You Can Stop Humming Now: A Doctor's Stories of Life, Death, and in Between

You Can Stop Humming Now: A Doctor's Stories of Life, Death, and in Between

"Gripping, soaring, inspiring."--Atul Gawande, author of Being Mortal For readers of Atul Gawande and Jerome Groopman, a book of beautifully crafted stories about what life is like for patients kept alive by modern medical technology. Modern medicine is a world that glimmers with new technology and cutting-edge research. To the public eye, medical stories often begin with "Gripping, soaring, inspiring."--Atul Gawande, author of Being Mortal For readers of Atul Gawande and Jerome...

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Title:You Can Stop Humming Now: A Doctor's Stories of Life, Death, and in Between
Author:Daniela J. Lamas
Rating:
Genres:Nonfiction
ISBN:0316393177
Format Type:Hardcover
Number of Pages:256 pages pages

You Can Stop Humming Now: A Doctor's Stories of Life, Death, and in Between Reviews

  • Courtney
    May 21, 2018

    I received a copy of this book in exchange for an honest review. You Can Stop Humming Now is a non fiction memoir of sorts that takes us through the wonders of modern medicine by examining various patients past and patient under the care of Daniela Lamas. Rather than baffle you wit...

    A compassionate look at medical care from a clinician?s perspective. Dr. Lamas is a gifted writer in addition to being a sympathetic healer. This book should be required reading for every doctor in training. Truly gorgeous reading. ...

    I went into this book wanting to learn more about the science and policies of my health care colleagues across the pond. My expectations quickly shifted as I realised this book was about the people we care for, their stories and the impact of medical interventions on them. Dr Lamas wri...

    It gets 4 from me because of the interesting topic and subtle presentation of such. I had never really thought about there being a group of patients who spend much of their last years suspended between life and death. The irony is there are increasingly more of these people because of ...

    Daniela Lamas has written a book about many of the patients she has looked after in her years in medicine. As well as talking about the care they receive in the critical units of the hospital, she goes and talks to some of the patients after they have been discharged to see how their l...

    This was fine. Lamas is a capable writer and the stories are both interesting and moving. When I finished it, though, I was left not quite sure what point she was trying to make. Without a connective thread beyond "these people spent time in the ICU and only survived, when they did, du...

    I learned a lot here (particularly about the "in between") about the medical world that I had no knowledge of before. The stories are told with thoughtfulness and tenderness and really bring the people to life. ...

    I love reading about the work that medical doctors do and I hold good medical doctors in very high esteem. Daniela Lamas is one of those doctors and deserves recognition for the great work she does with a professional and yet compassion approach. She is a doctor who works in critical c...

    I enjoy reading books on medicine and I enjoyed this quite a lot. Lamas admits that she doesn't much about what happens when a critical care patient goes home, and I think that's probably true for most physicians. In fact, I'm sad to say that most probably don't know and don't even...

    I read books about dying and death and medicine because I want to able to make informed decisions for my loved ones. This book discussed the medical devices that are able to keep very ill people alive longer and the difficult decisions that people face when they choose to take advantag...

    I really enjoyed this book. The stories themselves were actually a bit on the depressing side, but I think the author has done an excellent job of portraying the not happily ever after ending most of us see in up lifting news stories. If you are fortunate enough to have little experien...

    I thought this book by a critical care physician would be much like "Being Mortal", but I found it to be less informative. The author becomes curious as to what happens to patients she sees in the CCU after they leave and find themselves with a different life than they had before a hea...

    As a physician, who also aspires to be a writer, this book is well written and very inspiring. As Daniela notes in the acknowledgements, ?The path to becoming a doctor is relatively clear; the path to becoming a writer, less so.? She seems to be laying down a very clear path to fol...

    I have mixed feelings about this book. As an Ex critical care nurse (UK) I can read and understand the case histories provided. The US is, I feel, more proactive in moving patients with invasive therapies on. I haven't worked with ECMO patients but the idea of mobilising them seems ali...

    The author writes of maybe 10 patients she encountered with diagnoses that would have killed them a generation ago. The march of medical science changed that ? and that was the point of the book she wanted to write. None of the patients are in this fix from bad lifestyle choices. So ...

    This short book is made up of essay-chapters about patients who are, for the most part, on the periphery of the medical system in one way or another--waiting for a transplant, waiting to die, waiting to return to their lives, coping with life after TBI--and it's very interesting. It's ...

    This is a Goodreads book. The intro explains the journey Dr. Lamas went through from wanting to win at all costs to when to let go and make the patient comfortable. The different chapters depict different patients, what they went through and in the afterword, their results good and b...

    This is a really great book! It is not just about the ethics of the "miracle of modern medicine", which is what I thought it would be about, and having had a close family member go through this experience of life after ICU. It is more about the shifting attitudes towards quality of lif...

    Very interesting, but depressing, food for thought. Lamas presents the shocking reality of how little information or true guidance families are given when their loved ones are in ICU and must make decisions about interventions. There are some hopeful stories for balance, thank goodness...

    A real eye opener into the medical world and patients lives. I loved this book, it made me want to be a doctor, I found myself trying to diagnose patients as I read it !! A must read ! ...

    I loved this account from both doctor and patient perspective. ...

    The flip side of what it means to have access to modern medical intervention. It gives another ring of meaning to the term "cutting edge". ...

    I just want to thank the author for her dedication to being a wonderful doctor and for sharing an insightful insider?s view. You are an incredibly gifted woman. ...

    I liked this book but my impression of the author was that she was aloof to her patients and never quite connected to them as humans. ...

    WOW great book to really see what happens in between the ICU and long term care. Everyone should read this! ...

    Dr. Lamas gives voice to unheard, uncomfortable and messy patient stories with an open heart and compassionate prose. ...

  • Rosanne
    Apr 15, 2018

    I received a copy of this book in exchange for an honest review. You Can Stop Humming Now is a non fiction memoir of sorts that takes us through the wonders of modern medicine by examining various patients past and patient under the care of Daniela Lamas. Rather than baffle you wit...

    A compassionate look at medical care from a clinician?s perspective. Dr. Lamas is a gifted writer in addition to being a sympathetic healer. This book should be required reading for every doctor in training. Truly gorgeous reading. ...

    I went into this book wanting to learn more about the science and policies of my health care colleagues across the pond. My expectations quickly shifted as I realised this book was about the people we care for, their stories and the impact of medical interventions on them. Dr Lamas wri...

    It gets 4 from me because of the interesting topic and subtle presentation of such. I had never really thought about there being a group of patients who spend much of their last years suspended between life and death. The irony is there are increasingly more of these people because of ...

    Daniela Lamas has written a book about many of the patients she has looked after in her years in medicine. As well as talking about the care they receive in the critical units of the hospital, she goes and talks to some of the patients after they have been discharged to see how their l...

    This was fine. Lamas is a capable writer and the stories are both interesting and moving. When I finished it, though, I was left not quite sure what point she was trying to make. Without a connective thread beyond "these people spent time in the ICU and only survived, when they did, du...

    I learned a lot here (particularly about the "in between") about the medical world that I had no knowledge of before. The stories are told with thoughtfulness and tenderness and really bring the people to life. ...

    I love reading about the work that medical doctors do and I hold good medical doctors in very high esteem. Daniela Lamas is one of those doctors and deserves recognition for the great work she does with a professional and yet compassion approach. She is a doctor who works in critical c...

    I enjoy reading books on medicine and I enjoyed this quite a lot. Lamas admits that she doesn't much about what happens when a critical care patient goes home, and I think that's probably true for most physicians. In fact, I'm sad to say that most probably don't know and don't even...

    I read books about dying and death and medicine because I want to able to make informed decisions for my loved ones. This book discussed the medical devices that are able to keep very ill people alive longer and the difficult decisions that people face when they choose to take advantag...

    I really enjoyed this book. The stories themselves were actually a bit on the depressing side, but I think the author has done an excellent job of portraying the not happily ever after ending most of us see in up lifting news stories. If you are fortunate enough to have little experien...

    I thought this book by a critical care physician would be much like "Being Mortal", but I found it to be less informative. The author becomes curious as to what happens to patients she sees in the CCU after they leave and find themselves with a different life than they had before a hea...

  • Cathy
    Apr 06, 2018

    I received a copy of this book in exchange for an honest review. You Can Stop Humming Now is a non fiction memoir of sorts that takes us through the wonders of modern medicine by examining various patients past and patient under the care of Daniela Lamas. Rather than baffle you wit...

    A compassionate look at medical care from a clinician?s perspective. Dr. Lamas is a gifted writer in addition to being a sympathetic healer. This book should be required reading for every doctor in training. Truly gorgeous reading. ...

    I went into this book wanting to learn more about the science and policies of my health care colleagues across the pond. My expectations quickly shifted as I realised this book was about the people we care for, their stories and the impact of medical interventions on them. Dr Lamas wri...

    It gets 4 from me because of the interesting topic and subtle presentation of such. I had never really thought about there being a group of patients who spend much of their last years suspended between life and death. The irony is there are increasingly more of these people because of ...

    Daniela Lamas has written a book about many of the patients she has looked after in her years in medicine. As well as talking about the care they receive in the critical units of the hospital, she goes and talks to some of the patients after they have been discharged to see how their l...

    This was fine. Lamas is a capable writer and the stories are both interesting and moving. When I finished it, though, I was left not quite sure what point she was trying to make. Without a connective thread beyond "these people spent time in the ICU and only survived, when they did, du...

    I learned a lot here (particularly about the "in between") about the medical world that I had no knowledge of before. The stories are told with thoughtfulness and tenderness and really bring the people to life. ...

    I love reading about the work that medical doctors do and I hold good medical doctors in very high esteem. Daniela Lamas is one of those doctors and deserves recognition for the great work she does with a professional and yet compassion approach. She is a doctor who works in critical c...

    I enjoy reading books on medicine and I enjoyed this quite a lot. Lamas admits that she doesn't much about what happens when a critical care patient goes home, and I think that's probably true for most physicians. In fact, I'm sad to say that most probably don't know and don't even...

    I read books about dying and death and medicine because I want to able to make informed decisions for my loved ones. This book discussed the medical devices that are able to keep very ill people alive longer and the difficult decisions that people face when they choose to take advantag...

    I really enjoyed this book. The stories themselves were actually a bit on the depressing side, but I think the author has done an excellent job of portraying the not happily ever after ending most of us see in up lifting news stories. If you are fortunate enough to have little experien...

    I thought this book by a critical care physician would be much like "Being Mortal", but I found it to be less informative. The author becomes curious as to what happens to patients she sees in the CCU after they leave and find themselves with a different life than they had before a hea...

    As a physician, who also aspires to be a writer, this book is well written and very inspiring. As Daniela notes in the acknowledgements, ?The path to becoming a doctor is relatively clear; the path to becoming a writer, less so.? She seems to be laying down a very clear path to fol...

    I have mixed feelings about this book. As an Ex critical care nurse (UK) I can read and understand the case histories provided. The US is, I feel, more proactive in moving patients with invasive therapies on. I haven't worked with ECMO patients but the idea of mobilising them seems ali...

    The author writes of maybe 10 patients she encountered with diagnoses that would have killed them a generation ago. The march of medical science changed that ? and that was the point of the book she wanted to write. None of the patients are in this fix from bad lifestyle choices. So ...

    This short book is made up of essay-chapters about patients who are, for the most part, on the periphery of the medical system in one way or another--waiting for a transplant, waiting to die, waiting to return to their lives, coping with life after TBI--and it's very interesting. It's ...

