The Third Hotel

The Third Hotel

In Havana, Cuba, a widow tries to come to terms with her husband?s death?and the truth about their marriage?in Laura van den Berg?s surreal, mystifying story of psychological reflection and metaphysical mystery. Shortly after Clare arrives in Havana, Cuba, to attend the annual Festival of New Latin American Cinema, she finds her husband, Richard, standing outside a museum. In Havana, Cuba, a widow tries to come to terms with her husband?s death?and the truth about their marriag...

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Title:The Third Hotel
Author:Laura van den Berg
Rating:
Genres:Fiction
ISBN:The Third Hotel
ISBN
Format Type:Hardcover
Number of Pages:208 pages pages

The Third Hotel Reviews

  • Jenny (Reading Envy)
    Aug 05, 2018

    Beautifully written, atmospheric novel about marriage and grief. Also very strange, diffuse. Mostly set in Cuba, and the country is rendered in lovely ways. So much precision of language. The ending... doesn't quite work for me, or, better put, I did not understand the ending. I admire...

    This is my favorite work of the author's yet. After her husband's death, Clare travels to Cuba on the trip they were supposed to make together, to a horror film festival. Her husband was an academic studying the genre. But then she sees him in Havana.... The remarkable thing is tha...

  • Blair
    Jan 24, 2018

    Beautifully written, atmospheric novel about marriage and grief. Also very strange, diffuse. Mostly set in Cuba, and the country is rendered in lovely ways. So much precision of language. The ending... doesn't quite work for me, or, better put, I did not understand the ending. I admire...

    This is my favorite work of the author's yet. After her husband's death, Clare travels to Cuba on the trip they were supposed to make together, to a horror film festival. Her husband was an academic studying the genre. But then she sees him in Havana.... The remarkable thing is tha...

    2.5/5 (rounded down) "What in the world did I just read" - sums up this book very well. At least for me. Aside from giving it a low rating I actually do not think that this is a bad book, I think that this is a brilliant book - for the right audience. The closest thing I can com...

    I hate to say this and maybe it was me, but I was lost with the story. The writer could write well enough. But the story seemed all over the place. In my mind there was a bit of false advertising from the blurb. It was nothing like I imagined it would be. ...

    The Third Hotel is such a complex and meaningful novel, so deceptively smooth yet so loaded with significance. It's almost too big for me to sum up without spinning into endless ruminations. It's about tourism, grief, and misogyny in the arts. It is also a startling piece of weird fict...

  • Jenifer
    Aug 17, 2018

    Beautifully written, atmospheric novel about marriage and grief. Also very strange, diffuse. Mostly set in Cuba, and the country is rendered in lovely ways. So much precision of language. The ending... doesn't quite work for me, or, better put, I did not understand the ending. I admire...

    This is my favorite work of the author's yet. After her husband's death, Clare travels to Cuba on the trip they were supposed to make together, to a horror film festival. Her husband was an academic studying the genre. But then she sees him in Havana.... The remarkable thing is tha...

    2.5/5 (rounded down) "What in the world did I just read" - sums up this book very well. At least for me. Aside from giving it a low rating I actually do not think that this is a bad book, I think that this is a brilliant book - for the right audience. The closest thing I can com...

    I hate to say this and maybe it was me, but I was lost with the story. The writer could write well enough. But the story seemed all over the place. In my mind there was a bit of false advertising from the blurb. It was nothing like I imagined it would be. ...

    The Third Hotel is such a complex and meaningful novel, so deceptively smooth yet so loaded with significance. It's almost too big for me to sum up without spinning into endless ruminations. It's about tourism, grief, and misogyny in the arts. It is also a startling piece of weird fict...

    Read this book if you like any of the following, or all of the following, and you'll be utterly entranced: (a) horror movies (b) smart discussions about horror movies (c) ghost stories (d) ghost stories that kind of maybe aren't ghost stories, but also maybe are? (e) strange, con...

    So this was ok, fine, mildly diverting ? It has elicited a vague shrug and nodding admiration from me but now almost 24 hours after finishing I find it leaves no real lasting impression. The writing is good, it's easy to read, even has some light humour but nothing jumped out and de...

    What is real and what is in the imagination of the mind? Laura Van Den Berg's "The Third Hotel" takes us through a surreal experience where the characters are in a liminal space between real and unreal, and between dead and not dead. Recently widowed Clare travels to Havana to atten...

    But maybe a person became even more themselves when away, liberated from their usual present tense I read this sentence only a few days after returning from my own vacation, and I paused for a minute to consider how true it was: On my first trip in a few years, I felt liberated from...

    "...the foundation of horror is a dislocation of reality, a dislocation designed to reveal the reality that has been there all along..." In this moody, liminal novel of ideas, Van den Berg immerses the reader in a hallucinatory narrative that is highly cinematic. And, like a surreal...

    I spent most of my time reading The Third Hotel in a state of déjà vu, trying to work out what it was reminding me of. This tale of an American in a foreign city, tailing a doppelgänger who may or may not be a figment of their imagination, felt so familiar but I just couldn?t plac...

    Suddenly and newly widowed Clare (5 weeks as the story opens) has gone to a Latin Horror Movie Festival in Havana, not because she?s into horror movies, but because her husband was. She mingles a little with the other attendees, but mostly wanders around isolated and alone. Then she ...

    I enjoyed the writing in this slim book about grief, losing yourself in travel, and daring to take a look at your ?secret? self. Parts of the plot are vague, which would normally bother me, but in this case the vagueness added a subtly creepy element to the story. We go deep into t...

    Cuba, zombies, and loose molars - this is a fever dream turned into a novel. Laura van den Berg writes about grief and the power of the subconscious: Clare, a traveling sales executive for an elevator company, loses her husband in a car accident. Richard was a film scholar who did rese...

    I?m really not entirely sure how I feel about this novel, so I?ve given it the benefit of the doubt. This review should be read with the understanding that I have a fairly high tolerance for ambiguity in a novel- in that I enjoy ?ideas reading? as much as I do ?plot reading?...

    A creative and atmospheric exploration of grief and, especially, the hidden depths and secret desires of ourselves and those we love. It is about the impossibility of truly knowing ourselves, let alone anyone else. The imagery is heavy handed at times, but overall, definitely worth a r...

    A strange little book that sees our protagonist, Clare, reeling from the death of her husband Richard. Richard was a horror film buff, and was planning to go to a film festival in Cuba when he died in an accident. Clare decides to honour this wish and still go. She does go to some of t...

    Unfortunately, this is another book that is going into my DNF file. I truly tried not only to like this book but to also understand what it was trying to relate to me. I managed to get to the 60% mark, but in reality have not a clue what I have read and how it all comes together. I did...

    I can?t decide whether to give this book a 2 or a 3. I keep changing the rating. The writing is beautiful and I loved the premise. The plot was intriguing and dark and kept me guessing until the end. Unfortunately, it kept me guessing a little too much because about 3/4 ways through ...

  • Jerrie (redwritinghood)
    Oct 03, 2018

    Beautifully written, atmospheric novel about marriage and grief. Also very strange, diffuse. Mostly set in Cuba, and the country is rendered in lovely ways. So much precision of language. The ending... doesn't quite work for me, or, better put, I did not understand the ending. I admire...

    This is my favorite work of the author's yet. After her husband's death, Clare travels to Cuba on the trip they were supposed to make together, to a horror film festival. Her husband was an academic studying the genre. But then she sees him in Havana.... The remarkable thing is tha...

    2.5/5 (rounded down) "What in the world did I just read" - sums up this book very well. At least for me. Aside from giving it a low rating I actually do not think that this is a bad book, I think that this is a brilliant book - for the right audience. The closest thing I can com...

    I hate to say this and maybe it was me, but I was lost with the story. The writer could write well enough. But the story seemed all over the place. In my mind there was a bit of false advertising from the blurb. It was nothing like I imagined it would be. ...

    The Third Hotel is such a complex and meaningful novel, so deceptively smooth yet so loaded with significance. It's almost too big for me to sum up without spinning into endless ruminations. It's about tourism, grief, and misogyny in the arts. It is also a startling piece of weird fict...

    Read this book if you like any of the following, or all of the following, and you'll be utterly entranced: (a) horror movies (b) smart discussions about horror movies (c) ghost stories (d) ghost stories that kind of maybe aren't ghost stories, but also maybe are? (e) strange, con...

    So this was ok, fine, mildly diverting ? It has elicited a vague shrug and nodding admiration from me but now almost 24 hours after finishing I find it leaves no real lasting impression. The writing is good, it's easy to read, even has some light humour but nothing jumped out and de...

    What is real and what is in the imagination of the mind? Laura Van Den Berg's "The Third Hotel" takes us through a surreal experience where the characters are in a liminal space between real and unreal, and between dead and not dead. Recently widowed Clare travels to Havana to atten...

    But maybe a person became even more themselves when away, liberated from their usual present tense I read this sentence only a few days after returning from my own vacation, and I paused for a minute to consider how true it was: On my first trip in a few years, I felt liberated from...

    "...the foundation of horror is a dislocation of reality, a dislocation designed to reveal the reality that has been there all along..." In this moody, liminal novel of ideas, Van den Berg immerses the reader in a hallucinatory narrative that is highly cinematic. And, like a surreal...

    I spent most of my time reading The Third Hotel in a state of déjà vu, trying to work out what it was reminding me of. This tale of an American in a foreign city, tailing a doppelgänger who may or may not be a figment of their imagination, felt so familiar but I just couldn?t plac...

    Suddenly and newly widowed Clare (5 weeks as the story opens) has gone to a Latin Horror Movie Festival in Havana, not because she?s into horror movies, but because her husband was. She mingles a little with the other attendees, but mostly wanders around isolated and alone. Then she ...

