Give Me Some Truth

Give Me Some Truth

Carson Mastick is entering his senior year of high school and desperate to make his mark, on the reservation and off. A rock band -- and winning the local Battle of the Bands, with its first prize of a trip to New York City -- is his best shot. But things keep getting in the way. Small matters like the lack of an actual band, or the fact that his brother just got shot conf Carson Mastick is entering his senior year of high school and desperate to make his mark, on the reservation and off. A r...

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Title:Give Me Some Truth
Author:Eric Gansworth
Rating:
Genres:Young Adult
ISBN:1338143549
Edition Language:English
Format Type:Hardcover
Number of Pages:432 pages pages

Give Me Some Truth Reviews

  • Dan
    Jul 20, 2018

    3.5 stars This is a story told in dual POV: the 15-year-old Maggi and the 17-year-old Carson, both native American teens, Tuscarora Nation (#ownvoices), living on a reservation near Niagra Falls and the border with Canada in 1980. My audiobook subscription ends the third, and I r...

    It's 1980 and Carson wants to win Battle of the Bands to get a free trip to NYC. But first he needs a band. That's the basic premise of this book, but it's so, so much more than that. Carson is a Tuscarora Indian living on a reservation and at the very beginning of the book his brother...

    This book was a little slow to grab me, but I definitely became very invested in these characters. There's such a mix of stakes at play here--will these teens win their battle of the bands? Will Maggi have sex for the first time with a shady older guy? will white people honor native tr...

    Wow, so this was great. I started to draft a long, largely incoherent love letter to this book, and then I remembered Debbie Reese had this to say about Eric Gansworth's first young-adult novel, If I Ever Get Out of Here: https://americanindiansinchildrenslit... , which is both more au...

    This was a sometimes wonderful, sometimes sad, and sometimes uncomfortable look at the lives of teens on a Native American reservation. I really appreciated Carson's awakening during this story, and his growing interest in activism. He considered himself a ChameleIndian, a Native A...

    Yes! ...

    I had a harder time getting into this one, but ultimately enjoyed it. I liked and cared about both characters. I preferred Maggi's POV chapters to Carson's in the beginning, and then flip-flopped about halfway through and much preferred Carson's. Maggi's relationship with Jim really cr...

    This is a 4.5 for me for many reasons. When I received this ARC of Eric Gansworth's latest offering, I knew that it would land on the top of my to-read pile, but I also knew that I would want to savor it just as I savored his earlier If I Ever Get Out of Here. I had to wait until the w...

    3.5ish stars -- this ended up being a lot less about the "teens start a band" conceit than I thought it would be, which isn't necessarily a bad thing! It's very slice-of-life, focusing on six months in the year 1980. The world feels fully fleshed out and lived-in, with Gansworth not pu...

    I was generally lost a lot when reading this book, and I don't know if I was lost because it took me so long to finish, or it took me a long time to finish because I was so often lost. Who is saying what? What was with that sentence structure? What are they trying to say here? Huh? Who...

    I loved this book! Great characters! Historical fiction set in 1980, very strong feeling of that time in the story, mostly through music. I seem to be drawn to YA that have music plots - there are a lot of them, and this is one of the best! I liked learning about life on their reserv...

    After reading this, I?m ashamed I haven?t read any of Gansworth?s other novels. Give Me Some Truth is masterfully written, with layers upon layers between characters and plot. It?s tough to say what the main story is: our main character?s need for growth that he can?t seem ...

    I was given an advance copy of this book in exchange for an honest review. Gansworth's latest novel follows the formation of a band and their quest to win a Battle of the Bands through the viewpoint of two Native American teens, Carson and Maggi. I liked the distinct voices of these...

    I enjoyed Carson's arc infinitely more than Maggie's. Carson is having a true coming of age experience, deciding what kind of person he wants to be, what issues he'll stand for and against, if he can bear to let people be his true friends, whether he can be a friend in return. I think ...

    diverse teen fiction (Indians living on a reservation near US-Canada border, Niagara Falls) Carson is about 17--a high school senior and Maggi is 15; Carson's story revolves around getting a band together to compete for a prize trip to NY (his ticket off the Rez) and Maggi's story rev...

    I loved the voices of the two narrators in this novel. To me it's always risky to bring two POVs to a novel because they both have to be equally engaging or the reader gets impatient. I never felt that way in this book. The various storylines kept my attention throughout. The character...

    Loved "If I Ever Get Out of Here." Slogged through this, barely. There are plenty of good ingredients here (music-making detail, emotionally intelligent[ish] teen boys, microaggression demonstrations, same great humor), but it's a rambling mess overall. It's hard to see what could be d...

    I'm supposed to be out touristing but I'm in finishing this instead. There's so much to love about this book, from the richness of the voices to the window (for me) aspect to the decision to take Yoko Ono's art seriously (because even in 2018 I hear her name mostly in reference to h...

    Unfortunately I was unable to enjoy this book as much as others. I had to force myself to finish reading it, and I feel bad for even admitting that. Its not that the writing was bad - or even the plot- its just that I couldn't seem to connect with the characters enough to even want t...

    Although it took me a while to get into this book, once I did I was hooked. Loved the characters, well almost all the characters. You?ll know which one I disliked when you read it yourself. Great YA book that is written by an indigenous author! The book would have received five stars...

    It?s helpful to read Gansworth?s other novel, If I Ever Get Out of Here, before this one as the many of the characters and plot lines overlap (even though this is technically not a sequel.) This is my least favorite of the two books, but I enjoyed listening to Gansworth himself nar...

    I don't know anything about the Beatles, or John Lennon, or Yoko Ono, which is how I know I missed some of the more subtle stuff in this book. It was still incredible, though--well written and emotionally true from start to finish. I loved the dual POV. It fit better and contributed to...

    I'm not entirely sure how I feel about the plot and the main character arcs, as neither really moved the needle for me by the end of the book. But my lukewarm feelings there are more than balanced by the deep, powerful sense of setting Gansworth instills, both in terms of the music, ar...

    "An achingly real and honest look into the lives of teenagers pushed to the margins, creating and loving against life's headwinds. Sometimes hilarious, sometimes heartbreaking, always heartfelt." -- author Jeff Zentner ...

    I received an ARC of this book from the 2017 YALSA Symposium. I got to chapter 7 in this book, but I just couldn't finish it. Initially, it reminded me a bit of The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian, but it quickly lost that feel. It just felt like the story wasn't going a...

    This one was slow going for me. However it is a great book. ...

    This book was a Best of the Best for the month of August 2018, as selected by Stevo's Book Reviews on the Internet. http://forums.delphiforums.com/stevo1... ...

    Every bit as great a read as If I Ever Get Out of Here, with even more substance. Well worth the read. ...

    There is so much to talk about in this epic, character-driven tale. It's one I don't think I will soon forget. I can't wait to read If I Ever Get Out of Here soon! ...

  • Abby Johnson
    Jun 30, 2018

    3.5 stars This is a story told in dual POV: the 15-year-old Maggi and the 17-year-old Carson, both native American teens, Tuscarora Nation (#ownvoices), living on a reservation near Niagra Falls and the border with Canada in 1980. My audiobook subscription ends the third, and I r...

    It's 1980 and Carson wants to win Battle of the Bands to get a free trip to NYC. But first he needs a band. That's the basic premise of this book, but it's so, so much more than that. Carson is a Tuscarora Indian living on a reservation and at the very beginning of the book his brother...

  • Renata
    Jul 30, 2018

    3.5 stars This is a story told in dual POV: the 15-year-old Maggi and the 17-year-old Carson, both native American teens, Tuscarora Nation (#ownvoices), living on a reservation near Niagra Falls and the border with Canada in 1980. My audiobook subscription ends the third, and I r...

    It's 1980 and Carson wants to win Battle of the Bands to get a free trip to NYC. But first he needs a band. That's the basic premise of this book, but it's so, so much more than that. Carson is a Tuscarora Indian living on a reservation and at the very beginning of the book his brother...

    This book was a little slow to grab me, but I definitely became very invested in these characters. There's such a mix of stakes at play here--will these teens win their battle of the bands? Will Maggi have sex for the first time with a shady older guy? will white people honor native tr...

  • Tracey
    Jul 12, 2018

    3.5 stars This is a story told in dual POV: the 15-year-old Maggi and the 17-year-old Carson, both native American teens, Tuscarora Nation (#ownvoices), living on a reservation near Niagra Falls and the border with Canada in 1980. My audiobook subscription ends the third, and I r...

    It's 1980 and Carson wants to win Battle of the Bands to get a free trip to NYC. But first he needs a band. That's the basic premise of this book, but it's so, so much more than that. Carson is a Tuscarora Indian living on a reservation and at the very beginning of the book his brother...

    This book was a little slow to grab me, but I definitely became very invested in these characters. There's such a mix of stakes at play here--will these teens win their battle of the bands? Will Maggi have sex for the first time with a shady older guy? will white people honor native tr...

    Wow, so this was great. I started to draft a long, largely incoherent love letter to this book, and then I remembered Debbie Reese had this to say about Eric Gansworth's first young-adult novel, If I Ever Get Out of Here: https://americanindiansinchildrenslit... , which is both more au...

    This was a sometimes wonderful, sometimes sad, and sometimes uncomfortable look at the lives of teens on a Native American reservation. I really appreciated Carson's awakening during this story, and his growing interest in activism. He considered himself a ChameleIndian, a Native A...

    Yes! ...

    I had a harder time getting into this one, but ultimately enjoyed it. I liked and cared about both characters. I preferred Maggi's POV chapters to Carson's in the beginning, and then flip-flopped about halfway through and much preferred Carson's. Maggi's relationship with Jim really cr...

    This is a 4.5 for me for many reasons. When I received this ARC of Eric Gansworth's latest offering, I knew that it would land on the top of my to-read pile, but I also knew that I would want to savor it just as I savored his earlier If I Ever Get Out of Here. I had to wait until the w...

    3.5ish stars -- this ended up being a lot less about the "teens start a band" conceit than I thought it would be, which isn't necessarily a bad thing! It's very slice-of-life, focusing on six months in the year 1980. The world feels fully fleshed out and lived-in, with Gansworth not pu...

    I was generally lost a lot when reading this book, and I don't know if I was lost because it took me so long to finish, or it took me a long time to finish because I was so often lost. Who is saying what? What was with that sentence structure? What are they trying to say here? Huh? Who...

    I loved this book! Great characters! Historical fiction set in 1980, very strong feeling of that time in the story, mostly through music. I seem to be drawn to YA that have music plots - there are a lot of them, and this is one of the best! I liked learning about life on their reserv...

    After reading this, I?m ashamed I haven?t read any of Gansworth?s other novels. Give Me Some Truth is masterfully written, with layers upon layers between characters and plot. It?s tough to say what the main story is: our main character?s need for growth that he can?t seem ...

    I was given an advance copy of this book in exchange for an honest review. Gansworth's latest novel follows the formation of a band and their quest to win a Battle of the Bands through the viewpoint of two Native American teens, Carson and Maggi. I liked the distinct voices of these...

    I enjoyed Carson's arc infinitely more than Maggie's. Carson is having a true coming of age experience, deciding what kind of person he wants to be, what issues he'll stand for and against, if he can bear to let people be his true friends, whether he can be a friend in return. I think ...

    diverse teen fiction (Indians living on a reservation near US-Canada border, Niagara Falls) Carson is about 17--a high school senior and Maggi is 15; Carson's story revolves around getting a band together to compete for a prize trip to NY (his ticket off the Rez) and Maggi's story rev...

  • Mo
    May 29, 2018

    3.5 stars This is a story told in dual POV: the 15-year-old Maggi and the 17-year-old Carson, both native American teens, Tuscarora Nation (#ownvoices), living on a reservation near Niagra Falls and the border with Canada in 1980. My audiobook subscription ends the third, and I r...

    It's 1980 and Carson wants to win Battle of the Bands to get a free trip to NYC. But first he needs a band. That's the basic premise of this book, but it's so, so much more than that. Carson is a Tuscarora Indian living on a reservation and at the very beginning of the book his brother...

    This book was a little slow to grab me, but I definitely became very invested in these characters. There's such a mix of stakes at play here--will these teens win their battle of the bands? Will Maggi have sex for the first time with a shady older guy? will white people honor native tr...

    Wow, so this was great. I started to draft a long, largely incoherent love letter to this book, and then I remembered Debbie Reese had this to say about Eric Gansworth's first young-adult novel, If I Ever Get Out of Here: https://americanindiansinchildrenslit... , which is both more au...

  • jennifer
    Jun 16, 2018

    3.5 stars This is a story told in dual POV: the 15-year-old Maggi and the 17-year-old Carson, both native American teens, Tuscarora Nation (#ownvoices), living on a reservation near Niagra Falls and the border with Canada in 1980. My audiobook subscription ends the third, and I r...

    It's 1980 and Carson wants to win Battle of the Bands to get a free trip to NYC. But first he needs a band. That's the basic premise of this book, but it's so, so much more than that. Carson is a Tuscarora Indian living on a reservation and at the very beginning of the book his brother...

