Strange Stars: David Bowie, Pop Music, and the Decade Sci-Fi Exploded

Strange Stars: David Bowie, Pop Music, and the Decade Sci-Fi Exploded

A Hugo Award-winner explores the massive influence that science fiction has had on popular music, particularly on David Bowie and the heady, experimental 1970s scene In the 1960s and 70s old mores and lingering repressions were falling away, replaced with a new kind of hedonistic freedom that included sex, drugs, and rock 'n' roll. Although it didn't factor into the stereot A Hugo Award-winner explores the massive influence that science fiction has had on popular music, particularly on Dav...

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Title:Strange Stars: David Bowie, Pop Music, and the Decade Sci-Fi Exploded
Author:Jason Heller
Rating:
Genres:Music
ISBN:1612196977
Edition Language:English
Format Type:Hardcover
Number of Pages:302 pages pages

Strange Stars: David Bowie, Pop Music, and the Decade Sci-Fi Exploded Reviews

  • Jay Gabler
    Aug 01, 2018

    Great title, great cover, great concept, "meh" content. By the end, I really felt like Heller had had to dig to find artists and songs to support his thesis, relying heavily on the obscure and only vaguely sci-fi-ish. There was also a lack of first-hand research and/or personal intervi...

    Heller uses sci-fi to tie together everything from Sun Ra to Bowie to X-Ray Spex and even some New Romantic stuff from the 80s. It's really all I could ever ask for in a book and possibly the most interesting music book of 2018. ...

    This is fantastic. I was a child in the '70s and I am familiar with much of the music and books Heller discusses (not so much on movies although I do know Star Wars and Star Trek which was more than enough to get me through) so I figured this would be a fun "trip down memory lane,"...

    I enjoyed this book very much, but to me, it was the very definition of a mile wide and an inch deep. Heller tracks down and catalogs what seems to be every one of the hundreds of science fiction themed songs recorded during the 70s and duly notes if they were inspired by any specific ...

    My teenage musical interests tended to be deep and specific. As I read more about 1970s pop music the more I realize that I'm ignorant of so much of it even now. This book filled in some very serious gaps. This book isn't just about songs that literally reference sci fi (though ther...

    it's fun and all, but i can't help but feel that it's just another in a series of books which follow such a particular pattern that certain aspects of it can't help but feel shoehorned in. i really wanted heller to tie bowie in more often to the other things he was discussing, but it s...

    I'm disappointed in a way I have I have criticized others before in other reviews, in so much as I'm wishing this book covered things it doesn't. I did enjoy what is there. It puts forth an interesting premise. But I think it misses things that should have been included: Chariot of th...

    A mind-exploding collection of albums inform this fascinating exploration of the intersection of music and science fiction. Science fiction and music or sound is a woefully under-developed area of written analysis and history, and while a few existing essays, articles, or books (Esh...

    Thanks to Melville House for an advance reading copy of this book. In the acknowledgements to this book the author writes that if not for his editor he would have written an encyclopedia. He nearly did anyway, having created here a comprehensive, sometimes dizzying account of scienc...

    This was a heck of a lot of fun to read. My interest in sci-fi is fairly minimal, but it was delightful to read about how different sci-fi authors and stories and franchises influenced rock music, especially David Bowie - who is the main thread through the book. You better have YouTube...

    Very well researched look at how sci fi influenced and was influenced by pop culture throughout the 1970s. Jason Heller's book reminded me of a wall map of strings, connecting Bowie's Space Oddity to Kubrick's 2001, Sun Ra and afrofuturism, Devo, Kiss, Battlestar Galactica, Michael Jac...

    Throughout most of my life I have been drawn to sci-fi influenced music. So seeing this book was a dream come true. Heller's book is a well researched document about the influence of science fiction in popular music of the 70s. He discusses at length all the usual suspects like Bowie, ...

    Amazing book that not only makes you want to keep reading it, but start diving through old music and breaking out your library card and pick up all those old sci-fi books and settle in for an adventure. This is exactly what Dean Venture must have felt like in "Perchance to Dean" whe...

    This serves as an excellent survey of the fruitful exchange between pop music and science fiction in the 1970s. Heller's thoughtful and thorough research proved the explicit influence the movements had on each other and was illuminating from cover to cover. I highly recommend this for ...

    So... I wanted to like this book more than I did. Thumbs up for being comprehensive, but thumbs down for interest and insight. Long on names of groups, songs, sci-fi books and movies (many of which are repeated several times throughout), but short on broad context and insight. Reads a ...

    Reading this book is like having an intense and thrilling conversation with my favorite geek friends. Heller ties sci-fi music and literature together in a narrative that celebrates both the well known and almost forgotten. Your listening and reading lists will grow. *Review based on A...

    This book might have been more accessible if the chapters were organized thematically rather than chronologically, but obvs I still loved it. I reviewed Strange Stars for The Current. ...

  • Marc
    Jun 13, 2018

    Great title, great cover, great concept, "meh" content. By the end, I really felt like Heller had had to dig to find artists and songs to support his thesis, relying heavily on the obscure and only vaguely sci-fi-ish. There was also a lack of first-hand research and/or personal intervi...

    Heller uses sci-fi to tie together everything from Sun Ra to Bowie to X-Ray Spex and even some New Romantic stuff from the 80s. It's really all I could ever ask for in a book and possibly the most interesting music book of 2018. ...

    This is fantastic. I was a child in the '70s and I am familiar with much of the music and books Heller discusses (not so much on movies although I do know Star Wars and Star Trek which was more than enough to get me through) so I figured this would be a fun "trip down memory lane,"...

    I enjoyed this book very much, but to me, it was the very definition of a mile wide and an inch deep. Heller tracks down and catalogs what seems to be every one of the hundreds of science fiction themed songs recorded during the 70s and duly notes if they were inspired by any specific ...

    My teenage musical interests tended to be deep and specific. As I read more about 1970s pop music the more I realize that I'm ignorant of so much of it even now. This book filled in some very serious gaps. This book isn't just about songs that literally reference sci fi (though ther...

    it's fun and all, but i can't help but feel that it's just another in a series of books which follow such a particular pattern that certain aspects of it can't help but feel shoehorned in. i really wanted heller to tie bowie in more often to the other things he was discussing, but it s...

    I'm disappointed in a way I have I have criticized others before in other reviews, in so much as I'm wishing this book covered things it doesn't. I did enjoy what is there. It puts forth an interesting premise. But I think it misses things that should have been included: Chariot of th...

    A mind-exploding collection of albums inform this fascinating exploration of the intersection of music and science fiction. Science fiction and music or sound is a woefully under-developed area of written analysis and history, and while a few existing essays, articles, or books (Esh...

    Thanks to Melville House for an advance reading copy of this book. In the acknowledgements to this book the author writes that if not for his editor he would have written an encyclopedia. He nearly did anyway, having created here a comprehensive, sometimes dizzying account of scienc...

    This was a heck of a lot of fun to read. My interest in sci-fi is fairly minimal, but it was delightful to read about how different sci-fi authors and stories and franchises influenced rock music, especially David Bowie - who is the main thread through the book. You better have YouTube...

    Very well researched look at how sci fi influenced and was influenced by pop culture throughout the 1970s. Jason Heller's book reminded me of a wall map of strings, connecting Bowie's Space Oddity to Kubrick's 2001, Sun Ra and afrofuturism, Devo, Kiss, Battlestar Galactica, Michael Jac...

    Throughout most of my life I have been drawn to sci-fi influenced music. So seeing this book was a dream come true. Heller's book is a well researched document about the influence of science fiction in popular music of the 70s. He discusses at length all the usual suspects like Bowie, ...

    Amazing book that not only makes you want to keep reading it, but start diving through old music and breaking out your library card and pick up all those old sci-fi books and settle in for an adventure. This is exactly what Dean Venture must have felt like in "Perchance to Dean" whe...

  • Jessica
    Apr 07, 2018

    Great title, great cover, great concept, "meh" content. By the end, I really felt like Heller had had to dig to find artists and songs to support his thesis, relying heavily on the obscure and only vaguely sci-fi-ish. There was also a lack of first-hand research and/or personal intervi...

    Heller uses sci-fi to tie together everything from Sun Ra to Bowie to X-Ray Spex and even some New Romantic stuff from the 80s. It's really all I could ever ask for in a book and possibly the most interesting music book of 2018. ...

    This is fantastic. I was a child in the '70s and I am familiar with much of the music and books Heller discusses (not so much on movies although I do know Star Wars and Star Trek which was more than enough to get me through) so I figured this would be a fun "trip down memory lane,"...

  • Kristianne
    Jun 26, 2018

    Great title, great cover, great concept, "meh" content. By the end, I really felt like Heller had had to dig to find artists and songs to support his thesis, relying heavily on the obscure and only vaguely sci-fi-ish. There was also a lack of first-hand research and/or personal intervi...

    Heller uses sci-fi to tie together everything from Sun Ra to Bowie to X-Ray Spex and even some New Romantic stuff from the 80s. It's really all I could ever ask for in a book and possibly the most interesting music book of 2018. ...

    This is fantastic. I was a child in the '70s and I am familiar with much of the music and books Heller discusses (not so much on movies although I do know Star Wars and Star Trek which was more than enough to get me through) so I figured this would be a fun "trip down memory lane,"...

    I enjoyed this book very much, but to me, it was the very definition of a mile wide and an inch deep. Heller tracks down and catalogs what seems to be every one of the hundreds of science fiction themed songs recorded during the 70s and duly notes if they were inspired by any specific ...

    My teenage musical interests tended to be deep and specific. As I read more about 1970s pop music the more I realize that I'm ignorant of so much of it even now. This book filled in some very serious gaps. This book isn't just about songs that literally reference sci fi (though ther...

    it's fun and all, but i can't help but feel that it's just another in a series of books which follow such a particular pattern that certain aspects of it can't help but feel shoehorned in. i really wanted heller to tie bowie in more often to the other things he was discussing, but it s...

    I'm disappointed in a way I have I have criticized others before in other reviews, in so much as I'm wishing this book covered things it doesn't. I did enjoy what is there. It puts forth an interesting premise. But I think it misses things that should have been included: Chariot of th...

    A mind-exploding collection of albums inform this fascinating exploration of the intersection of music and science fiction. Science fiction and music or sound is a woefully under-developed area of written analysis and history, and while a few existing essays, articles, or books (Esh...

    Thanks to Melville House for an advance reading copy of this book. In the acknowledgements to this book the author writes that if not for his editor he would have written an encyclopedia. He nearly did anyway, having created here a comprehensive, sometimes dizzying account of scienc...

    This was a heck of a lot of fun to read. My interest in sci-fi is fairly minimal, but it was delightful to read about how different sci-fi authors and stories and franchises influenced rock music, especially David Bowie - who is the main thread through the book. You better have YouTube...

    Very well researched look at how sci fi influenced and was influenced by pop culture throughout the 1970s. Jason Heller's book reminded me of a wall map of strings, connecting Bowie's Space Oddity to Kubrick's 2001, Sun Ra and afrofuturism, Devo, Kiss, Battlestar Galactica, Michael Jac...

    Throughout most of my life I have been drawn to sci-fi influenced music. So seeing this book was a dream come true. Heller's book is a well researched document about the influence of science fiction in popular music of the 70s. He discusses at length all the usual suspects like Bowie, ...

    Amazing book that not only makes you want to keep reading it, but start diving through old music and breaking out your library card and pick up all those old sci-fi books and settle in for an adventure. This is exactly what Dean Venture must have felt like in "Perchance to Dean" whe...

    This serves as an excellent survey of the fruitful exchange between pop music and science fiction in the 1970s. Heller's thoughtful and thorough research proved the explicit influence the movements had on each other and was illuminating from cover to cover. I highly recommend this for ...