    This is a Goodreads book. The intro explains the journey Dr. Lamas went through from wanting to win at all costs to when to let go and make the patient comfortable. The different chapters depict different patients, what they went through and in the afterword, their results good and b...

    This is a really great book! It is not just about the ethics of the "miracle of modern medicine", which is what I thought it would be about, and having had a close family member go through this experience of life after ICU. It is more about the shifting attitudes towards quality of lif...

    Very interesting, but depressing, food for thought. Lamas presents the shocking reality of how little information or true guidance families are given when their loved ones are in ICU and must make decisions about interventions. There are some hopeful stories for balance, thank goodness...

    A real eye opener into the medical world and patients lives. I loved this book, it made me want to be a doctor, I found myself trying to diagnose patients as I read it !! A must read ! ...

    I loved this account from both doctor and patient perspective. ...

    The flip side of what it means to have access to modern medical intervention. It gives another ring of meaning to the term "cutting edge". ...

    I just want to thank the author for her dedication to being a wonderful doctor and for sharing an insightful insider?s view. You are an incredibly gifted woman. ...

    I liked this book but my impression of the author was that she was aloof to her patients and never quite connected to them as humans. ...

    WOW great book to really see what happens in between the ICU and long term care. Everyone should read this! ...

    Dr. Lamas gives voice to unheard, uncomfortable and messy patient stories with an open heart and compassionate prose. ...

    4.5 ...

    A must read for physicians, patients, and loved ones of patients...Certainly places a whole new perspective on critical illness and health care. ...

    Not the best of the genre. Didn?t feel she adequately discussed how to address end of life decisions with patients and families. ...

  • Julie
    May 22, 2018

    I received a copy of this book in exchange for an honest review. You Can Stop Humming Now is a non fiction memoir of sorts that takes us through the wonders of modern medicine by examining various patients past and patient under the care of Daniela Lamas. Rather than baffle you wit...

    A compassionate look at medical care from a clinician?s perspective. Dr. Lamas is a gifted writer in addition to being a sympathetic healer. This book should be required reading for every doctor in training. Truly gorgeous reading. ...

    I went into this book wanting to learn more about the science and policies of my health care colleagues across the pond. My expectations quickly shifted as I realised this book was about the people we care for, their stories and the impact of medical interventions on them. Dr Lamas wri...

    It gets 4 from me because of the interesting topic and subtle presentation of such. I had never really thought about there being a group of patients who spend much of their last years suspended between life and death. The irony is there are increasingly more of these people because of ...

    Daniela Lamas has written a book about many of the patients she has looked after in her years in medicine. As well as talking about the care they receive in the critical units of the hospital, she goes and talks to some of the patients after they have been discharged to see how their l...

    This was fine. Lamas is a capable writer and the stories are both interesting and moving. When I finished it, though, I was left not quite sure what point she was trying to make. Without a connective thread beyond "these people spent time in the ICU and only survived, when they did, du...

    I learned a lot here (particularly about the "in between") about the medical world that I had no knowledge of before. The stories are told with thoughtfulness and tenderness and really bring the people to life. ...

    I love reading about the work that medical doctors do and I hold good medical doctors in very high esteem. Daniela Lamas is one of those doctors and deserves recognition for the great work she does with a professional and yet compassion approach. She is a doctor who works in critical c...

    I enjoy reading books on medicine and I enjoyed this quite a lot. Lamas admits that she doesn't much about what happens when a critical care patient goes home, and I think that's probably true for most physicians. In fact, I'm sad to say that most probably don't know and don't even...

    I read books about dying and death and medicine because I want to able to make informed decisions for my loved ones. This book discussed the medical devices that are able to keep very ill people alive longer and the difficult decisions that people face when they choose to take advantag...

    I really enjoyed this book. The stories themselves were actually a bit on the depressing side, but I think the author has done an excellent job of portraying the not happily ever after ending most of us see in up lifting news stories. If you are fortunate enough to have little experien...

    I thought this book by a critical care physician would be much like "Being Mortal", but I found it to be less informative. The author becomes curious as to what happens to patients she sees in the CCU after they leave and find themselves with a different life than they had before a hea...

    As a physician, who also aspires to be a writer, this book is well written and very inspiring. As Daniela notes in the acknowledgements, ?The path to becoming a doctor is relatively clear; the path to becoming a writer, less so.? She seems to be laying down a very clear path to fol...

    I have mixed feelings about this book. As an Ex critical care nurse (UK) I can read and understand the case histories provided. The US is, I feel, more proactive in moving patients with invasive therapies on. I haven't worked with ECMO patients but the idea of mobilising them seems ali...

    The author writes of maybe 10 patients she encountered with diagnoses that would have killed them a generation ago. The march of medical science changed that ? and that was the point of the book she wanted to write. None of the patients are in this fix from bad lifestyle choices. So ...

    This short book is made up of essay-chapters about patients who are, for the most part, on the periphery of the medical system in one way or another--waiting for a transplant, waiting to die, waiting to return to their lives, coping with life after TBI--and it's very interesting. It's ...

    This is a Goodreads book. The intro explains the journey Dr. Lamas went through from wanting to win at all costs to when to let go and make the patient comfortable. The different chapters depict different patients, what they went through and in the afterword, their results good and b...

    This is a really great book! It is not just about the ethics of the "miracle of modern medicine", which is what I thought it would be about, and having had a close family member go through this experience of life after ICU. It is more about the shifting attitudes towards quality of lif...

    Very interesting, but depressing, food for thought. Lamas presents the shocking reality of how little information or true guidance families are given when their loved ones are in ICU and must make decisions about interventions. There are some hopeful stories for balance, thank goodness...

  • Sara
    Mar 03, 2018

    I received a copy of this book in exchange for an honest review. You Can Stop Humming Now is a non fiction memoir of sorts that takes us through the wonders of modern medicine by examining various patients past and patient under the care of Daniela Lamas. Rather than baffle you wit...

  • Emily
    May 17, 2018

    I received a copy of this book in exchange for an honest review. You Can Stop Humming Now is a non fiction memoir of sorts that takes us through the wonders of modern medicine by examining various patients past and patient under the care of Daniela Lamas. Rather than baffle you wit...

    A compassionate look at medical care from a clinician?s perspective. Dr. Lamas is a gifted writer in addition to being a sympathetic healer. This book should be required reading for every doctor in training. Truly gorgeous reading. ...

    I went into this book wanting to learn more about the science and policies of my health care colleagues across the pond. My expectations quickly shifted as I realised this book was about the people we care for, their stories and the impact of medical interventions on them. Dr Lamas wri...

    It gets 4 from me because of the interesting topic and subtle presentation of such. I had never really thought about there being a group of patients who spend much of their last years suspended between life and death. The irony is there are increasingly more of these people because of ...

    Daniela Lamas has written a book about many of the patients she has looked after in her years in medicine. As well as talking about the care they receive in the critical units of the hospital, she goes and talks to some of the patients after they have been discharged to see how their l...

    This was fine. Lamas is a capable writer and the stories are both interesting and moving. When I finished it, though, I was left not quite sure what point she was trying to make. Without a connective thread beyond "these people spent time in the ICU and only survived, when they did, du...

  • Donna
    May 15, 2018

    I received a copy of this book in exchange for an honest review. You Can Stop Humming Now is a non fiction memoir of sorts that takes us through the wonders of modern medicine by examining various patients past and patient under the care of Daniela Lamas. Rather than baffle you wit...

    A compassionate look at medical care from a clinician?s perspective. Dr. Lamas is a gifted writer in addition to being a sympathetic healer. This book should be required reading for every doctor in training. Truly gorgeous reading. ...

    I went into this book wanting to learn more about the science and policies of my health care colleagues across the pond. My expectations quickly shifted as I realised this book was about the people we care for, their stories and the impact of medical interventions on them. Dr Lamas wri...

    It gets 4 from me because of the interesting topic and subtle presentation of such. I had never really thought about there being a group of patients who spend much of their last years suspended between life and death. The irony is there are increasingly more of these people because of ...

    Daniela Lamas has written a book about many of the patients she has looked after in her years in medicine. As well as talking about the care they receive in the critical units of the hospital, she goes and talks to some of the patients after they have been discharged to see how their l...

    This was fine. Lamas is a capable writer and the stories are both interesting and moving. When I finished it, though, I was left not quite sure what point she was trying to make. Without a connective thread beyond "these people spent time in the ICU and only survived, when they did, du...

    I learned a lot here (particularly about the "in between") about the medical world that I had no knowledge of before. The stories are told with thoughtfulness and tenderness and really bring the people to life. ...

    I love reading about the work that medical doctors do and I hold good medical doctors in very high esteem. Daniela Lamas is one of those doctors and deserves recognition for the great work she does with a professional and yet compassion approach. She is a doctor who works in critical c...

    I enjoy reading books on medicine and I enjoyed this quite a lot. Lamas admits that she doesn't much about what happens when a critical care patient goes home, and I think that's probably true for most physicians. In fact, I'm sad to say that most probably don't know and don't even...

    I read books about dying and death and medicine because I want to able to make informed decisions for my loved ones. This book discussed the medical devices that are able to keep very ill people alive longer and the difficult decisions that people face when they choose to take advantag...

    I really enjoyed this book. The stories themselves were actually a bit on the depressing side, but I think the author has done an excellent job of portraying the not happily ever after ending most of us see in up lifting news stories. If you are fortunate enough to have little experien...

    I thought this book by a critical care physician would be much like "Being Mortal", but I found it to be less informative. The author becomes curious as to what happens to patients she sees in the CCU after they leave and find themselves with a different life than they had before a hea...

    As a physician, who also aspires to be a writer, this book is well written and very inspiring. As Daniela notes in the acknowledgements, ?The path to becoming a doctor is relatively clear; the path to becoming a writer, less so.? She seems to be laying down a very clear path to fol...

    I have mixed feelings about this book. As an Ex critical care nurse (UK) I can read and understand the case histories provided. The US is, I feel, more proactive in moving patients with invasive therapies on. I haven't worked with ECMO patients but the idea of mobilising them seems ali...

    The author writes of maybe 10 patients she encountered with diagnoses that would have killed them a generation ago. The march of medical science changed that ? and that was the point of the book she wanted to write. None of the patients are in this fix from bad lifestyle choices. So ...

  • Marie (UK)
    May 03, 2018

    I received a copy of this book in exchange for an honest review. You Can Stop Humming Now is a non fiction memoir of sorts that takes us through the wonders of modern medicine by examining various patients past and patient under the care of Daniela Lamas. Rather than baffle you wit...

    A compassionate look at medical care from a clinician?s perspective. Dr. Lamas is a gifted writer in addition to being a sympathetic healer. This book should be required reading for every doctor in training. Truly gorgeous reading. ...

    I went into this book wanting to learn more about the science and policies of my health care colleagues across the pond. My expectations quickly shifted as I realised this book was about the people we care for, their stories and the impact of medical interventions on them. Dr Lamas wri...

    It gets 4 from me because of the interesting topic and subtle presentation of such. I had never really thought about there being a group of patients who spend much of their last years suspended between life and death. The irony is there are increasingly more of these people because of ...

    Daniela Lamas has written a book about many of the patients she has looked after in her years in medicine. As well as talking about the care they receive in the critical units of the hospital, she goes and talks to some of the patients after they have been discharged to see how their l...

