.991 stars - - - i'm free! this was a struggle to continue the more i read. broken into five sections: 'in the world', 'in the audience', 'in the gallery', 'on the bookshelf', and 'feel free', this book covers eclectic material like christian marclay's 24 hr movie, the clock; mark...

    The essays in this book have been published before, mostly in the New York Review of Books and The New Yorker, but it is quite something to see and read them all together. One has the impression of a very talkative, precocious teenager who notices ceaselessly, has opinions on everythi...

    A mixed collection of essays: the best are when Smith is discussing issues of politics (the closure of public libraries, the Brexit vote) where she brings a personal intimacy to national questions. Less enticing are the 'musing' essays where Smith responds to artworks, books, or pl...

    Zadie Smith must have felt freer in writing this book. She deals with a broad range of issues in her essays. There is no single theme that runs through them. There are essays that are quite ordinary. I have expected far more intellectually stimulating stuff from her. For instan...

    There's enough here for any and everybody to enjoy! Brava Queen! ...

    Writing exists (for me) at the intersection of three precarious, uncertain elements: language, the world, the self. The first is never wholly mine; the second I can only ever know in a partial sense; the third is a malleable and improvised response to the previous two. If my writing is...

    So: Zadie Smith, it seems, has replaced David Foster Wallace as my new person-to-aspire-to-be writer. Some pretty major shit going on with that right now. More as the story develops. ...

    Zadie offers up a collection of her essays here but what's interesting it that she notes in the foreword that all of them were written during the Obama presidency and therefore a product of an already bygone world. An interesting prompt for an essay I'd wish she'd written as well. ...

  • Sara
    Dec 09, 2017

    2.991 stars - - - i'm free! this was a struggle to continue the more i read. broken into five sections: 'in the world', 'in the audience', 'in the gallery', 'on the bookshelf', and 'feel free', this book covers eclectic material like christian marclay's 24 hr movie, the clock; mark...

    The essays in this book have been published before, mostly in the New York Review of Books and The New Yorker, but it is quite something to see and read them all together. One has the impression of a very talkative, precocious teenager who notices ceaselessly, has opinions on everythi...

    A mixed collection of essays: the best are when Smith is discussing issues of politics (the closure of public libraries, the Brexit vote) where she brings a personal intimacy to national questions. Less enticing are the 'musing' essays where Smith responds to artworks, books, or pl...

    Zadie Smith must have felt freer in writing this book. She deals with a broad range of issues in her essays. There is no single theme that runs through them. There are essays that are quite ordinary. I have expected far more intellectually stimulating stuff from her. For instan...

    There's enough here for any and everybody to enjoy! Brava Queen! ...

    Writing exists (for me) at the intersection of three precarious, uncertain elements: language, the world, the self. The first is never wholly mine; the second I can only ever know in a partial sense; the third is a malleable and improvised response to the previous two. If my writing is...

    So: Zadie Smith, it seems, has replaced David Foster Wallace as my new person-to-aspire-to-be writer. Some pretty major shit going on with that right now. More as the story develops. ...

    Zadie offers up a collection of her essays here but what's interesting it that she notes in the foreword that all of them were written during the Obama presidency and therefore a product of an already bygone world. An interesting prompt for an essay I'd wish she'd written as well. ...

    I absolutely loved this book. My first Zadie Smith, but not my last. I want to be her BFF. Her mind is lively, free-ranging, compassionate, self-effacing... I just love her! (By the way, I read this as an audiobook, which I highly recommend. The reader is great.) ...

    ???.5 The standout aspect of these essays is the writing is always stunning. It is not difficult to understand why Zadie Smith is hailed in all corners of the literary world. There is an essay where she is talking about Joni Mitchell?s music and the passion rising off the page ...

    My association with the works of Zadie Smith started somewhere in 2003, with White Teeth. It was one of those books that are actually unputdownable (I have always been of the opinion that terms such as these are nothing but marketing gimmicks). Since then, Smith has been one of my favo...

    Just gonna say, Some Notes on Attunement is one of the best essays about music I've ever read. I know 100% nothing about Joni Mitchell. I'm sure I've heard something of hers at some point, but I have no idea what, and I've always sort of put her in this camp with U2 and the Beatles a...

    My most anticipated 2018 book! ...

    This was an advance reading copy graciously lent to me. What is truly amazing about Zadie Smith is her ability to go from "low" culture to high art in one sentence - she'll be musing on Key and Peele or Jay-Z and suddenly launch into a deep discussion of Schoepenhauer, Berger, or Bu...

    This collection of essays spans a diverse range of topics: current events, music, art, books and movies, to name a few of the observations, covering both ends of the cultural spectrum. As an ex-librarian, I especially appreciated the piece on public libraries (?the only thing left on...

    The range of subjects Smith explores is this collection is truly dizzying: from the personal to the political, the philosophical to the physical, Brexit to Justin Bieber, Phillip Roth to Karl Ove Knausgard.Here are essays about her neighborhood library, traveling through Italy with h...

    It seems there are two kinds of readers when it comes to Zadie Smith: those who love and admire her writing and those who dislike and are annoyed by it. I typically fall into the former camp: her gift with prose is deft, her intellect fierce, and I get a kick out of the characters she ...

    I love her essays more than her fiction, and always jump to read a new one -- so I'd read about half of these before. And I'd read them again. She's brilliant, she writes beautifully, and has a charmingly open enthusiastic curiosity for so many different things -- art, politics, dance,...

  • Andre
    Nov 19, 2017

    2.991 stars - - - i'm free! this was a struggle to continue the more i read. broken into five sections: 'in the world', 'in the audience', 'in the gallery', 'on the bookshelf', and 'feel free', this book covers eclectic material like christian marclay's 24 hr movie, the clock; mark...

    The essays in this book have been published before, mostly in the New York Review of Books and The New Yorker, but it is quite something to see and read them all together. One has the impression of a very talkative, precocious teenager who notices ceaselessly, has opinions on everythi...

    A mixed collection of essays: the best are when Smith is discussing issues of politics (the closure of public libraries, the Brexit vote) where she brings a personal intimacy to national questions. Less enticing are the 'musing' essays where Smith responds to artworks, books, or pl...

    Zadie Smith must have felt freer in writing this book. She deals with a broad range of issues in her essays. There is no single theme that runs through them. There are essays that are quite ordinary. I have expected far more intellectually stimulating stuff from her. For instan...

    There's enough here for any and everybody to enjoy! Brava Queen! ...

    Writing exists (for me) at the intersection of three precarious, uncertain elements: language, the world, the self. The first is never wholly mine; the second I can only ever know in a partial sense; the third is a malleable and improvised response to the previous two. If my writing is...

    So: Zadie Smith, it seems, has replaced David Foster Wallace as my new person-to-aspire-to-be writer. Some pretty major shit going on with that right now. More as the story develops. ...

    Zadie offers up a collection of her essays here but what's interesting it that she notes in the foreword that all of them were written during the Obama presidency and therefore a product of an already bygone world. An interesting prompt for an essay I'd wish she'd written as well. ...

    I absolutely loved this book. My first Zadie Smith, but not my last. I want to be her BFF. Her mind is lively, free-ranging, compassionate, self-effacing... I just love her! (By the way, I read this as an audiobook, which I highly recommend. The reader is great.) ...

    ???.5 The standout aspect of these essays is the writing is always stunning. It is not difficult to understand why Zadie Smith is hailed in all corners of the literary world. There is an essay where she is talking about Joni Mitchell?s music and the passion rising off the page ...

  • Mina De Caro (Mina's Bookshelf)
    Jun 20, 2018

    2.991 stars - - - i'm free! this was a struggle to continue the more i read. broken into five sections: 'in the world', 'in the audience', 'in the gallery', 'on the bookshelf', and 'feel free', this book covers eclectic material like christian marclay's 24 hr movie, the clock; mark...

    The essays in this book have been published before, mostly in the New York Review of Books and The New Yorker, but it is quite something to see and read them all together. One has the impression of a very talkative, precocious teenager who notices ceaselessly, has opinions on everythi...

    A mixed collection of essays: the best are when Smith is discussing issues of politics (the closure of public libraries, the Brexit vote) where she brings a personal intimacy to national questions. Less enticing are the 'musing' essays where Smith responds to artworks, books, or pl...