    So... I wanted to like this book more than I did. Thumbs up for being comprehensive, but thumbs down for interest and insight. Long on names of groups, songs, sci-fi books and movies (many of which are repeated several times throughout), but short on broad context and insight. Reads a ...

    Reading this book is like having an intense and thrilling conversation with my favorite geek friends. Heller ties sci-fi music and literature together in a narrative that celebrates both the well known and almost forgotten. Your listening and reading lists will grow. *Review based on A...

    This book might have been more accessible if the chapters were organized thematically rather than chronologically, but obvs I still loved it. I reviewed Strange Stars for The Current. ...

    I'm actually doing a paid review for a local publication so you'll have to wait... But it's good. I'll post a link when the review goes live. ...

    An exhaustive (and sometimes exhausting) chronicle of the synergy between science fiction and pop music in the 70s. A fascinating nostalgia trip, yet probably different for every generation. ...

    Detailed and vastly interesting, it tends to read more like an extended encyclopedia entry than an actual exploration, but that does not in anyway take away from the quantity of spectacular information. This book itself could (should?) be an entire course in 70?s science fiction cult...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    From 'Stardust' in Shelf Awareness for Readers "The scarcity of science fiction titles on David Bowie's list of 100 favorite books is notable because, from lyrics to stage personalities and film roles, it's apparent that speculative fiction inspired the musician. That influence, on Bo...

  • Jason
    Jun 02, 2018

    Great title, great cover, great concept, "meh" content. By the end, I really felt like Heller had had to dig to find artists and songs to support his thesis, relying heavily on the obscure and only vaguely sci-fi-ish. There was also a lack of first-hand research and/or personal intervi...

    Heller uses sci-fi to tie together everything from Sun Ra to Bowie to X-Ray Spex and even some New Romantic stuff from the 80s. It's really all I could ever ask for in a book and possibly the most interesting music book of 2018. ...

    This is fantastic. I was a child in the '70s and I am familiar with much of the music and books Heller discusses (not so much on movies although I do know Star Wars and Star Trek which was more than enough to get me through) so I figured this would be a fun "trip down memory lane,"...

    I enjoyed this book very much, but to me, it was the very definition of a mile wide and an inch deep. Heller tracks down and catalogs what seems to be every one of the hundreds of science fiction themed songs recorded during the 70s and duly notes if they were inspired by any specific ...

    My teenage musical interests tended to be deep and specific. As I read more about 1970s pop music the more I realize that I'm ignorant of so much of it even now. This book filled in some very serious gaps. This book isn't just about songs that literally reference sci fi (though ther...

    it's fun and all, but i can't help but feel that it's just another in a series of books which follow such a particular pattern that certain aspects of it can't help but feel shoehorned in. i really wanted heller to tie bowie in more often to the other things he was discussing, but it s...

    I'm disappointed in a way I have I have criticized others before in other reviews, in so much as I'm wishing this book covered things it doesn't. I did enjoy what is there. It puts forth an interesting premise. But I think it misses things that should have been included: Chariot of th...

    A mind-exploding collection of albums inform this fascinating exploration of the intersection of music and science fiction. Science fiction and music or sound is a woefully under-developed area of written analysis and history, and while a few existing essays, articles, or books (Esh...

    Thanks to Melville House for an advance reading copy of this book. In the acknowledgements to this book the author writes that if not for his editor he would have written an encyclopedia. He nearly did anyway, having created here a comprehensive, sometimes dizzying account of scienc...

    This was a heck of a lot of fun to read. My interest in sci-fi is fairly minimal, but it was delightful to read about how different sci-fi authors and stories and franchises influenced rock music, especially David Bowie - who is the main thread through the book. You better have YouTube...

    Very well researched look at how sci fi influenced and was influenced by pop culture throughout the 1970s. Jason Heller's book reminded me of a wall map of strings, connecting Bowie's Space Oddity to Kubrick's 2001, Sun Ra and afrofuturism, Devo, Kiss, Battlestar Galactica, Michael Jac...

    Throughout most of my life I have been drawn to sci-fi influenced music. So seeing this book was a dream come true. Heller's book is a well researched document about the influence of science fiction in popular music of the 70s. He discusses at length all the usual suspects like Bowie, ...

    Amazing book that not only makes you want to keep reading it, but start diving through old music and breaking out your library card and pick up all those old sci-fi books and settle in for an adventure. This is exactly what Dean Venture must have felt like in "Perchance to Dean" whe...

    This serves as an excellent survey of the fruitful exchange between pop music and science fiction in the 1970s. Heller's thoughtful and thorough research proved the explicit influence the movements had on each other and was illuminating from cover to cover. I highly recommend this for ...

    So... I wanted to like this book more than I did. Thumbs up for being comprehensive, but thumbs down for interest and insight. Long on names of groups, songs, sci-fi books and movies (many of which are repeated several times throughout), but short on broad context and insight. Reads a ...

    Reading this book is like having an intense and thrilling conversation with my favorite geek friends. Heller ties sci-fi music and literature together in a narrative that celebrates both the well known and almost forgotten. Your listening and reading lists will grow. *Review based on A...

    This book might have been more accessible if the chapters were organized thematically rather than chronologically, but obvs I still loved it. I reviewed Strange Stars for The Current. ...

    I'm actually doing a paid review for a local publication so you'll have to wait... But it's good. I'll post a link when the review goes live. ...

    An exhaustive (and sometimes exhausting) chronicle of the synergy between science fiction and pop music in the 70s. A fascinating nostalgia trip, yet probably different for every generation. ...

    Detailed and vastly interesting, it tends to read more like an extended encyclopedia entry than an actual exploration, but that does not in anyway take away from the quantity of spectacular information. This book itself could (should?) be an entire course in 70?s science fiction cult...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    From 'Stardust' in Shelf Awareness for Readers "The scarcity of science fiction titles on David Bowie's list of 100 favorite books is notable because, from lyrics to stage personalities and film roles, it's apparent that speculative fiction inspired the musician. That influence, on Bo...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

  • Karin Kross
    Jun 06, 2018

    Great title, great cover, great concept, "meh" content. By the end, I really felt like Heller had had to dig to find artists and songs to support his thesis, relying heavily on the obscure and only vaguely sci-fi-ish. There was also a lack of first-hand research and/or personal intervi...

    Heller uses sci-fi to tie together everything from Sun Ra to Bowie to X-Ray Spex and even some New Romantic stuff from the 80s. It's really all I could ever ask for in a book and possibly the most interesting music book of 2018. ...

    This is fantastic. I was a child in the '70s and I am familiar with much of the music and books Heller discusses (not so much on movies although I do know Star Wars and Star Trek which was more than enough to get me through) so I figured this would be a fun "trip down memory lane,"...

    I enjoyed this book very much, but to me, it was the very definition of a mile wide and an inch deep. Heller tracks down and catalogs what seems to be every one of the hundreds of science fiction themed songs recorded during the 70s and duly notes if they were inspired by any specific ...

    My teenage musical interests tended to be deep and specific. As I read more about 1970s pop music the more I realize that I'm ignorant of so much of it even now. This book filled in some very serious gaps. This book isn't just about songs that literally reference sci fi (though ther...

    it's fun and all, but i can't help but feel that it's just another in a series of books which follow such a particular pattern that certain aspects of it can't help but feel shoehorned in. i really wanted heller to tie bowie in more often to the other things he was discussing, but it s...

    I'm disappointed in a way I have I have criticized others before in other reviews, in so much as I'm wishing this book covered things it doesn't. I did enjoy what is there. It puts forth an interesting premise. But I think it misses things that should have been included: Chariot of th...

    A mind-exploding collection of albums inform this fascinating exploration of the intersection of music and science fiction. Science fiction and music or sound is a woefully under-developed area of written analysis and history, and while a few existing essays, articles, or books (Esh...

    Thanks to Melville House for an advance reading copy of this book. In the acknowledgements to this book the author writes that if not for his editor he would have written an encyclopedia. He nearly did anyway, having created here a comprehensive, sometimes dizzying account of scienc...

    This was a heck of a lot of fun to read. My interest in sci-fi is fairly minimal, but it was delightful to read about how different sci-fi authors and stories and franchises influenced rock music, especially David Bowie - who is the main thread through the book. You better have YouTube...

    Very well researched look at how sci fi influenced and was influenced by pop culture throughout the 1970s. Jason Heller's book reminded me of a wall map of strings, connecting Bowie's Space Oddity to Kubrick's 2001, Sun Ra and afrofuturism, Devo, Kiss, Battlestar Galactica, Michael Jac...

    Throughout most of my life I have been drawn to sci-fi influenced music. So seeing this book was a dream come true. Heller's book is a well researched document about the influence of science fiction in popular music of the 70s. He discusses at length all the usual suspects like Bowie, ...

    Amazing book that not only makes you want to keep reading it, but start diving through old music and breaking out your library card and pick up all those old sci-fi books and settle in for an adventure. This is exactly what Dean Venture must have felt like in "Perchance to Dean" whe...

    This serves as an excellent survey of the fruitful exchange between pop music and science fiction in the 1970s. Heller's thoughtful and thorough research proved the explicit influence the movements had on each other and was illuminating from cover to cover. I highly recommend this for ...

    So... I wanted to like this book more than I did. Thumbs up for being comprehensive, but thumbs down for interest and insight. Long on names of groups, songs, sci-fi books and movies (many of which are repeated several times throughout), but short on broad context and insight. Reads a ...

    Reading this book is like having an intense and thrilling conversation with my favorite geek friends. Heller ties sci-fi music and literature together in a narrative that celebrates both the well known and almost forgotten. Your listening and reading lists will grow. *Review based on A...

    This book might have been more accessible if the chapters were organized thematically rather than chronologically, but obvs I still loved it. I reviewed Strange Stars for The Current. ...

    I'm actually doing a paid review for a local publication so you'll have to wait... But it's good. I'll post a link when the review goes live. ...

    An exhaustive (and sometimes exhausting) chronicle of the synergy between science fiction and pop music in the 70s. A fascinating nostalgia trip, yet probably different for every generation. ...

    Detailed and vastly interesting, it tends to read more like an extended encyclopedia entry than an actual exploration, but that does not in anyway take away from the quantity of spectacular information. This book itself could (should?) be an entire course in 70?s science fiction cult...

    ...

    ...

  • Casciato
    Mar 09, 2018

    Great title, great cover, great concept, "meh" content. By the end, I really felt like Heller had had to dig to find artists and songs to support his thesis, relying heavily on the obscure and only vaguely sci-fi-ish. There was also a lack of first-hand research and/or personal intervi...

    Heller uses sci-fi to tie together everything from Sun Ra to Bowie to X-Ray Spex and even some New Romantic stuff from the 80s. It's really all I could ever ask for in a book and possibly the most interesting music book of 2018. ...

    This is fantastic. I was a child in the '70s and I am familiar with much of the music and books Heller discusses (not so much on movies although I do know Star Wars and Star Trek which was more than enough to get me through) so I figured this would be a fun "trip down memory lane,"...

    I enjoyed this book very much, but to me, it was the very definition of a mile wide and an inch deep. Heller tracks down and catalogs what seems to be every one of the hundreds of science fiction themed songs recorded during the 70s and duly notes if they were inspired by any specific ...

    My teenage musical interests tended to be deep and specific. As I read more about 1970s pop music the more I realize that I'm ignorant of so much of it even now. This book filled in some very serious gaps. This book isn't just about songs that literally reference sci fi (though ther...

    it's fun and all, but i can't help but feel that it's just another in a series of books which follow such a particular pattern that certain aspects of it can't help but feel shoehorned in. i really wanted heller to tie bowie in more often to the other things he was discussing, but it s...