    This was fine. Lamas is a capable writer and the stories are both interesting and moving. When I finished it, though, I was left not quite sure what point she was trying to make. Without a connective thread beyond "these people spent time in the ICU and only survived, when they did, du...

    I learned a lot here (particularly about the "in between") about the medical world that I had no knowledge of before. The stories are told with thoughtfulness and tenderness and really bring the people to life. ...

    I love reading about the work that medical doctors do and I hold good medical doctors in very high esteem. Daniela Lamas is one of those doctors and deserves recognition for the great work she does with a professional and yet compassion approach. She is a doctor who works in critical c...

    I enjoy reading books on medicine and I enjoyed this quite a lot. Lamas admits that she doesn't much about what happens when a critical care patient goes home, and I think that's probably true for most physicians. In fact, I'm sad to say that most probably don't know and don't even...

    I read books about dying and death and medicine because I want to able to make informed decisions for my loved ones. This book discussed the medical devices that are able to keep very ill people alive longer and the difficult decisions that people face when they choose to take advantag...

    I really enjoyed this book. The stories themselves were actually a bit on the depressing side, but I think the author has done an excellent job of portraying the not happily ever after ending most of us see in up lifting news stories. If you are fortunate enough to have little experien...

    I thought this book by a critical care physician would be much like "Being Mortal", but I found it to be less informative. The author becomes curious as to what happens to patients she sees in the CCU after they leave and find themselves with a different life than they had before a hea...

    As a physician, who also aspires to be a writer, this book is well written and very inspiring. As Daniela notes in the acknowledgements, ?The path to becoming a doctor is relatively clear; the path to becoming a writer, less so.? She seems to be laying down a very clear path to fol...

    I have mixed feelings about this book. As an Ex critical care nurse (UK) I can read and understand the case histories provided. The US is, I feel, more proactive in moving patients with invasive therapies on. I haven't worked with ECMO patients but the idea of mobilising them seems ali...

  • Julie
    May 17, 2018

    I received a copy of this book in exchange for an honest review. You Can Stop Humming Now is a non fiction memoir of sorts that takes us through the wonders of modern medicine by examining various patients past and patient under the care of Daniela Lamas. Rather than baffle you wit...

    A compassionate look at medical care from a clinician?s perspective. Dr. Lamas is a gifted writer in addition to being a sympathetic healer. This book should be required reading for every doctor in training. Truly gorgeous reading. ...

    I went into this book wanting to learn more about the science and policies of my health care colleagues across the pond. My expectations quickly shifted as I realised this book was about the people we care for, their stories and the impact of medical interventions on them. Dr Lamas wri...

    It gets 4 from me because of the interesting topic and subtle presentation of such. I had never really thought about there being a group of patients who spend much of their last years suspended between life and death. The irony is there are increasingly more of these people because of ...

    Daniela Lamas has written a book about many of the patients she has looked after in her years in medicine. As well as talking about the care they receive in the critical units of the hospital, she goes and talks to some of the patients after they have been discharged to see how their l...

  • Jackie
    May 18, 2018

    I received a copy of this book in exchange for an honest review. You Can Stop Humming Now is a non fiction memoir of sorts that takes us through the wonders of modern medicine by examining various patients past and patient under the care of Daniela Lamas. Rather than baffle you wit...

    A compassionate look at medical care from a clinician?s perspective. Dr. Lamas is a gifted writer in addition to being a sympathetic healer. This book should be required reading for every doctor in training. Truly gorgeous reading. ...

    I went into this book wanting to learn more about the science and policies of my health care colleagues across the pond. My expectations quickly shifted as I realised this book was about the people we care for, their stories and the impact of medical interventions on them. Dr Lamas wri...

    It gets 4 from me because of the interesting topic and subtle presentation of such. I had never really thought about there being a group of patients who spend much of their last years suspended between life and death. The irony is there are increasingly more of these people because of ...

  • Sylvia
    Apr 07, 2018

    I received a copy of this book in exchange for an honest review. You Can Stop Humming Now is a non fiction memoir of sorts that takes us through the wonders of modern medicine by examining various patients past and patient under the care of Daniela Lamas. Rather than baffle you wit...

    A compassionate look at medical care from a clinician?s perspective. Dr. Lamas is a gifted writer in addition to being a sympathetic healer. This book should be required reading for every doctor in training. Truly gorgeous reading. ...

    I went into this book wanting to learn more about the science and policies of my health care colleagues across the pond. My expectations quickly shifted as I realised this book was about the people we care for, their stories and the impact of medical interventions on them. Dr Lamas wri...

    It gets 4 from me because of the interesting topic and subtle presentation of such. I had never really thought about there being a group of patients who spend much of their last years suspended between life and death. The irony is there are increasingly more of these people because of ...

    Daniela Lamas has written a book about many of the patients she has looked after in her years in medicine. As well as talking about the care they receive in the critical units of the hospital, she goes and talks to some of the patients after they have been discharged to see how their l...

    This was fine. Lamas is a capable writer and the stories are both interesting and moving. When I finished it, though, I was left not quite sure what point she was trying to make. Without a connective thread beyond "these people spent time in the ICU and only survived, when they did, du...

    I learned a lot here (particularly about the "in between") about the medical world that I had no knowledge of before. The stories are told with thoughtfulness and tenderness and really bring the people to life. ...

    I love reading about the work that medical doctors do and I hold good medical doctors in very high esteem. Daniela Lamas is one of those doctors and deserves recognition for the great work she does with a professional and yet compassion approach. She is a doctor who works in critical c...

    I enjoy reading books on medicine and I enjoyed this quite a lot. Lamas admits that she doesn't much about what happens when a critical care patient goes home, and I think that's probably true for most physicians. In fact, I'm sad to say that most probably don't know and don't even...

    I read books about dying and death and medicine because I want to able to make informed decisions for my loved ones. This book discussed the medical devices that are able to keep very ill people alive longer and the difficult decisions that people face when they choose to take advantag...

    I really enjoyed this book. The stories themselves were actually a bit on the depressing side, but I think the author has done an excellent job of portraying the not happily ever after ending most of us see in up lifting news stories. If you are fortunate enough to have little experien...

    I thought this book by a critical care physician would be much like "Being Mortal", but I found it to be less informative. The author becomes curious as to what happens to patients she sees in the CCU after they leave and find themselves with a different life than they had before a hea...

    As a physician, who also aspires to be a writer, this book is well written and very inspiring. As Daniela notes in the acknowledgements, ?The path to becoming a doctor is relatively clear; the path to becoming a writer, less so.? She seems to be laying down a very clear path to fol...

    I have mixed feelings about this book. As an Ex critical care nurse (UK) I can read and understand the case histories provided. The US is, I feel, more proactive in moving patients with invasive therapies on. I haven't worked with ECMO patients but the idea of mobilising them seems ali...

    The author writes of maybe 10 patients she encountered with diagnoses that would have killed them a generation ago. The march of medical science changed that ? and that was the point of the book she wanted to write. None of the patients are in this fix from bad lifestyle choices. So ...

    This short book is made up of essay-chapters about patients who are, for the most part, on the periphery of the medical system in one way or another--waiting for a transplant, waiting to die, waiting to return to their lives, coping with life after TBI--and it's very interesting. It's ...

    This is a Goodreads book. The intro explains the journey Dr. Lamas went through from wanting to win at all costs to when to let go and make the patient comfortable. The different chapters depict different patients, what they went through and in the afterword, their results good and b...

    This is a really great book! It is not just about the ethics of the "miracle of modern medicine", which is what I thought it would be about, and having had a close family member go through this experience of life after ICU. It is more about the shifting attitudes towards quality of lif...

    Very interesting, but depressing, food for thought. Lamas presents the shocking reality of how little information or true guidance families are given when their loved ones are in ICU and must make decisions about interventions. There are some hopeful stories for balance, thank goodness...

    A real eye opener into the medical world and patients lives. I loved this book, it made me want to be a doctor, I found myself trying to diagnose patients as I read it !! A must read ! ...

    I loved this account from both doctor and patient perspective. ...

    The flip side of what it means to have access to modern medical intervention. It gives another ring of meaning to the term "cutting edge". ...

    I just want to thank the author for her dedication to being a wonderful doctor and for sharing an insightful insider?s view. You are an incredibly gifted woman. ...

    I liked this book but my impression of the author was that she was aloof to her patients and never quite connected to them as humans. ...

  • Elizabeth Vazquez
    May 07, 2018

    I received a copy of this book in exchange for an honest review. You Can Stop Humming Now is a non fiction memoir of sorts that takes us through the wonders of modern medicine by examining various patients past and patient under the care of Daniela Lamas. Rather than baffle you wit...

    A compassionate look at medical care from a clinician?s perspective. Dr. Lamas is a gifted writer in addition to being a sympathetic healer. This book should be required reading for every doctor in training. Truly gorgeous reading. ...

    I went into this book wanting to learn more about the science and policies of my health care colleagues across the pond. My expectations quickly shifted as I realised this book was about the people we care for, their stories and the impact of medical interventions on them. Dr Lamas wri...

    It gets 4 from me because of the interesting topic and subtle presentation of such. I had never really thought about there being a group of patients who spend much of their last years suspended between life and death. The irony is there are increasingly more of these people because of ...

    Daniela Lamas has written a book about many of the patients she has looked after in her years in medicine. As well as talking about the care they receive in the critical units of the hospital, she goes and talks to some of the patients after they have been discharged to see how their l...

    This was fine. Lamas is a capable writer and the stories are both interesting and moving. When I finished it, though, I was left not quite sure what point she was trying to make. Without a connective thread beyond "these people spent time in the ICU and only survived, when they did, du...

    I learned a lot here (particularly about the "in between") about the medical world that I had no knowledge of before. The stories are told with thoughtfulness and tenderness and really bring the people to life. ...

    I love reading about the work that medical doctors do and I hold good medical doctors in very high esteem. Daniela Lamas is one of those doctors and deserves recognition for the great work she does with a professional and yet compassion approach. She is a doctor who works in critical c...

    I enjoy reading books on medicine and I enjoyed this quite a lot. Lamas admits that she doesn't much about what happens when a critical care patient goes home, and I think that's probably true for most physicians. In fact, I'm sad to say that most probably don't know and don't even...

    I read books about dying and death and medicine because I want to able to make informed decisions for my loved ones. This book discussed the medical devices that are able to keep very ill people alive longer and the difficult decisions that people face when they choose to take advantag...

  • Shelley
    Mar 12, 2018

    I received a copy of this book in exchange for an honest review. You Can Stop Humming Now is a non fiction memoir of sorts that takes us through the wonders of modern medicine by examining various patients past and patient under the care of Daniela Lamas. Rather than baffle you wit...

    A compassionate look at medical care from a clinician?s perspective. Dr. Lamas is a gifted writer in addition to being a sympathetic healer. This book should be required reading for every doctor in training. Truly gorgeous reading. ...

    I went into this book wanting to learn more about the science and policies of my health care colleagues across the pond. My expectations quickly shifted as I realised this book was about the people we care for, their stories and the impact of medical interventions on them. Dr Lamas wri...

    It gets 4 from me because of the interesting topic and subtle presentation of such. I had never really thought about there being a group of patients who spend much of their last years suspended between life and death. The irony is there are increasingly more of these people because of ...

    Daniela Lamas has written a book about many of the patients she has looked after in her years in medicine. As well as talking about the care they receive in the critical units of the hospital, she goes and talks to some of the patients after they have been discharged to see how their l...