    I enjoyed the writing in this slim book about grief, losing yourself in travel, and daring to take a look at your ?secret? self. Parts of the plot are vague, which would normally bother me, but in this case the vagueness added a subtly creepy element to the story. We go deep into t...

  • Roxane
    Sep 08, 2018

    Beautifully written, atmospheric novel about marriage and grief. Also very strange, diffuse. Mostly set in Cuba, and the country is rendered in lovely ways. So much precision of language. The ending... doesn't quite work for me, or, better put, I did not understand the ending. I admire...

  • Marialyce
    Jul 29, 2018

    Beautifully written, atmospheric novel about marriage and grief. Also very strange, diffuse. Mostly set in Cuba, and the country is rendered in lovely ways. So much precision of language. The ending... doesn't quite work for me, or, better put, I did not understand the ending. I admire...

    This is my favorite work of the author's yet. After her husband's death, Clare travels to Cuba on the trip they were supposed to make together, to a horror film festival. Her husband was an academic studying the genre. But then she sees him in Havana.... The remarkable thing is tha...

    2.5/5 (rounded down) "What in the world did I just read" - sums up this book very well. At least for me. Aside from giving it a low rating I actually do not think that this is a bad book, I think that this is a brilliant book - for the right audience. The closest thing I can com...

    I hate to say this and maybe it was me, but I was lost with the story. The writer could write well enough. But the story seemed all over the place. In my mind there was a bit of false advertising from the blurb. It was nothing like I imagined it would be. ...

    The Third Hotel is such a complex and meaningful novel, so deceptively smooth yet so loaded with significance. It's almost too big for me to sum up without spinning into endless ruminations. It's about tourism, grief, and misogyny in the arts. It is also a startling piece of weird fict...

    Read this book if you like any of the following, or all of the following, and you'll be utterly entranced: (a) horror movies (b) smart discussions about horror movies (c) ghost stories (d) ghost stories that kind of maybe aren't ghost stories, but also maybe are? (e) strange, con...

    So this was ok, fine, mildly diverting ? It has elicited a vague shrug and nodding admiration from me but now almost 24 hours after finishing I find it leaves no real lasting impression. The writing is good, it's easy to read, even has some light humour but nothing jumped out and de...

    What is real and what is in the imagination of the mind? Laura Van Den Berg's "The Third Hotel" takes us through a surreal experience where the characters are in a liminal space between real and unreal, and between dead and not dead. Recently widowed Clare travels to Havana to atten...

    But maybe a person became even more themselves when away, liberated from their usual present tense I read this sentence only a few days after returning from my own vacation, and I paused for a minute to consider how true it was: On my first trip in a few years, I felt liberated from...

    "...the foundation of horror is a dislocation of reality, a dislocation designed to reveal the reality that has been there all along..." In this moody, liminal novel of ideas, Van den Berg immerses the reader in a hallucinatory narrative that is highly cinematic. And, like a surreal...

    I spent most of my time reading The Third Hotel in a state of déjà vu, trying to work out what it was reminding me of. This tale of an American in a foreign city, tailing a doppelgänger who may or may not be a figment of their imagination, felt so familiar but I just couldn?t plac...

    Suddenly and newly widowed Clare (5 weeks as the story opens) has gone to a Latin Horror Movie Festival in Havana, not because she?s into horror movies, but because her husband was. She mingles a little with the other attendees, but mostly wanders around isolated and alone. Then she ...

    I enjoyed the writing in this slim book about grief, losing yourself in travel, and daring to take a look at your ?secret? self. Parts of the plot are vague, which would normally bother me, but in this case the vagueness added a subtly creepy element to the story. We go deep into t...

    Cuba, zombies, and loose molars - this is a fever dream turned into a novel. Laura van den Berg writes about grief and the power of the subconscious: Clare, a traveling sales executive for an elevator company, loses her husband in a car accident. Richard was a film scholar who did rese...

    I?m really not entirely sure how I feel about this novel, so I?ve given it the benefit of the doubt. This review should be read with the understanding that I have a fairly high tolerance for ambiguity in a novel- in that I enjoy ?ideas reading? as much as I do ?plot reading?...

    A creative and atmospheric exploration of grief and, especially, the hidden depths and secret desires of ourselves and those we love. It is about the impossibility of truly knowing ourselves, let alone anyone else. The imagery is heavy handed at times, but overall, definitely worth a r...

    A strange little book that sees our protagonist, Clare, reeling from the death of her husband Richard. Richard was a horror film buff, and was planning to go to a film festival in Cuba when he died in an accident. Clare decides to honour this wish and still go. She does go to some of t...

    Unfortunately, this is another book that is going into my DNF file. I truly tried not only to like this book but to also understand what it was trying to relate to me. I managed to get to the 60% mark, but in reality have not a clue what I have read and how it all comes together. I did...

  • David
    Oct 09, 2018

    Beautifully written, atmospheric novel about marriage and grief. Also very strange, diffuse. Mostly set in Cuba, and the country is rendered in lovely ways. So much precision of language. The ending... doesn't quite work for me, or, better put, I did not understand the ending. I admire...

    This is my favorite work of the author's yet. After her husband's death, Clare travels to Cuba on the trip they were supposed to make together, to a horror film festival. Her husband was an academic studying the genre. But then she sees him in Havana.... The remarkable thing is tha...

    2.5/5 (rounded down) "What in the world did I just read" - sums up this book very well. At least for me. Aside from giving it a low rating I actually do not think that this is a bad book, I think that this is a brilliant book - for the right audience. The closest thing I can com...

    I hate to say this and maybe it was me, but I was lost with the story. The writer could write well enough. But the story seemed all over the place. In my mind there was a bit of false advertising from the blurb. It was nothing like I imagined it would be. ...

    The Third Hotel is such a complex and meaningful novel, so deceptively smooth yet so loaded with significance. It's almost too big for me to sum up without spinning into endless ruminations. It's about tourism, grief, and misogyny in the arts. It is also a startling piece of weird fict...

    Read this book if you like any of the following, or all of the following, and you'll be utterly entranced: (a) horror movies (b) smart discussions about horror movies (c) ghost stories (d) ghost stories that kind of maybe aren't ghost stories, but also maybe are? (e) strange, con...

    So this was ok, fine, mildly diverting ? It has elicited a vague shrug and nodding admiration from me but now almost 24 hours after finishing I find it leaves no real lasting impression. The writing is good, it's easy to read, even has some light humour but nothing jumped out and de...

    What is real and what is in the imagination of the mind? Laura Van Den Berg's "The Third Hotel" takes us through a surreal experience where the characters are in a liminal space between real and unreal, and between dead and not dead. Recently widowed Clare travels to Havana to atten...

    But maybe a person became even more themselves when away, liberated from their usual present tense I read this sentence only a few days after returning from my own vacation, and I paused for a minute to consider how true it was: On my first trip in a few years, I felt liberated from...

    "...the foundation of horror is a dislocation of reality, a dislocation designed to reveal the reality that has been there all along..." In this moody, liminal novel of ideas, Van den Berg immerses the reader in a hallucinatory narrative that is highly cinematic. And, like a surreal...

  • Kalen
    May 07, 2018

    Beautifully written, atmospheric novel about marriage and grief. Also very strange, diffuse. Mostly set in Cuba, and the country is rendered in lovely ways. So much precision of language. The ending... doesn't quite work for me, or, better put, I did not understand the ending. I admire...

    This is my favorite work of the author's yet. After her husband's death, Clare travels to Cuba on the trip they were supposed to make together, to a horror film festival. Her husband was an academic studying the genre. But then she sees him in Havana.... The remarkable thing is tha...

    2.5/5 (rounded down) "What in the world did I just read" - sums up this book very well. At least for me. Aside from giving it a low rating I actually do not think that this is a bad book, I think that this is a brilliant book - for the right audience. The closest thing I can com...

    I hate to say this and maybe it was me, but I was lost with the story. The writer could write well enough. But the story seemed all over the place. In my mind there was a bit of false advertising from the blurb. It was nothing like I imagined it would be. ...

    The Third Hotel is such a complex and meaningful novel, so deceptively smooth yet so loaded with significance. It's almost too big for me to sum up without spinning into endless ruminations. It's about tourism, grief, and misogyny in the arts. It is also a startling piece of weird fict...

    Read this book if you like any of the following, or all of the following, and you'll be utterly entranced: (a) horror movies (b) smart discussions about horror movies (c) ghost stories (d) ghost stories that kind of maybe aren't ghost stories, but also maybe are? (e) strange, con...

    So this was ok, fine, mildly diverting ? It has elicited a vague shrug and nodding admiration from me but now almost 24 hours after finishing I find it leaves no real lasting impression. The writing is good, it's easy to read, even has some light humour but nothing jumped out and de...

    What is real and what is in the imagination of the mind? Laura Van Den Berg's "The Third Hotel" takes us through a surreal experience where the characters are in a liminal space between real and unreal, and between dead and not dead. Recently widowed Clare travels to Havana to atten...

    But maybe a person became even more themselves when away, liberated from their usual present tense I read this sentence only a few days after returning from my own vacation, and I paused for a minute to consider how true it was: On my first trip in a few years, I felt liberated from...

    "...the foundation of horror is a dislocation of reality, a dislocation designed to reveal the reality that has been there all along..." In this moody, liminal novel of ideas, Van den Berg immerses the reader in a hallucinatory narrative that is highly cinematic. And, like a surreal...

    I spent most of my time reading The Third Hotel in a state of déjà vu, trying to work out what it was reminding me of. This tale of an American in a foreign city, tailing a doppelgänger who may or may not be a figment of their imagination, felt so familiar but I just couldn?t plac...