    This book was a little slow to grab me, but I definitely became very invested in these characters. There's such a mix of stakes at play here--will these teens win their battle of the bands? Will Maggi have sex for the first time with a shady older guy? will white people honor native tr...

    Wow, so this was great. I started to draft a long, largely incoherent love letter to this book, and then I remembered Debbie Reese had this to say about Eric Gansworth's first young-adult novel, If I Ever Get Out of Here: https://americanindiansinchildrenslit... , which is both more au...

    This was a sometimes wonderful, sometimes sad, and sometimes uncomfortable look at the lives of teens on a Native American reservation. I really appreciated Carson's awakening during this story, and his growing interest in activism. He considered himself a ChameleIndian, a Native A...

    Yes! ...

    I had a harder time getting into this one, but ultimately enjoyed it. I liked and cared about both characters. I preferred Maggi's POV chapters to Carson's in the beginning, and then flip-flopped about halfway through and much preferred Carson's. Maggi's relationship with Jim really cr...

    This is a 4.5 for me for many reasons. When I received this ARC of Eric Gansworth's latest offering, I knew that it would land on the top of my to-read pile, but I also knew that I would want to savor it just as I savored his earlier If I Ever Get Out of Here. I had to wait until the w...

    3.5ish stars -- this ended up being a lot less about the "teens start a band" conceit than I thought it would be, which isn't necessarily a bad thing! It's very slice-of-life, focusing on six months in the year 1980. The world feels fully fleshed out and lived-in, with Gansworth not pu...

    I was generally lost a lot when reading this book, and I don't know if I was lost because it took me so long to finish, or it took me a long time to finish because I was so often lost. Who is saying what? What was with that sentence structure? What are they trying to say here? Huh? Who...

    I loved this book! Great characters! Historical fiction set in 1980, very strong feeling of that time in the story, mostly through music. I seem to be drawn to YA that have music plots - there are a lot of them, and this is one of the best! I liked learning about life on their reserv...

    After reading this, I?m ashamed I haven?t read any of Gansworth?s other novels. Give Me Some Truth is masterfully written, with layers upon layers between characters and plot. It?s tough to say what the main story is: our main character?s need for growth that he can?t seem ...

    I was given an advance copy of this book in exchange for an honest review. Gansworth's latest novel follows the formation of a band and their quest to win a Battle of the Bands through the viewpoint of two Native American teens, Carson and Maggi. I liked the distinct voices of these...

    I enjoyed Carson's arc infinitely more than Maggie's. Carson is having a true coming of age experience, deciding what kind of person he wants to be, what issues he'll stand for and against, if he can bear to let people be his true friends, whether he can be a friend in return. I think ...

    diverse teen fiction (Indians living on a reservation near US-Canada border, Niagara Falls) Carson is about 17--a high school senior and Maggi is 15; Carson's story revolves around getting a band together to compete for a prize trip to NY (his ticket off the Rez) and Maggi's story rev...

    I loved the voices of the two narrators in this novel. To me it's always risky to bring two POVs to a novel because they both have to be equally engaging or the reader gets impatient. I never felt that way in this book. The various storylines kept my attention throughout. The character...

    Loved "If I Ever Get Out of Here." Slogged through this, barely. There are plenty of good ingredients here (music-making detail, emotionally intelligent[ish] teen boys, microaggression demonstrations, same great humor), but it's a rambling mess overall. It's hard to see what could be d...

    I'm supposed to be out touristing but I'm in finishing this instead. There's so much to love about this book, from the richness of the voices to the window (for me) aspect to the decision to take Yoko Ono's art seriously (because even in 2018 I hear her name mostly in reference to h...

  • Justin
    Apr 16, 2018

    3.5 stars This is a story told in dual POV: the 15-year-old Maggi and the 17-year-old Carson, both native American teens, Tuscarora Nation (#ownvoices), living on a reservation near Niagra Falls and the border with Canada in 1980. My audiobook subscription ends the third, and I r...

    It's 1980 and Carson wants to win Battle of the Bands to get a free trip to NYC. But first he needs a band. That's the basic premise of this book, but it's so, so much more than that. Carson is a Tuscarora Indian living on a reservation and at the very beginning of the book his brother...

    This book was a little slow to grab me, but I definitely became very invested in these characters. There's such a mix of stakes at play here--will these teens win their battle of the bands? Will Maggi have sex for the first time with a shady older guy? will white people honor native tr...

    Wow, so this was great. I started to draft a long, largely incoherent love letter to this book, and then I remembered Debbie Reese had this to say about Eric Gansworth's first young-adult novel, If I Ever Get Out of Here: https://americanindiansinchildrenslit... , which is both more au...

    This was a sometimes wonderful, sometimes sad, and sometimes uncomfortable look at the lives of teens on a Native American reservation. I really appreciated Carson's awakening during this story, and his growing interest in activism. He considered himself a ChameleIndian, a Native A...

    Yes! ...

    I had a harder time getting into this one, but ultimately enjoyed it. I liked and cared about both characters. I preferred Maggi's POV chapters to Carson's in the beginning, and then flip-flopped about halfway through and much preferred Carson's. Maggi's relationship with Jim really cr...

    This is a 4.5 for me for many reasons. When I received this ARC of Eric Gansworth's latest offering, I knew that it would land on the top of my to-read pile, but I also knew that I would want to savor it just as I savored his earlier If I Ever Get Out of Here. I had to wait until the w...

    3.5ish stars -- this ended up being a lot less about the "teens start a band" conceit than I thought it would be, which isn't necessarily a bad thing! It's very slice-of-life, focusing on six months in the year 1980. The world feels fully fleshed out and lived-in, with Gansworth not pu...

    I was generally lost a lot when reading this book, and I don't know if I was lost because it took me so long to finish, or it took me a long time to finish because I was so often lost. Who is saying what? What was with that sentence structure? What are they trying to say here? Huh? Who...

    I loved this book! Great characters! Historical fiction set in 1980, very strong feeling of that time in the story, mostly through music. I seem to be drawn to YA that have music plots - there are a lot of them, and this is one of the best! I liked learning about life on their reserv...

    After reading this, I?m ashamed I haven?t read any of Gansworth?s other novels. Give Me Some Truth is masterfully written, with layers upon layers between characters and plot. It?s tough to say what the main story is: our main character?s need for growth that he can?t seem ...

    I was given an advance copy of this book in exchange for an honest review. Gansworth's latest novel follows the formation of a band and their quest to win a Battle of the Bands through the viewpoint of two Native American teens, Carson and Maggi. I liked the distinct voices of these...

    I enjoyed Carson's arc infinitely more than Maggie's. Carson is having a true coming of age experience, deciding what kind of person he wants to be, what issues he'll stand for and against, if he can bear to let people be his true friends, whether he can be a friend in return. I think ...

    diverse teen fiction (Indians living on a reservation near US-Canada border, Niagara Falls) Carson is about 17--a high school senior and Maggi is 15; Carson's story revolves around getting a band together to compete for a prize trip to NY (his ticket off the Rez) and Maggi's story rev...

    I loved the voices of the two narrators in this novel. To me it's always risky to bring two POVs to a novel because they both have to be equally engaging or the reader gets impatient. I never felt that way in this book. The various storylines kept my attention throughout. The character...

    Loved "If I Ever Get Out of Here." Slogged through this, barely. There are plenty of good ingredients here (music-making detail, emotionally intelligent[ish] teen boys, microaggression demonstrations, same great humor), but it's a rambling mess overall. It's hard to see what could be d...

    I'm supposed to be out touristing but I'm in finishing this instead. There's so much to love about this book, from the richness of the voices to the window (for me) aspect to the decision to take Yoko Ono's art seriously (because even in 2018 I hear her name mostly in reference to h...

    Unfortunately I was unable to enjoy this book as much as others. I had to force myself to finish reading it, and I feel bad for even admitting that. Its not that the writing was bad - or even the plot- its just that I couldn't seem to connect with the characters enough to even want t...

    Although it took me a while to get into this book, once I did I was hooked. Loved the characters, well almost all the characters. You?ll know which one I disliked when you read it yourself. Great YA book that is written by an indigenous author! The book would have received five stars...

    It?s helpful to read Gansworth?s other novel, If I Ever Get Out of Here, before this one as the many of the characters and plot lines overlap (even though this is technically not a sequel.) This is my least favorite of the two books, but I enjoyed listening to Gansworth himself nar...

    I don't know anything about the Beatles, or John Lennon, or Yoko Ono, which is how I know I missed some of the more subtle stuff in this book. It was still incredible, though--well written and emotionally true from start to finish. I loved the dual POV. It fit better and contributed to...

    I'm not entirely sure how I feel about the plot and the main character arcs, as neither really moved the needle for me by the end of the book. But my lukewarm feelings there are more than balanced by the deep, powerful sense of setting Gansworth instills, both in terms of the music, ar...

  • Barbara
    Dec 26, 2017

    3.5 stars This is a story told in dual POV: the 15-year-old Maggi and the 17-year-old Carson, both native American teens, Tuscarora Nation (#ownvoices), living on a reservation near Niagra Falls and the border with Canada in 1980. My audiobook subscription ends the third, and I r...

    It's 1980 and Carson wants to win Battle of the Bands to get a free trip to NYC. But first he needs a band. That's the basic premise of this book, but it's so, so much more than that. Carson is a Tuscarora Indian living on a reservation and at the very beginning of the book his brother...

    This book was a little slow to grab me, but I definitely became very invested in these characters. There's such a mix of stakes at play here--will these teens win their battle of the bands? Will Maggi have sex for the first time with a shady older guy? will white people honor native tr...

    Wow, so this was great. I started to draft a long, largely incoherent love letter to this book, and then I remembered Debbie Reese had this to say about Eric Gansworth's first young-adult novel, If I Ever Get Out of Here: https://americanindiansinchildrenslit... , which is both more au...

    This was a sometimes wonderful, sometimes sad, and sometimes uncomfortable look at the lives of teens on a Native American reservation. I really appreciated Carson's awakening during this story, and his growing interest in activism. He considered himself a ChameleIndian, a Native A...

    Yes! ...

    I had a harder time getting into this one, but ultimately enjoyed it. I liked and cared about both characters. I preferred Maggi's POV chapters to Carson's in the beginning, and then flip-flopped about halfway through and much preferred Carson's. Maggi's relationship with Jim really cr...

    This is a 4.5 for me for many reasons. When I received this ARC of Eric Gansworth's latest offering, I knew that it would land on the top of my to-read pile, but I also knew that I would want to savor it just as I savored his earlier If I Ever Get Out of Here. I had to wait until the w...

  • Brian
    Feb 04, 2018

    3.5 stars This is a story told in dual POV: the 15-year-old Maggi and the 17-year-old Carson, both native American teens, Tuscarora Nation (#ownvoices), living on a reservation near Niagra Falls and the border with Canada in 1980. My audiobook subscription ends the third, and I r...

    It's 1980 and Carson wants to win Battle of the Bands to get a free trip to NYC. But first he needs a band. That's the basic premise of this book, but it's so, so much more than that. Carson is a Tuscarora Indian living on a reservation and at the very beginning of the book his brother...

    This book was a little slow to grab me, but I definitely became very invested in these characters. There's such a mix of stakes at play here--will these teens win their battle of the bands? Will Maggi have sex for the first time with a shady older guy? will white people honor native tr...

    Wow, so this was great. I started to draft a long, largely incoherent love letter to this book, and then I remembered Debbie Reese had this to say about Eric Gansworth's first young-adult novel, If I Ever Get Out of Here: https://americanindiansinchildrenslit... , which is both more au...

    This was a sometimes wonderful, sometimes sad, and sometimes uncomfortable look at the lives of teens on a Native American reservation. I really appreciated Carson's awakening during this story, and his growing interest in activism. He considered himself a ChameleIndian, a Native A...

    Yes! ...

    I had a harder time getting into this one, but ultimately enjoyed it. I liked and cared about both characters. I preferred Maggi's POV chapters to Carson's in the beginning, and then flip-flopped about halfway through and much preferred Carson's. Maggi's relationship with Jim really cr...

    This is a 4.5 for me for many reasons. When I received this ARC of Eric Gansworth's latest offering, I knew that it would land on the top of my to-read pile, but I also knew that I would want to savor it just as I savored his earlier If I Ever Get Out of Here. I had to wait until the w...

    3.5ish stars -- this ended up being a lot less about the "teens start a band" conceit than I thought it would be, which isn't necessarily a bad thing! It's very slice-of-life, focusing on six months in the year 1980. The world feels fully fleshed out and lived-in, with Gansworth not pu...

    I was generally lost a lot when reading this book, and I don't know if I was lost because it took me so long to finish, or it took me a long time to finish because I was so often lost. Who is saying what? What was with that sentence structure? What are they trying to say here? Huh? Who...

    I loved this book! Great characters! Historical fiction set in 1980, very strong feeling of that time in the story, mostly through music. I seem to be drawn to YA that have music plots - there are a lot of them, and this is one of the best! I liked learning about life on their reserv...