    I'm disappointed in a way I have I have criticized others before in other reviews, in so much as I'm wishing this book covered things it doesn't. I did enjoy what is there. It puts forth an interesting premise. But I think it misses things that should have been included: Chariot of th...

    A mind-exploding collection of albums inform this fascinating exploration of the intersection of music and science fiction. Science fiction and music or sound is a woefully under-developed area of written analysis and history, and while a few existing essays, articles, or books (Esh...

    Thanks to Melville House for an advance reading copy of this book. In the acknowledgements to this book the author writes that if not for his editor he would have written an encyclopedia. He nearly did anyway, having created here a comprehensive, sometimes dizzying account of scienc...

    This was a heck of a lot of fun to read. My interest in sci-fi is fairly minimal, but it was delightful to read about how different sci-fi authors and stories and franchises influenced rock music, especially David Bowie - who is the main thread through the book. You better have YouTube...

    Very well researched look at how sci fi influenced and was influenced by pop culture throughout the 1970s. Jason Heller's book reminded me of a wall map of strings, connecting Bowie's Space Oddity to Kubrick's 2001, Sun Ra and afrofuturism, Devo, Kiss, Battlestar Galactica, Michael Jac...

    Throughout most of my life I have been drawn to sci-fi influenced music. So seeing this book was a dream come true. Heller's book is a well researched document about the influence of science fiction in popular music of the 70s. He discusses at length all the usual suspects like Bowie, ...

    Amazing book that not only makes you want to keep reading it, but start diving through old music and breaking out your library card and pick up all those old sci-fi books and settle in for an adventure. This is exactly what Dean Venture must have felt like in "Perchance to Dean" whe...

    This serves as an excellent survey of the fruitful exchange between pop music and science fiction in the 1970s. Heller's thoughtful and thorough research proved the explicit influence the movements had on each other and was illuminating from cover to cover. I highly recommend this for ...

    So... I wanted to like this book more than I did. Thumbs up for being comprehensive, but thumbs down for interest and insight. Long on names of groups, songs, sci-fi books and movies (many of which are repeated several times throughout), but short on broad context and insight. Reads a ...

    Reading this book is like having an intense and thrilling conversation with my favorite geek friends. Heller ties sci-fi music and literature together in a narrative that celebrates both the well known and almost forgotten. Your listening and reading lists will grow. *Review based on A...

    This book might have been more accessible if the chapters were organized thematically rather than chronologically, but obvs I still loved it. I reviewed Strange Stars for The Current. ...

    I'm actually doing a paid review for a local publication so you'll have to wait... But it's good. I'll post a link when the review goes live. ...

  • Allison Thurman
    Aug 11, 2018

    Great title, great cover, great concept, "meh" content. By the end, I really felt like Heller had had to dig to find artists and songs to support his thesis, relying heavily on the obscure and only vaguely sci-fi-ish. There was also a lack of first-hand research and/or personal intervi...

    Heller uses sci-fi to tie together everything from Sun Ra to Bowie to X-Ray Spex and even some New Romantic stuff from the 80s. It's really all I could ever ask for in a book and possibly the most interesting music book of 2018. ...

    This is fantastic. I was a child in the '70s and I am familiar with much of the music and books Heller discusses (not so much on movies although I do know Star Wars and Star Trek which was more than enough to get me through) so I figured this would be a fun "trip down memory lane,"...

    I enjoyed this book very much, but to me, it was the very definition of a mile wide and an inch deep. Heller tracks down and catalogs what seems to be every one of the hundreds of science fiction themed songs recorded during the 70s and duly notes if they were inspired by any specific ...

    My teenage musical interests tended to be deep and specific. As I read more about 1970s pop music the more I realize that I'm ignorant of so much of it even now. This book filled in some very serious gaps. This book isn't just about songs that literally reference sci fi (though ther...

  • Billie
    Mar 05, 2018

    Great title, great cover, great concept, "meh" content. By the end, I really felt like Heller had had to dig to find artists and songs to support his thesis, relying heavily on the obscure and only vaguely sci-fi-ish. There was also a lack of first-hand research and/or personal intervi...

  • Jason Diamond
    Apr 18, 2018

    Great title, great cover, great concept, "meh" content. By the end, I really felt like Heller had had to dig to find artists and songs to support his thesis, relying heavily on the obscure and only vaguely sci-fi-ish. There was also a lack of first-hand research and/or personal intervi...

    Heller uses sci-fi to tie together everything from Sun Ra to Bowie to X-Ray Spex and even some New Romantic stuff from the 80s. It's really all I could ever ask for in a book and possibly the most interesting music book of 2018. ...

  • Lee Barry
    Jun 25, 2018

    Great title, great cover, great concept, "meh" content. By the end, I really felt like Heller had had to dig to find artists and songs to support his thesis, relying heavily on the obscure and only vaguely sci-fi-ish. There was also a lack of first-hand research and/or personal intervi...

    Heller uses sci-fi to tie together everything from Sun Ra to Bowie to X-Ray Spex and even some New Romantic stuff from the 80s. It's really all I could ever ask for in a book and possibly the most interesting music book of 2018. ...

    This is fantastic. I was a child in the '70s and I am familiar with much of the music and books Heller discusses (not so much on movies although I do know Star Wars and Star Trek which was more than enough to get me through) so I figured this would be a fun "trip down memory lane,"...

    I enjoyed this book very much, but to me, it was the very definition of a mile wide and an inch deep. Heller tracks down and catalogs what seems to be every one of the hundreds of science fiction themed songs recorded during the 70s and duly notes if they were inspired by any specific ...

    My teenage musical interests tended to be deep and specific. As I read more about 1970s pop music the more I realize that I'm ignorant of so much of it even now. This book filled in some very serious gaps. This book isn't just about songs that literally reference sci fi (though ther...

    it's fun and all, but i can't help but feel that it's just another in a series of books which follow such a particular pattern that certain aspects of it can't help but feel shoehorned in. i really wanted heller to tie bowie in more often to the other things he was discussing, but it s...

    I'm disappointed in a way I have I have criticized others before in other reviews, in so much as I'm wishing this book covered things it doesn't. I did enjoy what is there. It puts forth an interesting premise. But I think it misses things that should have been included: Chariot of th...

    A mind-exploding collection of albums inform this fascinating exploration of the intersection of music and science fiction. Science fiction and music or sound is a woefully under-developed area of written analysis and history, and while a few existing essays, articles, or books (Esh...

    Thanks to Melville House for an advance reading copy of this book. In the acknowledgements to this book the author writes that if not for his editor he would have written an encyclopedia. He nearly did anyway, having created here a comprehensive, sometimes dizzying account of scienc...

    This was a heck of a lot of fun to read. My interest in sci-fi is fairly minimal, but it was delightful to read about how different sci-fi authors and stories and franchises influenced rock music, especially David Bowie - who is the main thread through the book. You better have YouTube...

    Very well researched look at how sci fi influenced and was influenced by pop culture throughout the 1970s. Jason Heller's book reminded me of a wall map of strings, connecting Bowie's Space Oddity to Kubrick's 2001, Sun Ra and afrofuturism, Devo, Kiss, Battlestar Galactica, Michael Jac...

    Throughout most of my life I have been drawn to sci-fi influenced music. So seeing this book was a dream come true. Heller's book is a well researched document about the influence of science fiction in popular music of the 70s. He discusses at length all the usual suspects like Bowie, ...

    Amazing book that not only makes you want to keep reading it, but start diving through old music and breaking out your library card and pick up all those old sci-fi books and settle in for an adventure. This is exactly what Dean Venture must have felt like in "Perchance to Dean" whe...

    This serves as an excellent survey of the fruitful exchange between pop music and science fiction in the 1970s. Heller's thoughtful and thorough research proved the explicit influence the movements had on each other and was illuminating from cover to cover. I highly recommend this for ...

    So... I wanted to like this book more than I did. Thumbs up for being comprehensive, but thumbs down for interest and insight. Long on names of groups, songs, sci-fi books and movies (many of which are repeated several times throughout), but short on broad context and insight. Reads a ...

    Reading this book is like having an intense and thrilling conversation with my favorite geek friends. Heller ties sci-fi music and literature together in a narrative that celebrates both the well known and almost forgotten. Your listening and reading lists will grow. *Review based on A...

    This book might have been more accessible if the chapters were organized thematically rather than chronologically, but obvs I still loved it. I reviewed Strange Stars for The Current. ...

    I'm actually doing a paid review for a local publication so you'll have to wait... But it's good. I'll post a link when the review goes live. ...

    An exhaustive (and sometimes exhausting) chronicle of the synergy between science fiction and pop music in the 70s. A fascinating nostalgia trip, yet probably different for every generation. ...

  • Amanda Mae
    Mar 30, 2018

    Great title, great cover, great concept, "meh" content. By the end, I really felt like Heller had had to dig to find artists and songs to support his thesis, relying heavily on the obscure and only vaguely sci-fi-ish. There was also a lack of first-hand research and/or personal intervi...

    Heller uses sci-fi to tie together everything from Sun Ra to Bowie to X-Ray Spex and even some New Romantic stuff from the 80s. It's really all I could ever ask for in a book and possibly the most interesting music book of 2018. ...

    This is fantastic. I was a child in the '70s and I am familiar with much of the music and books Heller discusses (not so much on movies although I do know Star Wars and Star Trek which was more than enough to get me through) so I figured this would be a fun "trip down memory lane,"...

    I enjoyed this book very much, but to me, it was the very definition of a mile wide and an inch deep. Heller tracks down and catalogs what seems to be every one of the hundreds of science fiction themed songs recorded during the 70s and duly notes if they were inspired by any specific ...

    My teenage musical interests tended to be deep and specific. As I read more about 1970s pop music the more I realize that I'm ignorant of so much of it even now. This book filled in some very serious gaps. This book isn't just about songs that literally reference sci fi (though ther...

    it's fun and all, but i can't help but feel that it's just another in a series of books which follow such a particular pattern that certain aspects of it can't help but feel shoehorned in. i really wanted heller to tie bowie in more often to the other things he was discussing, but it s...

    I'm disappointed in a way I have I have criticized others before in other reviews, in so much as I'm wishing this book covered things it doesn't. I did enjoy what is there. It puts forth an interesting premise. But I think it misses things that should have been included: Chariot of th...

    A mind-exploding collection of albums inform this fascinating exploration of the intersection of music and science fiction. Science fiction and music or sound is a woefully under-developed area of written analysis and history, and while a few existing essays, articles, or books (Esh...

    Thanks to Melville House for an advance reading copy of this book. In the acknowledgements to this book the author writes that if not for his editor he would have written an encyclopedia. He nearly did anyway, having created here a comprehensive, sometimes dizzying account of scienc...

    This was a heck of a lot of fun to read. My interest in sci-fi is fairly minimal, but it was delightful to read about how different sci-fi authors and stories and franchises influenced rock music, especially David Bowie - who is the main thread through the book. You better have YouTube...

  • Stacey
    Jun 20, 2018

    Great title, great cover, great concept, "meh" content. By the end, I really felt like Heller had had to dig to find artists and songs to support his thesis, relying heavily on the obscure and only vaguely sci-fi-ish. There was also a lack of first-hand research and/or personal intervi...

    Heller uses sci-fi to tie together everything from Sun Ra to Bowie to X-Ray Spex and even some New Romantic stuff from the 80s. It's really all I could ever ask for in a book and possibly the most interesting music book of 2018. ...

    This is fantastic. I was a child in the '70s and I am familiar with much of the music and books Heller discusses (not so much on movies although I do know Star Wars and Star Trek which was more than enough to get me through) so I figured this would be a fun "trip down memory lane,"...

    I enjoyed this book very much, but to me, it was the very definition of a mile wide and an inch deep. Heller tracks down and catalogs what seems to be every one of the hundreds of science fiction themed songs recorded during the 70s and duly notes if they were inspired by any specific ...