    This was fine. Lamas is a capable writer and the stories are both interesting and moving. When I finished it, though, I was left not quite sure what point she was trying to make. Without a connective thread beyond "these people spent time in the ICU and only survived, when they did, du...

    I learned a lot here (particularly about the "in between") about the medical world that I had no knowledge of before. The stories are told with thoughtfulness and tenderness and really bring the people to life. ...

    I love reading about the work that medical doctors do and I hold good medical doctors in very high esteem. Daniela Lamas is one of those doctors and deserves recognition for the great work she does with a professional and yet compassion approach. She is a doctor who works in critical c...

    I enjoy reading books on medicine and I enjoyed this quite a lot. Lamas admits that she doesn't much about what happens when a critical care patient goes home, and I think that's probably true for most physicians. In fact, I'm sad to say that most probably don't know and don't even...

    I read books about dying and death and medicine because I want to able to make informed decisions for my loved ones. This book discussed the medical devices that are able to keep very ill people alive longer and the difficult decisions that people face when they choose to take advantag...

    I really enjoyed this book. The stories themselves were actually a bit on the depressing side, but I think the author has done an excellent job of portraying the not happily ever after ending most of us see in up lifting news stories. If you are fortunate enough to have little experien...

    I thought this book by a critical care physician would be much like "Being Mortal", but I found it to be less informative. The author becomes curious as to what happens to patients she sees in the CCU after they leave and find themselves with a different life than they had before a hea...

    As a physician, who also aspires to be a writer, this book is well written and very inspiring. As Daniela notes in the acknowledgements, ?The path to becoming a doctor is relatively clear; the path to becoming a writer, less so.? She seems to be laying down a very clear path to fol...

    I have mixed feelings about this book. As an Ex critical care nurse (UK) I can read and understand the case histories provided. The US is, I feel, more proactive in moving patients with invasive therapies on. I haven't worked with ECMO patients but the idea of mobilising them seems ali...

    The author writes of maybe 10 patients she encountered with diagnoses that would have killed them a generation ago. The march of medical science changed that ? and that was the point of the book she wanted to write. None of the patients are in this fix from bad lifestyle choices. So ...

    This short book is made up of essay-chapters about patients who are, for the most part, on the periphery of the medical system in one way or another--waiting for a transplant, waiting to die, waiting to return to their lives, coping with life after TBI--and it's very interesting. It's ...

  • Mary
    May 01, 2018

    I received a copy of this book in exchange for an honest review. You Can Stop Humming Now is a non fiction memoir of sorts that takes us through the wonders of modern medicine by examining various patients past and patient under the care of Daniela Lamas. Rather than baffle you wit...

    A compassionate look at medical care from a clinician?s perspective. Dr. Lamas is a gifted writer in addition to being a sympathetic healer. This book should be required reading for every doctor in training. Truly gorgeous reading. ...

    I went into this book wanting to learn more about the science and policies of my health care colleagues across the pond. My expectations quickly shifted as I realised this book was about the people we care for, their stories and the impact of medical interventions on them. Dr Lamas wri...

    It gets 4 from me because of the interesting topic and subtle presentation of such. I had never really thought about there being a group of patients who spend much of their last years suspended between life and death. The irony is there are increasingly more of these people because of ...

    Daniela Lamas has written a book about many of the patients she has looked after in her years in medicine. As well as talking about the care they receive in the critical units of the hospital, she goes and talks to some of the patients after they have been discharged to see how their l...

    This was fine. Lamas is a capable writer and the stories are both interesting and moving. When I finished it, though, I was left not quite sure what point she was trying to make. Without a connective thread beyond "these people spent time in the ICU and only survived, when they did, du...

    I learned a lot here (particularly about the "in between") about the medical world that I had no knowledge of before. The stories are told with thoughtfulness and tenderness and really bring the people to life. ...

    I love reading about the work that medical doctors do and I hold good medical doctors in very high esteem. Daniela Lamas is one of those doctors and deserves recognition for the great work she does with a professional and yet compassion approach. She is a doctor who works in critical c...

    I enjoy reading books on medicine and I enjoyed this quite a lot. Lamas admits that she doesn't much about what happens when a critical care patient goes home, and I think that's probably true for most physicians. In fact, I'm sad to say that most probably don't know and don't even...

  • Susan Krich
    Mar 16, 2018

    I received a copy of this book in exchange for an honest review. You Can Stop Humming Now is a non fiction memoir of sorts that takes us through the wonders of modern medicine by examining various patients past and patient under the care of Daniela Lamas. Rather than baffle you wit...

    A compassionate look at medical care from a clinician?s perspective. Dr. Lamas is a gifted writer in addition to being a sympathetic healer. This book should be required reading for every doctor in training. Truly gorgeous reading. ...

    I went into this book wanting to learn more about the science and policies of my health care colleagues across the pond. My expectations quickly shifted as I realised this book was about the people we care for, their stories and the impact of medical interventions on them. Dr Lamas wri...

    It gets 4 from me because of the interesting topic and subtle presentation of such. I had never really thought about there being a group of patients who spend much of their last years suspended between life and death. The irony is there are increasingly more of these people because of ...

    Daniela Lamas has written a book about many of the patients she has looked after in her years in medicine. As well as talking about the care they receive in the critical units of the hospital, she goes and talks to some of the patients after they have been discharged to see how their l...

    This was fine. Lamas is a capable writer and the stories are both interesting and moving. When I finished it, though, I was left not quite sure what point she was trying to make. Without a connective thread beyond "these people spent time in the ICU and only survived, when they did, du...

    I learned a lot here (particularly about the "in between") about the medical world that I had no knowledge of before. The stories are told with thoughtfulness and tenderness and really bring the people to life. ...

    I love reading about the work that medical doctors do and I hold good medical doctors in very high esteem. Daniela Lamas is one of those doctors and deserves recognition for the great work she does with a professional and yet compassion approach. She is a doctor who works in critical c...

    I enjoy reading books on medicine and I enjoyed this quite a lot. Lamas admits that she doesn't much about what happens when a critical care patient goes home, and I think that's probably true for most physicians. In fact, I'm sad to say that most probably don't know and don't even...

    I read books about dying and death and medicine because I want to able to make informed decisions for my loved ones. This book discussed the medical devices that are able to keep very ill people alive longer and the difficult decisions that people face when they choose to take advantag...

    I really enjoyed this book. The stories themselves were actually a bit on the depressing side, but I think the author has done an excellent job of portraying the not happily ever after ending most of us see in up lifting news stories. If you are fortunate enough to have little experien...

    I thought this book by a critical care physician would be much like "Being Mortal", but I found it to be less informative. The author becomes curious as to what happens to patients she sees in the CCU after they leave and find themselves with a different life than they had before a hea...

    As a physician, who also aspires to be a writer, this book is well written and very inspiring. As Daniela notes in the acknowledgements, ?The path to becoming a doctor is relatively clear; the path to becoming a writer, less so.? She seems to be laying down a very clear path to fol...

    I have mixed feelings about this book. As an Ex critical care nurse (UK) I can read and understand the case histories provided. The US is, I feel, more proactive in moving patients with invasive therapies on. I haven't worked with ECMO patients but the idea of mobilising them seems ali...

    The author writes of maybe 10 patients she encountered with diagnoses that would have killed them a generation ago. The march of medical science changed that ? and that was the point of the book she wanted to write. None of the patients are in this fix from bad lifestyle choices. So ...

    This short book is made up of essay-chapters about patients who are, for the most part, on the periphery of the medical system in one way or another--waiting for a transplant, waiting to die, waiting to return to their lives, coping with life after TBI--and it's very interesting. It's ...

    This is a Goodreads book. The intro explains the journey Dr. Lamas went through from wanting to win at all costs to when to let go and make the patient comfortable. The different chapters depict different patients, what they went through and in the afterword, their results good and b...

  • Susannah
    Mar 22, 2018

    I received a copy of this book in exchange for an honest review. You Can Stop Humming Now is a non fiction memoir of sorts that takes us through the wonders of modern medicine by examining various patients past and patient under the care of Daniela Lamas. Rather than baffle you wit...

    A compassionate look at medical care from a clinician?s perspective. Dr. Lamas is a gifted writer in addition to being a sympathetic healer. This book should be required reading for every doctor in training. Truly gorgeous reading. ...

  • tisasday
    May 10, 2018

    I received a copy of this book in exchange for an honest review. You Can Stop Humming Now is a non fiction memoir of sorts that takes us through the wonders of modern medicine by examining various patients past and patient under the care of Daniela Lamas. Rather than baffle you wit...

    A compassionate look at medical care from a clinician?s perspective. Dr. Lamas is a gifted writer in addition to being a sympathetic healer. This book should be required reading for every doctor in training. Truly gorgeous reading. ...

    I went into this book wanting to learn more about the science and policies of my health care colleagues across the pond. My expectations quickly shifted as I realised this book was about the people we care for, their stories and the impact of medical interventions on them. Dr Lamas wri...

    It gets 4 from me because of the interesting topic and subtle presentation of such. I had never really thought about there being a group of patients who spend much of their last years suspended between life and death. The irony is there are increasingly more of these people because of ...

    Daniela Lamas has written a book about many of the patients she has looked after in her years in medicine. As well as talking about the care they receive in the critical units of the hospital, she goes and talks to some of the patients after they have been discharged to see how their l...

    This was fine. Lamas is a capable writer and the stories are both interesting and moving. When I finished it, though, I was left not quite sure what point she was trying to make. Without a connective thread beyond "these people spent time in the ICU and only survived, when they did, du...

    I learned a lot here (particularly about the "in between") about the medical world that I had no knowledge of before. The stories are told with thoughtfulness and tenderness and really bring the people to life. ...

    I love reading about the work that medical doctors do and I hold good medical doctors in very high esteem. Daniela Lamas is one of those doctors and deserves recognition for the great work she does with a professional and yet compassion approach. She is a doctor who works in critical c...

    I enjoy reading books on medicine and I enjoyed this quite a lot. Lamas admits that she doesn't much about what happens when a critical care patient goes home, and I think that's probably true for most physicians. In fact, I'm sad to say that most probably don't know and don't even...

    I read books about dying and death and medicine because I want to able to make informed decisions for my loved ones. This book discussed the medical devices that are able to keep very ill people alive longer and the difficult decisions that people face when they choose to take advantag...

    I really enjoyed this book. The stories themselves were actually a bit on the depressing side, but I think the author has done an excellent job of portraying the not happily ever after ending most of us see in up lifting news stories. If you are fortunate enough to have little experien...

    I thought this book by a critical care physician would be much like "Being Mortal", but I found it to be less informative. The author becomes curious as to what happens to patients she sees in the CCU after they leave and find themselves with a different life than they had before a hea...

    As a physician, who also aspires to be a writer, this book is well written and very inspiring. As Daniela notes in the acknowledgements, ?The path to becoming a doctor is relatively clear; the path to becoming a writer, less so.? She seems to be laying down a very clear path to fol...

    I have mixed feelings about this book. As an Ex critical care nurse (UK) I can read and understand the case histories provided. The US is, I feel, more proactive in moving patients with invasive therapies on. I haven't worked with ECMO patients but the idea of mobilising them seems ali...

    The author writes of maybe 10 patients she encountered with diagnoses that would have killed them a generation ago. The march of medical science changed that ? and that was the point of the book she wanted to write. None of the patients are in this fix from bad lifestyle choices. So ...