    After reading this, I?m ashamed I haven?t read any of Gansworth?s other novels. Give Me Some Truth is masterfully written, with layers upon layers between characters and plot. It?s tough to say what the main story is: our main character?s need for growth that he can?t seem ...

  • Jo
    Jul 08, 2018

    3.5 stars This is a story told in dual POV: the 15-year-old Maggi and the 17-year-old Carson, both native American teens, Tuscarora Nation (#ownvoices), living on a reservation near Niagra Falls and the border with Canada in 1980. My audiobook subscription ends the third, and I r...

    It's 1980 and Carson wants to win Battle of the Bands to get a free trip to NYC. But first he needs a band. That's the basic premise of this book, but it's so, so much more than that. Carson is a Tuscarora Indian living on a reservation and at the very beginning of the book his brother...

    This book was a little slow to grab me, but I definitely became very invested in these characters. There's such a mix of stakes at play here--will these teens win their battle of the bands? Will Maggi have sex for the first time with a shady older guy? will white people honor native tr...

    Wow, so this was great. I started to draft a long, largely incoherent love letter to this book, and then I remembered Debbie Reese had this to say about Eric Gansworth's first young-adult novel, If I Ever Get Out of Here: https://americanindiansinchildrenslit... , which is both more au...

    This was a sometimes wonderful, sometimes sad, and sometimes uncomfortable look at the lives of teens on a Native American reservation. I really appreciated Carson's awakening during this story, and his growing interest in activism. He considered himself a ChameleIndian, a Native A...

    Yes! ...

    I had a harder time getting into this one, but ultimately enjoyed it. I liked and cared about both characters. I preferred Maggi's POV chapters to Carson's in the beginning, and then flip-flopped about halfway through and much preferred Carson's. Maggi's relationship with Jim really cr...

    This is a 4.5 for me for many reasons. When I received this ARC of Eric Gansworth's latest offering, I knew that it would land on the top of my to-read pile, but I also knew that I would want to savor it just as I savored his earlier If I Ever Get Out of Here. I had to wait until the w...

    3.5ish stars -- this ended up being a lot less about the "teens start a band" conceit than I thought it would be, which isn't necessarily a bad thing! It's very slice-of-life, focusing on six months in the year 1980. The world feels fully fleshed out and lived-in, with Gansworth not pu...

  • Amy Jacobs
    Jun 08, 2018

    3.5 stars This is a story told in dual POV: the 15-year-old Maggi and the 17-year-old Carson, both native American teens, Tuscarora Nation (#ownvoices), living on a reservation near Niagra Falls and the border with Canada in 1980. My audiobook subscription ends the third, and I r...

    It's 1980 and Carson wants to win Battle of the Bands to get a free trip to NYC. But first he needs a band. That's the basic premise of this book, but it's so, so much more than that. Carson is a Tuscarora Indian living on a reservation and at the very beginning of the book his brother...

    This book was a little slow to grab me, but I definitely became very invested in these characters. There's such a mix of stakes at play here--will these teens win their battle of the bands? Will Maggi have sex for the first time with a shady older guy? will white people honor native tr...

    Wow, so this was great. I started to draft a long, largely incoherent love letter to this book, and then I remembered Debbie Reese had this to say about Eric Gansworth's first young-adult novel, If I Ever Get Out of Here: https://americanindiansinchildrenslit... , which is both more au...

    This was a sometimes wonderful, sometimes sad, and sometimes uncomfortable look at the lives of teens on a Native American reservation. I really appreciated Carson's awakening during this story, and his growing interest in activism. He considered himself a ChameleIndian, a Native A...

    Yes! ...

    I had a harder time getting into this one, but ultimately enjoyed it. I liked and cared about both characters. I preferred Maggi's POV chapters to Carson's in the beginning, and then flip-flopped about halfway through and much preferred Carson's. Maggi's relationship with Jim really cr...

    This is a 4.5 for me for many reasons. When I received this ARC of Eric Gansworth's latest offering, I knew that it would land on the top of my to-read pile, but I also knew that I would want to savor it just as I savored his earlier If I Ever Get Out of Here. I had to wait until the w...

    3.5ish stars -- this ended up being a lot less about the "teens start a band" conceit than I thought it would be, which isn't necessarily a bad thing! It's very slice-of-life, focusing on six months in the year 1980. The world feels fully fleshed out and lived-in, with Gansworth not pu...

    I was generally lost a lot when reading this book, and I don't know if I was lost because it took me so long to finish, or it took me a long time to finish because I was so often lost. Who is saying what? What was with that sentence structure? What are they trying to say here? Huh? Who...

    I loved this book! Great characters! Historical fiction set in 1980, very strong feeling of that time in the story, mostly through music. I seem to be drawn to YA that have music plots - there are a lot of them, and this is one of the best! I liked learning about life on their reserv...

    After reading this, I?m ashamed I haven?t read any of Gansworth?s other novels. Give Me Some Truth is masterfully written, with layers upon layers between characters and plot. It?s tough to say what the main story is: our main character?s need for growth that he can?t seem ...

    I was given an advance copy of this book in exchange for an honest review. Gansworth's latest novel follows the formation of a band and their quest to win a Battle of the Bands through the viewpoint of two Native American teens, Carson and Maggi. I liked the distinct voices of these...

    I enjoyed Carson's arc infinitely more than Maggie's. Carson is having a true coming of age experience, deciding what kind of person he wants to be, what issues he'll stand for and against, if he can bear to let people be his true friends, whether he can be a friend in return. I think ...

    diverse teen fiction (Indians living on a reservation near US-Canada border, Niagara Falls) Carson is about 17--a high school senior and Maggi is 15; Carson's story revolves around getting a band together to compete for a prize trip to NY (his ticket off the Rez) and Maggi's story rev...

    I loved the voices of the two narrators in this novel. To me it's always risky to bring two POVs to a novel because they both have to be equally engaging or the reader gets impatient. I never felt that way in this book. The various storylines kept my attention throughout. The character...

    Loved "If I Ever Get Out of Here." Slogged through this, barely. There are plenty of good ingredients here (music-making detail, emotionally intelligent[ish] teen boys, microaggression demonstrations, same great humor), but it's a rambling mess overall. It's hard to see what could be d...

    I'm supposed to be out touristing but I'm in finishing this instead. There's so much to love about this book, from the richness of the voices to the window (for me) aspect to the decision to take Yoko Ono's art seriously (because even in 2018 I hear her name mostly in reference to h...

    Unfortunately I was unable to enjoy this book as much as others. I had to force myself to finish reading it, and I feel bad for even admitting that. Its not that the writing was bad - or even the plot- its just that I couldn't seem to connect with the characters enough to even want t...

  • Hoover Public Library Kids and Teens
    Jul 30, 2018

    3.5 stars This is a story told in dual POV: the 15-year-old Maggi and the 17-year-old Carson, both native American teens, Tuscarora Nation (#ownvoices), living on a reservation near Niagra Falls and the border with Canada in 1980. My audiobook subscription ends the third, and I r...

    It's 1980 and Carson wants to win Battle of the Bands to get a free trip to NYC. But first he needs a band. That's the basic premise of this book, but it's so, so much more than that. Carson is a Tuscarora Indian living on a reservation and at the very beginning of the book his brother...

    This book was a little slow to grab me, but I definitely became very invested in these characters. There's such a mix of stakes at play here--will these teens win their battle of the bands? Will Maggi have sex for the first time with a shady older guy? will white people honor native tr...

    Wow, so this was great. I started to draft a long, largely incoherent love letter to this book, and then I remembered Debbie Reese had this to say about Eric Gansworth's first young-adult novel, If I Ever Get Out of Here: https://americanindiansinchildrenslit... , which is both more au...

    This was a sometimes wonderful, sometimes sad, and sometimes uncomfortable look at the lives of teens on a Native American reservation. I really appreciated Carson's awakening during this story, and his growing interest in activism. He considered himself a ChameleIndian, a Native A...

    Yes! ...

    I had a harder time getting into this one, but ultimately enjoyed it. I liked and cared about both characters. I preferred Maggi's POV chapters to Carson's in the beginning, and then flip-flopped about halfway through and much preferred Carson's. Maggi's relationship with Jim really cr...

    This is a 4.5 for me for many reasons. When I received this ARC of Eric Gansworth's latest offering, I knew that it would land on the top of my to-read pile, but I also knew that I would want to savor it just as I savored his earlier If I Ever Get Out of Here. I had to wait until the w...

    3.5ish stars -- this ended up being a lot less about the "teens start a band" conceit than I thought it would be, which isn't necessarily a bad thing! It's very slice-of-life, focusing on six months in the year 1980. The world feels fully fleshed out and lived-in, with Gansworth not pu...

    I was generally lost a lot when reading this book, and I don't know if I was lost because it took me so long to finish, or it took me a long time to finish because I was so often lost. Who is saying what? What was with that sentence structure? What are they trying to say here? Huh? Who...

    I loved this book! Great characters! Historical fiction set in 1980, very strong feeling of that time in the story, mostly through music. I seem to be drawn to YA that have music plots - there are a lot of them, and this is one of the best! I liked learning about life on their reserv...

    After reading this, I?m ashamed I haven?t read any of Gansworth?s other novels. Give Me Some Truth is masterfully written, with layers upon layers between characters and plot. It?s tough to say what the main story is: our main character?s need for growth that he can?t seem ...

    I was given an advance copy of this book in exchange for an honest review. Gansworth's latest novel follows the formation of a band and their quest to win a Battle of the Bands through the viewpoint of two Native American teens, Carson and Maggi. I liked the distinct voices of these...

    I enjoyed Carson's arc infinitely more than Maggie's. Carson is having a true coming of age experience, deciding what kind of person he wants to be, what issues he'll stand for and against, if he can bear to let people be his true friends, whether he can be a friend in return. I think ...

    diverse teen fiction (Indians living on a reservation near US-Canada border, Niagara Falls) Carson is about 17--a high school senior and Maggi is 15; Carson's story revolves around getting a band together to compete for a prize trip to NY (his ticket off the Rez) and Maggi's story rev...

    I loved the voices of the two narrators in this novel. To me it's always risky to bring two POVs to a novel because they both have to be equally engaging or the reader gets impatient. I never felt that way in this book. The various storylines kept my attention throughout. The character...

    Loved "If I Ever Get Out of Here." Slogged through this, barely. There are plenty of good ingredients here (music-making detail, emotionally intelligent[ish] teen boys, microaggression demonstrations, same great humor), but it's a rambling mess overall. It's hard to see what could be d...

    I'm supposed to be out touristing but I'm in finishing this instead. There's so much to love about this book, from the richness of the voices to the window (for me) aspect to the decision to take Yoko Ono's art seriously (because even in 2018 I hear her name mostly in reference to h...

    Unfortunately I was unable to enjoy this book as much as others. I had to force myself to finish reading it, and I feel bad for even admitting that. Its not that the writing was bad - or even the plot- its just that I couldn't seem to connect with the characters enough to even want t...

    Although it took me a while to get into this book, once I did I was hooked. Loved the characters, well almost all the characters. You?ll know which one I disliked when you read it yourself. Great YA book that is written by an indigenous author! The book would have received five stars...

    It?s helpful to read Gansworth?s other novel, If I Ever Get Out of Here, before this one as the many of the characters and plot lines overlap (even though this is technically not a sequel.) This is my least favorite of the two books, but I enjoyed listening to Gansworth himself nar...

    I don't know anything about the Beatles, or John Lennon, or Yoko Ono, which is how I know I missed some of the more subtle stuff in this book. It was still incredible, though--well written and emotionally true from start to finish. I loved the dual POV. It fit better and contributed to...

    I'm not entirely sure how I feel about the plot and the main character arcs, as neither really moved the needle for me by the end of the book. But my lukewarm feelings there are more than balanced by the deep, powerful sense of setting Gansworth instills, both in terms of the music, ar...

    "An achingly real and honest look into the lives of teenagers pushed to the margins, creating and loving against life's headwinds. Sometimes hilarious, sometimes heartbreaking, always heartfelt." -- author Jeff Zentner ...

  • Gretchen
    May 02, 2018

    3.5 stars This is a story told in dual POV: the 15-year-old Maggi and the 17-year-old Carson, both native American teens, Tuscarora Nation (#ownvoices), living on a reservation near Niagra Falls and the border with Canada in 1980. My audiobook subscription ends the third, and I r...

    It's 1980 and Carson wants to win Battle of the Bands to get a free trip to NYC. But first he needs a band. That's the basic premise of this book, but it's so, so much more than that. Carson is a Tuscarora Indian living on a reservation and at the very beginning of the book his brother...

    This book was a little slow to grab me, but I definitely became very invested in these characters. There's such a mix of stakes at play here--will these teens win their battle of the bands? Will Maggi have sex for the first time with a shady older guy? will white people honor native tr...

    Wow, so this was great. I started to draft a long, largely incoherent love letter to this book, and then I remembered Debbie Reese had this to say about Eric Gansworth's first young-adult novel, If I Ever Get Out of Here: https://americanindiansinchildrenslit... , which is both more au...