    Suddenly and newly widowed Clare (5 weeks as the story opens) has gone to a Latin Horror Movie Festival in Havana, not because she?s into horror movies, but because her husband was. She mingles a little with the other attendees, but mostly wanders around isolated and alone. Then she ...

    I enjoyed the writing in this slim book about grief, losing yourself in travel, and daring to take a look at your ?secret? self. Parts of the plot are vague, which would normally bother me, but in this case the vagueness added a subtly creepy element to the story. We go deep into t...

    Cuba, zombies, and loose molars - this is a fever dream turned into a novel. Laura van den Berg writes about grief and the power of the subconscious: Clare, a traveling sales executive for an elevator company, loses her husband in a car accident. Richard was a film scholar who did rese...

    I?m really not entirely sure how I feel about this novel, so I?ve given it the benefit of the doubt. This review should be read with the understanding that I have a fairly high tolerance for ambiguity in a novel- in that I enjoy ?ideas reading? as much as I do ?plot reading?...

    A creative and atmospheric exploration of grief and, especially, the hidden depths and secret desires of ourselves and those we love. It is about the impossibility of truly knowing ourselves, let alone anyone else. The imagery is heavy handed at times, but overall, definitely worth a r...

    A strange little book that sees our protagonist, Clare, reeling from the death of her husband Richard. Richard was a horror film buff, and was planning to go to a film festival in Cuba when he died in an accident. Clare decides to honour this wish and still go. She does go to some of t...

    Unfortunately, this is another book that is going into my DNF file. I truly tried not only to like this book but to also understand what it was trying to relate to me. I managed to get to the 60% mark, but in reality have not a clue what I have read and how it all comes together. I did...

    I can?t decide whether to give this book a 2 or a 3. I keep changing the rating. The writing is beautiful and I loved the premise. The plot was intriguing and dark and kept me guessing until the end. Unfortunately, it kept me guessing a little too much because about 3/4 ways through ...

    I just didn't get this one and I suspect it's more me than the book itself. I'm actually sitting here feeling rather stupid that I didn't get this one, pretty much at all. I suspect that if you're a fan of horror films and books, you'll get it and that's who I recommend it for. I a...

  • Heather
    Aug 25, 2018

    Beautifully written, atmospheric novel about marriage and grief. Also very strange, diffuse. Mostly set in Cuba, and the country is rendered in lovely ways. So much precision of language. The ending... doesn't quite work for me, or, better put, I did not understand the ending. I admire...

    This is my favorite work of the author's yet. After her husband's death, Clare travels to Cuba on the trip they were supposed to make together, to a horror film festival. Her husband was an academic studying the genre. But then she sees him in Havana.... The remarkable thing is tha...

    2.5/5 (rounded down) "What in the world did I just read" - sums up this book very well. At least for me. Aside from giving it a low rating I actually do not think that this is a bad book, I think that this is a brilliant book - for the right audience. The closest thing I can com...

    I hate to say this and maybe it was me, but I was lost with the story. The writer could write well enough. But the story seemed all over the place. In my mind there was a bit of false advertising from the blurb. It was nothing like I imagined it would be. ...

    The Third Hotel is such a complex and meaningful novel, so deceptively smooth yet so loaded with significance. It's almost too big for me to sum up without spinning into endless ruminations. It's about tourism, grief, and misogyny in the arts. It is also a startling piece of weird fict...

    Read this book if you like any of the following, or all of the following, and you'll be utterly entranced: (a) horror movies (b) smart discussions about horror movies (c) ghost stories (d) ghost stories that kind of maybe aren't ghost stories, but also maybe are? (e) strange, con...

    So this was ok, fine, mildly diverting ? It has elicited a vague shrug and nodding admiration from me but now almost 24 hours after finishing I find it leaves no real lasting impression. The writing is good, it's easy to read, even has some light humour but nothing jumped out and de...

    What is real and what is in the imagination of the mind? Laura Van Den Berg's "The Third Hotel" takes us through a surreal experience where the characters are in a liminal space between real and unreal, and between dead and not dead. Recently widowed Clare travels to Havana to atten...

    But maybe a person became even more themselves when away, liberated from their usual present tense I read this sentence only a few days after returning from my own vacation, and I paused for a minute to consider how true it was: On my first trip in a few years, I felt liberated from...

    "...the foundation of horror is a dislocation of reality, a dislocation designed to reveal the reality that has been there all along..." In this moody, liminal novel of ideas, Van den Berg immerses the reader in a hallucinatory narrative that is highly cinematic. And, like a surreal...

    I spent most of my time reading The Third Hotel in a state of déjà vu, trying to work out what it was reminding me of. This tale of an American in a foreign city, tailing a doppelgänger who may or may not be a figment of their imagination, felt so familiar but I just couldn?t plac...

    Suddenly and newly widowed Clare (5 weeks as the story opens) has gone to a Latin Horror Movie Festival in Havana, not because she?s into horror movies, but because her husband was. She mingles a little with the other attendees, but mostly wanders around isolated and alone. Then she ...

    I enjoyed the writing in this slim book about grief, losing yourself in travel, and daring to take a look at your ?secret? self. Parts of the plot are vague, which would normally bother me, but in this case the vagueness added a subtly creepy element to the story. We go deep into t...

    Cuba, zombies, and loose molars - this is a fever dream turned into a novel. Laura van den Berg writes about grief and the power of the subconscious: Clare, a traveling sales executive for an elevator company, loses her husband in a car accident. Richard was a film scholar who did rese...

    I?m really not entirely sure how I feel about this novel, so I?ve given it the benefit of the doubt. This review should be read with the understanding that I have a fairly high tolerance for ambiguity in a novel- in that I enjoy ?ideas reading? as much as I do ?plot reading?...

    A creative and atmospheric exploration of grief and, especially, the hidden depths and secret desires of ourselves and those we love. It is about the impossibility of truly knowing ourselves, let alone anyone else. The imagery is heavy handed at times, but overall, definitely worth a r...

    A strange little book that sees our protagonist, Clare, reeling from the death of her husband Richard. Richard was a horror film buff, and was planning to go to a film festival in Cuba when he died in an accident. Clare decides to honour this wish and still go. She does go to some of t...

    Unfortunately, this is another book that is going into my DNF file. I truly tried not only to like this book but to also understand what it was trying to relate to me. I managed to get to the 60% mark, but in reality have not a clue what I have read and how it all comes together. I did...

    I can?t decide whether to give this book a 2 or a 3. I keep changing the rating. The writing is beautiful and I loved the premise. The plot was intriguing and dark and kept me guessing until the end. Unfortunately, it kept me guessing a little too much because about 3/4 ways through ...

    I just didn't get this one and I suspect it's more me than the book itself. I'm actually sitting here feeling rather stupid that I didn't get this one, pretty much at all. I suspect that if you're a fan of horror films and books, you'll get it and that's who I recommend it for. I a...

    This is a cerebral text about liminal spaces. A woman pursues the ghost of her dead husband through Havana. He was a academic specializing in horror films which leads to some gorgeous brilliant insights on the techniques, purposes, and psychology of horror films. ...

  • Julie Ehlers
    Aug 28, 2018

    Beautifully written, atmospheric novel about marriage and grief. Also very strange, diffuse. Mostly set in Cuba, and the country is rendered in lovely ways. So much precision of language. The ending... doesn't quite work for me, or, better put, I did not understand the ending. I admire...

    This is my favorite work of the author's yet. After her husband's death, Clare travels to Cuba on the trip they were supposed to make together, to a horror film festival. Her husband was an academic studying the genre. But then she sees him in Havana.... The remarkable thing is tha...

    2.5/5 (rounded down) "What in the world did I just read" - sums up this book very well. At least for me. Aside from giving it a low rating I actually do not think that this is a bad book, I think that this is a brilliant book - for the right audience. The closest thing I can com...

    I hate to say this and maybe it was me, but I was lost with the story. The writer could write well enough. But the story seemed all over the place. In my mind there was a bit of false advertising from the blurb. It was nothing like I imagined it would be. ...

    The Third Hotel is such a complex and meaningful novel, so deceptively smooth yet so loaded with significance. It's almost too big for me to sum up without spinning into endless ruminations. It's about tourism, grief, and misogyny in the arts. It is also a startling piece of weird fict...

    Read this book if you like any of the following, or all of the following, and you'll be utterly entranced: (a) horror movies (b) smart discussions about horror movies (c) ghost stories (d) ghost stories that kind of maybe aren't ghost stories, but also maybe are? (e) strange, con...

    So this was ok, fine, mildly diverting ? It has elicited a vague shrug and nodding admiration from me but now almost 24 hours after finishing I find it leaves no real lasting impression. The writing is good, it's easy to read, even has some light humour but nothing jumped out and de...

    What is real and what is in the imagination of the mind? Laura Van Den Berg's "The Third Hotel" takes us through a surreal experience where the characters are in a liminal space between real and unreal, and between dead and not dead. Recently widowed Clare travels to Havana to atten...

    But maybe a person became even more themselves when away, liberated from their usual present tense I read this sentence only a few days after returning from my own vacation, and I paused for a minute to consider how true it was: On my first trip in a few years, I felt liberated from...

  • Kasa Cotugno
    Jun 12, 2018

    Beautifully written, atmospheric novel about marriage and grief. Also very strange, diffuse. Mostly set in Cuba, and the country is rendered in lovely ways. So much precision of language. The ending... doesn't quite work for me, or, better put, I did not understand the ending. I admire...

    This is my favorite work of the author's yet. After her husband's death, Clare travels to Cuba on the trip they were supposed to make together, to a horror film festival. Her husband was an academic studying the genre. But then she sees him in Havana.... The remarkable thing is tha...