    My teenage musical interests tended to be deep and specific. As I read more about 1970s pop music the more I realize that I'm ignorant of so much of it even now. This book filled in some very serious gaps. This book isn't just about songs that literally reference sci fi (though ther...

    it's fun and all, but i can't help but feel that it's just another in a series of books which follow such a particular pattern that certain aspects of it can't help but feel shoehorned in. i really wanted heller to tie bowie in more often to the other things he was discussing, but it s...

    I'm disappointed in a way I have I have criticized others before in other reviews, in so much as I'm wishing this book covered things it doesn't. I did enjoy what is there. It puts forth an interesting premise. But I think it misses things that should have been included: Chariot of th...

    A mind-exploding collection of albums inform this fascinating exploration of the intersection of music and science fiction. Science fiction and music or sound is a woefully under-developed area of written analysis and history, and while a few existing essays, articles, or books (Esh...

    Thanks to Melville House for an advance reading copy of this book. In the acknowledgements to this book the author writes that if not for his editor he would have written an encyclopedia. He nearly did anyway, having created here a comprehensive, sometimes dizzying account of scienc...

    This was a heck of a lot of fun to read. My interest in sci-fi is fairly minimal, but it was delightful to read about how different sci-fi authors and stories and franchises influenced rock music, especially David Bowie - who is the main thread through the book. You better have YouTube...

    Very well researched look at how sci fi influenced and was influenced by pop culture throughout the 1970s. Jason Heller's book reminded me of a wall map of strings, connecting Bowie's Space Oddity to Kubrick's 2001, Sun Ra and afrofuturism, Devo, Kiss, Battlestar Galactica, Michael Jac...

    Throughout most of my life I have been drawn to sci-fi influenced music. So seeing this book was a dream come true. Heller's book is a well researched document about the influence of science fiction in popular music of the 70s. He discusses at length all the usual suspects like Bowie, ...

    Amazing book that not only makes you want to keep reading it, but start diving through old music and breaking out your library card and pick up all those old sci-fi books and settle in for an adventure. This is exactly what Dean Venture must have felt like in "Perchance to Dean" whe...

    This serves as an excellent survey of the fruitful exchange between pop music and science fiction in the 1970s. Heller's thoughtful and thorough research proved the explicit influence the movements had on each other and was illuminating from cover to cover. I highly recommend this for ...

    So... I wanted to like this book more than I did. Thumbs up for being comprehensive, but thumbs down for interest and insight. Long on names of groups, songs, sci-fi books and movies (many of which are repeated several times throughout), but short on broad context and insight. Reads a ...

    Reading this book is like having an intense and thrilling conversation with my favorite geek friends. Heller ties sci-fi music and literature together in a narrative that celebrates both the well known and almost forgotten. Your listening and reading lists will grow. *Review based on A...

  • Brad
    Jun 22, 2018

    Great title, great cover, great concept, "meh" content. By the end, I really felt like Heller had had to dig to find artists and songs to support his thesis, relying heavily on the obscure and only vaguely sci-fi-ish. There was also a lack of first-hand research and/or personal intervi...

    Heller uses sci-fi to tie together everything from Sun Ra to Bowie to X-Ray Spex and even some New Romantic stuff from the 80s. It's really all I could ever ask for in a book and possibly the most interesting music book of 2018. ...

    This is fantastic. I was a child in the '70s and I am familiar with much of the music and books Heller discusses (not so much on movies although I do know Star Wars and Star Trek which was more than enough to get me through) so I figured this would be a fun "trip down memory lane,"...

    I enjoyed this book very much, but to me, it was the very definition of a mile wide and an inch deep. Heller tracks down and catalogs what seems to be every one of the hundreds of science fiction themed songs recorded during the 70s and duly notes if they were inspired by any specific ...

  • J
    Jul 27, 2018

    Great title, great cover, great concept, "meh" content. By the end, I really felt like Heller had had to dig to find artists and songs to support his thesis, relying heavily on the obscure and only vaguely sci-fi-ish. There was also a lack of first-hand research and/or personal intervi...

    Heller uses sci-fi to tie together everything from Sun Ra to Bowie to X-Ray Spex and even some New Romantic stuff from the 80s. It's really all I could ever ask for in a book and possibly the most interesting music book of 2018. ...

    This is fantastic. I was a child in the '70s and I am familiar with much of the music and books Heller discusses (not so much on movies although I do know Star Wars and Star Trek which was more than enough to get me through) so I figured this would be a fun "trip down memory lane,"...

    I enjoyed this book very much, but to me, it was the very definition of a mile wide and an inch deep. Heller tracks down and catalogs what seems to be every one of the hundreds of science fiction themed songs recorded during the 70s and duly notes if they were inspired by any specific ...

    My teenage musical interests tended to be deep and specific. As I read more about 1970s pop music the more I realize that I'm ignorant of so much of it even now. This book filled in some very serious gaps. This book isn't just about songs that literally reference sci fi (though ther...

    it's fun and all, but i can't help but feel that it's just another in a series of books which follow such a particular pattern that certain aspects of it can't help but feel shoehorned in. i really wanted heller to tie bowie in more often to the other things he was discussing, but it s...

    I'm disappointed in a way I have I have criticized others before in other reviews, in so much as I'm wishing this book covered things it doesn't. I did enjoy what is there. It puts forth an interesting premise. But I think it misses things that should have been included: Chariot of th...

    A mind-exploding collection of albums inform this fascinating exploration of the intersection of music and science fiction. Science fiction and music or sound is a woefully under-developed area of written analysis and history, and while a few existing essays, articles, or books (Esh...

    Thanks to Melville House for an advance reading copy of this book. In the acknowledgements to this book the author writes that if not for his editor he would have written an encyclopedia. He nearly did anyway, having created here a comprehensive, sometimes dizzying account of scienc...

    This was a heck of a lot of fun to read. My interest in sci-fi is fairly minimal, but it was delightful to read about how different sci-fi authors and stories and franchises influenced rock music, especially David Bowie - who is the main thread through the book. You better have YouTube...

    Very well researched look at how sci fi influenced and was influenced by pop culture throughout the 1970s. Jason Heller's book reminded me of a wall map of strings, connecting Bowie's Space Oddity to Kubrick's 2001, Sun Ra and afrofuturism, Devo, Kiss, Battlestar Galactica, Michael Jac...

    Throughout most of my life I have been drawn to sci-fi influenced music. So seeing this book was a dream come true. Heller's book is a well researched document about the influence of science fiction in popular music of the 70s. He discusses at length all the usual suspects like Bowie, ...

    Amazing book that not only makes you want to keep reading it, but start diving through old music and breaking out your library card and pick up all those old sci-fi books and settle in for an adventure. This is exactly what Dean Venture must have felt like in "Perchance to Dean" whe...

    This serves as an excellent survey of the fruitful exchange between pop music and science fiction in the 1970s. Heller's thoughtful and thorough research proved the explicit influence the movements had on each other and was illuminating from cover to cover. I highly recommend this for ...

    So... I wanted to like this book more than I did. Thumbs up for being comprehensive, but thumbs down for interest and insight. Long on names of groups, songs, sci-fi books and movies (many of which are repeated several times throughout), but short on broad context and insight. Reads a ...

    Reading this book is like having an intense and thrilling conversation with my favorite geek friends. Heller ties sci-fi music and literature together in a narrative that celebrates both the well known and almost forgotten. Your listening and reading lists will grow. *Review based on A...

    This book might have been more accessible if the chapters were organized thematically rather than chronologically, but obvs I still loved it. I reviewed Strange Stars for The Current. ...

    I'm actually doing a paid review for a local publication so you'll have to wait... But it's good. I'll post a link when the review goes live. ...

    An exhaustive (and sometimes exhausting) chronicle of the synergy between science fiction and pop music in the 70s. A fascinating nostalgia trip, yet probably different for every generation. ...

    Detailed and vastly interesting, it tends to read more like an extended encyclopedia entry than an actual exploration, but that does not in anyway take away from the quantity of spectacular information. This book itself could (should?) be an entire course in 70?s science fiction cult...

    ...

    ...

    ...

  • Erik Carl son
    Jul 23, 2018

    Great title, great cover, great concept, "meh" content. By the end, I really felt like Heller had had to dig to find artists and songs to support his thesis, relying heavily on the obscure and only vaguely sci-fi-ish. There was also a lack of first-hand research and/or personal intervi...

    Heller uses sci-fi to tie together everything from Sun Ra to Bowie to X-Ray Spex and even some New Romantic stuff from the 80s. It's really all I could ever ask for in a book and possibly the most interesting music book of 2018. ...

    This is fantastic. I was a child in the '70s and I am familiar with much of the music and books Heller discusses (not so much on movies although I do know Star Wars and Star Trek which was more than enough to get me through) so I figured this would be a fun "trip down memory lane,"...

    I enjoyed this book very much, but to me, it was the very definition of a mile wide and an inch deep. Heller tracks down and catalogs what seems to be every one of the hundreds of science fiction themed songs recorded during the 70s and duly notes if they were inspired by any specific ...

    My teenage musical interests tended to be deep and specific. As I read more about 1970s pop music the more I realize that I'm ignorant of so much of it even now. This book filled in some very serious gaps. This book isn't just about songs that literally reference sci fi (though ther...

    it's fun and all, but i can't help but feel that it's just another in a series of books which follow such a particular pattern that certain aspects of it can't help but feel shoehorned in. i really wanted heller to tie bowie in more often to the other things he was discussing, but it s...

    I'm disappointed in a way I have I have criticized others before in other reviews, in so much as I'm wishing this book covered things it doesn't. I did enjoy what is there. It puts forth an interesting premise. But I think it misses things that should have been included: Chariot of th...

    A mind-exploding collection of albums inform this fascinating exploration of the intersection of music and science fiction. Science fiction and music or sound is a woefully under-developed area of written analysis and history, and while a few existing essays, articles, or books (Esh...

    Thanks to Melville House for an advance reading copy of this book. In the acknowledgements to this book the author writes that if not for his editor he would have written an encyclopedia. He nearly did anyway, having created here a comprehensive, sometimes dizzying account of scienc...

    This was a heck of a lot of fun to read. My interest in sci-fi is fairly minimal, but it was delightful to read about how different sci-fi authors and stories and franchises influenced rock music, especially David Bowie - who is the main thread through the book. You better have YouTube...

    Very well researched look at how sci fi influenced and was influenced by pop culture throughout the 1970s. Jason Heller's book reminded me of a wall map of strings, connecting Bowie's Space Oddity to Kubrick's 2001, Sun Ra and afrofuturism, Devo, Kiss, Battlestar Galactica, Michael Jac...

    Throughout most of my life I have been drawn to sci-fi influenced music. So seeing this book was a dream come true. Heller's book is a well researched document about the influence of science fiction in popular music of the 70s. He discusses at length all the usual suspects like Bowie, ...

    Amazing book that not only makes you want to keep reading it, but start diving through old music and breaking out your library card and pick up all those old sci-fi books and settle in for an adventure. This is exactly what Dean Venture must have felt like in "Perchance to Dean" whe...

    This serves as an excellent survey of the fruitful exchange between pop music and science fiction in the 1970s. Heller's thoughtful and thorough research proved the explicit influence the movements had on each other and was illuminating from cover to cover. I highly recommend this for ...

    So... I wanted to like this book more than I did. Thumbs up for being comprehensive, but thumbs down for interest and insight. Long on names of groups, songs, sci-fi books and movies (many of which are repeated several times throughout), but short on broad context and insight. Reads a ...

    Reading this book is like having an intense and thrilling conversation with my favorite geek friends. Heller ties sci-fi music and literature together in a narrative that celebrates both the well known and almost forgotten. Your listening and reading lists will grow. *Review based on A...