    This was a sometimes wonderful, sometimes sad, and sometimes uncomfortable look at the lives of teens on a Native American reservation. I really appreciated Carson's awakening during this story, and his growing interest in activism. He considered himself a ChameleIndian, a Native A...

    Yes! ...

    I had a harder time getting into this one, but ultimately enjoyed it. I liked and cared about both characters. I preferred Maggi's POV chapters to Carson's in the beginning, and then flip-flopped about halfway through and much preferred Carson's. Maggi's relationship with Jim really cr...

    This is a 4.5 for me for many reasons. When I received this ARC of Eric Gansworth's latest offering, I knew that it would land on the top of my to-read pile, but I also knew that I would want to savor it just as I savored his earlier If I Ever Get Out of Here. I had to wait until the w...

    3.5ish stars -- this ended up being a lot less about the "teens start a band" conceit than I thought it would be, which isn't necessarily a bad thing! It's very slice-of-life, focusing on six months in the year 1980. The world feels fully fleshed out and lived-in, with Gansworth not pu...

    I was generally lost a lot when reading this book, and I don't know if I was lost because it took me so long to finish, or it took me a long time to finish because I was so often lost. Who is saying what? What was with that sentence structure? What are they trying to say here? Huh? Who...

    I loved this book! Great characters! Historical fiction set in 1980, very strong feeling of that time in the story, mostly through music. I seem to be drawn to YA that have music plots - there are a lot of them, and this is one of the best! I liked learning about life on their reserv...

    After reading this, I?m ashamed I haven?t read any of Gansworth?s other novels. Give Me Some Truth is masterfully written, with layers upon layers between characters and plot. It?s tough to say what the main story is: our main character?s need for growth that he can?t seem ...

    I was given an advance copy of this book in exchange for an honest review. Gansworth's latest novel follows the formation of a band and their quest to win a Battle of the Bands through the viewpoint of two Native American teens, Carson and Maggi. I liked the distinct voices of these...

    I enjoyed Carson's arc infinitely more than Maggie's. Carson is having a true coming of age experience, deciding what kind of person he wants to be, what issues he'll stand for and against, if he can bear to let people be his true friends, whether he can be a friend in return. I think ...

    diverse teen fiction (Indians living on a reservation near US-Canada border, Niagara Falls) Carson is about 17--a high school senior and Maggi is 15; Carson's story revolves around getting a band together to compete for a prize trip to NY (his ticket off the Rez) and Maggi's story rev...

    I loved the voices of the two narrators in this novel. To me it's always risky to bring two POVs to a novel because they both have to be equally engaging or the reader gets impatient. I never felt that way in this book. The various storylines kept my attention throughout. The character...

    Loved "If I Ever Get Out of Here." Slogged through this, barely. There are plenty of good ingredients here (music-making detail, emotionally intelligent[ish] teen boys, microaggression demonstrations, same great humor), but it's a rambling mess overall. It's hard to see what could be d...

    I'm supposed to be out touristing but I'm in finishing this instead. There's so much to love about this book, from the richness of the voices to the window (for me) aspect to the decision to take Yoko Ono's art seriously (because even in 2018 I hear her name mostly in reference to h...

    Unfortunately I was unable to enjoy this book as much as others. I had to force myself to finish reading it, and I feel bad for even admitting that. Its not that the writing was bad - or even the plot- its just that I couldn't seem to connect with the characters enough to even want t...

    Although it took me a while to get into this book, once I did I was hooked. Loved the characters, well almost all the characters. You?ll know which one I disliked when you read it yourself. Great YA book that is written by an indigenous author! The book would have received five stars...

    It?s helpful to read Gansworth?s other novel, If I Ever Get Out of Here, before this one as the many of the characters and plot lines overlap (even though this is technically not a sequel.) This is my least favorite of the two books, but I enjoyed listening to Gansworth himself nar...

    I don't know anything about the Beatles, or John Lennon, or Yoko Ono, which is how I know I missed some of the more subtle stuff in this book. It was still incredible, though--well written and emotionally true from start to finish. I loved the dual POV. It fit better and contributed to...

    I'm not entirely sure how I feel about the plot and the main character arcs, as neither really moved the needle for me by the end of the book. But my lukewarm feelings there are more than balanced by the deep, powerful sense of setting Gansworth instills, both in terms of the music, ar...

    "An achingly real and honest look into the lives of teenagers pushed to the margins, creating and loving against life's headwinds. Sometimes hilarious, sometimes heartbreaking, always heartfelt." -- author Jeff Zentner ...

    I received an ARC of this book from the 2017 YALSA Symposium. I got to chapter 7 in this book, but I just couldn't finish it. Initially, it reminded me a bit of The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian, but it quickly lost that feel. It just felt like the story wasn't going a...

  • Leah Moore
    Jun 09, 2018

    3.5 stars This is a story told in dual POV: the 15-year-old Maggi and the 17-year-old Carson, both native American teens, Tuscarora Nation (#ownvoices), living on a reservation near Niagra Falls and the border with Canada in 1980. My audiobook subscription ends the third, and I r...

    It's 1980 and Carson wants to win Battle of the Bands to get a free trip to NYC. But first he needs a band. That's the basic premise of this book, but it's so, so much more than that. Carson is a Tuscarora Indian living on a reservation and at the very beginning of the book his brother...

    This book was a little slow to grab me, but I definitely became very invested in these characters. There's such a mix of stakes at play here--will these teens win their battle of the bands? Will Maggi have sex for the first time with a shady older guy? will white people honor native tr...

    Wow, so this was great. I started to draft a long, largely incoherent love letter to this book, and then I remembered Debbie Reese had this to say about Eric Gansworth's first young-adult novel, If I Ever Get Out of Here: https://americanindiansinchildrenslit... , which is both more au...

    This was a sometimes wonderful, sometimes sad, and sometimes uncomfortable look at the lives of teens on a Native American reservation. I really appreciated Carson's awakening during this story, and his growing interest in activism. He considered himself a ChameleIndian, a Native A...

    Yes! ...

    I had a harder time getting into this one, but ultimately enjoyed it. I liked and cared about both characters. I preferred Maggi's POV chapters to Carson's in the beginning, and then flip-flopped about halfway through and much preferred Carson's. Maggi's relationship with Jim really cr...

    This is a 4.5 for me for many reasons. When I received this ARC of Eric Gansworth's latest offering, I knew that it would land on the top of my to-read pile, but I also knew that I would want to savor it just as I savored his earlier If I Ever Get Out of Here. I had to wait until the w...

    3.5ish stars -- this ended up being a lot less about the "teens start a band" conceit than I thought it would be, which isn't necessarily a bad thing! It's very slice-of-life, focusing on six months in the year 1980. The world feels fully fleshed out and lived-in, with Gansworth not pu...

    I was generally lost a lot when reading this book, and I don't know if I was lost because it took me so long to finish, or it took me a long time to finish because I was so often lost. Who is saying what? What was with that sentence structure? What are they trying to say here? Huh? Who...

    I loved this book! Great characters! Historical fiction set in 1980, very strong feeling of that time in the story, mostly through music. I seem to be drawn to YA that have music plots - there are a lot of them, and this is one of the best! I liked learning about life on their reserv...

  • S.M.
    Jun 09, 2018

    3.5 stars This is a story told in dual POV: the 15-year-old Maggi and the 17-year-old Carson, both native American teens, Tuscarora Nation (#ownvoices), living on a reservation near Niagra Falls and the border with Canada in 1980. My audiobook subscription ends the third, and I r...

    It's 1980 and Carson wants to win Battle of the Bands to get a free trip to NYC. But first he needs a band. That's the basic premise of this book, but it's so, so much more than that. Carson is a Tuscarora Indian living on a reservation and at the very beginning of the book his brother...

    This book was a little slow to grab me, but I definitely became very invested in these characters. There's such a mix of stakes at play here--will these teens win their battle of the bands? Will Maggi have sex for the first time with a shady older guy? will white people honor native tr...

    Wow, so this was great. I started to draft a long, largely incoherent love letter to this book, and then I remembered Debbie Reese had this to say about Eric Gansworth's first young-adult novel, If I Ever Get Out of Here: https://americanindiansinchildrenslit... , which is both more au...

    This was a sometimes wonderful, sometimes sad, and sometimes uncomfortable look at the lives of teens on a Native American reservation. I really appreciated Carson's awakening during this story, and his growing interest in activism. He considered himself a ChameleIndian, a Native A...

    Yes! ...

    I had a harder time getting into this one, but ultimately enjoyed it. I liked and cared about both characters. I preferred Maggi's POV chapters to Carson's in the beginning, and then flip-flopped about halfway through and much preferred Carson's. Maggi's relationship with Jim really cr...

    This is a 4.5 for me for many reasons. When I received this ARC of Eric Gansworth's latest offering, I knew that it would land on the top of my to-read pile, but I also knew that I would want to savor it just as I savored his earlier If I Ever Get Out of Here. I had to wait until the w...

    3.5ish stars -- this ended up being a lot less about the "teens start a band" conceit than I thought it would be, which isn't necessarily a bad thing! It's very slice-of-life, focusing on six months in the year 1980. The world feels fully fleshed out and lived-in, with Gansworth not pu...

    I was generally lost a lot when reading this book, and I don't know if I was lost because it took me so long to finish, or it took me a long time to finish because I was so often lost. Who is saying what? What was with that sentence structure? What are they trying to say here? Huh? Who...

    I loved this book! Great characters! Historical fiction set in 1980, very strong feeling of that time in the story, mostly through music. I seem to be drawn to YA that have music plots - there are a lot of them, and this is one of the best! I liked learning about life on their reserv...

    After reading this, I?m ashamed I haven?t read any of Gansworth?s other novels. Give Me Some Truth is masterfully written, with layers upon layers between characters and plot. It?s tough to say what the main story is: our main character?s need for growth that he can?t seem ...

    I was given an advance copy of this book in exchange for an honest review. Gansworth's latest novel follows the formation of a band and their quest to win a Battle of the Bands through the viewpoint of two Native American teens, Carson and Maggi. I liked the distinct voices of these...

    I enjoyed Carson's arc infinitely more than Maggie's. Carson is having a true coming of age experience, deciding what kind of person he wants to be, what issues he'll stand for and against, if he can bear to let people be his true friends, whether he can be a friend in return. I think ...

    diverse teen fiction (Indians living on a reservation near US-Canada border, Niagara Falls) Carson is about 17--a high school senior and Maggi is 15; Carson's story revolves around getting a band together to compete for a prize trip to NY (his ticket off the Rez) and Maggi's story rev...

    I loved the voices of the two narrators in this novel. To me it's always risky to bring two POVs to a novel because they both have to be equally engaging or the reader gets impatient. I never felt that way in this book. The various storylines kept my attention throughout. The character...

    Loved "If I Ever Get Out of Here." Slogged through this, barely. There are plenty of good ingredients here (music-making detail, emotionally intelligent[ish] teen boys, microaggression demonstrations, same great humor), but it's a rambling mess overall. It's hard to see what could be d...

    I'm supposed to be out touristing but I'm in finishing this instead. There's so much to love about this book, from the richness of the voices to the window (for me) aspect to the decision to take Yoko Ono's art seriously (because even in 2018 I hear her name mostly in reference to h...

    Unfortunately I was unable to enjoy this book as much as others. I had to force myself to finish reading it, and I feel bad for even admitting that. Its not that the writing was bad - or even the plot- its just that I couldn't seem to connect with the characters enough to even want t...

    Although it took me a while to get into this book, once I did I was hooked. Loved the characters, well almost all the characters. You?ll know which one I disliked when you read it yourself. Great YA book that is written by an indigenous author! The book would have received five stars...

    It?s helpful to read Gansworth?s other novel, If I Ever Get Out of Here, before this one as the many of the characters and plot lines overlap (even though this is technically not a sequel.) This is my least favorite of the two books, but I enjoyed listening to Gansworth himself nar...

    I don't know anything about the Beatles, or John Lennon, or Yoko Ono, which is how I know I missed some of the more subtle stuff in this book. It was still incredible, though--well written and emotionally true from start to finish. I loved the dual POV. It fit better and contributed to...

  • Jennifer Mangler
    Aug 08, 2018

    3.5 stars This is a story told in dual POV: the 15-year-old Maggi and the 17-year-old Carson, both native American teens, Tuscarora Nation (#ownvoices), living on a reservation near Niagra Falls and the border with Canada in 1980. My audiobook subscription ends the third, and I r...

    It's 1980 and Carson wants to win Battle of the Bands to get a free trip to NYC. But first he needs a band. That's the basic premise of this book, but it's so, so much more than that. Carson is a Tuscarora Indian living on a reservation and at the very beginning of the book his brother...

    This book was a little slow to grab me, but I definitely became very invested in these characters. There's such a mix of stakes at play here--will these teens win their battle of the bands? Will Maggi have sex for the first time with a shady older guy? will white people honor native tr...

    Wow, so this was great. I started to draft a long, largely incoherent love letter to this book, and then I remembered Debbie Reese had this to say about Eric Gansworth's first young-adult novel, If I Ever Get Out of Here: https://americanindiansinchildrenslit... , which is both more au...