    Zadie Smith must have felt freer in writing this book. She deals with a broad range of issues in her essays. There is no single theme that runs through them. There are essays that are quite ordinary. I have expected far more intellectually stimulating stuff from her. For instan...

    There's enough here for any and everybody to enjoy! Brava Queen! ...

    Writing exists (for me) at the intersection of three precarious, uncertain elements: language, the world, the self. The first is never wholly mine; the second I can only ever know in a partial sense; the third is a malleable and improvised response to the previous two. If my writing is...

    So: Zadie Smith, it seems, has replaced David Foster Wallace as my new person-to-aspire-to-be writer. Some pretty major shit going on with that right now. More as the story develops. ...

    Zadie offers up a collection of her essays here but what's interesting it that she notes in the foreword that all of them were written during the Obama presidency and therefore a product of an already bygone world. An interesting prompt for an essay I'd wish she'd written as well. ...

    I absolutely loved this book. My first Zadie Smith, but not my last. I want to be her BFF. Her mind is lively, free-ranging, compassionate, self-effacing... I just love her! (By the way, I read this as an audiobook, which I highly recommend. The reader is great.) ...

    ???.5 The standout aspect of these essays is the writing is always stunning. It is not difficult to understand why Zadie Smith is hailed in all corners of the literary world. There is an essay where she is talking about Joni Mitchell?s music and the passion rising off the page ...

    My association with the works of Zadie Smith started somewhere in 2003, with White Teeth. It was one of those books that are actually unputdownable (I have always been of the opinion that terms such as these are nothing but marketing gimmicks). Since then, Smith has been one of my favo...

    Just gonna say, Some Notes on Attunement is one of the best essays about music I've ever read. I know 100% nothing about Joni Mitchell. I'm sure I've heard something of hers at some point, but I have no idea what, and I've always sort of put her in this camp with U2 and the Beatles a...

    My most anticipated 2018 book! ...

    This was an advance reading copy graciously lent to me. What is truly amazing about Zadie Smith is her ability to go from "low" culture to high art in one sentence - she'll be musing on Key and Peele or Jay-Z and suddenly launch into a deep discussion of Schoepenhauer, Berger, or Bu...

    This collection of essays spans a diverse range of topics: current events, music, art, books and movies, to name a few of the observations, covering both ends of the cultural spectrum. As an ex-librarian, I especially appreciated the piece on public libraries (?the only thing left on...

    The range of subjects Smith explores is this collection is truly dizzying: from the personal to the political, the philosophical to the physical, Brexit to Justin Bieber, Phillip Roth to Karl Ove Knausgard.Here are essays about her neighborhood library, traveling through Italy with h...

    It seems there are two kinds of readers when it comes to Zadie Smith: those who love and admire her writing and those who dislike and are annoyed by it. I typically fall into the former camp: her gift with prose is deft, her intellect fierce, and I get a kick out of the characters she ...

    I love her essays more than her fiction, and always jump to read a new one -- so I'd read about half of these before. And I'd read them again. She's brilliant, she writes beautifully, and has a charmingly open enthusiastic curiosity for so many different things -- art, politics, dance,...

    I love Zadie Smith's mind. ...

    Average of 2.5. Some essays were a 1 for me (no!); others, a 5 (yes!). Nicely bookended with what turned out to be my favourite essays, "Northwest London Blues" and "Joy" (my absolute favourite of the bunch), the majority of the rest of them - though it absolutely pains me to say it...

    This collection of essays spans a diverse range of topics: current events, music, art, books and movies, to name a few of the observations, covering both ends of the cultural spectrum. As an ex-librarian, I especially appreciated the piece on public libraries (?the only thing left on...

    Read more on Mina's Bookshelf http://minadecaro.blogspot.com/2018/0... "...you can't fight for a freedom you've forgotten how to identify. To the reader still curious about freedom I offer these essays--to be used, changed, dismantled, destroyed or ignored as necessary!"?Zadie Smi...

  • Ellen
    Jan 28, 2018

    2.991 stars - - - i'm free! this was a struggle to continue the more i read. broken into five sections: 'in the world', 'in the audience', 'in the gallery', 'on the bookshelf', and 'feel free', this book covers eclectic material like christian marclay's 24 hr movie, the clock; mark...

    The essays in this book have been published before, mostly in the New York Review of Books and The New Yorker, but it is quite something to see and read them all together. One has the impression of a very talkative, precocious teenager who notices ceaselessly, has opinions on everythi...

    A mixed collection of essays: the best are when Smith is discussing issues of politics (the closure of public libraries, the Brexit vote) where she brings a personal intimacy to national questions. Less enticing are the 'musing' essays where Smith responds to artworks, books, or pl...

    Zadie Smith must have felt freer in writing this book. She deals with a broad range of issues in her essays. There is no single theme that runs through them. There are essays that are quite ordinary. I have expected far more intellectually stimulating stuff from her. For instan...

    There's enough here for any and everybody to enjoy! Brava Queen! ...

    Writing exists (for me) at the intersection of three precarious, uncertain elements: language, the world, the self. The first is never wholly mine; the second I can only ever know in a partial sense; the third is a malleable and improvised response to the previous two. If my writing is...

    So: Zadie Smith, it seems, has replaced David Foster Wallace as my new person-to-aspire-to-be writer. Some pretty major shit going on with that right now. More as the story develops. ...

    Zadie offers up a collection of her essays here but what's interesting it that she notes in the foreword that all of them were written during the Obama presidency and therefore a product of an already bygone world. An interesting prompt for an essay I'd wish she'd written as well. ...

    I absolutely loved this book. My first Zadie Smith, but not my last. I want to be her BFF. Her mind is lively, free-ranging, compassionate, self-effacing... I just love her! (By the way, I read this as an audiobook, which I highly recommend. The reader is great.) ...

    ???.5 The standout aspect of these essays is the writing is always stunning. It is not difficult to understand why Zadie Smith is hailed in all corners of the literary world. There is an essay where she is talking about Joni Mitchell?s music and the passion rising off the page ...

    My association with the works of Zadie Smith started somewhere in 2003, with White Teeth. It was one of those books that are actually unputdownable (I have always been of the opinion that terms such as these are nothing but marketing gimmicks). Since then, Smith has been one of my favo...

    Just gonna say, Some Notes on Attunement is one of the best essays about music I've ever read. I know 100% nothing about Joni Mitchell. I'm sure I've heard something of hers at some point, but I have no idea what, and I've always sort of put her in this camp with U2 and the Beatles a...

    My most anticipated 2018 book! ...

    This was an advance reading copy graciously lent to me. What is truly amazing about Zadie Smith is her ability to go from "low" culture to high art in one sentence - she'll be musing on Key and Peele or Jay-Z and suddenly launch into a deep discussion of Schoepenhauer, Berger, or Bu...

    This collection of essays spans a diverse range of topics: current events, music, art, books and movies, to name a few of the observations, covering both ends of the cultural spectrum. As an ex-librarian, I especially appreciated the piece on public libraries (?the only thing left on...

    The range of subjects Smith explores is this collection is truly dizzying: from the personal to the political, the philosophical to the physical, Brexit to Justin Bieber, Phillip Roth to Karl Ove Knausgard.Here are essays about her neighborhood library, traveling through Italy with h...

    It seems there are two kinds of readers when it comes to Zadie Smith: those who love and admire her writing and those who dislike and are annoyed by it. I typically fall into the former camp: her gift with prose is deft, her intellect fierce, and I get a kick out of the characters she ...

  • Erin Attenborough
    Mar 15, 2018

    2.991 stars - - - i'm free! this was a struggle to continue the more i read. broken into five sections: 'in the world', 'in the audience', 'in the gallery', 'on the bookshelf', and 'feel free', this book covers eclectic material like christian marclay's 24 hr movie, the clock; mark...

    The essays in this book have been published before, mostly in the New York Review of Books and The New Yorker, but it is quite something to see and read them all together. One has the impression of a very talkative, precocious teenager who notices ceaselessly, has opinions on everythi...

    A mixed collection of essays: the best are when Smith is discussing issues of politics (the closure of public libraries, the Brexit vote) where she brings a personal intimacy to national questions. Less enticing are the 'musing' essays where Smith responds to artworks, books, or pl...

    Zadie Smith must have felt freer in writing this book. She deals with a broad range of issues in her essays. There is no single theme that runs through them. There are essays that are quite ordinary. I have expected far more intellectually stimulating stuff from her. For instan...