    This book might have been more accessible if the chapters were organized thematically rather than chronologically, but obvs I still loved it. I reviewed Strange Stars for The Current. ...

    I'm actually doing a paid review for a local publication so you'll have to wait... But it's good. I'll post a link when the review goes live. ...

    An exhaustive (and sometimes exhausting) chronicle of the synergy between science fiction and pop music in the 70s. A fascinating nostalgia trip, yet probably different for every generation. ...

    Detailed and vastly interesting, it tends to read more like an extended encyclopedia entry than an actual exploration, but that does not in anyway take away from the quantity of spectacular information. This book itself could (should?) be an entire course in 70?s science fiction cult...

  • Deke
    Jul 16, 2018

    Great title, great cover, great concept, "meh" content. By the end, I really felt like Heller had had to dig to find artists and songs to support his thesis, relying heavily on the obscure and only vaguely sci-fi-ish. There was also a lack of first-hand research and/or personal intervi...

    Heller uses sci-fi to tie together everything from Sun Ra to Bowie to X-Ray Spex and even some New Romantic stuff from the 80s. It's really all I could ever ask for in a book and possibly the most interesting music book of 2018. ...

    This is fantastic. I was a child in the '70s and I am familiar with much of the music and books Heller discusses (not so much on movies although I do know Star Wars and Star Trek which was more than enough to get me through) so I figured this would be a fun "trip down memory lane,"...

    I enjoyed this book very much, but to me, it was the very definition of a mile wide and an inch deep. Heller tracks down and catalogs what seems to be every one of the hundreds of science fiction themed songs recorded during the 70s and duly notes if they were inspired by any specific ...

    My teenage musical interests tended to be deep and specific. As I read more about 1970s pop music the more I realize that I'm ignorant of so much of it even now. This book filled in some very serious gaps. This book isn't just about songs that literally reference sci fi (though ther...

    it's fun and all, but i can't help but feel that it's just another in a series of books which follow such a particular pattern that certain aspects of it can't help but feel shoehorned in. i really wanted heller to tie bowie in more often to the other things he was discussing, but it s...

    I'm disappointed in a way I have I have criticized others before in other reviews, in so much as I'm wishing this book covered things it doesn't. I did enjoy what is there. It puts forth an interesting premise. But I think it misses things that should have been included: Chariot of th...

    A mind-exploding collection of albums inform this fascinating exploration of the intersection of music and science fiction. Science fiction and music or sound is a woefully under-developed area of written analysis and history, and while a few existing essays, articles, or books (Esh...

    Thanks to Melville House for an advance reading copy of this book. In the acknowledgements to this book the author writes that if not for his editor he would have written an encyclopedia. He nearly did anyway, having created here a comprehensive, sometimes dizzying account of scienc...

    This was a heck of a lot of fun to read. My interest in sci-fi is fairly minimal, but it was delightful to read about how different sci-fi authors and stories and franchises influenced rock music, especially David Bowie - who is the main thread through the book. You better have YouTube...

    Very well researched look at how sci fi influenced and was influenced by pop culture throughout the 1970s. Jason Heller's book reminded me of a wall map of strings, connecting Bowie's Space Oddity to Kubrick's 2001, Sun Ra and afrofuturism, Devo, Kiss, Battlestar Galactica, Michael Jac...

    Throughout most of my life I have been drawn to sci-fi influenced music. So seeing this book was a dream come true. Heller's book is a well researched document about the influence of science fiction in popular music of the 70s. He discusses at length all the usual suspects like Bowie, ...

    Amazing book that not only makes you want to keep reading it, but start diving through old music and breaking out your library card and pick up all those old sci-fi books and settle in for an adventure. This is exactly what Dean Venture must have felt like in "Perchance to Dean" whe...

    This serves as an excellent survey of the fruitful exchange between pop music and science fiction in the 1970s. Heller's thoughtful and thorough research proved the explicit influence the movements had on each other and was illuminating from cover to cover. I highly recommend this for ...

    So... I wanted to like this book more than I did. Thumbs up for being comprehensive, but thumbs down for interest and insight. Long on names of groups, songs, sci-fi books and movies (many of which are repeated several times throughout), but short on broad context and insight. Reads a ...

  • Jason Mock
    Jul 26, 2018

    Great title, great cover, great concept, "meh" content. By the end, I really felt like Heller had had to dig to find artists and songs to support his thesis, relying heavily on the obscure and only vaguely sci-fi-ish. There was also a lack of first-hand research and/or personal intervi...

    Heller uses sci-fi to tie together everything from Sun Ra to Bowie to X-Ray Spex and even some New Romantic stuff from the 80s. It's really all I could ever ask for in a book and possibly the most interesting music book of 2018. ...

    This is fantastic. I was a child in the '70s and I am familiar with much of the music and books Heller discusses (not so much on movies although I do know Star Wars and Star Trek which was more than enough to get me through) so I figured this would be a fun "trip down memory lane,"...

    I enjoyed this book very much, but to me, it was the very definition of a mile wide and an inch deep. Heller tracks down and catalogs what seems to be every one of the hundreds of science fiction themed songs recorded during the 70s and duly notes if they were inspired by any specific ...

    My teenage musical interests tended to be deep and specific. As I read more about 1970s pop music the more I realize that I'm ignorant of so much of it even now. This book filled in some very serious gaps. This book isn't just about songs that literally reference sci fi (though ther...

    it's fun and all, but i can't help but feel that it's just another in a series of books which follow such a particular pattern that certain aspects of it can't help but feel shoehorned in. i really wanted heller to tie bowie in more often to the other things he was discussing, but it s...

    I'm disappointed in a way I have I have criticized others before in other reviews, in so much as I'm wishing this book covered things it doesn't. I did enjoy what is there. It puts forth an interesting premise. But I think it misses things that should have been included: Chariot of th...

    A mind-exploding collection of albums inform this fascinating exploration of the intersection of music and science fiction. Science fiction and music or sound is a woefully under-developed area of written analysis and history, and while a few existing essays, articles, or books (Esh...

    Thanks to Melville House for an advance reading copy of this book. In the acknowledgements to this book the author writes that if not for his editor he would have written an encyclopedia. He nearly did anyway, having created here a comprehensive, sometimes dizzying account of scienc...

    This was a heck of a lot of fun to read. My interest in sci-fi is fairly minimal, but it was delightful to read about how different sci-fi authors and stories and franchises influenced rock music, especially David Bowie - who is the main thread through the book. You better have YouTube...

    Very well researched look at how sci fi influenced and was influenced by pop culture throughout the 1970s. Jason Heller's book reminded me of a wall map of strings, connecting Bowie's Space Oddity to Kubrick's 2001, Sun Ra and afrofuturism, Devo, Kiss, Battlestar Galactica, Michael Jac...

    Throughout most of my life I have been drawn to sci-fi influenced music. So seeing this book was a dream come true. Heller's book is a well researched document about the influence of science fiction in popular music of the 70s. He discusses at length all the usual suspects like Bowie, ...

    Amazing book that not only makes you want to keep reading it, but start diving through old music and breaking out your library card and pick up all those old sci-fi books and settle in for an adventure. This is exactly what Dean Venture must have felt like in "Perchance to Dean" whe...

    This serves as an excellent survey of the fruitful exchange between pop music and science fiction in the 1970s. Heller's thoughtful and thorough research proved the explicit influence the movements had on each other and was illuminating from cover to cover. I highly recommend this for ...

    So... I wanted to like this book more than I did. Thumbs up for being comprehensive, but thumbs down for interest and insight. Long on names of groups, songs, sci-fi books and movies (many of which are repeated several times throughout), but short on broad context and insight. Reads a ...

    Reading this book is like having an intense and thrilling conversation with my favorite geek friends. Heller ties sci-fi music and literature together in a narrative that celebrates both the well known and almost forgotten. Your listening and reading lists will grow. *Review based on A...

    This book might have been more accessible if the chapters were organized thematically rather than chronologically, but obvs I still loved it. I reviewed Strange Stars for The Current. ...

    I'm actually doing a paid review for a local publication so you'll have to wait... But it's good. I'll post a link when the review goes live. ...

    An exhaustive (and sometimes exhausting) chronicle of the synergy between science fiction and pop music in the 70s. A fascinating nostalgia trip, yet probably different for every generation. ...

    Detailed and vastly interesting, it tends to read more like an extended encyclopedia entry than an actual exploration, but that does not in anyway take away from the quantity of spectacular information. This book itself could (should?) be an entire course in 70?s science fiction cult...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    From 'Stardust' in Shelf Awareness for Readers "The scarcity of science fiction titles on David Bowie's list of 100 favorite books is notable because, from lyrics to stage personalities and film roles, it's apparent that speculative fiction inspired the musician. That influence, on Bo...

    ...

    ...

  • Jason
    Apr 03, 2018

    Great title, great cover, great concept, "meh" content. By the end, I really felt like Heller had had to dig to find artists and songs to support his thesis, relying heavily on the obscure and only vaguely sci-fi-ish. There was also a lack of first-hand research and/or personal intervi...

    Heller uses sci-fi to tie together everything from Sun Ra to Bowie to X-Ray Spex and even some New Romantic stuff from the 80s. It's really all I could ever ask for in a book and possibly the most interesting music book of 2018. ...

    This is fantastic. I was a child in the '70s and I am familiar with much of the music and books Heller discusses (not so much on movies although I do know Star Wars and Star Trek which was more than enough to get me through) so I figured this would be a fun "trip down memory lane,"...

    I enjoyed this book very much, but to me, it was the very definition of a mile wide and an inch deep. Heller tracks down and catalogs what seems to be every one of the hundreds of science fiction themed songs recorded during the 70s and duly notes if they were inspired by any specific ...

    My teenage musical interests tended to be deep and specific. As I read more about 1970s pop music the more I realize that I'm ignorant of so much of it even now. This book filled in some very serious gaps. This book isn't just about songs that literally reference sci fi (though ther...

    it's fun and all, but i can't help but feel that it's just another in a series of books which follow such a particular pattern that certain aspects of it can't help but feel shoehorned in. i really wanted heller to tie bowie in more often to the other things he was discussing, but it s...

    I'm disappointed in a way I have I have criticized others before in other reviews, in so much as I'm wishing this book covered things it doesn't. I did enjoy what is there. It puts forth an interesting premise. But I think it misses things that should have been included: Chariot of th...

    A mind-exploding collection of albums inform this fascinating exploration of the intersection of music and science fiction. Science fiction and music or sound is a woefully under-developed area of written analysis and history, and while a few existing essays, articles, or books (Esh...

    Thanks to Melville House for an advance reading copy of this book. In the acknowledgements to this book the author writes that if not for his editor he would have written an encyclopedia. He nearly did anyway, having created here a comprehensive, sometimes dizzying account of scienc...

  • Stephen Shapiro
    Aug 15, 2018

    Great title, great cover, great concept, "meh" content. By the end, I really felt like Heller had had to dig to find artists and songs to support his thesis, relying heavily on the obscure and only vaguely sci-fi-ish. There was also a lack of first-hand research and/or personal intervi...

    Heller uses sci-fi to tie together everything from Sun Ra to Bowie to X-Ray Spex and even some New Romantic stuff from the 80s. It's really all I could ever ask for in a book and possibly the most interesting music book of 2018. ...

    This is fantastic. I was a child in the '70s and I am familiar with much of the music and books Heller discusses (not so much on movies although I do know Star Wars and Star Trek which was more than enough to get me through) so I figured this would be a fun "trip down memory lane,"...

    I enjoyed this book very much, but to me, it was the very definition of a mile wide and an inch deep. Heller tracks down and catalogs what seems to be every one of the hundreds of science fiction themed songs recorded during the 70s and duly notes if they were inspired by any specific ...