    This was a sometimes wonderful, sometimes sad, and sometimes uncomfortable look at the lives of teens on a Native American reservation. I really appreciated Carson's awakening during this story, and his growing interest in activism. He considered himself a ChameleIndian, a Native A...

    Yes! ...

    I had a harder time getting into this one, but ultimately enjoyed it. I liked and cared about both characters. I preferred Maggi's POV chapters to Carson's in the beginning, and then flip-flopped about halfway through and much preferred Carson's. Maggi's relationship with Jim really cr...

  • Angie
    Aug 03, 2018

    3.5 stars This is a story told in dual POV: the 15-year-old Maggi and the 17-year-old Carson, both native American teens, Tuscarora Nation (#ownvoices), living on a reservation near Niagra Falls and the border with Canada in 1980. My audiobook subscription ends the third, and I r...

    It's 1980 and Carson wants to win Battle of the Bands to get a free trip to NYC. But first he needs a band. That's the basic premise of this book, but it's so, so much more than that. Carson is a Tuscarora Indian living on a reservation and at the very beginning of the book his brother...

    This book was a little slow to grab me, but I definitely became very invested in these characters. There's such a mix of stakes at play here--will these teens win their battle of the bands? Will Maggi have sex for the first time with a shady older guy? will white people honor native tr...

    Wow, so this was great. I started to draft a long, largely incoherent love letter to this book, and then I remembered Debbie Reese had this to say about Eric Gansworth's first young-adult novel, If I Ever Get Out of Here: https://americanindiansinchildrenslit... , which is both more au...

    This was a sometimes wonderful, sometimes sad, and sometimes uncomfortable look at the lives of teens on a Native American reservation. I really appreciated Carson's awakening during this story, and his growing interest in activism. He considered himself a ChameleIndian, a Native A...

    Yes! ...

    I had a harder time getting into this one, but ultimately enjoyed it. I liked and cared about both characters. I preferred Maggi's POV chapters to Carson's in the beginning, and then flip-flopped about halfway through and much preferred Carson's. Maggi's relationship with Jim really cr...

    This is a 4.5 for me for many reasons. When I received this ARC of Eric Gansworth's latest offering, I knew that it would land on the top of my to-read pile, but I also knew that I would want to savor it just as I savored his earlier If I Ever Get Out of Here. I had to wait until the w...

    3.5ish stars -- this ended up being a lot less about the "teens start a band" conceit than I thought it would be, which isn't necessarily a bad thing! It's very slice-of-life, focusing on six months in the year 1980. The world feels fully fleshed out and lived-in, with Gansworth not pu...

    I was generally lost a lot when reading this book, and I don't know if I was lost because it took me so long to finish, or it took me a long time to finish because I was so often lost. Who is saying what? What was with that sentence structure? What are they trying to say here? Huh? Who...

  • Lauren Phelps
    Jun 23, 2018

    3.5 stars This is a story told in dual POV: the 15-year-old Maggi and the 17-year-old Carson, both native American teens, Tuscarora Nation (#ownvoices), living on a reservation near Niagra Falls and the border with Canada in 1980. My audiobook subscription ends the third, and I r...

    It's 1980 and Carson wants to win Battle of the Bands to get a free trip to NYC. But first he needs a band. That's the basic premise of this book, but it's so, so much more than that. Carson is a Tuscarora Indian living on a reservation and at the very beginning of the book his brother...

    This book was a little slow to grab me, but I definitely became very invested in these characters. There's such a mix of stakes at play here--will these teens win their battle of the bands? Will Maggi have sex for the first time with a shady older guy? will white people honor native tr...

    Wow, so this was great. I started to draft a long, largely incoherent love letter to this book, and then I remembered Debbie Reese had this to say about Eric Gansworth's first young-adult novel, If I Ever Get Out of Here: https://americanindiansinchildrenslit... , which is both more au...

    This was a sometimes wonderful, sometimes sad, and sometimes uncomfortable look at the lives of teens on a Native American reservation. I really appreciated Carson's awakening during this story, and his growing interest in activism. He considered himself a ChameleIndian, a Native A...

    Yes! ...

    I had a harder time getting into this one, but ultimately enjoyed it. I liked and cared about both characters. I preferred Maggi's POV chapters to Carson's in the beginning, and then flip-flopped about halfway through and much preferred Carson's. Maggi's relationship with Jim really cr...

    This is a 4.5 for me for many reasons. When I received this ARC of Eric Gansworth's latest offering, I knew that it would land on the top of my to-read pile, but I also knew that I would want to savor it just as I savored his earlier If I Ever Get Out of Here. I had to wait until the w...

    3.5ish stars -- this ended up being a lot less about the "teens start a band" conceit than I thought it would be, which isn't necessarily a bad thing! It's very slice-of-life, focusing on six months in the year 1980. The world feels fully fleshed out and lived-in, with Gansworth not pu...

    I was generally lost a lot when reading this book, and I don't know if I was lost because it took me so long to finish, or it took me a long time to finish because I was so often lost. Who is saying what? What was with that sentence structure? What are they trying to say here? Huh? Who...

    I loved this book! Great characters! Historical fiction set in 1980, very strong feeling of that time in the story, mostly through music. I seem to be drawn to YA that have music plots - there are a lot of them, and this is one of the best! I liked learning about life on their reserv...

    After reading this, I?m ashamed I haven?t read any of Gansworth?s other novels. Give Me Some Truth is masterfully written, with layers upon layers between characters and plot. It?s tough to say what the main story is: our main character?s need for growth that he can?t seem ...

    I was given an advance copy of this book in exchange for an honest review. Gansworth's latest novel follows the formation of a band and their quest to win a Battle of the Bands through the viewpoint of two Native American teens, Carson and Maggi. I liked the distinct voices of these...

    I enjoyed Carson's arc infinitely more than Maggie's. Carson is having a true coming of age experience, deciding what kind of person he wants to be, what issues he'll stand for and against, if he can bear to let people be his true friends, whether he can be a friend in return. I think ...

    diverse teen fiction (Indians living on a reservation near US-Canada border, Niagara Falls) Carson is about 17--a high school senior and Maggi is 15; Carson's story revolves around getting a band together to compete for a prize trip to NY (his ticket off the Rez) and Maggi's story rev...

    I loved the voices of the two narrators in this novel. To me it's always risky to bring two POVs to a novel because they both have to be equally engaging or the reader gets impatient. I never felt that way in this book. The various storylines kept my attention throughout. The character...

    Loved "If I Ever Get Out of Here." Slogged through this, barely. There are plenty of good ingredients here (music-making detail, emotionally intelligent[ish] teen boys, microaggression demonstrations, same great humor), but it's a rambling mess overall. It's hard to see what could be d...

    I'm supposed to be out touristing but I'm in finishing this instead. There's so much to love about this book, from the richness of the voices to the window (for me) aspect to the decision to take Yoko Ono's art seriously (because even in 2018 I hear her name mostly in reference to h...

    Unfortunately I was unable to enjoy this book as much as others. I had to force myself to finish reading it, and I feel bad for even admitting that. Its not that the writing was bad - or even the plot- its just that I couldn't seem to connect with the characters enough to even want t...

    Although it took me a while to get into this book, once I did I was hooked. Loved the characters, well almost all the characters. You?ll know which one I disliked when you read it yourself. Great YA book that is written by an indigenous author! The book would have received five stars...

    It?s helpful to read Gansworth?s other novel, If I Ever Get Out of Here, before this one as the many of the characters and plot lines overlap (even though this is technically not a sequel.) This is my least favorite of the two books, but I enjoyed listening to Gansworth himself nar...

  • Liz
    Nov 12, 2017

    3.5 stars This is a story told in dual POV: the 15-year-old Maggi and the 17-year-old Carson, both native American teens, Tuscarora Nation (#ownvoices), living on a reservation near Niagra Falls and the border with Canada in 1980. My audiobook subscription ends the third, and I r...

    It's 1980 and Carson wants to win Battle of the Bands to get a free trip to NYC. But first he needs a band. That's the basic premise of this book, but it's so, so much more than that. Carson is a Tuscarora Indian living on a reservation and at the very beginning of the book his brother...

    This book was a little slow to grab me, but I definitely became very invested in these characters. There's such a mix of stakes at play here--will these teens win their battle of the bands? Will Maggi have sex for the first time with a shady older guy? will white people honor native tr...

    Wow, so this was great. I started to draft a long, largely incoherent love letter to this book, and then I remembered Debbie Reese had this to say about Eric Gansworth's first young-adult novel, If I Ever Get Out of Here: https://americanindiansinchildrenslit... , which is both more au...

    This was a sometimes wonderful, sometimes sad, and sometimes uncomfortable look at the lives of teens on a Native American reservation. I really appreciated Carson's awakening during this story, and his growing interest in activism. He considered himself a ChameleIndian, a Native A...

    Yes! ...

    I had a harder time getting into this one, but ultimately enjoyed it. I liked and cared about both characters. I preferred Maggi's POV chapters to Carson's in the beginning, and then flip-flopped about halfway through and much preferred Carson's. Maggi's relationship with Jim really cr...

    This is a 4.5 for me for many reasons. When I received this ARC of Eric Gansworth's latest offering, I knew that it would land on the top of my to-read pile, but I also knew that I would want to savor it just as I savored his earlier If I Ever Get Out of Here. I had to wait until the w...

    3.5ish stars -- this ended up being a lot less about the "teens start a band" conceit than I thought it would be, which isn't necessarily a bad thing! It's very slice-of-life, focusing on six months in the year 1980. The world feels fully fleshed out and lived-in, with Gansworth not pu...

    I was generally lost a lot when reading this book, and I don't know if I was lost because it took me so long to finish, or it took me a long time to finish because I was so often lost. Who is saying what? What was with that sentence structure? What are they trying to say here? Huh? Who...

    I loved this book! Great characters! Historical fiction set in 1980, very strong feeling of that time in the story, mostly through music. I seem to be drawn to YA that have music plots - there are a lot of them, and this is one of the best! I liked learning about life on their reserv...

    After reading this, I?m ashamed I haven?t read any of Gansworth?s other novels. Give Me Some Truth is masterfully written, with layers upon layers between characters and plot. It?s tough to say what the main story is: our main character?s need for growth that he can?t seem ...

    I was given an advance copy of this book in exchange for an honest review. Gansworth's latest novel follows the formation of a band and their quest to win a Battle of the Bands through the viewpoint of two Native American teens, Carson and Maggi. I liked the distinct voices of these...

  • Margo
    Jun 22, 2018

    3.5 stars This is a story told in dual POV: the 15-year-old Maggi and the 17-year-old Carson, both native American teens, Tuscarora Nation (#ownvoices), living on a reservation near Niagra Falls and the border with Canada in 1980. My audiobook subscription ends the third, and I r...

    It's 1980 and Carson wants to win Battle of the Bands to get a free trip to NYC. But first he needs a band. That's the basic premise of this book, but it's so, so much more than that. Carson is a Tuscarora Indian living on a reservation and at the very beginning of the book his brother...

    This book was a little slow to grab me, but I definitely became very invested in these characters. There's such a mix of stakes at play here--will these teens win their battle of the bands? Will Maggi have sex for the first time with a shady older guy? will white people honor native tr...

    Wow, so this was great. I started to draft a long, largely incoherent love letter to this book, and then I remembered Debbie Reese had this to say about Eric Gansworth's first young-adult novel, If I Ever Get Out of Here: https://americanindiansinchildrenslit... , which is both more au...

    This was a sometimes wonderful, sometimes sad, and sometimes uncomfortable look at the lives of teens on a Native American reservation. I really appreciated Carson's awakening during this story, and his growing interest in activism. He considered himself a ChameleIndian, a Native A...

    Yes! ...

    I had a harder time getting into this one, but ultimately enjoyed it. I liked and cared about both characters. I preferred Maggi's POV chapters to Carson's in the beginning, and then flip-flopped about halfway through and much preferred Carson's. Maggi's relationship with Jim really cr...

    This is a 4.5 for me for many reasons. When I received this ARC of Eric Gansworth's latest offering, I knew that it would land on the top of my to-read pile, but I also knew that I would want to savor it just as I savored his earlier If I Ever Get Out of Here. I had to wait until the w...

    3.5ish stars -- this ended up being a lot less about the "teens start a band" conceit than I thought it would be, which isn't necessarily a bad thing! It's very slice-of-life, focusing on six months in the year 1980. The world feels fully fleshed out and lived-in, with Gansworth not pu...

    I was generally lost a lot when reading this book, and I don't know if I was lost because it took me so long to finish, or it took me a long time to finish because I was so often lost. Who is saying what? What was with that sentence structure? What are they trying to say here? Huh? Who...

    I loved this book! Great characters! Historical fiction set in 1980, very strong feeling of that time in the story, mostly through music. I seem to be drawn to YA that have music plots - there are a lot of them, and this is one of the best! I liked learning about life on their reserv...

    After reading this, I?m ashamed I haven?t read any of Gansworth?s other novels. Give Me Some Truth is masterfully written, with layers upon layers between characters and plot. It?s tough to say what the main story is: our main character?s need for growth that he can?t seem ...