    There's enough here for any and everybody to enjoy! Brava Queen! ...

    Writing exists (for me) at the intersection of three precarious, uncertain elements: language, the world, the self. The first is never wholly mine; the second I can only ever know in a partial sense; the third is a malleable and improvised response to the previous two. If my writing is...

    So: Zadie Smith, it seems, has replaced David Foster Wallace as my new person-to-aspire-to-be writer. Some pretty major shit going on with that right now. More as the story develops. ...

    Zadie offers up a collection of her essays here but what's interesting it that she notes in the foreword that all of them were written during the Obama presidency and therefore a product of an already bygone world. An interesting prompt for an essay I'd wish she'd written as well. ...

    I absolutely loved this book. My first Zadie Smith, but not my last. I want to be her BFF. Her mind is lively, free-ranging, compassionate, self-effacing... I just love her! (By the way, I read this as an audiobook, which I highly recommend. The reader is great.) ...

    ???.5 The standout aspect of these essays is the writing is always stunning. It is not difficult to understand why Zadie Smith is hailed in all corners of the literary world. There is an essay where she is talking about Joni Mitchell?s music and the passion rising off the page ...

    My association with the works of Zadie Smith started somewhere in 2003, with White Teeth. It was one of those books that are actually unputdownable (I have always been of the opinion that terms such as these are nothing but marketing gimmicks). Since then, Smith has been one of my favo...

    Just gonna say, Some Notes on Attunement is one of the best essays about music I've ever read. I know 100% nothing about Joni Mitchell. I'm sure I've heard something of hers at some point, but I have no idea what, and I've always sort of put her in this camp with U2 and the Beatles a...

    My most anticipated 2018 book! ...

    This was an advance reading copy graciously lent to me. What is truly amazing about Zadie Smith is her ability to go from "low" culture to high art in one sentence - she'll be musing on Key and Peele or Jay-Z and suddenly launch into a deep discussion of Schoepenhauer, Berger, or Bu...

    This collection of essays spans a diverse range of topics: current events, music, art, books and movies, to name a few of the observations, covering both ends of the cultural spectrum. As an ex-librarian, I especially appreciated the piece on public libraries (?the only thing left on...

    The range of subjects Smith explores is this collection is truly dizzying: from the personal to the political, the philosophical to the physical, Brexit to Justin Bieber, Phillip Roth to Karl Ove Knausgard.Here are essays about her neighborhood library, traveling through Italy with h...

    It seems there are two kinds of readers when it comes to Zadie Smith: those who love and admire her writing and those who dislike and are annoyed by it. I typically fall into the former camp: her gift with prose is deft, her intellect fierce, and I get a kick out of the characters she ...

    I love her essays more than her fiction, and always jump to read a new one -- so I'd read about half of these before. And I'd read them again. She's brilliant, she writes beautifully, and has a charmingly open enthusiastic curiosity for so many different things -- art, politics, dance,...

    I love Zadie Smith's mind. ...

    Average of 2.5. Some essays were a 1 for me (no!); others, a 5 (yes!). Nicely bookended with what turned out to be my favourite essays, "Northwest London Blues" and "Joy" (my absolute favourite of the bunch), the majority of the rest of them - though it absolutely pains me to say it...

    This collection of essays spans a diverse range of topics: current events, music, art, books and movies, to name a few of the observations, covering both ends of the cultural spectrum. As an ex-librarian, I especially appreciated the piece on public libraries (?the only thing left on...

    Read more on Mina's Bookshelf http://minadecaro.blogspot.com/2018/0... "...you can't fight for a freedom you've forgotten how to identify. To the reader still curious about freedom I offer these essays--to be used, changed, dismantled, destroyed or ignored as necessary!"?Zadie Smi...

    From BBC Radio 4 - Book of the week: Zadie Smith reads from her latest essay collection where she offers sharp, and often funny, insights and observations on high culture, pop culture, social change, political debate and the personal. Episode 1 of 5 Today, she reflects on growing...

    The key to my four star rating is hidden in the detail - an intriguing essay title, a short quippy sentence, the way words role off the tongue if you read a paragraph out loud, self-sufficient segments that you want to put speech bubbles around and quote, a pop of surprising humour, a ...

    Is there anything Zadie Smith can?t do? Following her last novel (?Swing Time? ? nominated for the Man Booker Prize, no less) ?Feel Free? is a collection of essays, ranging from the intimately personal to the critically topical. She opens with a nostalgic reminiscence of he...

  • Laurel May
    Apr 06, 2018

    2.991 stars - - - i'm free! this was a struggle to continue the more i read. broken into five sections: 'in the world', 'in the audience', 'in the gallery', 'on the bookshelf', and 'feel free', this book covers eclectic material like christian marclay's 24 hr movie, the clock; mark...

    The essays in this book have been published before, mostly in the New York Review of Books and The New Yorker, but it is quite something to see and read them all together. One has the impression of a very talkative, precocious teenager who notices ceaselessly, has opinions on everythi...

    A mixed collection of essays: the best are when Smith is discussing issues of politics (the closure of public libraries, the Brexit vote) where she brings a personal intimacy to national questions. Less enticing are the 'musing' essays where Smith responds to artworks, books, or pl...

    Zadie Smith must have felt freer in writing this book. She deals with a broad range of issues in her essays. There is no single theme that runs through them. There are essays that are quite ordinary. I have expected far more intellectually stimulating stuff from her. For instan...

    There's enough here for any and everybody to enjoy! Brava Queen! ...

    Writing exists (for me) at the intersection of three precarious, uncertain elements: language, the world, the self. The first is never wholly mine; the second I can only ever know in a partial sense; the third is a malleable and improvised response to the previous two. If my writing is...

    So: Zadie Smith, it seems, has replaced David Foster Wallace as my new person-to-aspire-to-be writer. Some pretty major shit going on with that right now. More as the story develops. ...

    Zadie offers up a collection of her essays here but what's interesting it that she notes in the foreword that all of them were written during the Obama presidency and therefore a product of an already bygone world. An interesting prompt for an essay I'd wish she'd written as well. ...

    I absolutely loved this book. My first Zadie Smith, but not my last. I want to be her BFF. Her mind is lively, free-ranging, compassionate, self-effacing... I just love her! (By the way, I read this as an audiobook, which I highly recommend. The reader is great.) ...

    ???.5 The standout aspect of these essays is the writing is always stunning. It is not difficult to understand why Zadie Smith is hailed in all corners of the literary world. There is an essay where she is talking about Joni Mitchell?s music and the passion rising off the page ...

    My association with the works of Zadie Smith started somewhere in 2003, with White Teeth. It was one of those books that are actually unputdownable (I have always been of the opinion that terms such as these are nothing but marketing gimmicks). Since then, Smith has been one of my favo...

    Just gonna say, Some Notes on Attunement is one of the best essays about music I've ever read. I know 100% nothing about Joni Mitchell. I'm sure I've heard something of hers at some point, but I have no idea what, and I've always sort of put her in this camp with U2 and the Beatles a...

    My most anticipated 2018 book! ...

    This was an advance reading copy graciously lent to me. What is truly amazing about Zadie Smith is her ability to go from "low" culture to high art in one sentence - she'll be musing on Key and Peele or Jay-Z and suddenly launch into a deep discussion of Schoepenhauer, Berger, or Bu...

    This collection of essays spans a diverse range of topics: current events, music, art, books and movies, to name a few of the observations, covering both ends of the cultural spectrum. As an ex-librarian, I especially appreciated the piece on public libraries (?the only thing left on...

    The range of subjects Smith explores is this collection is truly dizzying: from the personal to the political, the philosophical to the physical, Brexit to Justin Bieber, Phillip Roth to Karl Ove Knausgard.Here are essays about her neighborhood library, traveling through Italy with h...

    It seems there are two kinds of readers when it comes to Zadie Smith: those who love and admire her writing and those who dislike and are annoyed by it. I typically fall into the former camp: her gift with prose is deft, her intellect fierce, and I get a kick out of the characters she ...

    I love her essays more than her fiction, and always jump to read a new one -- so I'd read about half of these before. And I'd read them again. She's brilliant, she writes beautifully, and has a charmingly open enthusiastic curiosity for so many different things -- art, politics, dance,...