    My teenage musical interests tended to be deep and specific. As I read more about 1970s pop music the more I realize that I'm ignorant of so much of it even now. This book filled in some very serious gaps. This book isn't just about songs that literally reference sci fi (though ther...

    it's fun and all, but i can't help but feel that it's just another in a series of books which follow such a particular pattern that certain aspects of it can't help but feel shoehorned in. i really wanted heller to tie bowie in more often to the other things he was discussing, but it s...

    I'm disappointed in a way I have I have criticized others before in other reviews, in so much as I'm wishing this book covered things it doesn't. I did enjoy what is there. It puts forth an interesting premise. But I think it misses things that should have been included: Chariot of th...

    A mind-exploding collection of albums inform this fascinating exploration of the intersection of music and science fiction. Science fiction and music or sound is a woefully under-developed area of written analysis and history, and while a few existing essays, articles, or books (Esh...

    Thanks to Melville House for an advance reading copy of this book. In the acknowledgements to this book the author writes that if not for his editor he would have written an encyclopedia. He nearly did anyway, having created here a comprehensive, sometimes dizzying account of scienc...

    This was a heck of a lot of fun to read. My interest in sci-fi is fairly minimal, but it was delightful to read about how different sci-fi authors and stories and franchises influenced rock music, especially David Bowie - who is the main thread through the book. You better have YouTube...

    Very well researched look at how sci fi influenced and was influenced by pop culture throughout the 1970s. Jason Heller's book reminded me of a wall map of strings, connecting Bowie's Space Oddity to Kubrick's 2001, Sun Ra and afrofuturism, Devo, Kiss, Battlestar Galactica, Michael Jac...

    Throughout most of my life I have been drawn to sci-fi influenced music. So seeing this book was a dream come true. Heller's book is a well researched document about the influence of science fiction in popular music of the 70s. He discusses at length all the usual suspects like Bowie, ...

    Amazing book that not only makes you want to keep reading it, but start diving through old music and breaking out your library card and pick up all those old sci-fi books and settle in for an adventure. This is exactly what Dean Venture must have felt like in "Perchance to Dean" whe...

    This serves as an excellent survey of the fruitful exchange between pop music and science fiction in the 1970s. Heller's thoughtful and thorough research proved the explicit influence the movements had on each other and was illuminating from cover to cover. I highly recommend this for ...

    So... I wanted to like this book more than I did. Thumbs up for being comprehensive, but thumbs down for interest and insight. Long on names of groups, songs, sci-fi books and movies (many of which are repeated several times throughout), but short on broad context and insight. Reads a ...

    Reading this book is like having an intense and thrilling conversation with my favorite geek friends. Heller ties sci-fi music and literature together in a narrative that celebrates both the well known and almost forgotten. Your listening and reading lists will grow. *Review based on A...

    This book might have been more accessible if the chapters were organized thematically rather than chronologically, but obvs I still loved it. I reviewed Strange Stars for The Current. ...

    I'm actually doing a paid review for a local publication so you'll have to wait... But it's good. I'll post a link when the review goes live. ...

    An exhaustive (and sometimes exhausting) chronicle of the synergy between science fiction and pop music in the 70s. A fascinating nostalgia trip, yet probably different for every generation. ...

    Detailed and vastly interesting, it tends to read more like an extended encyclopedia entry than an actual exploration, but that does not in anyway take away from the quantity of spectacular information. This book itself could (should?) be an entire course in 70?s science fiction cult...

    ...

  • Ian Abrahams
    Jul 21, 2018

    Great title, great cover, great concept, "meh" content. By the end, I really felt like Heller had had to dig to find artists and songs to support his thesis, relying heavily on the obscure and only vaguely sci-fi-ish. There was also a lack of first-hand research and/or personal intervi...

    Heller uses sci-fi to tie together everything from Sun Ra to Bowie to X-Ray Spex and even some New Romantic stuff from the 80s. It's really all I could ever ask for in a book and possibly the most interesting music book of 2018. ...

    This is fantastic. I was a child in the '70s and I am familiar with much of the music and books Heller discusses (not so much on movies although I do know Star Wars and Star Trek which was more than enough to get me through) so I figured this would be a fun "trip down memory lane,"...

    I enjoyed this book very much, but to me, it was the very definition of a mile wide and an inch deep. Heller tracks down and catalogs what seems to be every one of the hundreds of science fiction themed songs recorded during the 70s and duly notes if they were inspired by any specific ...

    My teenage musical interests tended to be deep and specific. As I read more about 1970s pop music the more I realize that I'm ignorant of so much of it even now. This book filled in some very serious gaps. This book isn't just about songs that literally reference sci fi (though ther...

    it's fun and all, but i can't help but feel that it's just another in a series of books which follow such a particular pattern that certain aspects of it can't help but feel shoehorned in. i really wanted heller to tie bowie in more often to the other things he was discussing, but it s...

    I'm disappointed in a way I have I have criticized others before in other reviews, in so much as I'm wishing this book covered things it doesn't. I did enjoy what is there. It puts forth an interesting premise. But I think it misses things that should have been included: Chariot of th...

    A mind-exploding collection of albums inform this fascinating exploration of the intersection of music and science fiction. Science fiction and music or sound is a woefully under-developed area of written analysis and history, and while a few existing essays, articles, or books (Esh...

    Thanks to Melville House for an advance reading copy of this book. In the acknowledgements to this book the author writes that if not for his editor he would have written an encyclopedia. He nearly did anyway, having created here a comprehensive, sometimes dizzying account of scienc...

    This was a heck of a lot of fun to read. My interest in sci-fi is fairly minimal, but it was delightful to read about how different sci-fi authors and stories and franchises influenced rock music, especially David Bowie - who is the main thread through the book. You better have YouTube...

    Very well researched look at how sci fi influenced and was influenced by pop culture throughout the 1970s. Jason Heller's book reminded me of a wall map of strings, connecting Bowie's Space Oddity to Kubrick's 2001, Sun Ra and afrofuturism, Devo, Kiss, Battlestar Galactica, Michael Jac...

    Throughout most of my life I have been drawn to sci-fi influenced music. So seeing this book was a dream come true. Heller's book is a well researched document about the influence of science fiction in popular music of the 70s. He discusses at length all the usual suspects like Bowie, ...

    Amazing book that not only makes you want to keep reading it, but start diving through old music and breaking out your library card and pick up all those old sci-fi books and settle in for an adventure. This is exactly what Dean Venture must have felt like in "Perchance to Dean" whe...

    This serves as an excellent survey of the fruitful exchange between pop music and science fiction in the 1970s. Heller's thoughtful and thorough research proved the explicit influence the movements had on each other and was illuminating from cover to cover. I highly recommend this for ...

    So... I wanted to like this book more than I did. Thumbs up for being comprehensive, but thumbs down for interest and insight. Long on names of groups, songs, sci-fi books and movies (many of which are repeated several times throughout), but short on broad context and insight. Reads a ...

    Reading this book is like having an intense and thrilling conversation with my favorite geek friends. Heller ties sci-fi music and literature together in a narrative that celebrates both the well known and almost forgotten. Your listening and reading lists will grow. *Review based on A...

    This book might have been more accessible if the chapters were organized thematically rather than chronologically, but obvs I still loved it. I reviewed Strange Stars for The Current. ...

    I'm actually doing a paid review for a local publication so you'll have to wait... But it's good. I'll post a link when the review goes live. ...

    An exhaustive (and sometimes exhausting) chronicle of the synergy between science fiction and pop music in the 70s. A fascinating nostalgia trip, yet probably different for every generation. ...

    Detailed and vastly interesting, it tends to read more like an extended encyclopedia entry than an actual exploration, but that does not in anyway take away from the quantity of spectacular information. This book itself could (should?) be an entire course in 70?s science fiction cult...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    From 'Stardust' in Shelf Awareness for Readers "The scarcity of science fiction titles on David Bowie's list of 100 favorite books is notable because, from lyrics to stage personalities and film roles, it's apparent that speculative fiction inspired the musician. That influence, on Bo...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

  • Todd Glaeser
    Jul 26, 2018

    Great title, great cover, great concept, "meh" content. By the end, I really felt like Heller had had to dig to find artists and songs to support his thesis, relying heavily on the obscure and only vaguely sci-fi-ish. There was also a lack of first-hand research and/or personal intervi...

    Heller uses sci-fi to tie together everything from Sun Ra to Bowie to X-Ray Spex and even some New Romantic stuff from the 80s. It's really all I could ever ask for in a book and possibly the most interesting music book of 2018. ...

    This is fantastic. I was a child in the '70s and I am familiar with much of the music and books Heller discusses (not so much on movies although I do know Star Wars and Star Trek which was more than enough to get me through) so I figured this would be a fun "trip down memory lane,"...

    I enjoyed this book very much, but to me, it was the very definition of a mile wide and an inch deep. Heller tracks down and catalogs what seems to be every one of the hundreds of science fiction themed songs recorded during the 70s and duly notes if they were inspired by any specific ...

    My teenage musical interests tended to be deep and specific. As I read more about 1970s pop music the more I realize that I'm ignorant of so much of it even now. This book filled in some very serious gaps. This book isn't just about songs that literally reference sci fi (though ther...

    it's fun and all, but i can't help but feel that it's just another in a series of books which follow such a particular pattern that certain aspects of it can't help but feel shoehorned in. i really wanted heller to tie bowie in more often to the other things he was discussing, but it s...

    I'm disappointed in a way I have I have criticized others before in other reviews, in so much as I'm wishing this book covered things it doesn't. I did enjoy what is there. It puts forth an interesting premise. But I think it misses things that should have been included: Chariot of th...

  • Bob Proehl
    Jun 07, 2018

    Great title, great cover, great concept, "meh" content. By the end, I really felt like Heller had had to dig to find artists and songs to support his thesis, relying heavily on the obscure and only vaguely sci-fi-ish. There was also a lack of first-hand research and/or personal intervi...

    Heller uses sci-fi to tie together everything from Sun Ra to Bowie to X-Ray Spex and even some New Romantic stuff from the 80s. It's really all I could ever ask for in a book and possibly the most interesting music book of 2018. ...

    This is fantastic. I was a child in the '70s and I am familiar with much of the music and books Heller discusses (not so much on movies although I do know Star Wars and Star Trek which was more than enough to get me through) so I figured this would be a fun "trip down memory lane,"...

    I enjoyed this book very much, but to me, it was the very definition of a mile wide and an inch deep. Heller tracks down and catalogs what seems to be every one of the hundreds of science fiction themed songs recorded during the 70s and duly notes if they were inspired by any specific ...

    My teenage musical interests tended to be deep and specific. As I read more about 1970s pop music the more I realize that I'm ignorant of so much of it even now. This book filled in some very serious gaps. This book isn't just about songs that literally reference sci fi (though ther...

    it's fun and all, but i can't help but feel that it's just another in a series of books which follow such a particular pattern that certain aspects of it can't help but feel shoehorned in. i really wanted heller to tie bowie in more often to the other things he was discussing, but it s...

    I'm disappointed in a way I have I have criticized others before in other reviews, in so much as I'm wishing this book covered things it doesn't. I did enjoy what is there. It puts forth an interesting premise. But I think it misses things that should have been included: Chariot of th...

    A mind-exploding collection of albums inform this fascinating exploration of the intersection of music and science fiction. Science fiction and music or sound is a woefully under-developed area of written analysis and history, and while a few existing essays, articles, or books (Esh...

    Thanks to Melville House for an advance reading copy of this book. In the acknowledgements to this book the author writes that if not for his editor he would have written an encyclopedia. He nearly did anyway, having created here a comprehensive, sometimes dizzying account of scienc...