    This short book is made up of essay-chapters about patients who are, for the most part, on the periphery of the medical system in one way or another--waiting for a transplant, waiting to die, waiting to return to their lives, coping with life after TBI--and it's very interesting. It's ...

    This is a Goodreads book. The intro explains the journey Dr. Lamas went through from wanting to win at all costs to when to let go and make the patient comfortable. The different chapters depict different patients, what they went through and in the afterword, their results good and b...

    This is a really great book! It is not just about the ethics of the "miracle of modern medicine", which is what I thought it would be about, and having had a close family member go through this experience of life after ICU. It is more about the shifting attitudes towards quality of lif...

    Very interesting, but depressing, food for thought. Lamas presents the shocking reality of how little information or true guidance families are given when their loved ones are in ICU and must make decisions about interventions. There are some hopeful stories for balance, thank goodness...

    A real eye opener into the medical world and patients lives. I loved this book, it made me want to be a doctor, I found myself trying to diagnose patients as I read it !! A must read ! ...

    I loved this account from both doctor and patient perspective. ...

    The flip side of what it means to have access to modern medical intervention. It gives another ring of meaning to the term "cutting edge". ...

  • Carly
    Apr 03, 2018

    I received a copy of this book in exchange for an honest review. You Can Stop Humming Now is a non fiction memoir of sorts that takes us through the wonders of modern medicine by examining various patients past and patient under the care of Daniela Lamas. Rather than baffle you wit...

    A compassionate look at medical care from a clinician?s perspective. Dr. Lamas is a gifted writer in addition to being a sympathetic healer. This book should be required reading for every doctor in training. Truly gorgeous reading. ...

    I went into this book wanting to learn more about the science and policies of my health care colleagues across the pond. My expectations quickly shifted as I realised this book was about the people we care for, their stories and the impact of medical interventions on them. Dr Lamas wri...

    It gets 4 from me because of the interesting topic and subtle presentation of such. I had never really thought about there being a group of patients who spend much of their last years suspended between life and death. The irony is there are increasingly more of these people because of ...

    Daniela Lamas has written a book about many of the patients she has looked after in her years in medicine. As well as talking about the care they receive in the critical units of the hospital, she goes and talks to some of the patients after they have been discharged to see how their l...

    This was fine. Lamas is a capable writer and the stories are both interesting and moving. When I finished it, though, I was left not quite sure what point she was trying to make. Without a connective thread beyond "these people spent time in the ICU and only survived, when they did, du...

    I learned a lot here (particularly about the "in between") about the medical world that I had no knowledge of before. The stories are told with thoughtfulness and tenderness and really bring the people to life. ...

    I love reading about the work that medical doctors do and I hold good medical doctors in very high esteem. Daniela Lamas is one of those doctors and deserves recognition for the great work she does with a professional and yet compassion approach. She is a doctor who works in critical c...

    I enjoy reading books on medicine and I enjoyed this quite a lot. Lamas admits that she doesn't much about what happens when a critical care patient goes home, and I think that's probably true for most physicians. In fact, I'm sad to say that most probably don't know and don't even...

    I read books about dying and death and medicine because I want to able to make informed decisions for my loved ones. This book discussed the medical devices that are able to keep very ill people alive longer and the difficult decisions that people face when they choose to take advantag...

    I really enjoyed this book. The stories themselves were actually a bit on the depressing side, but I think the author has done an excellent job of portraying the not happily ever after ending most of us see in up lifting news stories. If you are fortunate enough to have little experien...

    I thought this book by a critical care physician would be much like "Being Mortal", but I found it to be less informative. The author becomes curious as to what happens to patients she sees in the CCU after they leave and find themselves with a different life than they had before a hea...

    As a physician, who also aspires to be a writer, this book is well written and very inspiring. As Daniela notes in the acknowledgements, ?The path to becoming a doctor is relatively clear; the path to becoming a writer, less so.? She seems to be laying down a very clear path to fol...

    I have mixed feelings about this book. As an Ex critical care nurse (UK) I can read and understand the case histories provided. The US is, I feel, more proactive in moving patients with invasive therapies on. I haven't worked with ECMO patients but the idea of mobilising them seems ali...

    The author writes of maybe 10 patients she encountered with diagnoses that would have killed them a generation ago. The march of medical science changed that ? and that was the point of the book she wanted to write. None of the patients are in this fix from bad lifestyle choices. So ...

    This short book is made up of essay-chapters about patients who are, for the most part, on the periphery of the medical system in one way or another--waiting for a transplant, waiting to die, waiting to return to their lives, coping with life after TBI--and it's very interesting. It's ...

    This is a Goodreads book. The intro explains the journey Dr. Lamas went through from wanting to win at all costs to when to let go and make the patient comfortable. The different chapters depict different patients, what they went through and in the afterword, their results good and b...

    This is a really great book! It is not just about the ethics of the "miracle of modern medicine", which is what I thought it would be about, and having had a close family member go through this experience of life after ICU. It is more about the shifting attitudes towards quality of lif...

    Very interesting, but depressing, food for thought. Lamas presents the shocking reality of how little information or true guidance families are given when their loved ones are in ICU and must make decisions about interventions. There are some hopeful stories for balance, thank goodness...

    A real eye opener into the medical world and patients lives. I loved this book, it made me want to be a doctor, I found myself trying to diagnose patients as I read it !! A must read ! ...

  • Kim
    Apr 16, 2018

    I received a copy of this book in exchange for an honest review. You Can Stop Humming Now is a non fiction memoir of sorts that takes us through the wonders of modern medicine by examining various patients past and patient under the care of Daniela Lamas. Rather than baffle you wit...

    A compassionate look at medical care from a clinician?s perspective. Dr. Lamas is a gifted writer in addition to being a sympathetic healer. This book should be required reading for every doctor in training. Truly gorgeous reading. ...

    I went into this book wanting to learn more about the science and policies of my health care colleagues across the pond. My expectations quickly shifted as I realised this book was about the people we care for, their stories and the impact of medical interventions on them. Dr Lamas wri...

    It gets 4 from me because of the interesting topic and subtle presentation of such. I had never really thought about there being a group of patients who spend much of their last years suspended between life and death. The irony is there are increasingly more of these people because of ...

    Daniela Lamas has written a book about many of the patients she has looked after in her years in medicine. As well as talking about the care they receive in the critical units of the hospital, she goes and talks to some of the patients after they have been discharged to see how their l...

    This was fine. Lamas is a capable writer and the stories are both interesting and moving. When I finished it, though, I was left not quite sure what point she was trying to make. Without a connective thread beyond "these people spent time in the ICU and only survived, when they did, du...

    I learned a lot here (particularly about the "in between") about the medical world that I had no knowledge of before. The stories are told with thoughtfulness and tenderness and really bring the people to life. ...

    I love reading about the work that medical doctors do and I hold good medical doctors in very high esteem. Daniela Lamas is one of those doctors and deserves recognition for the great work she does with a professional and yet compassion approach. She is a doctor who works in critical c...

    I enjoy reading books on medicine and I enjoyed this quite a lot. Lamas admits that she doesn't much about what happens when a critical care patient goes home, and I think that's probably true for most physicians. In fact, I'm sad to say that most probably don't know and don't even...

    I read books about dying and death and medicine because I want to able to make informed decisions for my loved ones. This book discussed the medical devices that are able to keep very ill people alive longer and the difficult decisions that people face when they choose to take advantag...

    I really enjoyed this book. The stories themselves were actually a bit on the depressing side, but I think the author has done an excellent job of portraying the not happily ever after ending most of us see in up lifting news stories. If you are fortunate enough to have little experien...

    I thought this book by a critical care physician would be much like "Being Mortal", but I found it to be less informative. The author becomes curious as to what happens to patients she sees in the CCU after they leave and find themselves with a different life than they had before a hea...

    As a physician, who also aspires to be a writer, this book is well written and very inspiring. As Daniela notes in the acknowledgements, ?The path to becoming a doctor is relatively clear; the path to becoming a writer, less so.? She seems to be laying down a very clear path to fol...

    I have mixed feelings about this book. As an Ex critical care nurse (UK) I can read and understand the case histories provided. The US is, I feel, more proactive in moving patients with invasive therapies on. I haven't worked with ECMO patients but the idea of mobilising them seems ali...

    The author writes of maybe 10 patients she encountered with diagnoses that would have killed them a generation ago. The march of medical science changed that ? and that was the point of the book she wanted to write. None of the patients are in this fix from bad lifestyle choices. So ...

    This short book is made up of essay-chapters about patients who are, for the most part, on the periphery of the medical system in one way or another--waiting for a transplant, waiting to die, waiting to return to their lives, coping with life after TBI--and it's very interesting. It's ...

    This is a Goodreads book. The intro explains the journey Dr. Lamas went through from wanting to win at all costs to when to let go and make the patient comfortable. The different chapters depict different patients, what they went through and in the afterword, their results good and b...

    This is a really great book! It is not just about the ethics of the "miracle of modern medicine", which is what I thought it would be about, and having had a close family member go through this experience of life after ICU. It is more about the shifting attitudes towards quality of lif...

    Very interesting, but depressing, food for thought. Lamas presents the shocking reality of how little information or true guidance families are given when their loved ones are in ICU and must make decisions about interventions. There are some hopeful stories for balance, thank goodness...

    A real eye opener into the medical world and patients lives. I loved this book, it made me want to be a doctor, I found myself trying to diagnose patients as I read it !! A must read ! ...

    I loved this account from both doctor and patient perspective. ...

    The flip side of what it means to have access to modern medical intervention. It gives another ring of meaning to the term "cutting edge". ...

    I just want to thank the author for her dedication to being a wonderful doctor and for sharing an insightful insider?s view. You are an incredibly gifted woman. ...

  • Angie
    May 07, 2018

    I received a copy of this book in exchange for an honest review. You Can Stop Humming Now is a non fiction memoir of sorts that takes us through the wonders of modern medicine by examining various patients past and patient under the care of Daniela Lamas. Rather than baffle you wit...

    A compassionate look at medical care from a clinician?s perspective. Dr. Lamas is a gifted writer in addition to being a sympathetic healer. This book should be required reading for every doctor in training. Truly gorgeous reading. ...

    I went into this book wanting to learn more about the science and policies of my health care colleagues across the pond. My expectations quickly shifted as I realised this book was about the people we care for, their stories and the impact of medical interventions on them. Dr Lamas wri...

    It gets 4 from me because of the interesting topic and subtle presentation of such. I had never really thought about there being a group of patients who spend much of their last years suspended between life and death. The irony is there are increasingly more of these people because of ...

    Daniela Lamas has written a book about many of the patients she has looked after in her years in medicine. As well as talking about the care they receive in the critical units of the hospital, she goes and talks to some of the patients after they have been discharged to see how their l...

    This was fine. Lamas is a capable writer and the stories are both interesting and moving. When I finished it, though, I was left not quite sure what point she was trying to make. Without a connective thread beyond "these people spent time in the ICU and only survived, when they did, du...

    I learned a lot here (particularly about the "in between") about the medical world that I had no knowledge of before. The stories are told with thoughtfulness and tenderness and really bring the people to life. ...

    I love reading about the work that medical doctors do and I hold good medical doctors in very high esteem. Daniela Lamas is one of those doctors and deserves recognition for the great work she does with a professional and yet compassion approach. She is a doctor who works in critical c...

    I enjoy reading books on medicine and I enjoyed this quite a lot. Lamas admits that she doesn't much about what happens when a critical care patient goes home, and I think that's probably true for most physicians. In fact, I'm sad to say that most probably don't know and don't even...