    I love Zadie Smith's mind. ...

    Average of 2.5. Some essays were a 1 for me (no!); others, a 5 (yes!). Nicely bookended with what turned out to be my favourite essays, "Northwest London Blues" and "Joy" (my absolute favourite of the bunch), the majority of the rest of them - though it absolutely pains me to say it...

    This collection of essays spans a diverse range of topics: current events, music, art, books and movies, to name a few of the observations, covering both ends of the cultural spectrum. As an ex-librarian, I especially appreciated the piece on public libraries (?the only thing left on...

    Read more on Mina's Bookshelf http://minadecaro.blogspot.com/2018/0... "...you can't fight for a freedom you've forgotten how to identify. To the reader still curious about freedom I offer these essays--to be used, changed, dismantled, destroyed or ignored as necessary!"?Zadie Smi...

    From BBC Radio 4 - Book of the week: Zadie Smith reads from her latest essay collection where she offers sharp, and often funny, insights and observations on high culture, pop culture, social change, political debate and the personal. Episode 1 of 5 Today, she reflects on growing...

    The key to my four star rating is hidden in the detail - an intriguing essay title, a short quippy sentence, the way words role off the tongue if you read a paragraph out loud, self-sufficient segments that you want to put speech bubbles around and quote, a pop of surprising humour, a ...

    Is there anything Zadie Smith can?t do? Following her last novel (?Swing Time? ? nominated for the Man Booker Prize, no less) ?Feel Free? is a collection of essays, ranging from the intimately personal to the critically topical. She opens with a nostalgic reminiscence of he...

    Phew! I feel like I have learned. These essays were insightful and intelligent and beautifully written and basically solidified Zadie Smith as writer goals. I look up to Smith and with everything she publishes I?m inspired by her. I enjoyed all these essays even the ones I di...

  • Max Urai
    Dec 20, 2017

    2.991 stars - - - i'm free! this was a struggle to continue the more i read. broken into five sections: 'in the world', 'in the audience', 'in the gallery', 'on the bookshelf', and 'feel free', this book covers eclectic material like christian marclay's 24 hr movie, the clock; mark...

    The essays in this book have been published before, mostly in the New York Review of Books and The New Yorker, but it is quite something to see and read them all together. One has the impression of a very talkative, precocious teenager who notices ceaselessly, has opinions on everythi...

    A mixed collection of essays: the best are when Smith is discussing issues of politics (the closure of public libraries, the Brexit vote) where she brings a personal intimacy to national questions. Less enticing are the 'musing' essays where Smith responds to artworks, books, or pl...

    Zadie Smith must have felt freer in writing this book. She deals with a broad range of issues in her essays. There is no single theme that runs through them. There are essays that are quite ordinary. I have expected far more intellectually stimulating stuff from her. For instan...

    There's enough here for any and everybody to enjoy! Brava Queen! ...

    Writing exists (for me) at the intersection of three precarious, uncertain elements: language, the world, the self. The first is never wholly mine; the second I can only ever know in a partial sense; the third is a malleable and improvised response to the previous two. If my writing is...

    So: Zadie Smith, it seems, has replaced David Foster Wallace as my new person-to-aspire-to-be writer. Some pretty major shit going on with that right now. More as the story develops. ...

  • Anni
    Jan 07, 2018

    2.991 stars - - - i'm free! this was a struggle to continue the more i read. broken into five sections: 'in the world', 'in the audience', 'in the gallery', 'on the bookshelf', and 'feel free', this book covers eclectic material like christian marclay's 24 hr movie, the clock; mark...

    The essays in this book have been published before, mostly in the New York Review of Books and The New Yorker, but it is quite something to see and read them all together. One has the impression of a very talkative, precocious teenager who notices ceaselessly, has opinions on everythi...

    A mixed collection of essays: the best are when Smith is discussing issues of politics (the closure of public libraries, the Brexit vote) where she brings a personal intimacy to national questions. Less enticing are the 'musing' essays where Smith responds to artworks, books, or pl...

    Zadie Smith must have felt freer in writing this book. She deals with a broad range of issues in her essays. There is no single theme that runs through them. There are essays that are quite ordinary. I have expected far more intellectually stimulating stuff from her. For instan...

    There's enough here for any and everybody to enjoy! Brava Queen! ...

    Writing exists (for me) at the intersection of three precarious, uncertain elements: language, the world, the self. The first is never wholly mine; the second I can only ever know in a partial sense; the third is a malleable and improvised response to the previous two. If my writing is...

    So: Zadie Smith, it seems, has replaced David Foster Wallace as my new person-to-aspire-to-be writer. Some pretty major shit going on with that right now. More as the story develops. ...

    Zadie offers up a collection of her essays here but what's interesting it that she notes in the foreword that all of them were written during the Obama presidency and therefore a product of an already bygone world. An interesting prompt for an essay I'd wish she'd written as well. ...

    I absolutely loved this book. My first Zadie Smith, but not my last. I want to be her BFF. Her mind is lively, free-ranging, compassionate, self-effacing... I just love her! (By the way, I read this as an audiobook, which I highly recommend. The reader is great.) ...

    ???.5 The standout aspect of these essays is the writing is always stunning. It is not difficult to understand why Zadie Smith is hailed in all corners of the literary world. There is an essay where she is talking about Joni Mitchell?s music and the passion rising off the page ...

    My association with the works of Zadie Smith started somewhere in 2003, with White Teeth. It was one of those books that are actually unputdownable (I have always been of the opinion that terms such as these are nothing but marketing gimmicks). Since then, Smith has been one of my favo...

    Just gonna say, Some Notes on Attunement is one of the best essays about music I've ever read. I know 100% nothing about Joni Mitchell. I'm sure I've heard something of hers at some point, but I have no idea what, and I've always sort of put her in this camp with U2 and the Beatles a...

    My most anticipated 2018 book! ...

    This was an advance reading copy graciously lent to me. What is truly amazing about Zadie Smith is her ability to go from "low" culture to high art in one sentence - she'll be musing on Key and Peele or Jay-Z and suddenly launch into a deep discussion of Schoepenhauer, Berger, or Bu...

    This collection of essays spans a diverse range of topics: current events, music, art, books and movies, to name a few of the observations, covering both ends of the cultural spectrum. As an ex-librarian, I especially appreciated the piece on public libraries (?the only thing left on...

  • Anni
    Jan 07, 2018

    2.991 stars - - - i'm free! this was a struggle to continue the more i read. broken into five sections: 'in the world', 'in the audience', 'in the gallery', 'on the bookshelf', and 'feel free', this book covers eclectic material like christian marclay's 24 hr movie, the clock; mark...

    The essays in this book have been published before, mostly in the New York Review of Books and The New Yorker, but it is quite something to see and read them all together. One has the impression of a very talkative, precocious teenager who notices ceaselessly, has opinions on everythi...

    A mixed collection of essays: the best are when Smith is discussing issues of politics (the closure of public libraries, the Brexit vote) where she brings a personal intimacy to national questions. Less enticing are the 'musing' essays where Smith responds to artworks, books, or pl...

    Zadie Smith must have felt freer in writing this book. She deals with a broad range of issues in her essays. There is no single theme that runs through them. There are essays that are quite ordinary. I have expected far more intellectually stimulating stuff from her. For instan...

    There's enough here for any and everybody to enjoy! Brava Queen! ...

    Writing exists (for me) at the intersection of three precarious, uncertain elements: language, the world, the self. The first is never wholly mine; the second I can only ever know in a partial sense; the third is a malleable and improvised response to the previous two. If my writing is...

    So: Zadie Smith, it seems, has replaced David Foster Wallace as my new person-to-aspire-to-be writer. Some pretty major shit going on with that right now. More as the story develops. ...

    Zadie offers up a collection of her essays here but what's interesting it that she notes in the foreword that all of them were written during the Obama presidency and therefore a product of an already bygone world. An interesting prompt for an essay I'd wish she'd written as well. ...

    I absolutely loved this book. My first Zadie Smith, but not my last. I want to be her BFF. Her mind is lively, free-ranging, compassionate, self-effacing... I just love her! (By the way, I read this as an audiobook, which I highly recommend. The reader is great.) ...

    ???.5 The standout aspect of these essays is the writing is always stunning. It is not difficult to understand why Zadie Smith is hailed in all corners of the literary world. There is an essay where she is talking about Joni Mitchell?s music and the passion rising off the page ...