    2.5/5 (rounded down) "What in the world did I just read" - sums up this book very well. At least for me. Aside from giving it a low rating I actually do not think that this is a bad book, I think that this is a brilliant book - for the right audience. The closest thing I can com...

    I hate to say this and maybe it was me, but I was lost with the story. The writer could write well enough. But the story seemed all over the place. In my mind there was a bit of false advertising from the blurb. It was nothing like I imagined it would be. ...

    The Third Hotel is such a complex and meaningful novel, so deceptively smooth yet so loaded with significance. It's almost too big for me to sum up without spinning into endless ruminations. It's about tourism, grief, and misogyny in the arts. It is also a startling piece of weird fict...

    Read this book if you like any of the following, or all of the following, and you'll be utterly entranced: (a) horror movies (b) smart discussions about horror movies (c) ghost stories (d) ghost stories that kind of maybe aren't ghost stories, but also maybe are? (e) strange, con...

    So this was ok, fine, mildly diverting ? It has elicited a vague shrug and nodding admiration from me but now almost 24 hours after finishing I find it leaves no real lasting impression. The writing is good, it's easy to read, even has some light humour but nothing jumped out and de...

    What is real and what is in the imagination of the mind? Laura Van Den Berg's "The Third Hotel" takes us through a surreal experience where the characters are in a liminal space between real and unreal, and between dead and not dead. Recently widowed Clare travels to Havana to atten...

    But maybe a person became even more themselves when away, liberated from their usual present tense I read this sentence only a few days after returning from my own vacation, and I paused for a minute to consider how true it was: On my first trip in a few years, I felt liberated from...

    "...the foundation of horror is a dislocation of reality, a dislocation designed to reveal the reality that has been there all along..." In this moody, liminal novel of ideas, Van den Berg immerses the reader in a hallucinatory narrative that is highly cinematic. And, like a surreal...

    I spent most of my time reading The Third Hotel in a state of déjà vu, trying to work out what it was reminding me of. This tale of an American in a foreign city, tailing a doppelgänger who may or may not be a figment of their imagination, felt so familiar but I just couldn?t plac...

    Suddenly and newly widowed Clare (5 weeks as the story opens) has gone to a Latin Horror Movie Festival in Havana, not because she?s into horror movies, but because her husband was. She mingles a little with the other attendees, but mostly wanders around isolated and alone. Then she ...

    I enjoyed the writing in this slim book about grief, losing yourself in travel, and daring to take a look at your ?secret? self. Parts of the plot are vague, which would normally bother me, but in this case the vagueness added a subtly creepy element to the story. We go deep into t...

    Cuba, zombies, and loose molars - this is a fever dream turned into a novel. Laura van den Berg writes about grief and the power of the subconscious: Clare, a traveling sales executive for an elevator company, loses her husband in a car accident. Richard was a film scholar who did rese...

    I?m really not entirely sure how I feel about this novel, so I?ve given it the benefit of the doubt. This review should be read with the understanding that I have a fairly high tolerance for ambiguity in a novel- in that I enjoy ?ideas reading? as much as I do ?plot reading?...

    A creative and atmospheric exploration of grief and, especially, the hidden depths and secret desires of ourselves and those we love. It is about the impossibility of truly knowing ourselves, let alone anyone else. The imagery is heavy handed at times, but overall, definitely worth a r...

    A strange little book that sees our protagonist, Clare, reeling from the death of her husband Richard. Richard was a horror film buff, and was planning to go to a film festival in Cuba when he died in an accident. Clare decides to honour this wish and still go. She does go to some of t...

    Unfortunately, this is another book that is going into my DNF file. I truly tried not only to like this book but to also understand what it was trying to relate to me. I managed to get to the 60% mark, but in reality have not a clue what I have read and how it all comes together. I did...

    I can?t decide whether to give this book a 2 or a 3. I keep changing the rating. The writing is beautiful and I loved the premise. The plot was intriguing and dark and kept me guessing until the end. Unfortunately, it kept me guessing a little too much because about 3/4 ways through ...

    I just didn't get this one and I suspect it's more me than the book itself. I'm actually sitting here feeling rather stupid that I didn't get this one, pretty much at all. I suspect that if you're a fan of horror films and books, you'll get it and that's who I recommend it for. I a...

    This is a cerebral text about liminal spaces. A woman pursues the ghost of her dead husband through Havana. He was a academic specializing in horror films which leads to some gorgeous brilliant insights on the techniques, purposes, and psychology of horror films. ...

    I liked it and the writing but I still don?t know quite what to make of it. The book felt unfinished. ...

    There is an amount of ambiguity and vagueness that can be great in a novel, but unfortunately that is almost all there was in The Third Hotel. Quite readable but I had absolutely no idea what was going on for almost the entire book - safe to say this was just not for me. ...

    This is a highly unusual take on a familiar subject, accomplished with originality and wit. Laura van den Berg had me at the location and setting, but her protagonist stepped off the page and became real, a viable character flaws and all. I was even intrigued by her line of work. Havan...

  • Lupita Reads
    Aug 11, 2018

    Beautifully written, atmospheric novel about marriage and grief. Also very strange, diffuse. Mostly set in Cuba, and the country is rendered in lovely ways. So much precision of language. The ending... doesn't quite work for me, or, better put, I did not understand the ending. I admire...

    This is my favorite work of the author's yet. After her husband's death, Clare travels to Cuba on the trip they were supposed to make together, to a horror film festival. Her husband was an academic studying the genre. But then she sees him in Havana.... The remarkable thing is tha...

    2.5/5 (rounded down) "What in the world did I just read" - sums up this book very well. At least for me. Aside from giving it a low rating I actually do not think that this is a bad book, I think that this is a brilliant book - for the right audience. The closest thing I can com...

    I hate to say this and maybe it was me, but I was lost with the story. The writer could write well enough. But the story seemed all over the place. In my mind there was a bit of false advertising from the blurb. It was nothing like I imagined it would be. ...

    The Third Hotel is such a complex and meaningful novel, so deceptively smooth yet so loaded with significance. It's almost too big for me to sum up without spinning into endless ruminations. It's about tourism, grief, and misogyny in the arts. It is also a startling piece of weird fict...

    Read this book if you like any of the following, or all of the following, and you'll be utterly entranced: (a) horror movies (b) smart discussions about horror movies (c) ghost stories (d) ghost stories that kind of maybe aren't ghost stories, but also maybe are? (e) strange, con...

    So this was ok, fine, mildly diverting ? It has elicited a vague shrug and nodding admiration from me but now almost 24 hours after finishing I find it leaves no real lasting impression. The writing is good, it's easy to read, even has some light humour but nothing jumped out and de...

    What is real and what is in the imagination of the mind? Laura Van Den Berg's "The Third Hotel" takes us through a surreal experience where the characters are in a liminal space between real and unreal, and between dead and not dead. Recently widowed Clare travels to Havana to atten...

    But maybe a person became even more themselves when away, liberated from their usual present tense I read this sentence only a few days after returning from my own vacation, and I paused for a minute to consider how true it was: On my first trip in a few years, I felt liberated from...

    "...the foundation of horror is a dislocation of reality, a dislocation designed to reveal the reality that has been there all along..." In this moody, liminal novel of ideas, Van den Berg immerses the reader in a hallucinatory narrative that is highly cinematic. And, like a surreal...

    I spent most of my time reading The Third Hotel in a state of déjà vu, trying to work out what it was reminding me of. This tale of an American in a foreign city, tailing a doppelgänger who may or may not be a figment of their imagination, felt so familiar but I just couldn?t plac...

    Suddenly and newly widowed Clare (5 weeks as the story opens) has gone to a Latin Horror Movie Festival in Havana, not because she?s into horror movies, but because her husband was. She mingles a little with the other attendees, but mostly wanders around isolated and alone. Then she ...

    I enjoyed the writing in this slim book about grief, losing yourself in travel, and daring to take a look at your ?secret? self. Parts of the plot are vague, which would normally bother me, but in this case the vagueness added a subtly creepy element to the story. We go deep into t...

    Cuba, zombies, and loose molars - this is a fever dream turned into a novel. Laura van den Berg writes about grief and the power of the subconscious: Clare, a traveling sales executive for an elevator company, loses her husband in a car accident. Richard was a film scholar who did rese...

    I?m really not entirely sure how I feel about this novel, so I?ve given it the benefit of the doubt. This review should be read with the understanding that I have a fairly high tolerance for ambiguity in a novel- in that I enjoy ?ideas reading? as much as I do ?plot reading?...

    A creative and atmospheric exploration of grief and, especially, the hidden depths and secret desires of ourselves and those we love. It is about the impossibility of truly knowing ourselves, let alone anyone else. The imagery is heavy handed at times, but overall, definitely worth a r...

    A strange little book that sees our protagonist, Clare, reeling from the death of her husband Richard. Richard was a horror film buff, and was planning to go to a film festival in Cuba when he died in an accident. Clare decides to honour this wish and still go. She does go to some of t...

    Unfortunately, this is another book that is going into my DNF file. I truly tried not only to like this book but to also understand what it was trying to relate to me. I managed to get to the 60% mark, but in reality have not a clue what I have read and how it all comes together. I did...

    I can?t decide whether to give this book a 2 or a 3. I keep changing the rating. The writing is beautiful and I loved the premise. The plot was intriguing and dark and kept me guessing until the end. Unfortunately, it kept me guessing a little too much because about 3/4 ways through ...

    I just didn't get this one and I suspect it's more me than the book itself. I'm actually sitting here feeling rather stupid that I didn't get this one, pretty much at all. I suspect that if you're a fan of horror films and books, you'll get it and that's who I recommend it for. I a...