    I read books about dying and death and medicine because I want to able to make informed decisions for my loved ones. This book discussed the medical devices that are able to keep very ill people alive longer and the difficult decisions that people face when they choose to take advantag...

    I really enjoyed this book. The stories themselves were actually a bit on the depressing side, but I think the author has done an excellent job of portraying the not happily ever after ending most of us see in up lifting news stories. If you are fortunate enough to have little experien...

    I thought this book by a critical care physician would be much like "Being Mortal", but I found it to be less informative. The author becomes curious as to what happens to patients she sees in the CCU after they leave and find themselves with a different life than they had before a hea...

    As a physician, who also aspires to be a writer, this book is well written and very inspiring. As Daniela notes in the acknowledgements, ?The path to becoming a doctor is relatively clear; the path to becoming a writer, less so.? She seems to be laying down a very clear path to fol...

    I have mixed feelings about this book. As an Ex critical care nurse (UK) I can read and understand the case histories provided. The US is, I feel, more proactive in moving patients with invasive therapies on. I haven't worked with ECMO patients but the idea of mobilising them seems ali...

    The author writes of maybe 10 patients she encountered with diagnoses that would have killed them a generation ago. The march of medical science changed that ? and that was the point of the book she wanted to write. None of the patients are in this fix from bad lifestyle choices. So ...

    This short book is made up of essay-chapters about patients who are, for the most part, on the periphery of the medical system in one way or another--waiting for a transplant, waiting to die, waiting to return to their lives, coping with life after TBI--and it's very interesting. It's ...

    This is a Goodreads book. The intro explains the journey Dr. Lamas went through from wanting to win at all costs to when to let go and make the patient comfortable. The different chapters depict different patients, what they went through and in the afterword, their results good and b...

    This is a really great book! It is not just about the ethics of the "miracle of modern medicine", which is what I thought it would be about, and having had a close family member go through this experience of life after ICU. It is more about the shifting attitudes towards quality of lif...

    Very interesting, but depressing, food for thought. Lamas presents the shocking reality of how little information or true guidance families are given when their loved ones are in ICU and must make decisions about interventions. There are some hopeful stories for balance, thank goodness...

    A real eye opener into the medical world and patients lives. I loved this book, it made me want to be a doctor, I found myself trying to diagnose patients as I read it !! A must read ! ...

    I loved this account from both doctor and patient perspective. ...

    The flip side of what it means to have access to modern medical intervention. It gives another ring of meaning to the term "cutting edge". ...

    I just want to thank the author for her dedication to being a wonderful doctor and for sharing an insightful insider?s view. You are an incredibly gifted woman. ...

    I liked this book but my impression of the author was that she was aloof to her patients and never quite connected to them as humans. ...

    WOW great book to really see what happens in between the ICU and long term care. Everyone should read this! ...

  • Anna
    May 15, 2018

    I received a copy of this book in exchange for an honest review. You Can Stop Humming Now is a non fiction memoir of sorts that takes us through the wonders of modern medicine by examining various patients past and patient under the care of Daniela Lamas. Rather than baffle you wit...

    A compassionate look at medical care from a clinician?s perspective. Dr. Lamas is a gifted writer in addition to being a sympathetic healer. This book should be required reading for every doctor in training. Truly gorgeous reading. ...

    I went into this book wanting to learn more about the science and policies of my health care colleagues across the pond. My expectations quickly shifted as I realised this book was about the people we care for, their stories and the impact of medical interventions on them. Dr Lamas wri...

    It gets 4 from me because of the interesting topic and subtle presentation of such. I had never really thought about there being a group of patients who spend much of their last years suspended between life and death. The irony is there are increasingly more of these people because of ...

    Daniela Lamas has written a book about many of the patients she has looked after in her years in medicine. As well as talking about the care they receive in the critical units of the hospital, she goes and talks to some of the patients after they have been discharged to see how their l...

    This was fine. Lamas is a capable writer and the stories are both interesting and moving. When I finished it, though, I was left not quite sure what point she was trying to make. Without a connective thread beyond "these people spent time in the ICU and only survived, when they did, du...

    I learned a lot here (particularly about the "in between") about the medical world that I had no knowledge of before. The stories are told with thoughtfulness and tenderness and really bring the people to life. ...

  • Joanne Mcleod
    Apr 25, 2018

    I received a copy of this book in exchange for an honest review. You Can Stop Humming Now is a non fiction memoir of sorts that takes us through the wonders of modern medicine by examining various patients past and patient under the care of Daniela Lamas. Rather than baffle you wit...

    A compassionate look at medical care from a clinician?s perspective. Dr. Lamas is a gifted writer in addition to being a sympathetic healer. This book should be required reading for every doctor in training. Truly gorgeous reading. ...

    I went into this book wanting to learn more about the science and policies of my health care colleagues across the pond. My expectations quickly shifted as I realised this book was about the people we care for, their stories and the impact of medical interventions on them. Dr Lamas wri...

    It gets 4 from me because of the interesting topic and subtle presentation of such. I had never really thought about there being a group of patients who spend much of their last years suspended between life and death. The irony is there are increasingly more of these people because of ...

    Daniela Lamas has written a book about many of the patients she has looked after in her years in medicine. As well as talking about the care they receive in the critical units of the hospital, she goes and talks to some of the patients after they have been discharged to see how their l...

    This was fine. Lamas is a capable writer and the stories are both interesting and moving. When I finished it, though, I was left not quite sure what point she was trying to make. Without a connective thread beyond "these people spent time in the ICU and only survived, when they did, du...

    I learned a lot here (particularly about the "in between") about the medical world that I had no knowledge of before. The stories are told with thoughtfulness and tenderness and really bring the people to life. ...

    I love reading about the work that medical doctors do and I hold good medical doctors in very high esteem. Daniela Lamas is one of those doctors and deserves recognition for the great work she does with a professional and yet compassion approach. She is a doctor who works in critical c...

    I enjoy reading books on medicine and I enjoyed this quite a lot. Lamas admits that she doesn't much about what happens when a critical care patient goes home, and I think that's probably true for most physicians. In fact, I'm sad to say that most probably don't know and don't even...

    I read books about dying and death and medicine because I want to able to make informed decisions for my loved ones. This book discussed the medical devices that are able to keep very ill people alive longer and the difficult decisions that people face when they choose to take advantag...

    I really enjoyed this book. The stories themselves were actually a bit on the depressing side, but I think the author has done an excellent job of portraying the not happily ever after ending most of us see in up lifting news stories. If you are fortunate enough to have little experien...

    I thought this book by a critical care physician would be much like "Being Mortal", but I found it to be less informative. The author becomes curious as to what happens to patients she sees in the CCU after they leave and find themselves with a different life than they had before a hea...

    As a physician, who also aspires to be a writer, this book is well written and very inspiring. As Daniela notes in the acknowledgements, ?The path to becoming a doctor is relatively clear; the path to becoming a writer, less so.? She seems to be laying down a very clear path to fol...

  • Theresa
    Apr 11, 2018

    I received a copy of this book in exchange for an honest review. You Can Stop Humming Now is a non fiction memoir of sorts that takes us through the wonders of modern medicine by examining various patients past and patient under the care of Daniela Lamas. Rather than baffle you wit...

    A compassionate look at medical care from a clinician?s perspective. Dr. Lamas is a gifted writer in addition to being a sympathetic healer. This book should be required reading for every doctor in training. Truly gorgeous reading. ...

    I went into this book wanting to learn more about the science and policies of my health care colleagues across the pond. My expectations quickly shifted as I realised this book was about the people we care for, their stories and the impact of medical interventions on them. Dr Lamas wri...

    It gets 4 from me because of the interesting topic and subtle presentation of such. I had never really thought about there being a group of patients who spend much of their last years suspended between life and death. The irony is there are increasingly more of these people because of ...

    Daniela Lamas has written a book about many of the patients she has looked after in her years in medicine. As well as talking about the care they receive in the critical units of the hospital, she goes and talks to some of the patients after they have been discharged to see how their l...

    This was fine. Lamas is a capable writer and the stories are both interesting and moving. When I finished it, though, I was left not quite sure what point she was trying to make. Without a connective thread beyond "these people spent time in the ICU and only survived, when they did, du...

    I learned a lot here (particularly about the "in between") about the medical world that I had no knowledge of before. The stories are told with thoughtfulness and tenderness and really bring the people to life. ...

    I love reading about the work that medical doctors do and I hold good medical doctors in very high esteem. Daniela Lamas is one of those doctors and deserves recognition for the great work she does with a professional and yet compassion approach. She is a doctor who works in critical c...

    I enjoy reading books on medicine and I enjoyed this quite a lot. Lamas admits that she doesn't much about what happens when a critical care patient goes home, and I think that's probably true for most physicians. In fact, I'm sad to say that most probably don't know and don't even...

    I read books about dying and death and medicine because I want to able to make informed decisions for my loved ones. This book discussed the medical devices that are able to keep very ill people alive longer and the difficult decisions that people face when they choose to take advantag...

    I really enjoyed this book. The stories themselves were actually a bit on the depressing side, but I think the author has done an excellent job of portraying the not happily ever after ending most of us see in up lifting news stories. If you are fortunate enough to have little experien...

    I thought this book by a critical care physician would be much like "Being Mortal", but I found it to be less informative. The author becomes curious as to what happens to patients she sees in the CCU after they leave and find themselves with a different life than they had before a hea...

    As a physician, who also aspires to be a writer, this book is well written and very inspiring. As Daniela notes in the acknowledgements, ?The path to becoming a doctor is relatively clear; the path to becoming a writer, less so.? She seems to be laying down a very clear path to fol...

    I have mixed feelings about this book. As an Ex critical care nurse (UK) I can read and understand the case histories provided. The US is, I feel, more proactive in moving patients with invasive therapies on. I haven't worked with ECMO patients but the idea of mobilising them seems ali...

    The author writes of maybe 10 patients she encountered with diagnoses that would have killed them a generation ago. The march of medical science changed that ? and that was the point of the book she wanted to write. None of the patients are in this fix from bad lifestyle choices. So ...

    This short book is made up of essay-chapters about patients who are, for the most part, on the periphery of the medical system in one way or another--waiting for a transplant, waiting to die, waiting to return to their lives, coping with life after TBI--and it's very interesting. It's ...

    This is a Goodreads book. The intro explains the journey Dr. Lamas went through from wanting to win at all costs to when to let go and make the patient comfortable. The different chapters depict different patients, what they went through and in the afterword, their results good and b...

    This is a really great book! It is not just about the ethics of the "miracle of modern medicine", which is what I thought it would be about, and having had a close family member go through this experience of life after ICU. It is more about the shifting attitudes towards quality of lif...

  • Nima Morgan
    May 14, 2018

    I received a copy of this book in exchange for an honest review. You Can Stop Humming Now is a non fiction memoir of sorts that takes us through the wonders of modern medicine by examining various patients past and patient under the care of Daniela Lamas. Rather than baffle you wit...

    A compassionate look at medical care from a clinician?s perspective. Dr. Lamas is a gifted writer in addition to being a sympathetic healer. This book should be required reading for every doctor in training. Truly gorgeous reading. ...

    I went into this book wanting to learn more about the science and policies of my health care colleagues across the pond. My expectations quickly shifted as I realised this book was about the people we care for, their stories and the impact of medical interventions on them. Dr Lamas wri...