    My association with the works of Zadie Smith started somewhere in 2003, with White Teeth. It was one of those books that are actually unputdownable (I have always been of the opinion that terms such as these are nothing but marketing gimmicks). Since then, Smith has been one of my favo...

    Just gonna say, Some Notes on Attunement is one of the best essays about music I've ever read. I know 100% nothing about Joni Mitchell. I'm sure I've heard something of hers at some point, but I have no idea what, and I've always sort of put her in this camp with U2 and the Beatles a...

    My most anticipated 2018 book! ...

    This was an advance reading copy graciously lent to me. What is truly amazing about Zadie Smith is her ability to go from "low" culture to high art in one sentence - she'll be musing on Key and Peele or Jay-Z and suddenly launch into a deep discussion of Schoepenhauer, Berger, or Bu...

    This collection of essays spans a diverse range of topics: current events, music, art, books and movies, to name a few of the observations, covering both ends of the cultural spectrum. As an ex-librarian, I especially appreciated the piece on public libraries (?the only thing left on...

    The range of subjects Smith explores is this collection is truly dizzying: from the personal to the political, the philosophical to the physical, Brexit to Justin Bieber, Phillip Roth to Karl Ove Knausgard.Here are essays about her neighborhood library, traveling through Italy with h...

    It seems there are two kinds of readers when it comes to Zadie Smith: those who love and admire her writing and those who dislike and are annoyed by it. I typically fall into the former camp: her gift with prose is deft, her intellect fierce, and I get a kick out of the characters she ...

    I love her essays more than her fiction, and always jump to read a new one -- so I'd read about half of these before. And I'd read them again. She's brilliant, she writes beautifully, and has a charmingly open enthusiastic curiosity for so many different things -- art, politics, dance,...

    I love Zadie Smith's mind. ...

    Average of 2.5. Some essays were a 1 for me (no!); others, a 5 (yes!). Nicely bookended with what turned out to be my favourite essays, "Northwest London Blues" and "Joy" (my absolute favourite of the bunch), the majority of the rest of them - though it absolutely pains me to say it...

    This collection of essays spans a diverse range of topics: current events, music, art, books and movies, to name a few of the observations, covering both ends of the cultural spectrum. As an ex-librarian, I especially appreciated the piece on public libraries (?the only thing left on...

  • Christine
    Feb 18, 2018

    2.991 stars - - - i'm free! this was a struggle to continue the more i read. broken into five sections: 'in the world', 'in the audience', 'in the gallery', 'on the bookshelf', and 'feel free', this book covers eclectic material like christian marclay's 24 hr movie, the clock; mark...

    The essays in this book have been published before, mostly in the New York Review of Books and The New Yorker, but it is quite something to see and read them all together. One has the impression of a very talkative, precocious teenager who notices ceaselessly, has opinions on everythi...

    A mixed collection of essays: the best are when Smith is discussing issues of politics (the closure of public libraries, the Brexit vote) where she brings a personal intimacy to national questions. Less enticing are the 'musing' essays where Smith responds to artworks, books, or pl...

    Zadie Smith must have felt freer in writing this book. She deals with a broad range of issues in her essays. There is no single theme that runs through them. There are essays that are quite ordinary. I have expected far more intellectually stimulating stuff from her. For instan...

    There's enough here for any and everybody to enjoy! Brava Queen! ...

    Writing exists (for me) at the intersection of three precarious, uncertain elements: language, the world, the self. The first is never wholly mine; the second I can only ever know in a partial sense; the third is a malleable and improvised response to the previous two. If my writing is...

    So: Zadie Smith, it seems, has replaced David Foster Wallace as my new person-to-aspire-to-be writer. Some pretty major shit going on with that right now. More as the story develops. ...

    Zadie offers up a collection of her essays here but what's interesting it that she notes in the foreword that all of them were written during the Obama presidency and therefore a product of an already bygone world. An interesting prompt for an essay I'd wish she'd written as well. ...

    I absolutely loved this book. My first Zadie Smith, but not my last. I want to be her BFF. Her mind is lively, free-ranging, compassionate, self-effacing... I just love her! (By the way, I read this as an audiobook, which I highly recommend. The reader is great.) ...

    ???.5 The standout aspect of these essays is the writing is always stunning. It is not difficult to understand why Zadie Smith is hailed in all corners of the literary world. There is an essay where she is talking about Joni Mitchell?s music and the passion rising off the page ...

    My association with the works of Zadie Smith started somewhere in 2003, with White Teeth. It was one of those books that are actually unputdownable (I have always been of the opinion that terms such as these are nothing but marketing gimmicks). Since then, Smith has been one of my favo...

    Just gonna say, Some Notes on Attunement is one of the best essays about music I've ever read. I know 100% nothing about Joni Mitchell. I'm sure I've heard something of hers at some point, but I have no idea what, and I've always sort of put her in this camp with U2 and the Beatles a...

    My most anticipated 2018 book! ...

    This was an advance reading copy graciously lent to me. What is truly amazing about Zadie Smith is her ability to go from "low" culture to high art in one sentence - she'll be musing on Key and Peele or Jay-Z and suddenly launch into a deep discussion of Schoepenhauer, Berger, or Bu...

    This collection of essays spans a diverse range of topics: current events, music, art, books and movies, to name a few of the observations, covering both ends of the cultural spectrum. As an ex-librarian, I especially appreciated the piece on public libraries (?the only thing left on...

    The range of subjects Smith explores is this collection is truly dizzying: from the personal to the political, the philosophical to the physical, Brexit to Justin Bieber, Phillip Roth to Karl Ove Knausgard.Here are essays about her neighborhood library, traveling through Italy with h...

    It seems there are two kinds of readers when it comes to Zadie Smith: those who love and admire her writing and those who dislike and are annoyed by it. I typically fall into the former camp: her gift with prose is deft, her intellect fierce, and I get a kick out of the characters she ...

    I love her essays more than her fiction, and always jump to read a new one -- so I'd read about half of these before. And I'd read them again. She's brilliant, she writes beautifully, and has a charmingly open enthusiastic curiosity for so many different things -- art, politics, dance,...

    I love Zadie Smith's mind. ...

    Average of 2.5. Some essays were a 1 for me (no!); others, a 5 (yes!). Nicely bookended with what turned out to be my favourite essays, "Northwest London Blues" and "Joy" (my absolute favourite of the bunch), the majority of the rest of them - though it absolutely pains me to say it...

  • Rachel León
    Mar 12, 2018

    2.991 stars - - - i'm free! this was a struggle to continue the more i read. broken into five sections: 'in the world', 'in the audience', 'in the gallery', 'on the bookshelf', and 'feel free', this book covers eclectic material like christian marclay's 24 hr movie, the clock; mark...

    The essays in this book have been published before, mostly in the New York Review of Books and The New Yorker, but it is quite something to see and read them all together. One has the impression of a very talkative, precocious teenager who notices ceaselessly, has opinions on everythi...

    A mixed collection of essays: the best are when Smith is discussing issues of politics (the closure of public libraries, the Brexit vote) where she brings a personal intimacy to national questions. Less enticing are the 'musing' essays where Smith responds to artworks, books, or pl...

    Zadie Smith must have felt freer in writing this book. She deals with a broad range of issues in her essays. There is no single theme that runs through them. There are essays that are quite ordinary. I have expected far more intellectually stimulating stuff from her. For instan...

    There's enough here for any and everybody to enjoy! Brava Queen! ...

    Writing exists (for me) at the intersection of three precarious, uncertain elements: language, the world, the self. The first is never wholly mine; the second I can only ever know in a partial sense; the third is a malleable and improvised response to the previous two. If my writing is...

    So: Zadie Smith, it seems, has replaced David Foster Wallace as my new person-to-aspire-to-be writer. Some pretty major shit going on with that right now. More as the story develops. ...

    Zadie offers up a collection of her essays here but what's interesting it that she notes in the foreword that all of them were written during the Obama presidency and therefore a product of an already bygone world. An interesting prompt for an essay I'd wish she'd written as well. ...

    I absolutely loved this book. My first Zadie Smith, but not my last. I want to be her BFF. Her mind is lively, free-ranging, compassionate, self-effacing... I just love her! (By the way, I read this as an audiobook, which I highly recommend. The reader is great.) ...