    This was a heck of a lot of fun to read. My interest in sci-fi is fairly minimal, but it was delightful to read about how different sci-fi authors and stories and franchises influenced rock music, especially David Bowie - who is the main thread through the book. You better have YouTube...

    Very well researched look at how sci fi influenced and was influenced by pop culture throughout the 1970s. Jason Heller's book reminded me of a wall map of strings, connecting Bowie's Space Oddity to Kubrick's 2001, Sun Ra and afrofuturism, Devo, Kiss, Battlestar Galactica, Michael Jac...

    Throughout most of my life I have been drawn to sci-fi influenced music. So seeing this book was a dream come true. Heller's book is a well researched document about the influence of science fiction in popular music of the 70s. He discusses at length all the usual suspects like Bowie, ...

    Amazing book that not only makes you want to keep reading it, but start diving through old music and breaking out your library card and pick up all those old sci-fi books and settle in for an adventure. This is exactly what Dean Venture must have felt like in "Perchance to Dean" whe...

    This serves as an excellent survey of the fruitful exchange between pop music and science fiction in the 1970s. Heller's thoughtful and thorough research proved the explicit influence the movements had on each other and was illuminating from cover to cover. I highly recommend this for ...

    So... I wanted to like this book more than I did. Thumbs up for being comprehensive, but thumbs down for interest and insight. Long on names of groups, songs, sci-fi books and movies (many of which are repeated several times throughout), but short on broad context and insight. Reads a ...

    Reading this book is like having an intense and thrilling conversation with my favorite geek friends. Heller ties sci-fi music and literature together in a narrative that celebrates both the well known and almost forgotten. Your listening and reading lists will grow. *Review based on A...

    This book might have been more accessible if the chapters were organized thematically rather than chronologically, but obvs I still loved it. I reviewed Strange Stars for The Current. ...

    I'm actually doing a paid review for a local publication so you'll have to wait... But it's good. I'll post a link when the review goes live. ...

    An exhaustive (and sometimes exhausting) chronicle of the synergy between science fiction and pop music in the 70s. A fascinating nostalgia trip, yet probably different for every generation. ...

    Detailed and vastly interesting, it tends to read more like an extended encyclopedia entry than an actual exploration, but that does not in anyway take away from the quantity of spectacular information. This book itself could (should?) be an entire course in 70?s science fiction cult...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    From 'Stardust' in Shelf Awareness for Readers "The scarcity of science fiction titles on David Bowie's list of 100 favorite books is notable because, from lyrics to stage personalities and film roles, it's apparent that speculative fiction inspired the musician. That influence, on Bo...

    ...

  • Woody Chichester
    Jun 29, 2018

    Great title, great cover, great concept, "meh" content. By the end, I really felt like Heller had had to dig to find artists and songs to support his thesis, relying heavily on the obscure and only vaguely sci-fi-ish. There was also a lack of first-hand research and/or personal intervi...

    Heller uses sci-fi to tie together everything from Sun Ra to Bowie to X-Ray Spex and even some New Romantic stuff from the 80s. It's really all I could ever ask for in a book and possibly the most interesting music book of 2018. ...

    This is fantastic. I was a child in the '70s and I am familiar with much of the music and books Heller discusses (not so much on movies although I do know Star Wars and Star Trek which was more than enough to get me through) so I figured this would be a fun "trip down memory lane,"...

    I enjoyed this book very much, but to me, it was the very definition of a mile wide and an inch deep. Heller tracks down and catalogs what seems to be every one of the hundreds of science fiction themed songs recorded during the 70s and duly notes if they were inspired by any specific ...

    My teenage musical interests tended to be deep and specific. As I read more about 1970s pop music the more I realize that I'm ignorant of so much of it even now. This book filled in some very serious gaps. This book isn't just about songs that literally reference sci fi (though ther...

    it's fun and all, but i can't help but feel that it's just another in a series of books which follow such a particular pattern that certain aspects of it can't help but feel shoehorned in. i really wanted heller to tie bowie in more often to the other things he was discussing, but it s...

    I'm disappointed in a way I have I have criticized others before in other reviews, in so much as I'm wishing this book covered things it doesn't. I did enjoy what is there. It puts forth an interesting premise. But I think it misses things that should have been included: Chariot of th...

    A mind-exploding collection of albums inform this fascinating exploration of the intersection of music and science fiction. Science fiction and music or sound is a woefully under-developed area of written analysis and history, and while a few existing essays, articles, or books (Esh...

    Thanks to Melville House for an advance reading copy of this book. In the acknowledgements to this book the author writes that if not for his editor he would have written an encyclopedia. He nearly did anyway, having created here a comprehensive, sometimes dizzying account of scienc...

    This was a heck of a lot of fun to read. My interest in sci-fi is fairly minimal, but it was delightful to read about how different sci-fi authors and stories and franchises influenced rock music, especially David Bowie - who is the main thread through the book. You better have YouTube...

    Very well researched look at how sci fi influenced and was influenced by pop culture throughout the 1970s. Jason Heller's book reminded me of a wall map of strings, connecting Bowie's Space Oddity to Kubrick's 2001, Sun Ra and afrofuturism, Devo, Kiss, Battlestar Galactica, Michael Jac...

  • Nick Spacek
    Jul 23, 2018

    Great title, great cover, great concept, "meh" content. By the end, I really felt like Heller had had to dig to find artists and songs to support his thesis, relying heavily on the obscure and only vaguely sci-fi-ish. There was also a lack of first-hand research and/or personal intervi...

    Heller uses sci-fi to tie together everything from Sun Ra to Bowie to X-Ray Spex and even some New Romantic stuff from the 80s. It's really all I could ever ask for in a book and possibly the most interesting music book of 2018. ...

    This is fantastic. I was a child in the '70s and I am familiar with much of the music and books Heller discusses (not so much on movies although I do know Star Wars and Star Trek which was more than enough to get me through) so I figured this would be a fun "trip down memory lane,"...

    I enjoyed this book very much, but to me, it was the very definition of a mile wide and an inch deep. Heller tracks down and catalogs what seems to be every one of the hundreds of science fiction themed songs recorded during the 70s and duly notes if they were inspired by any specific ...

    My teenage musical interests tended to be deep and specific. As I read more about 1970s pop music the more I realize that I'm ignorant of so much of it even now. This book filled in some very serious gaps. This book isn't just about songs that literally reference sci fi (though ther...

    it's fun and all, but i can't help but feel that it's just another in a series of books which follow such a particular pattern that certain aspects of it can't help but feel shoehorned in. i really wanted heller to tie bowie in more often to the other things he was discussing, but it s...

  • Jeremy Hunter
    Aug 05, 2018

    Great title, great cover, great concept, "meh" content. By the end, I really felt like Heller had had to dig to find artists and songs to support his thesis, relying heavily on the obscure and only vaguely sci-fi-ish. There was also a lack of first-hand research and/or personal intervi...

    Heller uses sci-fi to tie together everything from Sun Ra to Bowie to X-Ray Spex and even some New Romantic stuff from the 80s. It's really all I could ever ask for in a book and possibly the most interesting music book of 2018. ...

    This is fantastic. I was a child in the '70s and I am familiar with much of the music and books Heller discusses (not so much on movies although I do know Star Wars and Star Trek which was more than enough to get me through) so I figured this would be a fun "trip down memory lane,"...

    I enjoyed this book very much, but to me, it was the very definition of a mile wide and an inch deep. Heller tracks down and catalogs what seems to be every one of the hundreds of science fiction themed songs recorded during the 70s and duly notes if they were inspired by any specific ...

    My teenage musical interests tended to be deep and specific. As I read more about 1970s pop music the more I realize that I'm ignorant of so much of it even now. This book filled in some very serious gaps. This book isn't just about songs that literally reference sci fi (though ther...

    it's fun and all, but i can't help but feel that it's just another in a series of books which follow such a particular pattern that certain aspects of it can't help but feel shoehorned in. i really wanted heller to tie bowie in more often to the other things he was discussing, but it s...

    I'm disappointed in a way I have I have criticized others before in other reviews, in so much as I'm wishing this book covered things it doesn't. I did enjoy what is there. It puts forth an interesting premise. But I think it misses things that should have been included: Chariot of th...

    A mind-exploding collection of albums inform this fascinating exploration of the intersection of music and science fiction. Science fiction and music or sound is a woefully under-developed area of written analysis and history, and while a few existing essays, articles, or books (Esh...

    Thanks to Melville House for an advance reading copy of this book. In the acknowledgements to this book the author writes that if not for his editor he would have written an encyclopedia. He nearly did anyway, having created here a comprehensive, sometimes dizzying account of scienc...

    This was a heck of a lot of fun to read. My interest in sci-fi is fairly minimal, but it was delightful to read about how different sci-fi authors and stories and franchises influenced rock music, especially David Bowie - who is the main thread through the book. You better have YouTube...

    Very well researched look at how sci fi influenced and was influenced by pop culture throughout the 1970s. Jason Heller's book reminded me of a wall map of strings, connecting Bowie's Space Oddity to Kubrick's 2001, Sun Ra and afrofuturism, Devo, Kiss, Battlestar Galactica, Michael Jac...

    Throughout most of my life I have been drawn to sci-fi influenced music. So seeing this book was a dream come true. Heller's book is a well researched document about the influence of science fiction in popular music of the 70s. He discusses at length all the usual suspects like Bowie, ...

  • Saoirse
    Aug 08, 2018

    Great title, great cover, great concept, "meh" content. By the end, I really felt like Heller had had to dig to find artists and songs to support his thesis, relying heavily on the obscure and only vaguely sci-fi-ish. There was also a lack of first-hand research and/or personal intervi...

    Heller uses sci-fi to tie together everything from Sun Ra to Bowie to X-Ray Spex and even some New Romantic stuff from the 80s. It's really all I could ever ask for in a book and possibly the most interesting music book of 2018. ...

    This is fantastic. I was a child in the '70s and I am familiar with much of the music and books Heller discusses (not so much on movies although I do know Star Wars and Star Trek which was more than enough to get me through) so I figured this would be a fun "trip down memory lane,"...

    I enjoyed this book very much, but to me, it was the very definition of a mile wide and an inch deep. Heller tracks down and catalogs what seems to be every one of the hundreds of science fiction themed songs recorded during the 70s and duly notes if they were inspired by any specific ...

    My teenage musical interests tended to be deep and specific. As I read more about 1970s pop music the more I realize that I'm ignorant of so much of it even now. This book filled in some very serious gaps. This book isn't just about songs that literally reference sci fi (though ther...

    it's fun and all, but i can't help but feel that it's just another in a series of books which follow such a particular pattern that certain aspects of it can't help but feel shoehorned in. i really wanted heller to tie bowie in more often to the other things he was discussing, but it s...

    I'm disappointed in a way I have I have criticized others before in other reviews, in so much as I'm wishing this book covered things it doesn't. I did enjoy what is there. It puts forth an interesting premise. But I think it misses things that should have been included: Chariot of th...

    A mind-exploding collection of albums inform this fascinating exploration of the intersection of music and science fiction. Science fiction and music or sound is a woefully under-developed area of written analysis and history, and while a few existing essays, articles, or books (Esh...

    Thanks to Melville House for an advance reading copy of this book. In the acknowledgements to this book the author writes that if not for his editor he would have written an encyclopedia. He nearly did anyway, having created here a comprehensive, sometimes dizzying account of scienc...

    This was a heck of a lot of fun to read. My interest in sci-fi is fairly minimal, but it was delightful to read about how different sci-fi authors and stories and franchises influenced rock music, especially David Bowie - who is the main thread through the book. You better have YouTube...

    Very well researched look at how sci fi influenced and was influenced by pop culture throughout the 1970s. Jason Heller's book reminded me of a wall map of strings, connecting Bowie's Space Oddity to Kubrick's 2001, Sun Ra and afrofuturism, Devo, Kiss, Battlestar Galactica, Michael Jac...