    This is a cerebral text about liminal spaces. A woman pursues the ghost of her dead husband through Havana. He was a academic specializing in horror films which leads to some gorgeous brilliant insights on the techniques, purposes, and psychology of horror films. ...

    I liked it and the writing but I still don?t know quite what to make of it. The book felt unfinished. ...

    There is an amount of ambiguity and vagueness that can be great in a novel, but unfortunately that is almost all there was in The Third Hotel. Quite readable but I had absolutely no idea what was going on for almost the entire book - safe to say this was just not for me. ...

    This is a highly unusual take on a familiar subject, accomplished with originality and wit. Laura van den Berg had me at the location and setting, but her protagonist stepped off the page and became real, a viable character flaws and all. I was even intrigued by her line of work. Havan...

    The two impulses cannot be separated. The desire to have a life and the desire to disappear from it. The world is unlivable and yet we live in it every day. ? Laura van den Berg, The Third Hotel . . Laura van den Berg?s ?The Third Hotel? is one of those books that may be sli...

    I just never fully connected with The Third Hotel. I appreciated many aspects of the novel, and van den Berg does a great job with the setting. I almost feel like I had visited Havana in some ways by the time I was done. But ultimately I think there was a bit too much going on, and...

    Grief is a monster that?s never been rawly explored- this novel attempts that and does so much justice to the human soul. I loved this! Making it one of my favorites of 2018. Strange, eerie yet so very beautifully written. ...

  • Adam
    Aug 17, 2018

    Beautifully written, atmospheric novel about marriage and grief. Also very strange, diffuse. Mostly set in Cuba, and the country is rendered in lovely ways. So much precision of language. The ending... doesn't quite work for me, or, better put, I did not understand the ending. I admire...

    This is my favorite work of the author's yet. After her husband's death, Clare travels to Cuba on the trip they were supposed to make together, to a horror film festival. Her husband was an academic studying the genre. But then she sees him in Havana.... The remarkable thing is tha...

    2.5/5 (rounded down) "What in the world did I just read" - sums up this book very well. At least for me. Aside from giving it a low rating I actually do not think that this is a bad book, I think that this is a brilliant book - for the right audience. The closest thing I can com...

    I hate to say this and maybe it was me, but I was lost with the story. The writer could write well enough. But the story seemed all over the place. In my mind there was a bit of false advertising from the blurb. It was nothing like I imagined it would be. ...

    The Third Hotel is such a complex and meaningful novel, so deceptively smooth yet so loaded with significance. It's almost too big for me to sum up without spinning into endless ruminations. It's about tourism, grief, and misogyny in the arts. It is also a startling piece of weird fict...

    Read this book if you like any of the following, or all of the following, and you'll be utterly entranced: (a) horror movies (b) smart discussions about horror movies (c) ghost stories (d) ghost stories that kind of maybe aren't ghost stories, but also maybe are? (e) strange, con...

    So this was ok, fine, mildly diverting ? It has elicited a vague shrug and nodding admiration from me but now almost 24 hours after finishing I find it leaves no real lasting impression. The writing is good, it's easy to read, even has some light humour but nothing jumped out and de...

    What is real and what is in the imagination of the mind? Laura Van Den Berg's "The Third Hotel" takes us through a surreal experience where the characters are in a liminal space between real and unreal, and between dead and not dead. Recently widowed Clare travels to Havana to atten...

    But maybe a person became even more themselves when away, liberated from their usual present tense I read this sentence only a few days after returning from my own vacation, and I paused for a minute to consider how true it was: On my first trip in a few years, I felt liberated from...

    "...the foundation of horror is a dislocation of reality, a dislocation designed to reveal the reality that has been there all along..." In this moody, liminal novel of ideas, Van den Berg immerses the reader in a hallucinatory narrative that is highly cinematic. And, like a surreal...

    I spent most of my time reading The Third Hotel in a state of déjà vu, trying to work out what it was reminding me of. This tale of an American in a foreign city, tailing a doppelgänger who may or may not be a figment of their imagination, felt so familiar but I just couldn?t plac...

    Suddenly and newly widowed Clare (5 weeks as the story opens) has gone to a Latin Horror Movie Festival in Havana, not because she?s into horror movies, but because her husband was. She mingles a little with the other attendees, but mostly wanders around isolated and alone. Then she ...

    I enjoyed the writing in this slim book about grief, losing yourself in travel, and daring to take a look at your ?secret? self. Parts of the plot are vague, which would normally bother me, but in this case the vagueness added a subtly creepy element to the story. We go deep into t...

    Cuba, zombies, and loose molars - this is a fever dream turned into a novel. Laura van den Berg writes about grief and the power of the subconscious: Clare, a traveling sales executive for an elevator company, loses her husband in a car accident. Richard was a film scholar who did rese...

    I?m really not entirely sure how I feel about this novel, so I?ve given it the benefit of the doubt. This review should be read with the understanding that I have a fairly high tolerance for ambiguity in a novel- in that I enjoy ?ideas reading? as much as I do ?plot reading?...

    A creative and atmospheric exploration of grief and, especially, the hidden depths and secret desires of ourselves and those we love. It is about the impossibility of truly knowing ourselves, let alone anyone else. The imagery is heavy handed at times, but overall, definitely worth a r...

    A strange little book that sees our protagonist, Clare, reeling from the death of her husband Richard. Richard was a horror film buff, and was planning to go to a film festival in Cuba when he died in an accident. Clare decides to honour this wish and still go. She does go to some of t...

    Unfortunately, this is another book that is going into my DNF file. I truly tried not only to like this book but to also understand what it was trying to relate to me. I managed to get to the 60% mark, but in reality have not a clue what I have read and how it all comes together. I did...

    I can?t decide whether to give this book a 2 or a 3. I keep changing the rating. The writing is beautiful and I loved the premise. The plot was intriguing and dark and kept me guessing until the end. Unfortunately, it kept me guessing a little too much because about 3/4 ways through ...

    I just didn't get this one and I suspect it's more me than the book itself. I'm actually sitting here feeling rather stupid that I didn't get this one, pretty much at all. I suspect that if you're a fan of horror films and books, you'll get it and that's who I recommend it for. I a...

    This is a cerebral text about liminal spaces. A woman pursues the ghost of her dead husband through Havana. He was a academic specializing in horror films which leads to some gorgeous brilliant insights on the techniques, purposes, and psychology of horror films. ...

    I liked it and the writing but I still don?t know quite what to make of it. The book felt unfinished. ...

    There is an amount of ambiguity and vagueness that can be great in a novel, but unfortunately that is almost all there was in The Third Hotel. Quite readable but I had absolutely no idea what was going on for almost the entire book - safe to say this was just not for me. ...

    This is a highly unusual take on a familiar subject, accomplished with originality and wit. Laura van den Berg had me at the location and setting, but her protagonist stepped off the page and became real, a viable character flaws and all. I was even intrigued by her line of work. Havan...

    The two impulses cannot be separated. The desire to have a life and the desire to disappear from it. The world is unlivable and yet we live in it every day. ? Laura van den Berg, The Third Hotel . . Laura van den Berg?s ?The Third Hotel? is one of those books that may be sli...

    I just never fully connected with The Third Hotel. I appreciated many aspects of the novel, and van den Berg does a great job with the setting. I almost feel like I had visited Havana in some ways by the time I was done. But ultimately I think there was a bit too much going on, and...

  • Sarah
    Oct 07, 2018

    Beautifully written, atmospheric novel about marriage and grief. Also very strange, diffuse. Mostly set in Cuba, and the country is rendered in lovely ways. So much precision of language. The ending... doesn't quite work for me, or, better put, I did not understand the ending. I admire...

    This is my favorite work of the author's yet. After her husband's death, Clare travels to Cuba on the trip they were supposed to make together, to a horror film festival. Her husband was an academic studying the genre. But then she sees him in Havana.... The remarkable thing is tha...

    2.5/5 (rounded down) "What in the world did I just read" - sums up this book very well. At least for me. Aside from giving it a low rating I actually do not think that this is a bad book, I think that this is a brilliant book - for the right audience. The closest thing I can com...

    I hate to say this and maybe it was me, but I was lost with the story. The writer could write well enough. But the story seemed all over the place. In my mind there was a bit of false advertising from the blurb. It was nothing like I imagined it would be. ...

    The Third Hotel is such a complex and meaningful novel, so deceptively smooth yet so loaded with significance. It's almost too big for me to sum up without spinning into endless ruminations. It's about tourism, grief, and misogyny in the arts. It is also a startling piece of weird fict...

    Read this book if you like any of the following, or all of the following, and you'll be utterly entranced: (a) horror movies (b) smart discussions about horror movies (c) ghost stories (d) ghost stories that kind of maybe aren't ghost stories, but also maybe are? (e) strange, con...

    So this was ok, fine, mildly diverting ? It has elicited a vague shrug and nodding admiration from me but now almost 24 hours after finishing I find it leaves no real lasting impression. The writing is good, it's easy to read, even has some light humour but nothing jumped out and de...

    What is real and what is in the imagination of the mind? Laura Van Den Berg's "The Third Hotel" takes us through a surreal experience where the characters are in a liminal space between real and unreal, and between dead and not dead. Recently widowed Clare travels to Havana to atten...

    But maybe a person became even more themselves when away, liberated from their usual present tense I read this sentence only a few days after returning from my own vacation, and I paused for a minute to consider how true it was: On my first trip in a few years, I felt liberated from...

    "...the foundation of horror is a dislocation of reality, a dislocation designed to reveal the reality that has been there all along..." In this moody, liminal novel of ideas, Van den Berg immerses the reader in a hallucinatory narrative that is highly cinematic. And, like a surreal...

    I spent most of my time reading The Third Hotel in a state of déjà vu, trying to work out what it was reminding me of. This tale of an American in a foreign city, tailing a doppelgänger who may or may not be a figment of their imagination, felt so familiar but I just couldn?t plac...