    ???.5 The standout aspect of these essays is the writing is always stunning. It is not difficult to understand why Zadie Smith is hailed in all corners of the literary world. There is an essay where she is talking about Joni Mitchell?s music and the passion rising off the page ...

    My association with the works of Zadie Smith started somewhere in 2003, with White Teeth. It was one of those books that are actually unputdownable (I have always been of the opinion that terms such as these are nothing but marketing gimmicks). Since then, Smith has been one of my favo...

    Just gonna say, Some Notes on Attunement is one of the best essays about music I've ever read. I know 100% nothing about Joni Mitchell. I'm sure I've heard something of hers at some point, but I have no idea what, and I've always sort of put her in this camp with U2 and the Beatles a...

    My most anticipated 2018 book! ...

    This was an advance reading copy graciously lent to me. What is truly amazing about Zadie Smith is her ability to go from "low" culture to high art in one sentence - she'll be musing on Key and Peele or Jay-Z and suddenly launch into a deep discussion of Schoepenhauer, Berger, or Bu...

    This collection of essays spans a diverse range of topics: current events, music, art, books and movies, to name a few of the observations, covering both ends of the cultural spectrum. As an ex-librarian, I especially appreciated the piece on public libraries (?the only thing left on...

    The range of subjects Smith explores is this collection is truly dizzying: from the personal to the political, the philosophical to the physical, Brexit to Justin Bieber, Phillip Roth to Karl Ove Knausgard.Here are essays about her neighborhood library, traveling through Italy with h...

    It seems there are two kinds of readers when it comes to Zadie Smith: those who love and admire her writing and those who dislike and are annoyed by it. I typically fall into the former camp: her gift with prose is deft, her intellect fierce, and I get a kick out of the characters she ...

    I love her essays more than her fiction, and always jump to read a new one -- so I'd read about half of these before. And I'd read them again. She's brilliant, she writes beautifully, and has a charmingly open enthusiastic curiosity for so many different things -- art, politics, dance,...

    I love Zadie Smith's mind. ...

    Average of 2.5. Some essays were a 1 for me (no!); others, a 5 (yes!). Nicely bookended with what turned out to be my favourite essays, "Northwest London Blues" and "Joy" (my absolute favourite of the bunch), the majority of the rest of them - though it absolutely pains me to say it...

    This collection of essays spans a diverse range of topics: current events, music, art, books and movies, to name a few of the observations, covering both ends of the cultural spectrum. As an ex-librarian, I especially appreciated the piece on public libraries (?the only thing left on...

    Read more on Mina's Bookshelf http://minadecaro.blogspot.com/2018/0... "...you can't fight for a freedom you've forgotten how to identify. To the reader still curious about freedom I offer these essays--to be used, changed, dismantled, destroyed or ignored as necessary!"?Zadie Smi...

    From BBC Radio 4 - Book of the week: Zadie Smith reads from her latest essay collection where she offers sharp, and often funny, insights and observations on high culture, pop culture, social change, political debate and the personal. Episode 1 of 5 Today, she reflects on growing...

    The key to my four star rating is hidden in the detail - an intriguing essay title, a short quippy sentence, the way words role off the tongue if you read a paragraph out loud, self-sufficient segments that you want to put speech bubbles around and quote, a pop of surprising humour, a ...

    Is there anything Zadie Smith can?t do? Following her last novel (?Swing Time? ? nominated for the Man Booker Prize, no less) ?Feel Free? is a collection of essays, ranging from the intimately personal to the critically topical. She opens with a nostalgic reminiscence of he...

    Phew! I feel like I have learned. These essays were insightful and intelligent and beautifully written and basically solidified Zadie Smith as writer goals. I look up to Smith and with everything she publishes I?m inspired by her. I enjoyed all these essays even the ones I di...

    I love Zadie Smith and I love essay collections. I figured this book would be a 5 star read, easy. It wasn't such a slam dunk. Some of the essays are phenomenal and others I left pretty lukewarm about. I could've done without almost a hundred pages of her Harpers column, but overall ...

  • Liam Horsman
    Feb 20, 2018

    2.991 stars - - - i'm free! this was a struggle to continue the more i read. broken into five sections: 'in the world', 'in the audience', 'in the gallery', 'on the bookshelf', and 'feel free', this book covers eclectic material like christian marclay's 24 hr movie, the clock; mark...

    The essays in this book have been published before, mostly in the New York Review of Books and The New Yorker, but it is quite something to see and read them all together. One has the impression of a very talkative, precocious teenager who notices ceaselessly, has opinions on everythi...

    A mixed collection of essays: the best are when Smith is discussing issues of politics (the closure of public libraries, the Brexit vote) where she brings a personal intimacy to national questions. Less enticing are the 'musing' essays where Smith responds to artworks, books, or pl...

    Zadie Smith must have felt freer in writing this book. She deals with a broad range of issues in her essays. There is no single theme that runs through them. There are essays that are quite ordinary. I have expected far more intellectually stimulating stuff from her. For instan...

    There's enough here for any and everybody to enjoy! Brava Queen! ...

    Writing exists (for me) at the intersection of three precarious, uncertain elements: language, the world, the self. The first is never wholly mine; the second I can only ever know in a partial sense; the third is a malleable and improvised response to the previous two. If my writing is...

    So: Zadie Smith, it seems, has replaced David Foster Wallace as my new person-to-aspire-to-be writer. Some pretty major shit going on with that right now. More as the story develops. ...

    Zadie offers up a collection of her essays here but what's interesting it that she notes in the foreword that all of them were written during the Obama presidency and therefore a product of an already bygone world. An interesting prompt for an essay I'd wish she'd written as well. ...

    I absolutely loved this book. My first Zadie Smith, but not my last. I want to be her BFF. Her mind is lively, free-ranging, compassionate, self-effacing... I just love her! (By the way, I read this as an audiobook, which I highly recommend. The reader is great.) ...

    ???.5 The standout aspect of these essays is the writing is always stunning. It is not difficult to understand why Zadie Smith is hailed in all corners of the literary world. There is an essay where she is talking about Joni Mitchell?s music and the passion rising off the page ...

    My association with the works of Zadie Smith started somewhere in 2003, with White Teeth. It was one of those books that are actually unputdownable (I have always been of the opinion that terms such as these are nothing but marketing gimmicks). Since then, Smith has been one of my favo...

    Just gonna say, Some Notes on Attunement is one of the best essays about music I've ever read. I know 100% nothing about Joni Mitchell. I'm sure I've heard something of hers at some point, but I have no idea what, and I've always sort of put her in this camp with U2 and the Beatles a...

    My most anticipated 2018 book! ...

    This was an advance reading copy graciously lent to me. What is truly amazing about Zadie Smith is her ability to go from "low" culture to high art in one sentence - she'll be musing on Key and Peele or Jay-Z and suddenly launch into a deep discussion of Schoepenhauer, Berger, or Bu...

    This collection of essays spans a diverse range of topics: current events, music, art, books and movies, to name a few of the observations, covering both ends of the cultural spectrum. As an ex-librarian, I especially appreciated the piece on public libraries (?the only thing left on...

    The range of subjects Smith explores is this collection is truly dizzying: from the personal to the political, the philosophical to the physical, Brexit to Justin Bieber, Phillip Roth to Karl Ove Knausgard.Here are essays about her neighborhood library, traveling through Italy with h...

    It seems there are two kinds of readers when it comes to Zadie Smith: those who love and admire her writing and those who dislike and are annoyed by it. I typically fall into the former camp: her gift with prose is deft, her intellect fierce, and I get a kick out of the characters she ...

    I love her essays more than her fiction, and always jump to read a new one -- so I'd read about half of these before. And I'd read them again. She's brilliant, she writes beautifully, and has a charmingly open enthusiastic curiosity for so many different things -- art, politics, dance,...

    I love Zadie Smith's mind. ...

    Average of 2.5. Some essays were a 1 for me (no!); others, a 5 (yes!). Nicely bookended with what turned out to be my favourite essays, "Northwest London Blues" and "Joy" (my absolute favourite of the bunch), the majority of the rest of them - though it absolutely pains me to say it...

    This collection of essays spans a diverse range of topics: current events, music, art, books and movies, to name a few of the observations, covering both ends of the cultural spectrum. As an ex-librarian, I especially appreciated the piece on public libraries (?the only thing left on...