    Throughout most of my life I have been drawn to sci-fi influenced music. So seeing this book was a dream come true. Heller's book is a well researched document about the influence of science fiction in popular music of the 70s. He discusses at length all the usual suspects like Bowie, ...

    Amazing book that not only makes you want to keep reading it, but start diving through old music and breaking out your library card and pick up all those old sci-fi books and settle in for an adventure. This is exactly what Dean Venture must have felt like in "Perchance to Dean" whe...

    This serves as an excellent survey of the fruitful exchange between pop music and science fiction in the 1970s. Heller's thoughtful and thorough research proved the explicit influence the movements had on each other and was illuminating from cover to cover. I highly recommend this for ...

    So... I wanted to like this book more than I did. Thumbs up for being comprehensive, but thumbs down for interest and insight. Long on names of groups, songs, sci-fi books and movies (many of which are repeated several times throughout), but short on broad context and insight. Reads a ...

    Reading this book is like having an intense and thrilling conversation with my favorite geek friends. Heller ties sci-fi music and literature together in a narrative that celebrates both the well known and almost forgotten. Your listening and reading lists will grow. *Review based on A...

    This book might have been more accessible if the chapters were organized thematically rather than chronologically, but obvs I still loved it. I reviewed Strange Stars for The Current. ...

    I'm actually doing a paid review for a local publication so you'll have to wait... But it's good. I'll post a link when the review goes live. ...

    An exhaustive (and sometimes exhausting) chronicle of the synergy between science fiction and pop music in the 70s. A fascinating nostalgia trip, yet probably different for every generation. ...

    Detailed and vastly interesting, it tends to read more like an extended encyclopedia entry than an actual exploration, but that does not in anyway take away from the quantity of spectacular information. This book itself could (should?) be an entire course in 70?s science fiction cult...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    From 'Stardust' in Shelf Awareness for Readers "The scarcity of science fiction titles on David Bowie's list of 100 favorite books is notable because, from lyrics to stage personalities and film roles, it's apparent that speculative fiction inspired the musician. That influence, on Bo...

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  • Trace Reddell
    Aug 06, 2018

    Great title, great cover, great concept, "meh" content. By the end, I really felt like Heller had had to dig to find artists and songs to support his thesis, relying heavily on the obscure and only vaguely sci-fi-ish. There was also a lack of first-hand research and/or personal intervi...

    Heller uses sci-fi to tie together everything from Sun Ra to Bowie to X-Ray Spex and even some New Romantic stuff from the 80s. It's really all I could ever ask for in a book and possibly the most interesting music book of 2018. ...

    This is fantastic. I was a child in the '70s and I am familiar with much of the music and books Heller discusses (not so much on movies although I do know Star Wars and Star Trek which was more than enough to get me through) so I figured this would be a fun "trip down memory lane,"...

    I enjoyed this book very much, but to me, it was the very definition of a mile wide and an inch deep. Heller tracks down and catalogs what seems to be every one of the hundreds of science fiction themed songs recorded during the 70s and duly notes if they were inspired by any specific ...

    My teenage musical interests tended to be deep and specific. As I read more about 1970s pop music the more I realize that I'm ignorant of so much of it even now. This book filled in some very serious gaps. This book isn't just about songs that literally reference sci fi (though ther...

    it's fun and all, but i can't help but feel that it's just another in a series of books which follow such a particular pattern that certain aspects of it can't help but feel shoehorned in. i really wanted heller to tie bowie in more often to the other things he was discussing, but it s...

    I'm disappointed in a way I have I have criticized others before in other reviews, in so much as I'm wishing this book covered things it doesn't. I did enjoy what is there. It puts forth an interesting premise. But I think it misses things that should have been included: Chariot of th...

    A mind-exploding collection of albums inform this fascinating exploration of the intersection of music and science fiction. Science fiction and music or sound is a woefully under-developed area of written analysis and history, and while a few existing essays, articles, or books (Esh...

  • Max
    Jul 31, 2018

    Great title, great cover, great concept, "meh" content. By the end, I really felt like Heller had had to dig to find artists and songs to support his thesis, relying heavily on the obscure and only vaguely sci-fi-ish. There was also a lack of first-hand research and/or personal intervi...

    Heller uses sci-fi to tie together everything from Sun Ra to Bowie to X-Ray Spex and even some New Romantic stuff from the 80s. It's really all I could ever ask for in a book and possibly the most interesting music book of 2018. ...

    This is fantastic. I was a child in the '70s and I am familiar with much of the music and books Heller discusses (not so much on movies although I do know Star Wars and Star Trek which was more than enough to get me through) so I figured this would be a fun "trip down memory lane,"...

    I enjoyed this book very much, but to me, it was the very definition of a mile wide and an inch deep. Heller tracks down and catalogs what seems to be every one of the hundreds of science fiction themed songs recorded during the 70s and duly notes if they were inspired by any specific ...

    My teenage musical interests tended to be deep and specific. As I read more about 1970s pop music the more I realize that I'm ignorant of so much of it even now. This book filled in some very serious gaps. This book isn't just about songs that literally reference sci fi (though ther...

    it's fun and all, but i can't help but feel that it's just another in a series of books which follow such a particular pattern that certain aspects of it can't help but feel shoehorned in. i really wanted heller to tie bowie in more often to the other things he was discussing, but it s...

    I'm disappointed in a way I have I have criticized others before in other reviews, in so much as I'm wishing this book covered things it doesn't. I did enjoy what is there. It puts forth an interesting premise. But I think it misses things that should have been included: Chariot of th...

    A mind-exploding collection of albums inform this fascinating exploration of the intersection of music and science fiction. Science fiction and music or sound is a woefully under-developed area of written analysis and history, and while a few existing essays, articles, or books (Esh...

    Thanks to Melville House for an advance reading copy of this book. In the acknowledgements to this book the author writes that if not for his editor he would have written an encyclopedia. He nearly did anyway, having created here a comprehensive, sometimes dizzying account of scienc...

    This was a heck of a lot of fun to read. My interest in sci-fi is fairly minimal, but it was delightful to read about how different sci-fi authors and stories and franchises influenced rock music, especially David Bowie - who is the main thread through the book. You better have YouTube...

    Very well researched look at how sci fi influenced and was influenced by pop culture throughout the 1970s. Jason Heller's book reminded me of a wall map of strings, connecting Bowie's Space Oddity to Kubrick's 2001, Sun Ra and afrofuturism, Devo, Kiss, Battlestar Galactica, Michael Jac...

    Throughout most of my life I have been drawn to sci-fi influenced music. So seeing this book was a dream come true. Heller's book is a well researched document about the influence of science fiction in popular music of the 70s. He discusses at length all the usual suspects like Bowie, ...

    Amazing book that not only makes you want to keep reading it, but start diving through old music and breaking out your library card and pick up all those old sci-fi books and settle in for an adventure. This is exactly what Dean Venture must have felt like in "Perchance to Dean" whe...

    This serves as an excellent survey of the fruitful exchange between pop music and science fiction in the 1970s. Heller's thoughtful and thorough research proved the explicit influence the movements had on each other and was illuminating from cover to cover. I highly recommend this for ...

  • Alicia Irby
    Jul 17, 2018

    Great title, great cover, great concept, "meh" content. By the end, I really felt like Heller had had to dig to find artists and songs to support his thesis, relying heavily on the obscure and only vaguely sci-fi-ish. There was also a lack of first-hand research and/or personal intervi...

    Heller uses sci-fi to tie together everything from Sun Ra to Bowie to X-Ray Spex and even some New Romantic stuff from the 80s. It's really all I could ever ask for in a book and possibly the most interesting music book of 2018. ...

    This is fantastic. I was a child in the '70s and I am familiar with much of the music and books Heller discusses (not so much on movies although I do know Star Wars and Star Trek which was more than enough to get me through) so I figured this would be a fun "trip down memory lane,"...

    I enjoyed this book very much, but to me, it was the very definition of a mile wide and an inch deep. Heller tracks down and catalogs what seems to be every one of the hundreds of science fiction themed songs recorded during the 70s and duly notes if they were inspired by any specific ...

    My teenage musical interests tended to be deep and specific. As I read more about 1970s pop music the more I realize that I'm ignorant of so much of it even now. This book filled in some very serious gaps. This book isn't just about songs that literally reference sci fi (though ther...

    it's fun and all, but i can't help but feel that it's just another in a series of books which follow such a particular pattern that certain aspects of it can't help but feel shoehorned in. i really wanted heller to tie bowie in more often to the other things he was discussing, but it s...

    I'm disappointed in a way I have I have criticized others before in other reviews, in so much as I'm wishing this book covered things it doesn't. I did enjoy what is there. It puts forth an interesting premise. But I think it misses things that should have been included: Chariot of th...

    A mind-exploding collection of albums inform this fascinating exploration of the intersection of music and science fiction. Science fiction and music or sound is a woefully under-developed area of written analysis and history, and while a few existing essays, articles, or books (Esh...

    Thanks to Melville House for an advance reading copy of this book. In the acknowledgements to this book the author writes that if not for his editor he would have written an encyclopedia. He nearly did anyway, having created here a comprehensive, sometimes dizzying account of scienc...

    This was a heck of a lot of fun to read. My interest in sci-fi is fairly minimal, but it was delightful to read about how different sci-fi authors and stories and franchises influenced rock music, especially David Bowie - who is the main thread through the book. You better have YouTube...

    Very well researched look at how sci fi influenced and was influenced by pop culture throughout the 1970s. Jason Heller's book reminded me of a wall map of strings, connecting Bowie's Space Oddity to Kubrick's 2001, Sun Ra and afrofuturism, Devo, Kiss, Battlestar Galactica, Michael Jac...

    Throughout most of my life I have been drawn to sci-fi influenced music. So seeing this book was a dream come true. Heller's book is a well researched document about the influence of science fiction in popular music of the 70s. He discusses at length all the usual suspects like Bowie, ...

    Amazing book that not only makes you want to keep reading it, but start diving through old music and breaking out your library card and pick up all those old sci-fi books and settle in for an adventure. This is exactly what Dean Venture must have felt like in "Perchance to Dean" whe...

    This serves as an excellent survey of the fruitful exchange between pop music and science fiction in the 1970s. Heller's thoughtful and thorough research proved the explicit influence the movements had on each other and was illuminating from cover to cover. I highly recommend this for ...

    So... I wanted to like this book more than I did. Thumbs up for being comprehensive, but thumbs down for interest and insight. Long on names of groups, songs, sci-fi books and movies (many of which are repeated several times throughout), but short on broad context and insight. Reads a ...

    Reading this book is like having an intense and thrilling conversation with my favorite geek friends. Heller ties sci-fi music and literature together in a narrative that celebrates both the well known and almost forgotten. Your listening and reading lists will grow. *Review based on A...

    This book might have been more accessible if the chapters were organized thematically rather than chronologically, but obvs I still loved it. I reviewed Strange Stars for The Current. ...

    I'm actually doing a paid review for a local publication so you'll have to wait... But it's good. I'll post a link when the review goes live. ...

    An exhaustive (and sometimes exhausting) chronicle of the synergy between science fiction and pop music in the 70s. A fascinating nostalgia trip, yet probably different for every generation. ...

    Detailed and vastly interesting, it tends to read more like an extended encyclopedia entry than an actual exploration, but that does not in anyway take away from the quantity of spectacular information. This book itself could (should?) be an entire course in 70?s science fiction cult...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    From 'Stardust' in Shelf Awareness for Readers "The scarcity of science fiction titles on David Bowie's list of 100 favorite books is notable because, from lyrics to stage personalities and film roles, it's apparent that speculative fiction inspired the musician. That influence, on Bo...

    ...

    ...

    ...