    Suddenly and newly widowed Clare (5 weeks as the story opens) has gone to a Latin Horror Movie Festival in Havana, not because she?s into horror movies, but because her husband was. She mingles a little with the other attendees, but mostly wanders around isolated and alone. Then she ...

    I enjoyed the writing in this slim book about grief, losing yourself in travel, and daring to take a look at your ?secret? self. Parts of the plot are vague, which would normally bother me, but in this case the vagueness added a subtly creepy element to the story. We go deep into t...

    Cuba, zombies, and loose molars - this is a fever dream turned into a novel. Laura van den Berg writes about grief and the power of the subconscious: Clare, a traveling sales executive for an elevator company, loses her husband in a car accident. Richard was a film scholar who did rese...

    I?m really not entirely sure how I feel about this novel, so I?ve given it the benefit of the doubt. This review should be read with the understanding that I have a fairly high tolerance for ambiguity in a novel- in that I enjoy ?ideas reading? as much as I do ?plot reading?...

    A creative and atmospheric exploration of grief and, especially, the hidden depths and secret desires of ourselves and those we love. It is about the impossibility of truly knowing ourselves, let alone anyone else. The imagery is heavy handed at times, but overall, definitely worth a r...

    A strange little book that sees our protagonist, Clare, reeling from the death of her husband Richard. Richard was a horror film buff, and was planning to go to a film festival in Cuba when he died in an accident. Clare decides to honour this wish and still go. She does go to some of t...

    Unfortunately, this is another book that is going into my DNF file. I truly tried not only to like this book but to also understand what it was trying to relate to me. I managed to get to the 60% mark, but in reality have not a clue what I have read and how it all comes together. I did...

    I can?t decide whether to give this book a 2 or a 3. I keep changing the rating. The writing is beautiful and I loved the premise. The plot was intriguing and dark and kept me guessing until the end. Unfortunately, it kept me guessing a little too much because about 3/4 ways through ...

    I just didn't get this one and I suspect it's more me than the book itself. I'm actually sitting here feeling rather stupid that I didn't get this one, pretty much at all. I suspect that if you're a fan of horror films and books, you'll get it and that's who I recommend it for. I a...

    This is a cerebral text about liminal spaces. A woman pursues the ghost of her dead husband through Havana. He was a academic specializing in horror films which leads to some gorgeous brilliant insights on the techniques, purposes, and psychology of horror films. ...

    I liked it and the writing but I still don?t know quite what to make of it. The book felt unfinished. ...

    There is an amount of ambiguity and vagueness that can be great in a novel, but unfortunately that is almost all there was in The Third Hotel. Quite readable but I had absolutely no idea what was going on for almost the entire book - safe to say this was just not for me. ...

  • Trudie
    Oct 08, 2018

    Beautifully written, atmospheric novel about marriage and grief. Also very strange, diffuse. Mostly set in Cuba, and the country is rendered in lovely ways. So much precision of language. The ending... doesn't quite work for me, or, better put, I did not understand the ending. I admire...

    This is my favorite work of the author's yet. After her husband's death, Clare travels to Cuba on the trip they were supposed to make together, to a horror film festival. Her husband was an academic studying the genre. But then she sees him in Havana.... The remarkable thing is tha...

    2.5/5 (rounded down) "What in the world did I just read" - sums up this book very well. At least for me. Aside from giving it a low rating I actually do not think that this is a bad book, I think that this is a brilliant book - for the right audience. The closest thing I can com...

    I hate to say this and maybe it was me, but I was lost with the story. The writer could write well enough. But the story seemed all over the place. In my mind there was a bit of false advertising from the blurb. It was nothing like I imagined it would be. ...

    The Third Hotel is such a complex and meaningful novel, so deceptively smooth yet so loaded with significance. It's almost too big for me to sum up without spinning into endless ruminations. It's about tourism, grief, and misogyny in the arts. It is also a startling piece of weird fict...

    Read this book if you like any of the following, or all of the following, and you'll be utterly entranced: (a) horror movies (b) smart discussions about horror movies (c) ghost stories (d) ghost stories that kind of maybe aren't ghost stories, but also maybe are? (e) strange, con...

    So this was ok, fine, mildly diverting ? It has elicited a vague shrug and nodding admiration from me but now almost 24 hours after finishing I find it leaves no real lasting impression. The writing is good, it's easy to read, even has some light humour but nothing jumped out and de...

  • Connie
    Aug 28, 2018

    Beautifully written, atmospheric novel about marriage and grief. Also very strange, diffuse. Mostly set in Cuba, and the country is rendered in lovely ways. So much precision of language. The ending... doesn't quite work for me, or, better put, I did not understand the ending. I admire...

    This is my favorite work of the author's yet. After her husband's death, Clare travels to Cuba on the trip they were supposed to make together, to a horror film festival. Her husband was an academic studying the genre. But then she sees him in Havana.... The remarkable thing is tha...

    2.5/5 (rounded down) "What in the world did I just read" - sums up this book very well. At least for me. Aside from giving it a low rating I actually do not think that this is a bad book, I think that this is a brilliant book - for the right audience. The closest thing I can com...

    I hate to say this and maybe it was me, but I was lost with the story. The writer could write well enough. But the story seemed all over the place. In my mind there was a bit of false advertising from the blurb. It was nothing like I imagined it would be. ...

    The Third Hotel is such a complex and meaningful novel, so deceptively smooth yet so loaded with significance. It's almost too big for me to sum up without spinning into endless ruminations. It's about tourism, grief, and misogyny in the arts. It is also a startling piece of weird fict...

    Read this book if you like any of the following, or all of the following, and you'll be utterly entranced: (a) horror movies (b) smart discussions about horror movies (c) ghost stories (d) ghost stories that kind of maybe aren't ghost stories, but also maybe are? (e) strange, con...

    So this was ok, fine, mildly diverting ? It has elicited a vague shrug and nodding admiration from me but now almost 24 hours after finishing I find it leaves no real lasting impression. The writing is good, it's easy to read, even has some light humour but nothing jumped out and de...

    What is real and what is in the imagination of the mind? Laura Van Den Berg's "The Third Hotel" takes us through a surreal experience where the characters are in a liminal space between real and unreal, and between dead and not dead. Recently widowed Clare travels to Havana to atten...

  • Vincent Scarpa
    Nov 06, 2017

    Beautifully written, atmospheric novel about marriage and grief. Also very strange, diffuse. Mostly set in Cuba, and the country is rendered in lovely ways. So much precision of language. The ending... doesn't quite work for me, or, better put, I did not understand the ending. I admire...

    This is my favorite work of the author's yet. After her husband's death, Clare travels to Cuba on the trip they were supposed to make together, to a horror film festival. Her husband was an academic studying the genre. But then she sees him in Havana.... The remarkable thing is tha...

    2.5/5 (rounded down) "What in the world did I just read" - sums up this book very well. At least for me. Aside from giving it a low rating I actually do not think that this is a bad book, I think that this is a brilliant book - for the right audience. The closest thing I can com...

    I hate to say this and maybe it was me, but I was lost with the story. The writer could write well enough. But the story seemed all over the place. In my mind there was a bit of false advertising from the blurb. It was nothing like I imagined it would be. ...

    The Third Hotel is such a complex and meaningful novel, so deceptively smooth yet so loaded with significance. It's almost too big for me to sum up without spinning into endless ruminations. It's about tourism, grief, and misogyny in the arts. It is also a startling piece of weird fict...

    Read this book if you like any of the following, or all of the following, and you'll be utterly entranced: (a) horror movies (b) smart discussions about horror movies (c) ghost stories (d) ghost stories that kind of maybe aren't ghost stories, but also maybe are? (e) strange, con...

    So this was ok, fine, mildly diverting ? It has elicited a vague shrug and nodding admiration from me but now almost 24 hours after finishing I find it leaves no real lasting impression. The writing is good, it's easy to read, even has some light humour but nothing jumped out and de...

    What is real and what is in the imagination of the mind? Laura Van Den Berg's "The Third Hotel" takes us through a surreal experience where the characters are in a liminal space between real and unreal, and between dead and not dead. Recently widowed Clare travels to Havana to atten...

    But maybe a person became even more themselves when away, liberated from their usual present tense I read this sentence only a few days after returning from my own vacation, and I paused for a minute to consider how true it was: On my first trip in a few years, I felt liberated from...

    "...the foundation of horror is a dislocation of reality, a dislocation designed to reveal the reality that has been there all along..." In this moody, liminal novel of ideas, Van den Berg immerses the reader in a hallucinatory narrative that is highly cinematic. And, like a surreal...

    I spent most of my time reading The Third Hotel in a state of déjà vu, trying to work out what it was reminding me of. This tale of an American in a foreign city, tailing a doppelgänger who may or may not be a figment of their imagination, felt so familiar but I just couldn?t plac...

    Suddenly and newly widowed Clare (5 weeks as the story opens) has gone to a Latin Horror Movie Festival in Havana, not because she?s into horror movies, but because her husband was. She mingles a little with the other attendees, but mostly wanders around isolated and alone. Then she ...

    I enjoyed the writing in this slim book about grief, losing yourself in travel, and daring to take a look at your ?secret? self. Parts of the plot are vague, which would normally bother me, but in this case the vagueness added a subtly creepy element to the story. We go deep into t...

    Cuba, zombies, and loose molars - this is a fever dream turned into a novel. Laura van den Berg writes about grief and the power of the subconscious: Clare, a traveling sales executive for an elevator company, loses her husband in a car accident. Richard was a film scholar who did rese...