    Read more on Mina's Bookshelf http://minadecaro.blogspot.com/2018/0... "...you can't fight for a freedom you've forgotten how to identify. To the reader still curious about freedom I offer these essays--to be used, changed, dismantled, destroyed or ignored as necessary!"?Zadie Smi...

    From BBC Radio 4 - Book of the week: Zadie Smith reads from her latest essay collection where she offers sharp, and often funny, insights and observations on high culture, pop culture, social change, political debate and the personal. Episode 1 of 5 Today, she reflects on growing...

    The key to my four star rating is hidden in the detail - an intriguing essay title, a short quippy sentence, the way words role off the tongue if you read a paragraph out loud, self-sufficient segments that you want to put speech bubbles around and quote, a pop of surprising humour, a ...

    Is there anything Zadie Smith can?t do? Following her last novel (?Swing Time? ? nominated for the Man Booker Prize, no less) ?Feel Free? is a collection of essays, ranging from the intimately personal to the critically topical. She opens with a nostalgic reminiscence of he...

    Phew! I feel like I have learned. These essays were insightful and intelligent and beautifully written and basically solidified Zadie Smith as writer goals. I look up to Smith and with everything she publishes I?m inspired by her. I enjoyed all these essays even the ones I di...

    I love Zadie Smith and I love essay collections. I figured this book would be a 5 star read, easy. It wasn't such a slam dunk. Some of the essays are phenomenal and others I left pretty lukewarm about. I could've done without almost a hundred pages of her Harpers column, but overall ...

    Zadie Smith has a vast collection of published essays, which are collected in this wonderful book. Some topics may appeal more than others, but even if a subject may not suit the reader, Smith's writing is so elegant and thoughtful, that you can't resist reading- such as her essay on J...

    This was an absolute pleasure from start to finish. Reading this felt like having a multitude of genuine and intelligent conversations with Zadie Smith herself. This is only the second book by her that I've read, so while my opinion may change, for the moment I think that I find her no...

    Is it hyperbolic to say that I rarely feel more sane and grounded than when I read Zadie? Given that I've read the majority of these essays in one medium or another, I expected to love Feel Free, but I was wholly unprepared for the emotional and intellectual force of encountering th...

  • Rod-Kelly Hines
    Feb 20, 2018

    2.991 stars - - - i'm free! this was a struggle to continue the more i read. broken into five sections: 'in the world', 'in the audience', 'in the gallery', 'on the bookshelf', and 'feel free', this book covers eclectic material like christian marclay's 24 hr movie, the clock; mark...

    The essays in this book have been published before, mostly in the New York Review of Books and The New Yorker, but it is quite something to see and read them all together. One has the impression of a very talkative, precocious teenager who notices ceaselessly, has opinions on everythi...

    A mixed collection of essays: the best are when Smith is discussing issues of politics (the closure of public libraries, the Brexit vote) where she brings a personal intimacy to national questions. Less enticing are the 'musing' essays where Smith responds to artworks, books, or pl...

    Zadie Smith must have felt freer in writing this book. She deals with a broad range of issues in her essays. There is no single theme that runs through them. There are essays that are quite ordinary. I have expected far more intellectually stimulating stuff from her. For instan...

    There's enough here for any and everybody to enjoy! Brava Queen! ...

  • Roman Clodia
    Dec 29, 2017

    2.991 stars - - - i'm free! this was a struggle to continue the more i read. broken into five sections: 'in the world', 'in the audience', 'in the gallery', 'on the bookshelf', and 'feel free', this book covers eclectic material like christian marclay's 24 hr movie, the clock; mark...

    The essays in this book have been published before, mostly in the New York Review of Books and The New Yorker, but it is quite something to see and read them all together. One has the impression of a very talkative, precocious teenager who notices ceaselessly, has opinions on everythi...

    A mixed collection of essays: the best are when Smith is discussing issues of politics (the closure of public libraries, the Brexit vote) where she brings a personal intimacy to national questions. Less enticing are the 'musing' essays where Smith responds to artworks, books, or pl...

  • Monika
    Feb 13, 2018

    2.991 stars - - - i'm free! this was a struggle to continue the more i read. broken into five sections: 'in the world', 'in the audience', 'in the gallery', 'on the bookshelf', and 'feel free', this book covers eclectic material like christian marclay's 24 hr movie, the clock; mark...

    The essays in this book have been published before, mostly in the New York Review of Books and The New Yorker, but it is quite something to see and read them all together. One has the impression of a very talkative, precocious teenager who notices ceaselessly, has opinions on everythi...

    A mixed collection of essays: the best are when Smith is discussing issues of politics (the closure of public libraries, the Brexit vote) where she brings a personal intimacy to national questions. Less enticing are the 'musing' essays where Smith responds to artworks, books, or pl...

    Zadie Smith must have felt freer in writing this book. She deals with a broad range of issues in her essays. There is no single theme that runs through them. There are essays that are quite ordinary. I have expected far more intellectually stimulating stuff from her. For instan...

    There's enough here for any and everybody to enjoy! Brava Queen! ...

    Writing exists (for me) at the intersection of three precarious, uncertain elements: language, the world, the self. The first is never wholly mine; the second I can only ever know in a partial sense; the third is a malleable and improvised response to the previous two. If my writing is...

    So: Zadie Smith, it seems, has replaced David Foster Wallace as my new person-to-aspire-to-be writer. Some pretty major shit going on with that right now. More as the story develops. ...

    Zadie offers up a collection of her essays here but what's interesting it that she notes in the foreword that all of them were written during the Obama presidency and therefore a product of an already bygone world. An interesting prompt for an essay I'd wish she'd written as well. ...

    I absolutely loved this book. My first Zadie Smith, but not my last. I want to be her BFF. Her mind is lively, free-ranging, compassionate, self-effacing... I just love her! (By the way, I read this as an audiobook, which I highly recommend. The reader is great.) ...

    ???.5 The standout aspect of these essays is the writing is always stunning. It is not difficult to understand why Zadie Smith is hailed in all corners of the literary world. There is an essay where she is talking about Joni Mitchell?s music and the passion rising off the page ...

    My association with the works of Zadie Smith started somewhere in 2003, with White Teeth. It was one of those books that are actually unputdownable (I have always been of the opinion that terms such as these are nothing but marketing gimmicks). Since then, Smith has been one of my favo...

    Just gonna say, Some Notes on Attunement is one of the best essays about music I've ever read. I know 100% nothing about Joni Mitchell. I'm sure I've heard something of hers at some point, but I have no idea what, and I've always sort of put her in this camp with U2 and the Beatles a...

    My most anticipated 2018 book! ...

    This was an advance reading copy graciously lent to me. What is truly amazing about Zadie Smith is her ability to go from "low" culture to high art in one sentence - she'll be musing on Key and Peele or Jay-Z and suddenly launch into a deep discussion of Schoepenhauer, Berger, or Bu...

    This collection of essays spans a diverse range of topics: current events, music, art, books and movies, to name a few of the observations, covering both ends of the cultural spectrum. As an ex-librarian, I especially appreciated the piece on public libraries (?the only thing left on...

    The range of subjects Smith explores is this collection is truly dizzying: from the personal to the political, the philosophical to the physical, Brexit to Justin Bieber, Phillip Roth to Karl Ove Knausgard.Here are essays about her neighborhood library, traveling through Italy with h...

    It seems there are two kinds of readers when it comes to Zadie Smith: those who love and admire her writing and those who dislike and are annoyed by it. I typically fall into the former camp: her gift with prose is deft, her intellect fierce, and I get a kick out of the characters she ...

    I love her essays more than her fiction, and always jump to read a new one -- so I'd read about half of these before. And I'd read them again. She's brilliant, she writes beautifully, and has a charmingly open enthusiastic curiosity for so many different things -- art, politics, dance,...

    I love Zadie Smith's mind. ...

    Average of 2.5. Some essays were a 1 for me (no!); others, a 5 (yes!). Nicely bookended with what turned out to be my favourite essays, "Northwest London Blues" and "Joy" (my absolute favourite of the bunch), the majority of the rest of them - though it absolutely pains me to say it...

    This collection of essays spans a diverse range of topics: current events, music, art, books and movies, to name a few of the observations, covering both ends of the cultural spectrum. As an ex-librarian, I especially appreciated the piece on public libraries (?the only thing left on...