    I was given an advance copy of this book in exchange for an honest review. Gansworth's latest novel follows the formation of a band and their quest to win a Battle of the Bands through the viewpoint of two Native American teens, Carson and Maggi. I liked the distinct voices of these...

    I enjoyed Carson's arc infinitely more than Maggie's. Carson is having a true coming of age experience, deciding what kind of person he wants to be, what issues he'll stand for and against, if he can bear to let people be his true friends, whether he can be a friend in return. I think ...

    diverse teen fiction (Indians living on a reservation near US-Canada border, Niagara Falls) Carson is about 17--a high school senior and Maggi is 15; Carson's story revolves around getting a band together to compete for a prize trip to NY (his ticket off the Rez) and Maggi's story rev...

    I loved the voices of the two narrators in this novel. To me it's always risky to bring two POVs to a novel because they both have to be equally engaging or the reader gets impatient. I never felt that way in this book. The various storylines kept my attention throughout. The character...

    Loved "If I Ever Get Out of Here." Slogged through this, barely. There are plenty of good ingredients here (music-making detail, emotionally intelligent[ish] teen boys, microaggression demonstrations, same great humor), but it's a rambling mess overall. It's hard to see what could be d...

    I'm supposed to be out touristing but I'm in finishing this instead. There's so much to love about this book, from the richness of the voices to the window (for me) aspect to the decision to take Yoko Ono's art seriously (because even in 2018 I hear her name mostly in reference to h...

    Unfortunately I was unable to enjoy this book as much as others. I had to force myself to finish reading it, and I feel bad for even admitting that. Its not that the writing was bad - or even the plot- its just that I couldn't seem to connect with the characters enough to even want t...

    Although it took me a while to get into this book, once I did I was hooked. Loved the characters, well almost all the characters. You?ll know which one I disliked when you read it yourself. Great YA book that is written by an indigenous author! The book would have received five stars...

    It?s helpful to read Gansworth?s other novel, If I Ever Get Out of Here, before this one as the many of the characters and plot lines overlap (even though this is technically not a sequel.) This is my least favorite of the two books, but I enjoyed listening to Gansworth himself nar...

    I don't know anything about the Beatles, or John Lennon, or Yoko Ono, which is how I know I missed some of the more subtle stuff in this book. It was still incredible, though--well written and emotionally true from start to finish. I loved the dual POV. It fit better and contributed to...

    I'm not entirely sure how I feel about the plot and the main character arcs, as neither really moved the needle for me by the end of the book. But my lukewarm feelings there are more than balanced by the deep, powerful sense of setting Gansworth instills, both in terms of the music, ar...

    "An achingly real and honest look into the lives of teenagers pushed to the margins, creating and loving against life's headwinds. Sometimes hilarious, sometimes heartbreaking, always heartfelt." -- author Jeff Zentner ...

    I received an ARC of this book from the 2017 YALSA Symposium. I got to chapter 7 in this book, but I just couldn't finish it. Initially, it reminded me a bit of The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian, but it quickly lost that feel. It just felt like the story wasn't going a...

    This one was slow going for me. However it is a great book. ...

    This book was a Best of the Best for the month of August 2018, as selected by Stevo's Book Reviews on the Internet. http://forums.delphiforums.com/stevo1... ...

    Every bit as great a read as If I Ever Get Out of Here, with even more substance. Well worth the read. ...

  • Garren
    Jul 12, 2018

    3.5 stars This is a story told in dual POV: the 15-year-old Maggi and the 17-year-old Carson, both native American teens, Tuscarora Nation (#ownvoices), living on a reservation near Niagra Falls and the border with Canada in 1980. My audiobook subscription ends the third, and I r...

    It's 1980 and Carson wants to win Battle of the Bands to get a free trip to NYC. But first he needs a band. That's the basic premise of this book, but it's so, so much more than that. Carson is a Tuscarora Indian living on a reservation and at the very beginning of the book his brother...

    This book was a little slow to grab me, but I definitely became very invested in these characters. There's such a mix of stakes at play here--will these teens win their battle of the bands? Will Maggi have sex for the first time with a shady older guy? will white people honor native tr...

    Wow, so this was great. I started to draft a long, largely incoherent love letter to this book, and then I remembered Debbie Reese had this to say about Eric Gansworth's first young-adult novel, If I Ever Get Out of Here: https://americanindiansinchildrenslit... , which is both more au...

    This was a sometimes wonderful, sometimes sad, and sometimes uncomfortable look at the lives of teens on a Native American reservation. I really appreciated Carson's awakening during this story, and his growing interest in activism. He considered himself a ChameleIndian, a Native A...

    Yes! ...

    I had a harder time getting into this one, but ultimately enjoyed it. I liked and cared about both characters. I preferred Maggi's POV chapters to Carson's in the beginning, and then flip-flopped about halfway through and much preferred Carson's. Maggi's relationship with Jim really cr...

    This is a 4.5 for me for many reasons. When I received this ARC of Eric Gansworth's latest offering, I knew that it would land on the top of my to-read pile, but I also knew that I would want to savor it just as I savored his earlier If I Ever Get Out of Here. I had to wait until the w...

    3.5ish stars -- this ended up being a lot less about the "teens start a band" conceit than I thought it would be, which isn't necessarily a bad thing! It's very slice-of-life, focusing on six months in the year 1980. The world feels fully fleshed out and lived-in, with Gansworth not pu...

    I was generally lost a lot when reading this book, and I don't know if I was lost because it took me so long to finish, or it took me a long time to finish because I was so often lost. Who is saying what? What was with that sentence structure? What are they trying to say here? Huh? Who...

    I loved this book! Great characters! Historical fiction set in 1980, very strong feeling of that time in the story, mostly through music. I seem to be drawn to YA that have music plots - there are a lot of them, and this is one of the best! I liked learning about life on their reserv...

    After reading this, I?m ashamed I haven?t read any of Gansworth?s other novels. Give Me Some Truth is masterfully written, with layers upon layers between characters and plot. It?s tough to say what the main story is: our main character?s need for growth that he can?t seem ...

    I was given an advance copy of this book in exchange for an honest review. Gansworth's latest novel follows the formation of a band and their quest to win a Battle of the Bands through the viewpoint of two Native American teens, Carson and Maggi. I liked the distinct voices of these...

    I enjoyed Carson's arc infinitely more than Maggie's. Carson is having a true coming of age experience, deciding what kind of person he wants to be, what issues he'll stand for and against, if he can bear to let people be his true friends, whether he can be a friend in return. I think ...

    diverse teen fiction (Indians living on a reservation near US-Canada border, Niagara Falls) Carson is about 17--a high school senior and Maggi is 15; Carson's story revolves around getting a band together to compete for a prize trip to NY (his ticket off the Rez) and Maggi's story rev...

    I loved the voices of the two narrators in this novel. To me it's always risky to bring two POVs to a novel because they both have to be equally engaging or the reader gets impatient. I never felt that way in this book. The various storylines kept my attention throughout. The character...

    Loved "If I Ever Get Out of Here." Slogged through this, barely. There are plenty of good ingredients here (music-making detail, emotionally intelligent[ish] teen boys, microaggression demonstrations, same great humor), but it's a rambling mess overall. It's hard to see what could be d...

  • Lauren
    Apr 09, 2018

    3.5 stars This is a story told in dual POV: the 15-year-old Maggi and the 17-year-old Carson, both native American teens, Tuscarora Nation (#ownvoices), living on a reservation near Niagra Falls and the border with Canada in 1980. My audiobook subscription ends the third, and I r...

    It's 1980 and Carson wants to win Battle of the Bands to get a free trip to NYC. But first he needs a band. That's the basic premise of this book, but it's so, so much more than that. Carson is a Tuscarora Indian living on a reservation and at the very beginning of the book his brother...

    This book was a little slow to grab me, but I definitely became very invested in these characters. There's such a mix of stakes at play here--will these teens win their battle of the bands? Will Maggi have sex for the first time with a shady older guy? will white people honor native tr...

    Wow, so this was great. I started to draft a long, largely incoherent love letter to this book, and then I remembered Debbie Reese had this to say about Eric Gansworth's first young-adult novel, If I Ever Get Out of Here: https://americanindiansinchildrenslit... , which is both more au...

    This was a sometimes wonderful, sometimes sad, and sometimes uncomfortable look at the lives of teens on a Native American reservation. I really appreciated Carson's awakening during this story, and his growing interest in activism. He considered himself a ChameleIndian, a Native A...

    Yes! ...

  • Cheryl
    Jul 11, 2018

    3.5 stars This is a story told in dual POV: the 15-year-old Maggi and the 17-year-old Carson, both native American teens, Tuscarora Nation (#ownvoices), living on a reservation near Niagra Falls and the border with Canada in 1980. My audiobook subscription ends the third, and I r...

    It's 1980 and Carson wants to win Battle of the Bands to get a free trip to NYC. But first he needs a band. That's the basic premise of this book, but it's so, so much more than that. Carson is a Tuscarora Indian living on a reservation and at the very beginning of the book his brother...

    This book was a little slow to grab me, but I definitely became very invested in these characters. There's such a mix of stakes at play here--will these teens win their battle of the bands? Will Maggi have sex for the first time with a shady older guy? will white people honor native tr...

    Wow, so this was great. I started to draft a long, largely incoherent love letter to this book, and then I remembered Debbie Reese had this to say about Eric Gansworth's first young-adult novel, If I Ever Get Out of Here: https://americanindiansinchildrenslit... , which is both more au...

    This was a sometimes wonderful, sometimes sad, and sometimes uncomfortable look at the lives of teens on a Native American reservation. I really appreciated Carson's awakening during this story, and his growing interest in activism. He considered himself a ChameleIndian, a Native A...

    Yes! ...

    I had a harder time getting into this one, but ultimately enjoyed it. I liked and cared about both characters. I preferred Maggi's POV chapters to Carson's in the beginning, and then flip-flopped about halfway through and much preferred Carson's. Maggi's relationship with Jim really cr...

    This is a 4.5 for me for many reasons. When I received this ARC of Eric Gansworth's latest offering, I knew that it would land on the top of my to-read pile, but I also knew that I would want to savor it just as I savored his earlier If I Ever Get Out of Here. I had to wait until the w...

    3.5ish stars -- this ended up being a lot less about the "teens start a band" conceit than I thought it would be, which isn't necessarily a bad thing! It's very slice-of-life, focusing on six months in the year 1980. The world feels fully fleshed out and lived-in, with Gansworth not pu...

    I was generally lost a lot when reading this book, and I don't know if I was lost because it took me so long to finish, or it took me a long time to finish because I was so often lost. Who is saying what? What was with that sentence structure? What are they trying to say here? Huh? Who...

    I loved this book! Great characters! Historical fiction set in 1980, very strong feeling of that time in the story, mostly through music. I seem to be drawn to YA that have music plots - there are a lot of them, and this is one of the best! I liked learning about life on their reserv...

    After reading this, I?m ashamed I haven?t read any of Gansworth?s other novels. Give Me Some Truth is masterfully written, with layers upon layers between characters and plot. It?s tough to say what the main story is: our main character?s need for growth that he can?t seem ...

    I was given an advance copy of this book in exchange for an honest review. Gansworth's latest novel follows the formation of a band and their quest to win a Battle of the Bands through the viewpoint of two Native American teens, Carson and Maggi. I liked the distinct voices of these...

    I enjoyed Carson's arc infinitely more than Maggie's. Carson is having a true coming of age experience, deciding what kind of person he wants to be, what issues he'll stand for and against, if he can bear to let people be his true friends, whether he can be a friend in return. I think ...

    diverse teen fiction (Indians living on a reservation near US-Canada border, Niagara Falls) Carson is about 17--a high school senior and Maggi is 15; Carson's story revolves around getting a band together to compete for a prize trip to NY (his ticket off the Rez) and Maggi's story rev...

    I loved the voices of the two narrators in this novel. To me it's always risky to bring two POVs to a novel because they both have to be equally engaging or the reader gets impatient. I never felt that way in this book. The various storylines kept my attention throughout. The character...

    Loved "If I Ever Get Out of Here." Slogged through this, barely. There are plenty of good ingredients here (music-making detail, emotionally intelligent[ish] teen boys, microaggression demonstrations, same great humor), but it's a rambling mess overall. It's hard to see what could be d...

    I'm supposed to be out touristing but I'm in finishing this instead. There's so much to love about this book, from the richness of the voices to the window (for me) aspect to the decision to take Yoko Ono's art seriously (because even in 2018 I hear her name mostly in reference to h...

    Unfortunately I was unable to enjoy this book as much as others. I had to force myself to finish reading it, and I feel bad for even admitting that. Its not that the writing was bad - or even the plot- its just that I couldn't seem to connect with the characters enough to even want t...

    Although it took me a while to get into this book, once I did I was hooked. Loved the characters, well almost all the characters. You?ll know which one I disliked when you read it yourself. Great YA book that is written by an indigenous author! The book would have received five stars...