    I?m really not entirely sure how I feel about this novel, so I?ve given it the benefit of the doubt. This review should be read with the understanding that I have a fairly high tolerance for ambiguity in a novel- in that I enjoy ?ideas reading? as much as I do ?plot reading?...

    A creative and atmospheric exploration of grief and, especially, the hidden depths and secret desires of ourselves and those we love. It is about the impossibility of truly knowing ourselves, let alone anyone else. The imagery is heavy handed at times, but overall, definitely worth a r...

    A strange little book that sees our protagonist, Clare, reeling from the death of her husband Richard. Richard was a horror film buff, and was planning to go to a film festival in Cuba when he died in an accident. Clare decides to honour this wish and still go. She does go to some of t...

    Unfortunately, this is another book that is going into my DNF file. I truly tried not only to like this book but to also understand what it was trying to relate to me. I managed to get to the 60% mark, but in reality have not a clue what I have read and how it all comes together. I did...

    I can?t decide whether to give this book a 2 or a 3. I keep changing the rating. The writing is beautiful and I loved the premise. The plot was intriguing and dark and kept me guessing until the end. Unfortunately, it kept me guessing a little too much because about 3/4 ways through ...

    I just didn't get this one and I suspect it's more me than the book itself. I'm actually sitting here feeling rather stupid that I didn't get this one, pretty much at all. I suspect that if you're a fan of horror films and books, you'll get it and that's who I recommend it for. I a...

    This is a cerebral text about liminal spaces. A woman pursues the ghost of her dead husband through Havana. He was a academic specializing in horror films which leads to some gorgeous brilliant insights on the techniques, purposes, and psychology of horror films. ...

    I liked it and the writing but I still don?t know quite what to make of it. The book felt unfinished. ...

    There is an amount of ambiguity and vagueness that can be great in a novel, but unfortunately that is almost all there was in The Third Hotel. Quite readable but I had absolutely no idea what was going on for almost the entire book - safe to say this was just not for me. ...

    This is a highly unusual take on a familiar subject, accomplished with originality and wit. Laura van den Berg had me at the location and setting, but her protagonist stepped off the page and became real, a viable character flaws and all. I was even intrigued by her line of work. Havan...

    The two impulses cannot be separated. The desire to have a life and the desire to disappear from it. The world is unlivable and yet we live in it every day. ? Laura van den Berg, The Third Hotel . . Laura van den Berg?s ?The Third Hotel? is one of those books that may be sli...

    I just never fully connected with The Third Hotel. I appreciated many aspects of the novel, and van den Berg does a great job with the setting. I almost feel like I had visited Havana in some ways by the time I was done. But ultimately I think there was a bit too much going on, and...

    Grief is a monster that?s never been rawly explored- this novel attempts that and does so much justice to the human soul. I loved this! Making it one of my favorites of 2018. Strange, eerie yet so very beautifully written. ...

    A lovely, haunting book that recalls Deb Olin Unferth's "Vacation" crossed with Samantha Hunt "The Seas." If you enjoyed the film, "A Ghost Story", you will love this book. It's complex, lush, sensual and wholly original. An enchanting read. ...

    Beyond the possibilities of articulation. A masterpiece from a writer with singular empathetic and intellectual voltage. ...

  • Claire
    Oct 09, 2018

    Beautifully written, atmospheric novel about marriage and grief. Also very strange, diffuse. Mostly set in Cuba, and the country is rendered in lovely ways. So much precision of language. The ending... doesn't quite work for me, or, better put, I did not understand the ending. I admire...

    This is my favorite work of the author's yet. After her husband's death, Clare travels to Cuba on the trip they were supposed to make together, to a horror film festival. Her husband was an academic studying the genre. But then she sees him in Havana.... The remarkable thing is tha...

    2.5/5 (rounded down) "What in the world did I just read" - sums up this book very well. At least for me. Aside from giving it a low rating I actually do not think that this is a bad book, I think that this is a brilliant book - for the right audience. The closest thing I can com...

    I hate to say this and maybe it was me, but I was lost with the story. The writer could write well enough. But the story seemed all over the place. In my mind there was a bit of false advertising from the blurb. It was nothing like I imagined it would be. ...

    The Third Hotel is such a complex and meaningful novel, so deceptively smooth yet so loaded with significance. It's almost too big for me to sum up without spinning into endless ruminations. It's about tourism, grief, and misogyny in the arts. It is also a startling piece of weird fict...

    Read this book if you like any of the following, or all of the following, and you'll be utterly entranced: (a) horror movies (b) smart discussions about horror movies (c) ghost stories (d) ghost stories that kind of maybe aren't ghost stories, but also maybe are? (e) strange, con...

    So this was ok, fine, mildly diverting ? It has elicited a vague shrug and nodding admiration from me but now almost 24 hours after finishing I find it leaves no real lasting impression. The writing is good, it's easy to read, even has some light humour but nothing jumped out and de...

    What is real and what is in the imagination of the mind? Laura Van Den Berg's "The Third Hotel" takes us through a surreal experience where the characters are in a liminal space between real and unreal, and between dead and not dead. Recently widowed Clare travels to Havana to atten...

    But maybe a person became even more themselves when away, liberated from their usual present tense I read this sentence only a few days after returning from my own vacation, and I paused for a minute to consider how true it was: On my first trip in a few years, I felt liberated from...

    "...the foundation of horror is a dislocation of reality, a dislocation designed to reveal the reality that has been there all along..." In this moody, liminal novel of ideas, Van den Berg immerses the reader in a hallucinatory narrative that is highly cinematic. And, like a surreal...

    I spent most of my time reading The Third Hotel in a state of déjà vu, trying to work out what it was reminding me of. This tale of an American in a foreign city, tailing a doppelgänger who may or may not be a figment of their imagination, felt so familiar but I just couldn?t plac...

    Suddenly and newly widowed Clare (5 weeks as the story opens) has gone to a Latin Horror Movie Festival in Havana, not because she?s into horror movies, but because her husband was. She mingles a little with the other attendees, but mostly wanders around isolated and alone. Then she ...

    I enjoyed the writing in this slim book about grief, losing yourself in travel, and daring to take a look at your ?secret? self. Parts of the plot are vague, which would normally bother me, but in this case the vagueness added a subtly creepy element to the story. We go deep into t...

    Cuba, zombies, and loose molars - this is a fever dream turned into a novel. Laura van den Berg writes about grief and the power of the subconscious: Clare, a traveling sales executive for an elevator company, loses her husband in a car accident. Richard was a film scholar who did rese...

    I?m really not entirely sure how I feel about this novel, so I?ve given it the benefit of the doubt. This review should be read with the understanding that I have a fairly high tolerance for ambiguity in a novel- in that I enjoy ?ideas reading? as much as I do ?plot reading?...

  • Audra (ouija.doodle.reads)
    Aug 19, 2018

    Beautifully written, atmospheric novel about marriage and grief. Also very strange, diffuse. Mostly set in Cuba, and the country is rendered in lovely ways. So much precision of language. The ending... doesn't quite work for me, or, better put, I did not understand the ending. I admire...

    This is my favorite work of the author's yet. After her husband's death, Clare travels to Cuba on the trip they were supposed to make together, to a horror film festival. Her husband was an academic studying the genre. But then she sees him in Havana.... The remarkable thing is tha...

    2.5/5 (rounded down) "What in the world did I just read" - sums up this book very well. At least for me. Aside from giving it a low rating I actually do not think that this is a bad book, I think that this is a brilliant book - for the right audience. The closest thing I can com...

    I hate to say this and maybe it was me, but I was lost with the story. The writer could write well enough. But the story seemed all over the place. In my mind there was a bit of false advertising from the blurb. It was nothing like I imagined it would be. ...

    The Third Hotel is such a complex and meaningful novel, so deceptively smooth yet so loaded with significance. It's almost too big for me to sum up without spinning into endless ruminations. It's about tourism, grief, and misogyny in the arts. It is also a startling piece of weird fict...

    Read this book if you like any of the following, or all of the following, and you'll be utterly entranced: (a) horror movies (b) smart discussions about horror movies (c) ghost stories (d) ghost stories that kind of maybe aren't ghost stories, but also maybe are? (e) strange, con...

    So this was ok, fine, mildly diverting ? It has elicited a vague shrug and nodding admiration from me but now almost 24 hours after finishing I find it leaves no real lasting impression. The writing is good, it's easy to read, even has some light humour but nothing jumped out and de...

    What is real and what is in the imagination of the mind? Laura Van Den Berg's "The Third Hotel" takes us through a surreal experience where the characters are in a liminal space between real and unreal, and between dead and not dead. Recently widowed Clare travels to Havana to atten...

    But maybe a person became even more themselves when away, liberated from their usual present tense I read this sentence only a few days after returning from my own vacation, and I paused for a minute to consider how true it was: On my first trip in a few years, I felt liberated from...

    "...the foundation of horror is a dislocation of reality, a dislocation designed to reveal the reality that has been there all along..." In this moody, liminal novel of ideas, Van den Berg immerses the reader in a hallucinatory narrative that is highly cinematic. And, like a surreal...

    I spent most of my time reading The Third Hotel in a state of déjà vu, trying to work out what it was reminding me of. This tale of an American in a foreign city, tailing a doppelgänger who may or may not be a figment of their imagination, felt so familiar but I just couldn?t plac...

    Suddenly and newly widowed Clare (5 weeks as the story opens) has gone to a Latin Horror Movie Festival in Havana, not because she?s into horror movies, but because her husband was. She mingles a little with the other attendees, but mostly wanders around isolated and alone. Then she ...

    I enjoyed the writing in this slim book about grief, losing yourself in travel, and daring to take a look at your ?secret? self. Parts of the plot are vague, which would normally bother me, but in this case the vagueness added a subtly creepy element to the story. We go deep into t...