    It gets 4 from me because of the interesting topic and subtle presentation of such. I had never really thought about there being a group of patients who spend much of their last years suspended between life and death. The irony is there are increasingly more of these people because of ...

    Daniela Lamas has written a book about many of the patients she has looked after in her years in medicine. As well as talking about the care they receive in the critical units of the hospital, she goes and talks to some of the patients after they have been discharged to see how their l...

    This was fine. Lamas is a capable writer and the stories are both interesting and moving. When I finished it, though, I was left not quite sure what point she was trying to make. Without a connective thread beyond "these people spent time in the ICU and only survived, when they did, du...

    I learned a lot here (particularly about the "in between") about the medical world that I had no knowledge of before. The stories are told with thoughtfulness and tenderness and really bring the people to life. ...

    I love reading about the work that medical doctors do and I hold good medical doctors in very high esteem. Daniela Lamas is one of those doctors and deserves recognition for the great work she does with a professional and yet compassion approach. She is a doctor who works in critical c...

    I enjoy reading books on medicine and I enjoyed this quite a lot. Lamas admits that she doesn't much about what happens when a critical care patient goes home, and I think that's probably true for most physicians. In fact, I'm sad to say that most probably don't know and don't even...

    I read books about dying and death and medicine because I want to able to make informed decisions for my loved ones. This book discussed the medical devices that are able to keep very ill people alive longer and the difficult decisions that people face when they choose to take advantag...

    I really enjoyed this book. The stories themselves were actually a bit on the depressing side, but I think the author has done an excellent job of portraying the not happily ever after ending most of us see in up lifting news stories. If you are fortunate enough to have little experien...

    I thought this book by a critical care physician would be much like "Being Mortal", but I found it to be less informative. The author becomes curious as to what happens to patients she sees in the CCU after they leave and find themselves with a different life than they had before a hea...

    As a physician, who also aspires to be a writer, this book is well written and very inspiring. As Daniela notes in the acknowledgements, ?The path to becoming a doctor is relatively clear; the path to becoming a writer, less so.? She seems to be laying down a very clear path to fol...

    I have mixed feelings about this book. As an Ex critical care nurse (UK) I can read and understand the case histories provided. The US is, I feel, more proactive in moving patients with invasive therapies on. I haven't worked with ECMO patients but the idea of mobilising them seems ali...

    The author writes of maybe 10 patients she encountered with diagnoses that would have killed them a generation ago. The march of medical science changed that ? and that was the point of the book she wanted to write. None of the patients are in this fix from bad lifestyle choices. So ...

    This short book is made up of essay-chapters about patients who are, for the most part, on the periphery of the medical system in one way or another--waiting for a transplant, waiting to die, waiting to return to their lives, coping with life after TBI--and it's very interesting. It's ...

    This is a Goodreads book. The intro explains the journey Dr. Lamas went through from wanting to win at all costs to when to let go and make the patient comfortable. The different chapters depict different patients, what they went through and in the afterword, their results good and b...

    This is a really great book! It is not just about the ethics of the "miracle of modern medicine", which is what I thought it would be about, and having had a close family member go through this experience of life after ICU. It is more about the shifting attitudes towards quality of lif...

    Very interesting, but depressing, food for thought. Lamas presents the shocking reality of how little information or true guidance families are given when their loved ones are in ICU and must make decisions about interventions. There are some hopeful stories for balance, thank goodness...

    A real eye opener into the medical world and patients lives. I loved this book, it made me want to be a doctor, I found myself trying to diagnose patients as I read it !! A must read ! ...

    I loved this account from both doctor and patient perspective. ...

    The flip side of what it means to have access to modern medical intervention. It gives another ring of meaning to the term "cutting edge". ...

    I just want to thank the author for her dedication to being a wonderful doctor and for sharing an insightful insider?s view. You are an incredibly gifted woman. ...

    I liked this book but my impression of the author was that she was aloof to her patients and never quite connected to them as humans. ...

    WOW great book to really see what happens in between the ICU and long term care. Everyone should read this! ...

    Dr. Lamas gives voice to unheard, uncomfortable and messy patient stories with an open heart and compassionate prose. ...

    4.5 ...

    A must read for physicians, patients, and loved ones of patients...Certainly places a whole new perspective on critical illness and health care. ...

  • Mary Patch
    May 19, 2018

    I received a copy of this book in exchange for an honest review. You Can Stop Humming Now is a non fiction memoir of sorts that takes us through the wonders of modern medicine by examining various patients past and patient under the care of Daniela Lamas. Rather than baffle you wit...

    A compassionate look at medical care from a clinician?s perspective. Dr. Lamas is a gifted writer in addition to being a sympathetic healer. This book should be required reading for every doctor in training. Truly gorgeous reading. ...

    I went into this book wanting to learn more about the science and policies of my health care colleagues across the pond. My expectations quickly shifted as I realised this book was about the people we care for, their stories and the impact of medical interventions on them. Dr Lamas wri...

    It gets 4 from me because of the interesting topic and subtle presentation of such. I had never really thought about there being a group of patients who spend much of their last years suspended between life and death. The irony is there are increasingly more of these people because of ...

    Daniela Lamas has written a book about many of the patients she has looked after in her years in medicine. As well as talking about the care they receive in the critical units of the hospital, she goes and talks to some of the patients after they have been discharged to see how their l...

    This was fine. Lamas is a capable writer and the stories are both interesting and moving. When I finished it, though, I was left not quite sure what point she was trying to make. Without a connective thread beyond "these people spent time in the ICU and only survived, when they did, du...

    I learned a lot here (particularly about the "in between") about the medical world that I had no knowledge of before. The stories are told with thoughtfulness and tenderness and really bring the people to life. ...

    I love reading about the work that medical doctors do and I hold good medical doctors in very high esteem. Daniela Lamas is one of those doctors and deserves recognition for the great work she does with a professional and yet compassion approach. She is a doctor who works in critical c...

    I enjoy reading books on medicine and I enjoyed this quite a lot. Lamas admits that she doesn't much about what happens when a critical care patient goes home, and I think that's probably true for most physicians. In fact, I'm sad to say that most probably don't know and don't even...

    I read books about dying and death and medicine because I want to able to make informed decisions for my loved ones. This book discussed the medical devices that are able to keep very ill people alive longer and the difficult decisions that people face when they choose to take advantag...

    I really enjoyed this book. The stories themselves were actually a bit on the depressing side, but I think the author has done an excellent job of portraying the not happily ever after ending most of us see in up lifting news stories. If you are fortunate enough to have little experien...

    I thought this book by a critical care physician would be much like "Being Mortal", but I found it to be less informative. The author becomes curious as to what happens to patients she sees in the CCU after they leave and find themselves with a different life than they had before a hea...

    As a physician, who also aspires to be a writer, this book is well written and very inspiring. As Daniela notes in the acknowledgements, ?The path to becoming a doctor is relatively clear; the path to becoming a writer, less so.? She seems to be laying down a very clear path to fol...

    I have mixed feelings about this book. As an Ex critical care nurse (UK) I can read and understand the case histories provided. The US is, I feel, more proactive in moving patients with invasive therapies on. I haven't worked with ECMO patients but the idea of mobilising them seems ali...

    The author writes of maybe 10 patients she encountered with diagnoses that would have killed them a generation ago. The march of medical science changed that ? and that was the point of the book she wanted to write. None of the patients are in this fix from bad lifestyle choices. So ...

    This short book is made up of essay-chapters about patients who are, for the most part, on the periphery of the medical system in one way or another--waiting for a transplant, waiting to die, waiting to return to their lives, coping with life after TBI--and it's very interesting. It's ...

    This is a Goodreads book. The intro explains the journey Dr. Lamas went through from wanting to win at all costs to when to let go and make the patient comfortable. The different chapters depict different patients, what they went through and in the afterword, their results good and b...

    This is a really great book! It is not just about the ethics of the "miracle of modern medicine", which is what I thought it would be about, and having had a close family member go through this experience of life after ICU. It is more about the shifting attitudes towards quality of lif...

    Very interesting, but depressing, food for thought. Lamas presents the shocking reality of how little information or true guidance families are given when their loved ones are in ICU and must make decisions about interventions. There are some hopeful stories for balance, thank goodness...

    A real eye opener into the medical world and patients lives. I loved this book, it made me want to be a doctor, I found myself trying to diagnose patients as I read it !! A must read ! ...

    I loved this account from both doctor and patient perspective. ...

    The flip side of what it means to have access to modern medical intervention. It gives another ring of meaning to the term "cutting edge". ...

    I just want to thank the author for her dedication to being a wonderful doctor and for sharing an insightful insider?s view. You are an incredibly gifted woman. ...

    I liked this book but my impression of the author was that she was aloof to her patients and never quite connected to them as humans. ...

    WOW great book to really see what happens in between the ICU and long term care. Everyone should read this! ...

    Dr. Lamas gives voice to unheard, uncomfortable and messy patient stories with an open heart and compassionate prose. ...

    4.5 ...

  • Barbara Tarnay
    Apr 16, 2018

    I received a copy of this book in exchange for an honest review. You Can Stop Humming Now is a non fiction memoir of sorts that takes us through the wonders of modern medicine by examining various patients past and patient under the care of Daniela Lamas. Rather than baffle you wit...

    A compassionate look at medical care from a clinician?s perspective. Dr. Lamas is a gifted writer in addition to being a sympathetic healer. This book should be required reading for every doctor in training. Truly gorgeous reading. ...

    I went into this book wanting to learn more about the science and policies of my health care colleagues across the pond. My expectations quickly shifted as I realised this book was about the people we care for, their stories and the impact of medical interventions on them. Dr Lamas wri...

    It gets 4 from me because of the interesting topic and subtle presentation of such. I had never really thought about there being a group of patients who spend much of their last years suspended between life and death. The irony is there are increasingly more of these people because of ...

    Daniela Lamas has written a book about many of the patients she has looked after in her years in medicine. As well as talking about the care they receive in the critical units of the hospital, she goes and talks to some of the patients after they have been discharged to see how their l...

    This was fine. Lamas is a capable writer and the stories are both interesting and moving. When I finished it, though, I was left not quite sure what point she was trying to make. Without a connective thread beyond "these people spent time in the ICU and only survived, when they did, du...

    I learned a lot here (particularly about the "in between") about the medical world that I had no knowledge of before. The stories are told with thoughtfulness and tenderness and really bring the people to life. ...

    I love reading about the work that medical doctors do and I hold good medical doctors in very high esteem. Daniela Lamas is one of those doctors and deserves recognition for the great work she does with a professional and yet compassion approach. She is a doctor who works in critical c...

    I enjoy reading books on medicine and I enjoyed this quite a lot. Lamas admits that she doesn't much about what happens when a critical care patient goes home, and I think that's probably true for most physicians. In fact, I'm sad to say that most probably don't know and don't even...

    I read books about dying and death and medicine because I want to able to make informed decisions for my loved ones. This book discussed the medical devices that are able to keep very ill people alive longer and the difficult decisions that people face when they choose to take advantag...

    I really enjoyed this book. The stories themselves were actually a bit on the depressing side, but I think the author has done an excellent job of portraying the not happily ever after ending most of us see in up lifting news stories. If you are fortunate enough to have little experien...

  • Kind  Konfetti
    Feb 26, 2018

    I received a copy of this book in exchange for an honest review. You Can Stop Humming Now is a non fiction memoir of sorts that takes us through the wonders of modern medicine by examining various patients past and patient under the care of Daniela Lamas. Rather than baffle you wit...