    It?s helpful to read Gansworth?s other novel, If I Ever Get Out of Here, before this one as the many of the characters and plot lines overlap (even though this is technically not a sequel.) This is my least favorite of the two books, but I enjoyed listening to Gansworth himself nar...

    I don't know anything about the Beatles, or John Lennon, or Yoko Ono, which is how I know I missed some of the more subtle stuff in this book. It was still incredible, though--well written and emotionally true from start to finish. I loved the dual POV. It fit better and contributed to...

    I'm not entirely sure how I feel about the plot and the main character arcs, as neither really moved the needle for me by the end of the book. But my lukewarm feelings there are more than balanced by the deep, powerful sense of setting Gansworth instills, both in terms of the music, ar...

    "An achingly real and honest look into the lives of teenagers pushed to the margins, creating and loving against life's headwinds. Sometimes hilarious, sometimes heartbreaking, always heartfelt." -- author Jeff Zentner ...

    I received an ARC of this book from the 2017 YALSA Symposium. I got to chapter 7 in this book, but I just couldn't finish it. Initially, it reminded me a bit of The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian, but it quickly lost that feel. It just felt like the story wasn't going a...

    This one was slow going for me. However it is a great book. ...

  • Michelle Barker
    Aug 05, 2018

    3.5 stars This is a story told in dual POV: the 15-year-old Maggi and the 17-year-old Carson, both native American teens, Tuscarora Nation (#ownvoices), living on a reservation near Niagra Falls and the border with Canada in 1980. My audiobook subscription ends the third, and I r...

    It's 1980 and Carson wants to win Battle of the Bands to get a free trip to NYC. But first he needs a band. That's the basic premise of this book, but it's so, so much more than that. Carson is a Tuscarora Indian living on a reservation and at the very beginning of the book his brother...

    This book was a little slow to grab me, but I definitely became very invested in these characters. There's such a mix of stakes at play here--will these teens win their battle of the bands? Will Maggi have sex for the first time with a shady older guy? will white people honor native tr...

    Wow, so this was great. I started to draft a long, largely incoherent love letter to this book, and then I remembered Debbie Reese had this to say about Eric Gansworth's first young-adult novel, If I Ever Get Out of Here: https://americanindiansinchildrenslit... , which is both more au...

    This was a sometimes wonderful, sometimes sad, and sometimes uncomfortable look at the lives of teens on a Native American reservation. I really appreciated Carson's awakening during this story, and his growing interest in activism. He considered himself a ChameleIndian, a Native A...

    Yes! ...

    I had a harder time getting into this one, but ultimately enjoyed it. I liked and cared about both characters. I preferred Maggi's POV chapters to Carson's in the beginning, and then flip-flopped about halfway through and much preferred Carson's. Maggi's relationship with Jim really cr...

    This is a 4.5 for me for many reasons. When I received this ARC of Eric Gansworth's latest offering, I knew that it would land on the top of my to-read pile, but I also knew that I would want to savor it just as I savored his earlier If I Ever Get Out of Here. I had to wait until the w...

    3.5ish stars -- this ended up being a lot less about the "teens start a band" conceit than I thought it would be, which isn't necessarily a bad thing! It's very slice-of-life, focusing on six months in the year 1980. The world feels fully fleshed out and lived-in, with Gansworth not pu...

    I was generally lost a lot when reading this book, and I don't know if I was lost because it took me so long to finish, or it took me a long time to finish because I was so often lost. Who is saying what? What was with that sentence structure? What are they trying to say here? Huh? Who...

    I loved this book! Great characters! Historical fiction set in 1980, very strong feeling of that time in the story, mostly through music. I seem to be drawn to YA that have music plots - there are a lot of them, and this is one of the best! I liked learning about life on their reserv...

    After reading this, I?m ashamed I haven?t read any of Gansworth?s other novels. Give Me Some Truth is masterfully written, with layers upon layers between characters and plot. It?s tough to say what the main story is: our main character?s need for growth that he can?t seem ...

    I was given an advance copy of this book in exchange for an honest review. Gansworth's latest novel follows the formation of a band and their quest to win a Battle of the Bands through the viewpoint of two Native American teens, Carson and Maggi. I liked the distinct voices of these...

    I enjoyed Carson's arc infinitely more than Maggie's. Carson is having a true coming of age experience, deciding what kind of person he wants to be, what issues he'll stand for and against, if he can bear to let people be his true friends, whether he can be a friend in return. I think ...

    diverse teen fiction (Indians living on a reservation near US-Canada border, Niagara Falls) Carson is about 17--a high school senior and Maggi is 15; Carson's story revolves around getting a band together to compete for a prize trip to NY (his ticket off the Rez) and Maggi's story rev...

    I loved the voices of the two narrators in this novel. To me it's always risky to bring two POVs to a novel because they both have to be equally engaging or the reader gets impatient. I never felt that way in this book. The various storylines kept my attention throughout. The character...

  • Amanda
    Aug 02, 2018

    3.5 stars This is a story told in dual POV: the 15-year-old Maggi and the 17-year-old Carson, both native American teens, Tuscarora Nation (#ownvoices), living on a reservation near Niagra Falls and the border with Canada in 1980. My audiobook subscription ends the third, and I r...

    It's 1980 and Carson wants to win Battle of the Bands to get a free trip to NYC. But first he needs a band. That's the basic premise of this book, but it's so, so much more than that. Carson is a Tuscarora Indian living on a reservation and at the very beginning of the book his brother...

    This book was a little slow to grab me, but I definitely became very invested in these characters. There's such a mix of stakes at play here--will these teens win their battle of the bands? Will Maggi have sex for the first time with a shady older guy? will white people honor native tr...

    Wow, so this was great. I started to draft a long, largely incoherent love letter to this book, and then I remembered Debbie Reese had this to say about Eric Gansworth's first young-adult novel, If I Ever Get Out of Here: https://americanindiansinchildrenslit... , which is both more au...

    This was a sometimes wonderful, sometimes sad, and sometimes uncomfortable look at the lives of teens on a Native American reservation. I really appreciated Carson's awakening during this story, and his growing interest in activism. He considered himself a ChameleIndian, a Native A...

    Yes! ...

    I had a harder time getting into this one, but ultimately enjoyed it. I liked and cared about both characters. I preferred Maggi's POV chapters to Carson's in the beginning, and then flip-flopped about halfway through and much preferred Carson's. Maggi's relationship with Jim really cr...

    This is a 4.5 for me for many reasons. When I received this ARC of Eric Gansworth's latest offering, I knew that it would land on the top of my to-read pile, but I also knew that I would want to savor it just as I savored his earlier If I Ever Get Out of Here. I had to wait until the w...

    3.5ish stars -- this ended up being a lot less about the "teens start a band" conceit than I thought it would be, which isn't necessarily a bad thing! It's very slice-of-life, focusing on six months in the year 1980. The world feels fully fleshed out and lived-in, with Gansworth not pu...

    I was generally lost a lot when reading this book, and I don't know if I was lost because it took me so long to finish, or it took me a long time to finish because I was so often lost. Who is saying what? What was with that sentence structure? What are they trying to say here? Huh? Who...

    I loved this book! Great characters! Historical fiction set in 1980, very strong feeling of that time in the story, mostly through music. I seem to be drawn to YA that have music plots - there are a lot of them, and this is one of the best! I liked learning about life on their reserv...

    After reading this, I?m ashamed I haven?t read any of Gansworth?s other novels. Give Me Some Truth is masterfully written, with layers upon layers between characters and plot. It?s tough to say what the main story is: our main character?s need for growth that he can?t seem ...

    I was given an advance copy of this book in exchange for an honest review. Gansworth's latest novel follows the formation of a band and their quest to win a Battle of the Bands through the viewpoint of two Native American teens, Carson and Maggi. I liked the distinct voices of these...

    I enjoyed Carson's arc infinitely more than Maggie's. Carson is having a true coming of age experience, deciding what kind of person he wants to be, what issues he'll stand for and against, if he can bear to let people be his true friends, whether he can be a friend in return. I think ...

  • Kelly Koppang
    Jul 04, 2018

    3.5 stars This is a story told in dual POV: the 15-year-old Maggi and the 17-year-old Carson, both native American teens, Tuscarora Nation (#ownvoices), living on a reservation near Niagra Falls and the border with Canada in 1980. My audiobook subscription ends the third, and I r...

    It's 1980 and Carson wants to win Battle of the Bands to get a free trip to NYC. But first he needs a band. That's the basic premise of this book, but it's so, so much more than that. Carson is a Tuscarora Indian living on a reservation and at the very beginning of the book his brother...

    This book was a little slow to grab me, but I definitely became very invested in these characters. There's such a mix of stakes at play here--will these teens win their battle of the bands? Will Maggi have sex for the first time with a shady older guy? will white people honor native tr...

    Wow, so this was great. I started to draft a long, largely incoherent love letter to this book, and then I remembered Debbie Reese had this to say about Eric Gansworth's first young-adult novel, If I Ever Get Out of Here: https://americanindiansinchildrenslit... , which is both more au...

    This was a sometimes wonderful, sometimes sad, and sometimes uncomfortable look at the lives of teens on a Native American reservation. I really appreciated Carson's awakening during this story, and his growing interest in activism. He considered himself a ChameleIndian, a Native A...

    Yes! ...

    I had a harder time getting into this one, but ultimately enjoyed it. I liked and cared about both characters. I preferred Maggi's POV chapters to Carson's in the beginning, and then flip-flopped about halfway through and much preferred Carson's. Maggi's relationship with Jim really cr...

    This is a 4.5 for me for many reasons. When I received this ARC of Eric Gansworth's latest offering, I knew that it would land on the top of my to-read pile, but I also knew that I would want to savor it just as I savored his earlier If I Ever Get Out of Here. I had to wait until the w...

    3.5ish stars -- this ended up being a lot less about the "teens start a band" conceit than I thought it would be, which isn't necessarily a bad thing! It's very slice-of-life, focusing on six months in the year 1980. The world feels fully fleshed out and lived-in, with Gansworth not pu...

    I was generally lost a lot when reading this book, and I don't know if I was lost because it took me so long to finish, or it took me a long time to finish because I was so often lost. Who is saying what? What was with that sentence structure? What are they trying to say here? Huh? Who...

    I loved this book! Great characters! Historical fiction set in 1980, very strong feeling of that time in the story, mostly through music. I seem to be drawn to YA that have music plots - there are a lot of them, and this is one of the best! I liked learning about life on their reserv...

    After reading this, I?m ashamed I haven?t read any of Gansworth?s other novels. Give Me Some Truth is masterfully written, with layers upon layers between characters and plot. It?s tough to say what the main story is: our main character?s need for growth that he can?t seem ...

    I was given an advance copy of this book in exchange for an honest review. Gansworth's latest novel follows the formation of a band and their quest to win a Battle of the Bands through the viewpoint of two Native American teens, Carson and Maggi. I liked the distinct voices of these...

    I enjoyed Carson's arc infinitely more than Maggie's. Carson is having a true coming of age experience, deciding what kind of person he wants to be, what issues he'll stand for and against, if he can bear to let people be his true friends, whether he can be a friend in return. I think ...

    diverse teen fiction (Indians living on a reservation near US-Canada border, Niagara Falls) Carson is about 17--a high school senior and Maggi is 15; Carson's story revolves around getting a band together to compete for a prize trip to NY (his ticket off the Rez) and Maggi's story rev...

    I loved the voices of the two narrators in this novel. To me it's always risky to bring two POVs to a novel because they both have to be equally engaging or the reader gets impatient. I never felt that way in this book. The various storylines kept my attention throughout. The character...

    Loved "If I Ever Get Out of Here." Slogged through this, barely. There are plenty of good ingredients here (music-making detail, emotionally intelligent[ish] teen boys, microaggression demonstrations, same great humor), but it's a rambling mess overall. It's hard to see what could be d...

    I'm supposed to be out touristing but I'm in finishing this instead. There's so much to love about this book, from the richness of the voices to the window (for me) aspect to the decision to take Yoko Ono's art seriously (because even in 2018 I hear her name mostly in reference to h...

    Unfortunately I was unable to enjoy this book as much as others. I had to force myself to finish reading it, and I feel bad for even admitting that. Its not that the writing was bad - or even the plot- its just that I couldn't seem to connect with the characters enough to even want t...

    Although it took me a while to get into this book, once I did I was hooked. Loved the characters, well almost all the characters. You?ll know which one I disliked when you read it yourself. Great YA book that is written by an indigenous author! The book would have received five stars...

    It?s helpful to read Gansworth?s other novel, If I Ever Get Out of Here, before this one as the many of the characters and plot lines overlap (even though this is technically not a sequel.) This is my least favorite of the two books, but I enjoyed listening to Gansworth himself nar...

    I don't know anything about the Beatles, or John Lennon, or Yoko Ono, which is how I know I missed some of the more subtle stuff in this book. It was still incredible, though--well written and emotionally true from start to finish. I loved the dual POV. It fit better and contributed to...

    I'm not entirely sure how I feel about the plot and the main character arcs, as neither really moved the needle for me by the end of the book. But my lukewarm feelings there are more than balanced by the deep, powerful sense of setting Gansworth instills, both in terms of the music, ar...