    Read more on Mina's Bookshelf http://minadecaro.blogspot.com/2018/0... "...you can't fight for a freedom you've forgotten how to identify. To the reader still curious about freedom I offer these essays--to be used, changed, dismantled, destroyed or ignored as necessary!"?Zadie Smi...

    From BBC Radio 4 - Book of the week: Zadie Smith reads from her latest essay collection where she offers sharp, and often funny, insights and observations on high culture, pop culture, social change, political debate and the personal. Episode 1 of 5 Today, she reflects on growing...

    The key to my four star rating is hidden in the detail - an intriguing essay title, a short quippy sentence, the way words role off the tongue if you read a paragraph out loud, self-sufficient segments that you want to put speech bubbles around and quote, a pop of surprising humour, a ...

    Is there anything Zadie Smith can?t do? Following her last novel (?Swing Time? ? nominated for the Man Booker Prize, no less) ?Feel Free? is a collection of essays, ranging from the intimately personal to the critically topical. She opens with a nostalgic reminiscence of he...

    Phew! I feel like I have learned. These essays were insightful and intelligent and beautifully written and basically solidified Zadie Smith as writer goals. I look up to Smith and with everything she publishes I?m inspired by her. I enjoyed all these essays even the ones I di...

    I love Zadie Smith and I love essay collections. I figured this book would be a 5 star read, easy. It wasn't such a slam dunk. Some of the essays are phenomenal and others I left pretty lukewarm about. I could've done without almost a hundred pages of her Harpers column, but overall ...

    Zadie Smith has a vast collection of published essays, which are collected in this wonderful book. Some topics may appeal more than others, but even if a subject may not suit the reader, Smith's writing is so elegant and thoughtful, that you can't resist reading- such as her essay on J...

    This was an absolute pleasure from start to finish. Reading this felt like having a multitude of genuine and intelligent conversations with Zadie Smith herself. This is only the second book by her that I've read, so while my opinion may change, for the moment I think that I find her no...

  • [p]aulie
    Mar 18, 2018

    2.991 stars - - - i'm free! this was a struggle to continue the more i read. broken into five sections: 'in the world', 'in the audience', 'in the gallery', 'on the bookshelf', and 'feel free', this book covers eclectic material like christian marclay's 24 hr movie, the clock; mark...

  • Bianca
    Jun 19, 2018

    2.991 stars - - - i'm free! this was a struggle to continue the more i read. broken into five sections: 'in the world', 'in the audience', 'in the gallery', 'on the bookshelf', and 'feel free', this book covers eclectic material like christian marclay's 24 hr movie, the clock; mark...

    The essays in this book have been published before, mostly in the New York Review of Books and The New Yorker, but it is quite something to see and read them all together. One has the impression of a very talkative, precocious teenager who notices ceaselessly, has opinions on everythi...

    A mixed collection of essays: the best are when Smith is discussing issues of politics (the closure of public libraries, the Brexit vote) where she brings a personal intimacy to national questions. Less enticing are the 'musing' essays where Smith responds to artworks, books, or pl...

    Zadie Smith must have felt freer in writing this book. She deals with a broad range of issues in her essays. There is no single theme that runs through them. There are essays that are quite ordinary. I have expected far more intellectually stimulating stuff from her. For instan...

    There's enough here for any and everybody to enjoy! Brava Queen! ...

    Writing exists (for me) at the intersection of three precarious, uncertain elements: language, the world, the self. The first is never wholly mine; the second I can only ever know in a partial sense; the third is a malleable and improvised response to the previous two. If my writing is...

    So: Zadie Smith, it seems, has replaced David Foster Wallace as my new person-to-aspire-to-be writer. Some pretty major shit going on with that right now. More as the story develops. ...

    Zadie offers up a collection of her essays here but what's interesting it that she notes in the foreword that all of them were written during the Obama presidency and therefore a product of an already bygone world. An interesting prompt for an essay I'd wish she'd written as well. ...

    I absolutely loved this book. My first Zadie Smith, but not my last. I want to be her BFF. Her mind is lively, free-ranging, compassionate, self-effacing... I just love her! (By the way, I read this as an audiobook, which I highly recommend. The reader is great.) ...

    ???.5 The standout aspect of these essays is the writing is always stunning. It is not difficult to understand why Zadie Smith is hailed in all corners of the literary world. There is an essay where she is talking about Joni Mitchell?s music and the passion rising off the page ...

    My association with the works of Zadie Smith started somewhere in 2003, with White Teeth. It was one of those books that are actually unputdownable (I have always been of the opinion that terms such as these are nothing but marketing gimmicks). Since then, Smith has been one of my favo...

    Just gonna say, Some Notes on Attunement is one of the best essays about music I've ever read. I know 100% nothing about Joni Mitchell. I'm sure I've heard something of hers at some point, but I have no idea what, and I've always sort of put her in this camp with U2 and the Beatles a...

    My most anticipated 2018 book! ...

    This was an advance reading copy graciously lent to me. What is truly amazing about Zadie Smith is her ability to go from "low" culture to high art in one sentence - she'll be musing on Key and Peele or Jay-Z and suddenly launch into a deep discussion of Schoepenhauer, Berger, or Bu...

    This collection of essays spans a diverse range of topics: current events, music, art, books and movies, to name a few of the observations, covering both ends of the cultural spectrum. As an ex-librarian, I especially appreciated the piece on public libraries (?the only thing left on...

    The range of subjects Smith explores is this collection is truly dizzying: from the personal to the political, the philosophical to the physical, Brexit to Justin Bieber, Phillip Roth to Karl Ove Knausgard.Here are essays about her neighborhood library, traveling through Italy with h...

    It seems there are two kinds of readers when it comes to Zadie Smith: those who love and admire her writing and those who dislike and are annoyed by it. I typically fall into the former camp: her gift with prose is deft, her intellect fierce, and I get a kick out of the characters she ...

    I love her essays more than her fiction, and always jump to read a new one -- so I'd read about half of these before. And I'd read them again. She's brilliant, she writes beautifully, and has a charmingly open enthusiastic curiosity for so many different things -- art, politics, dance,...

    I love Zadie Smith's mind. ...

    Average of 2.5. Some essays were a 1 for me (no!); others, a 5 (yes!). Nicely bookended with what turned out to be my favourite essays, "Northwest London Blues" and "Joy" (my absolute favourite of the bunch), the majority of the rest of them - though it absolutely pains me to say it...

    This collection of essays spans a diverse range of topics: current events, music, art, books and movies, to name a few of the observations, covering both ends of the cultural spectrum. As an ex-librarian, I especially appreciated the piece on public libraries (?the only thing left on...

    Read more on Mina's Bookshelf http://minadecaro.blogspot.com/2018/0... "...you can't fight for a freedom you've forgotten how to identify. To the reader still curious about freedom I offer these essays--to be used, changed, dismantled, destroyed or ignored as necessary!"?Zadie Smi...

    From BBC Radio 4 - Book of the week: Zadie Smith reads from her latest essay collection where she offers sharp, and often funny, insights and observations on high culture, pop culture, social change, political debate and the personal. Episode 1 of 5 Today, she reflects on growing...

    The key to my four star rating is hidden in the detail - an intriguing essay title, a short quippy sentence, the way words role off the tongue if you read a paragraph out loud, self-sufficient segments that you want to put speech bubbles around and quote, a pop of surprising humour, a ...

  • Khush
    Apr 02, 2018

    2.991 stars - - - i'm free! this was a struggle to continue the more i read. broken into five sections: 'in the world', 'in the audience', 'in the gallery', 'on the bookshelf', and 'feel free', this book covers eclectic material like christian marclay's 24 hr movie, the clock; mark...

    The essays in this book have been published before, mostly in the New York Review of Books and The New Yorker, but it is quite something to see and read them all together. One has the impression of a very talkative, precocious teenager who notices ceaselessly, has opinions on everythi...

    A mixed collection of essays: the best are when Smith is discussing issues of politics (the closure of public libraries, the Brexit vote) where she brings a personal intimacy to national questions. Less enticing are the 'musing' essays where Smith responds to artworks, books, or pl...

    Zadie Smith must have felt freer in writing this book. She deals with a broad range of issues in her essays. There is no single theme that runs through them. There are essays that are quite ordinary. I have expected far more intellectually stimulating stuff from her. For instan...