    A compassionate look at medical care from a clinician?s perspective. Dr. Lamas is a gifted writer in addition to being a sympathetic healer. This book should be required reading for every doctor in training. Truly gorgeous reading. ...

    I went into this book wanting to learn more about the science and policies of my health care colleagues across the pond. My expectations quickly shifted as I realised this book was about the people we care for, their stories and the impact of medical interventions on them. Dr Lamas wri...

  • Julie
    Mar 16, 2018

    I received a copy of this book in exchange for an honest review. You Can Stop Humming Now is a non fiction memoir of sorts that takes us through the wonders of modern medicine by examining various patients past and patient under the care of Daniela Lamas. Rather than baffle you wit...

    A compassionate look at medical care from a clinician?s perspective. Dr. Lamas is a gifted writer in addition to being a sympathetic healer. This book should be required reading for every doctor in training. Truly gorgeous reading. ...

    I went into this book wanting to learn more about the science and policies of my health care colleagues across the pond. My expectations quickly shifted as I realised this book was about the people we care for, their stories and the impact of medical interventions on them. Dr Lamas wri...

    It gets 4 from me because of the interesting topic and subtle presentation of such. I had never really thought about there being a group of patients who spend much of their last years suspended between life and death. The irony is there are increasingly more of these people because of ...

    Daniela Lamas has written a book about many of the patients she has looked after in her years in medicine. As well as talking about the care they receive in the critical units of the hospital, she goes and talks to some of the patients after they have been discharged to see how their l...

    This was fine. Lamas is a capable writer and the stories are both interesting and moving. When I finished it, though, I was left not quite sure what point she was trying to make. Without a connective thread beyond "these people spent time in the ICU and only survived, when they did, du...

    I learned a lot here (particularly about the "in between") about the medical world that I had no knowledge of before. The stories are told with thoughtfulness and tenderness and really bring the people to life. ...

    I love reading about the work that medical doctors do and I hold good medical doctors in very high esteem. Daniela Lamas is one of those doctors and deserves recognition for the great work she does with a professional and yet compassion approach. She is a doctor who works in critical c...

    I enjoy reading books on medicine and I enjoyed this quite a lot. Lamas admits that she doesn't much about what happens when a critical care patient goes home, and I think that's probably true for most physicians. In fact, I'm sad to say that most probably don't know and don't even...

    I read books about dying and death and medicine because I want to able to make informed decisions for my loved ones. This book discussed the medical devices that are able to keep very ill people alive longer and the difficult decisions that people face when they choose to take advantag...

    I really enjoyed this book. The stories themselves were actually a bit on the depressing side, but I think the author has done an excellent job of portraying the not happily ever after ending most of us see in up lifting news stories. If you are fortunate enough to have little experien...

    I thought this book by a critical care physician would be much like "Being Mortal", but I found it to be less informative. The author becomes curious as to what happens to patients she sees in the CCU after they leave and find themselves with a different life than they had before a hea...

    As a physician, who also aspires to be a writer, this book is well written and very inspiring. As Daniela notes in the acknowledgements, ?The path to becoming a doctor is relatively clear; the path to becoming a writer, less so.? She seems to be laying down a very clear path to fol...

    I have mixed feelings about this book. As an Ex critical care nurse (UK) I can read and understand the case histories provided. The US is, I feel, more proactive in moving patients with invasive therapies on. I haven't worked with ECMO patients but the idea of mobilising them seems ali...

    The author writes of maybe 10 patients she encountered with diagnoses that would have killed them a generation ago. The march of medical science changed that ? and that was the point of the book she wanted to write. None of the patients are in this fix from bad lifestyle choices. So ...

    This short book is made up of essay-chapters about patients who are, for the most part, on the periphery of the medical system in one way or another--waiting for a transplant, waiting to die, waiting to return to their lives, coping with life after TBI--and it's very interesting. It's ...

    This is a Goodreads book. The intro explains the journey Dr. Lamas went through from wanting to win at all costs to when to let go and make the patient comfortable. The different chapters depict different patients, what they went through and in the afterword, their results good and b...

    This is a really great book! It is not just about the ethics of the "miracle of modern medicine", which is what I thought it would be about, and having had a close family member go through this experience of life after ICU. It is more about the shifting attitudes towards quality of lif...

    Very interesting, but depressing, food for thought. Lamas presents the shocking reality of how little information or true guidance families are given when their loved ones are in ICU and must make decisions about interventions. There are some hopeful stories for balance, thank goodness...

    A real eye opener into the medical world and patients lives. I loved this book, it made me want to be a doctor, I found myself trying to diagnose patients as I read it !! A must read ! ...

    I loved this account from both doctor and patient perspective. ...

  • Michelle B
    Mar 07, 2018

    I received a copy of this book in exchange for an honest review. You Can Stop Humming Now is a non fiction memoir of sorts that takes us through the wonders of modern medicine by examining various patients past and patient under the care of Daniela Lamas. Rather than baffle you wit...

    A compassionate look at medical care from a clinician?s perspective. Dr. Lamas is a gifted writer in addition to being a sympathetic healer. This book should be required reading for every doctor in training. Truly gorgeous reading. ...

    I went into this book wanting to learn more about the science and policies of my health care colleagues across the pond. My expectations quickly shifted as I realised this book was about the people we care for, their stories and the impact of medical interventions on them. Dr Lamas wri...

    It gets 4 from me because of the interesting topic and subtle presentation of such. I had never really thought about there being a group of patients who spend much of their last years suspended between life and death. The irony is there are increasingly more of these people because of ...

    Daniela Lamas has written a book about many of the patients she has looked after in her years in medicine. As well as talking about the care they receive in the critical units of the hospital, she goes and talks to some of the patients after they have been discharged to see how their l...

    This was fine. Lamas is a capable writer and the stories are both interesting and moving. When I finished it, though, I was left not quite sure what point she was trying to make. Without a connective thread beyond "these people spent time in the ICU and only survived, when they did, du...

    I learned a lot here (particularly about the "in between") about the medical world that I had no knowledge of before. The stories are told with thoughtfulness and tenderness and really bring the people to life. ...

    I love reading about the work that medical doctors do and I hold good medical doctors in very high esteem. Daniela Lamas is one of those doctors and deserves recognition for the great work she does with a professional and yet compassion approach. She is a doctor who works in critical c...

  • Vnunez-Ms_luv2read
    Feb 15, 2018

    I received a copy of this book in exchange for an honest review. You Can Stop Humming Now is a non fiction memoir of sorts that takes us through the wonders of modern medicine by examining various patients past and patient under the care of Daniela Lamas. Rather than baffle you wit...

    A compassionate look at medical care from a clinician?s perspective. Dr. Lamas is a gifted writer in addition to being a sympathetic healer. This book should be required reading for every doctor in training. Truly gorgeous reading. ...

    I went into this book wanting to learn more about the science and policies of my health care colleagues across the pond. My expectations quickly shifted as I realised this book was about the people we care for, their stories and the impact of medical interventions on them. Dr Lamas wri...

    It gets 4 from me because of the interesting topic and subtle presentation of such. I had never really thought about there being a group of patients who spend much of their last years suspended between life and death. The irony is there are increasingly more of these people because of ...

    Daniela Lamas has written a book about many of the patients she has looked after in her years in medicine. As well as talking about the care they receive in the critical units of the hospital, she goes and talks to some of the patients after they have been discharged to see how their l...

    This was fine. Lamas is a capable writer and the stories are both interesting and moving. When I finished it, though, I was left not quite sure what point she was trying to make. Without a connective thread beyond "these people spent time in the ICU and only survived, when they did, du...

    I learned a lot here (particularly about the "in between") about the medical world that I had no knowledge of before. The stories are told with thoughtfulness and tenderness and really bring the people to life. ...

    I love reading about the work that medical doctors do and I hold good medical doctors in very high esteem. Daniela Lamas is one of those doctors and deserves recognition for the great work she does with a professional and yet compassion approach. She is a doctor who works in critical c...

    I enjoy reading books on medicine and I enjoyed this quite a lot. Lamas admits that she doesn't much about what happens when a critical care patient goes home, and I think that's probably true for most physicians. In fact, I'm sad to say that most probably don't know and don't even...

    I read books about dying and death and medicine because I want to able to make informed decisions for my loved ones. This book discussed the medical devices that are able to keep very ill people alive longer and the difficult decisions that people face when they choose to take advantag...

    I really enjoyed this book. The stories themselves were actually a bit on the depressing side, but I think the author has done an excellent job of portraying the not happily ever after ending most of us see in up lifting news stories. If you are fortunate enough to have little experien...

    I thought this book by a critical care physician would be much like "Being Mortal", but I found it to be less informative. The author becomes curious as to what happens to patients she sees in the CCU after they leave and find themselves with a different life than they had before a hea...

    As a physician, who also aspires to be a writer, this book is well written and very inspiring. As Daniela notes in the acknowledgements, ?The path to becoming a doctor is relatively clear; the path to becoming a writer, less so.? She seems to be laying down a very clear path to fol...

    I have mixed feelings about this book. As an Ex critical care nurse (UK) I can read and understand the case histories provided. The US is, I feel, more proactive in moving patients with invasive therapies on. I haven't worked with ECMO patients but the idea of mobilising them seems ali...

    The author writes of maybe 10 patients she encountered with diagnoses that would have killed them a generation ago. The march of medical science changed that ? and that was the point of the book she wanted to write. None of the patients are in this fix from bad lifestyle choices. So ...

    This short book is made up of essay-chapters about patients who are, for the most part, on the periphery of the medical system in one way or another--waiting for a transplant, waiting to die, waiting to return to their lives, coping with life after TBI--and it's very interesting. It's ...

    This is a Goodreads book. The intro explains the journey Dr. Lamas went through from wanting to win at all costs to when to let go and make the patient comfortable. The different chapters depict different patients, what they went through and in the afterword, their results good and b...

    This is a really great book! It is not just about the ethics of the "miracle of modern medicine", which is what I thought it would be about, and having had a close family member go through this experience of life after ICU. It is more about the shifting attitudes towards quality of lif...

    Very interesting, but depressing, food for thought. Lamas presents the shocking reality of how little information or true guidance families are given when their loved ones are in ICU and must make decisions about interventions. There are some hopeful stories for balance, thank goodness...

    A real eye opener into the medical world and patients lives. I loved this book, it made me want to be a doctor, I found myself trying to diagnose patients as I read it !! A must read ! ...

    I loved this account from both doctor and patient perspective. ...

    The flip side of what it means to have access to modern medical intervention. It gives another ring of meaning to the term "cutting edge". ...

    I just want to thank the author for her dedication to being a wonderful doctor and for sharing an insightful insider?s view. You are an incredibly gifted woman. ...

    I liked this book but my impression of the author was that she was aloof to her patients and never quite connected to them as humans. ...

    WOW great book to really see what happens in between the ICU and long term care. Everyone should read this! ...

    Dr. Lamas gives voice to unheard, uncomfortable and messy patient stories with an open heart and compassionate prose. ...

    4.5 ...

    A must read for physicians, patients, and loved ones of patients...Certainly places a whole new perspective on critical illness and health care. ...

    Not the best of the genre. Didn?t feel she adequately discussed how to address end of life decisions with patients and families. ...

    Very good book from a doctor with some of her patient's stories of various illnesses that they were dealing with. It was refreshing to see these stories and the affect it had on not only the patient but their families and the doctor. You could feel the doctor's compassion and her wanti...