    "An achingly real and honest look into the lives of teenagers pushed to the margins, creating and loving against life's headwinds. Sometimes hilarious, sometimes heartbreaking, always heartfelt." -- author Jeff Zentner ...

    I received an ARC of this book from the 2017 YALSA Symposium. I got to chapter 7 in this book, but I just couldn't finish it. Initially, it reminded me a bit of The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian, but it quickly lost that feel. It just felt like the story wasn't going a...

    This one was slow going for me. However it is a great book. ...

    This book was a Best of the Best for the month of August 2018, as selected by Stevo's Book Reviews on the Internet. http://forums.delphiforums.com/stevo1... ...

    Every bit as great a read as If I Ever Get Out of Here, with even more substance. Well worth the read. ...

    There is so much to talk about in this epic, character-driven tale. It's one I don't think I will soon forget. I can't wait to read If I Ever Get Out of Here soon! ...

    I'm excited to discuss this book with others - I think there is a LOT to talk about. ...

  • Samantha (WLABB)
    Jul 02, 2018

    3.5 stars This is a story told in dual POV: the 15-year-old Maggi and the 17-year-old Carson, both native American teens, Tuscarora Nation (#ownvoices), living on a reservation near Niagra Falls and the border with Canada in 1980. My audiobook subscription ends the third, and I r...

    It's 1980 and Carson wants to win Battle of the Bands to get a free trip to NYC. But first he needs a band. That's the basic premise of this book, but it's so, so much more than that. Carson is a Tuscarora Indian living on a reservation and at the very beginning of the book his brother...

    This book was a little slow to grab me, but I definitely became very invested in these characters. There's such a mix of stakes at play here--will these teens win their battle of the bands? Will Maggi have sex for the first time with a shady older guy? will white people honor native tr...

    Wow, so this was great. I started to draft a long, largely incoherent love letter to this book, and then I remembered Debbie Reese had this to say about Eric Gansworth's first young-adult novel, If I Ever Get Out of Here: https://americanindiansinchildrenslit... , which is both more au...

    This was a sometimes wonderful, sometimes sad, and sometimes uncomfortable look at the lives of teens on a Native American reservation. I really appreciated Carson's awakening during this story, and his growing interest in activism. He considered himself a ChameleIndian, a Native A...

  • Allison Sirovy
    Jul 29, 2018

    3.5 stars This is a story told in dual POV: the 15-year-old Maggi and the 17-year-old Carson, both native American teens, Tuscarora Nation (#ownvoices), living on a reservation near Niagra Falls and the border with Canada in 1980. My audiobook subscription ends the third, and I r...

    It's 1980 and Carson wants to win Battle of the Bands to get a free trip to NYC. But first he needs a band. That's the basic premise of this book, but it's so, so much more than that. Carson is a Tuscarora Indian living on a reservation and at the very beginning of the book his brother...

    This book was a little slow to grab me, but I definitely became very invested in these characters. There's such a mix of stakes at play here--will these teens win their battle of the bands? Will Maggi have sex for the first time with a shady older guy? will white people honor native tr...

    Wow, so this was great. I started to draft a long, largely incoherent love letter to this book, and then I remembered Debbie Reese had this to say about Eric Gansworth's first young-adult novel, If I Ever Get Out of Here: https://americanindiansinchildrenslit... , which is both more au...

    This was a sometimes wonderful, sometimes sad, and sometimes uncomfortable look at the lives of teens on a Native American reservation. I really appreciated Carson's awakening during this story, and his growing interest in activism. He considered himself a ChameleIndian, a Native A...

    Yes! ...

    I had a harder time getting into this one, but ultimately enjoyed it. I liked and cared about both characters. I preferred Maggi's POV chapters to Carson's in the beginning, and then flip-flopped about halfway through and much preferred Carson's. Maggi's relationship with Jim really cr...

    This is a 4.5 for me for many reasons. When I received this ARC of Eric Gansworth's latest offering, I knew that it would land on the top of my to-read pile, but I also knew that I would want to savor it just as I savored his earlier If I Ever Get Out of Here. I had to wait until the w...

    3.5ish stars -- this ended up being a lot less about the "teens start a band" conceit than I thought it would be, which isn't necessarily a bad thing! It's very slice-of-life, focusing on six months in the year 1980. The world feels fully fleshed out and lived-in, with Gansworth not pu...

    I was generally lost a lot when reading this book, and I don't know if I was lost because it took me so long to finish, or it took me a long time to finish because I was so often lost. Who is saying what? What was with that sentence structure? What are they trying to say here? Huh? Who...

    I loved this book! Great characters! Historical fiction set in 1980, very strong feeling of that time in the story, mostly through music. I seem to be drawn to YA that have music plots - there are a lot of them, and this is one of the best! I liked learning about life on their reserv...

    After reading this, I?m ashamed I haven?t read any of Gansworth?s other novels. Give Me Some Truth is masterfully written, with layers upon layers between characters and plot. It?s tough to say what the main story is: our main character?s need for growth that he can?t seem ...

    I was given an advance copy of this book in exchange for an honest review. Gansworth's latest novel follows the formation of a band and their quest to win a Battle of the Bands through the viewpoint of two Native American teens, Carson and Maggi. I liked the distinct voices of these...

    I enjoyed Carson's arc infinitely more than Maggie's. Carson is having a true coming of age experience, deciding what kind of person he wants to be, what issues he'll stand for and against, if he can bear to let people be his true friends, whether he can be a friend in return. I think ...

    diverse teen fiction (Indians living on a reservation near US-Canada border, Niagara Falls) Carson is about 17--a high school senior and Maggi is 15; Carson's story revolves around getting a band together to compete for a prize trip to NY (his ticket off the Rez) and Maggi's story rev...

    I loved the voices of the two narrators in this novel. To me it's always risky to bring two POVs to a novel because they both have to be equally engaging or the reader gets impatient. I never felt that way in this book. The various storylines kept my attention throughout. The character...

    Loved "If I Ever Get Out of Here." Slogged through this, barely. There are plenty of good ingredients here (music-making detail, emotionally intelligent[ish] teen boys, microaggression demonstrations, same great humor), but it's a rambling mess overall. It's hard to see what could be d...

    I'm supposed to be out touristing but I'm in finishing this instead. There's so much to love about this book, from the richness of the voices to the window (for me) aspect to the decision to take Yoko Ono's art seriously (because even in 2018 I hear her name mostly in reference to h...

    Unfortunately I was unable to enjoy this book as much as others. I had to force myself to finish reading it, and I feel bad for even admitting that. Its not that the writing was bad - or even the plot- its just that I couldn't seem to connect with the characters enough to even want t...

    Although it took me a while to get into this book, once I did I was hooked. Loved the characters, well almost all the characters. You?ll know which one I disliked when you read it yourself. Great YA book that is written by an indigenous author! The book would have received five stars...

  • Stevo Brock
    Aug 02, 2018

    3.5 stars This is a story told in dual POV: the 15-year-old Maggi and the 17-year-old Carson, both native American teens, Tuscarora Nation (#ownvoices), living on a reservation near Niagra Falls and the border with Canada in 1980. My audiobook subscription ends the third, and I r...

    It's 1980 and Carson wants to win Battle of the Bands to get a free trip to NYC. But first he needs a band. That's the basic premise of this book, but it's so, so much more than that. Carson is a Tuscarora Indian living on a reservation and at the very beginning of the book his brother...

    This book was a little slow to grab me, but I definitely became very invested in these characters. There's such a mix of stakes at play here--will these teens win their battle of the bands? Will Maggi have sex for the first time with a shady older guy? will white people honor native tr...

    Wow, so this was great. I started to draft a long, largely incoherent love letter to this book, and then I remembered Debbie Reese had this to say about Eric Gansworth's first young-adult novel, If I Ever Get Out of Here: https://americanindiansinchildrenslit... , which is both more au...

    This was a sometimes wonderful, sometimes sad, and sometimes uncomfortable look at the lives of teens on a Native American reservation. I really appreciated Carson's awakening during this story, and his growing interest in activism. He considered himself a ChameleIndian, a Native A...

    Yes! ...

    I had a harder time getting into this one, but ultimately enjoyed it. I liked and cared about both characters. I preferred Maggi's POV chapters to Carson's in the beginning, and then flip-flopped about halfway through and much preferred Carson's. Maggi's relationship with Jim really cr...

    This is a 4.5 for me for many reasons. When I received this ARC of Eric Gansworth's latest offering, I knew that it would land on the top of my to-read pile, but I also knew that I would want to savor it just as I savored his earlier If I Ever Get Out of Here. I had to wait until the w...

    3.5ish stars -- this ended up being a lot less about the "teens start a band" conceit than I thought it would be, which isn't necessarily a bad thing! It's very slice-of-life, focusing on six months in the year 1980. The world feels fully fleshed out and lived-in, with Gansworth not pu...

    I was generally lost a lot when reading this book, and I don't know if I was lost because it took me so long to finish, or it took me a long time to finish because I was so often lost. Who is saying what? What was with that sentence structure? What are they trying to say here? Huh? Who...

    I loved this book! Great characters! Historical fiction set in 1980, very strong feeling of that time in the story, mostly through music. I seem to be drawn to YA that have music plots - there are a lot of them, and this is one of the best! I liked learning about life on their reserv...

    After reading this, I?m ashamed I haven?t read any of Gansworth?s other novels. Give Me Some Truth is masterfully written, with layers upon layers between characters and plot. It?s tough to say what the main story is: our main character?s need for growth that he can?t seem ...

    I was given an advance copy of this book in exchange for an honest review. Gansworth's latest novel follows the formation of a band and their quest to win a Battle of the Bands through the viewpoint of two Native American teens, Carson and Maggi. I liked the distinct voices of these...

    I enjoyed Carson's arc infinitely more than Maggie's. Carson is having a true coming of age experience, deciding what kind of person he wants to be, what issues he'll stand for and against, if he can bear to let people be his true friends, whether he can be a friend in return. I think ...

    diverse teen fiction (Indians living on a reservation near US-Canada border, Niagara Falls) Carson is about 17--a high school senior and Maggi is 15; Carson's story revolves around getting a band together to compete for a prize trip to NY (his ticket off the Rez) and Maggi's story rev...

    I loved the voices of the two narrators in this novel. To me it's always risky to bring two POVs to a novel because they both have to be equally engaging or the reader gets impatient. I never felt that way in this book. The various storylines kept my attention throughout. The character...

    Loved "If I Ever Get Out of Here." Slogged through this, barely. There are plenty of good ingredients here (music-making detail, emotionally intelligent[ish] teen boys, microaggression demonstrations, same great humor), but it's a rambling mess overall. It's hard to see what could be d...

    I'm supposed to be out touristing but I'm in finishing this instead. There's so much to love about this book, from the richness of the voices to the window (for me) aspect to the decision to take Yoko Ono's art seriously (because even in 2018 I hear her name mostly in reference to h...

    Unfortunately I was unable to enjoy this book as much as others. I had to force myself to finish reading it, and I feel bad for even admitting that. Its not that the writing was bad - or even the plot- its just that I couldn't seem to connect with the characters enough to even want t...

    Although it took me a while to get into this book, once I did I was hooked. Loved the characters, well almost all the characters. You?ll know which one I disliked when you read it yourself. Great YA book that is written by an indigenous author! The book would have received five stars...

    It?s helpful to read Gansworth?s other novel, If I Ever Get Out of Here, before this one as the many of the characters and plot lines overlap (even though this is technically not a sequel.) This is my least favorite of the two books, but I enjoyed listening to Gansworth himself nar...

    I don't know anything about the Beatles, or John Lennon, or Yoko Ono, which is how I know I missed some of the more subtle stuff in this book. It was still incredible, though--well written and emotionally true from start to finish. I loved the dual POV. It fit better and contributed to...

    I'm not entirely sure how I feel about the plot and the main character arcs, as neither really moved the needle for me by the end of the book. But my lukewarm feelings there are more than balanced by the deep, powerful sense of setting Gansworth instills, both in terms of the music, ar...

    "An achingly real and honest look into the lives of teenagers pushed to the margins, creating and loving against life's headwinds. Sometimes hilarious, sometimes heartbreaking, always heartfelt." -- author Jeff Zentner ...

    I received an ARC of this book from the 2017 YALSA Symposium. I got to chapter 7 in this book, but I just couldn't finish it. Initially, it reminded me a bit of The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian, but it quickly lost that feel. It just felt like the story wasn't going a...

    This one was slow going for me. However it is a great book. ...

    This book was a Best of the Best for the month of August 2018, as selected by Stevo's Book Reviews on the Internet. http://forums.delphiforums.com/stevo1... ...

  • Elke (BEroyal)
    Jun 02, 2018

    3.5 stars This is a story told in dual POV: the 15-year-old Maggi and the 17-year-old Carson, both native American teens, Tuscarora Nation (#ownvoices), living on a reservation near Niagra Falls and the border with Canada in 1980. My audiobook subscription ends the third, and I r...