    Cuba, zombies, and loose molars - this is a fever dream turned into a novel. Laura van den Berg writes about grief and the power of the subconscious: Clare, a traveling sales executive for an elevator company, loses her husband in a car accident. Richard was a film scholar who did rese...

    I?m really not entirely sure how I feel about this novel, so I?ve given it the benefit of the doubt. This review should be read with the understanding that I have a fairly high tolerance for ambiguity in a novel- in that I enjoy ?ideas reading? as much as I do ?plot reading?...

    A creative and atmospheric exploration of grief and, especially, the hidden depths and secret desires of ourselves and those we love. It is about the impossibility of truly knowing ourselves, let alone anyone else. The imagery is heavy handed at times, but overall, definitely worth a r...

    A strange little book that sees our protagonist, Clare, reeling from the death of her husband Richard. Richard was a horror film buff, and was planning to go to a film festival in Cuba when he died in an accident. Clare decides to honour this wish and still go. She does go to some of t...

    Unfortunately, this is another book that is going into my DNF file. I truly tried not only to like this book but to also understand what it was trying to relate to me. I managed to get to the 60% mark, but in reality have not a clue what I have read and how it all comes together. I did...

    I can?t decide whether to give this book a 2 or a 3. I keep changing the rating. The writing is beautiful and I loved the premise. The plot was intriguing and dark and kept me guessing until the end. Unfortunately, it kept me guessing a little too much because about 3/4 ways through ...

    I just didn't get this one and I suspect it's more me than the book itself. I'm actually sitting here feeling rather stupid that I didn't get this one, pretty much at all. I suspect that if you're a fan of horror films and books, you'll get it and that's who I recommend it for. I a...

    This is a cerebral text about liminal spaces. A woman pursues the ghost of her dead husband through Havana. He was a academic specializing in horror films which leads to some gorgeous brilliant insights on the techniques, purposes, and psychology of horror films. ...

    I liked it and the writing but I still don?t know quite what to make of it. The book felt unfinished. ...

    There is an amount of ambiguity and vagueness that can be great in a novel, but unfortunately that is almost all there was in The Third Hotel. Quite readable but I had absolutely no idea what was going on for almost the entire book - safe to say this was just not for me. ...

    This is a highly unusual take on a familiar subject, accomplished with originality and wit. Laura van den Berg had me at the location and setting, but her protagonist stepped off the page and became real, a viable character flaws and all. I was even intrigued by her line of work. Havan...

    The two impulses cannot be separated. The desire to have a life and the desire to disappear from it. The world is unlivable and yet we live in it every day. ? Laura van den Berg, The Third Hotel . . Laura van den Berg?s ?The Third Hotel? is one of those books that may be sli...

    I just never fully connected with The Third Hotel. I appreciated many aspects of the novel, and van den Berg does a great job with the setting. I almost feel like I had visited Havana in some ways by the time I was done. But ultimately I think there was a bit too much going on, and...

    Grief is a monster that?s never been rawly explored- this novel attempts that and does so much justice to the human soul. I loved this! Making it one of my favorites of 2018. Strange, eerie yet so very beautifully written. ...

    A lovely, haunting book that recalls Deb Olin Unferth's "Vacation" crossed with Samantha Hunt "The Seas." If you enjoyed the film, "A Ghost Story", you will love this book. It's complex, lush, sensual and wholly original. An enchanting read. ...

    Beyond the possibilities of articulation. A masterpiece from a writer with singular empathetic and intellectual voltage. ...

    A gorgeous, unnerving, and supremely masterful novel. ". . . to plunge a viewer into a state of terror meant to take away their compass, their tools for navigating the world, and to replace it with a compass that told a different kind of truth. The trick was ensuring the viewer was ...

  • Marchpane
    Oct 07, 2018

    Beautifully written, atmospheric novel about marriage and grief. Also very strange, diffuse. Mostly set in Cuba, and the country is rendered in lovely ways. So much precision of language. The ending... doesn't quite work for me, or, better put, I did not understand the ending. I admire...

    This is my favorite work of the author's yet. After her husband's death, Clare travels to Cuba on the trip they were supposed to make together, to a horror film festival. Her husband was an academic studying the genre. But then she sees him in Havana.... The remarkable thing is tha...

    2.5/5 (rounded down) "What in the world did I just read" - sums up this book very well. At least for me. Aside from giving it a low rating I actually do not think that this is a bad book, I think that this is a brilliant book - for the right audience. The closest thing I can com...

    I hate to say this and maybe it was me, but I was lost with the story. The writer could write well enough. But the story seemed all over the place. In my mind there was a bit of false advertising from the blurb. It was nothing like I imagined it would be. ...

    The Third Hotel is such a complex and meaningful novel, so deceptively smooth yet so loaded with significance. It's almost too big for me to sum up without spinning into endless ruminations. It's about tourism, grief, and misogyny in the arts. It is also a startling piece of weird fict...

    Read this book if you like any of the following, or all of the following, and you'll be utterly entranced: (a) horror movies (b) smart discussions about horror movies (c) ghost stories (d) ghost stories that kind of maybe aren't ghost stories, but also maybe are? (e) strange, con...

    So this was ok, fine, mildly diverting ? It has elicited a vague shrug and nodding admiration from me but now almost 24 hours after finishing I find it leaves no real lasting impression. The writing is good, it's easy to read, even has some light humour but nothing jumped out and de...

    What is real and what is in the imagination of the mind? Laura Van Den Berg's "The Third Hotel" takes us through a surreal experience where the characters are in a liminal space between real and unreal, and between dead and not dead. Recently widowed Clare travels to Havana to atten...

    But maybe a person became even more themselves when away, liberated from their usual present tense I read this sentence only a few days after returning from my own vacation, and I paused for a minute to consider how true it was: On my first trip in a few years, I felt liberated from...

    "...the foundation of horror is a dislocation of reality, a dislocation designed to reveal the reality that has been there all along..." In this moody, liminal novel of ideas, Van den Berg immerses the reader in a hallucinatory narrative that is highly cinematic. And, like a surreal...

    I spent most of my time reading The Third Hotel in a state of déjà vu, trying to work out what it was reminding me of. This tale of an American in a foreign city, tailing a doppelgänger who may or may not be a figment of their imagination, felt so familiar but I just couldn?t plac...

  • Eilonwy
    Aug 17, 2018

    Beautifully written, atmospheric novel about marriage and grief. Also very strange, diffuse. Mostly set in Cuba, and the country is rendered in lovely ways. So much precision of language. The ending... doesn't quite work for me, or, better put, I did not understand the ending. I admire...

    This is my favorite work of the author's yet. After her husband's death, Clare travels to Cuba on the trip they were supposed to make together, to a horror film festival. Her husband was an academic studying the genre. But then she sees him in Havana.... The remarkable thing is tha...

    2.5/5 (rounded down) "What in the world did I just read" - sums up this book very well. At least for me. Aside from giving it a low rating I actually do not think that this is a bad book, I think that this is a brilliant book - for the right audience. The closest thing I can com...

    I hate to say this and maybe it was me, but I was lost with the story. The writer could write well enough. But the story seemed all over the place. In my mind there was a bit of false advertising from the blurb. It was nothing like I imagined it would be. ...

    The Third Hotel is such a complex and meaningful novel, so deceptively smooth yet so loaded with significance. It's almost too big for me to sum up without spinning into endless ruminations. It's about tourism, grief, and misogyny in the arts. It is also a startling piece of weird fict...

    Read this book if you like any of the following, or all of the following, and you'll be utterly entranced: (a) horror movies (b) smart discussions about horror movies (c) ghost stories (d) ghost stories that kind of maybe aren't ghost stories, but also maybe are? (e) strange, con...

    So this was ok, fine, mildly diverting ? It has elicited a vague shrug and nodding admiration from me but now almost 24 hours after finishing I find it leaves no real lasting impression. The writing is good, it's easy to read, even has some light humour but nothing jumped out and de...

    What is real and what is in the imagination of the mind? Laura Van Den Berg's "The Third Hotel" takes us through a surreal experience where the characters are in a liminal space between real and unreal, and between dead and not dead. Recently widowed Clare travels to Havana to atten...

    But maybe a person became even more themselves when away, liberated from their usual present tense I read this sentence only a few days after returning from my own vacation, and I paused for a minute to consider how true it was: On my first trip in a few years, I felt liberated from...

    "...the foundation of horror is a dislocation of reality, a dislocation designed to reveal the reality that has been there all along..." In this moody, liminal novel of ideas, Van den Berg immerses the reader in a hallucinatory narrative that is highly cinematic. And, like a surreal...

    I spent most of my time reading The Third Hotel in a state of déjà vu, trying to work out what it was reminding me of. This tale of an American in a foreign city, tailing a doppelgänger who may or may not be a figment of their imagination, felt so familiar but I just couldn?t plac...

    Suddenly and newly widowed Clare (5 weeks as the story opens) has gone to a Latin Horror Movie Festival in Havana, not because she?s into horror movies, but because her husband was. She mingles a little with the other attendees, but mostly wanders around isolated and alone. Then she ...

  • Courtney Maum
    Jan 11, 2018

    Beautifully written, atmospheric novel about marriage and grief. Also very strange, diffuse. Mostly set in Cuba, and the country is rendered in lovely ways. So much precision of language. The ending... doesn't quite work for me, or, better put, I did not understand the ending. I admire...

    This is my favorite work of the author's yet. After her husband's death, Clare travels to Cuba on the trip they were supposed to make together, to a horror film festival. Her husband was an academic studying the genre. But then she sees him in Havana.... The remarkable thing is tha...

    2.5/5 (rounded down) "What in the world did I just read" - sums up this book very well. At least for me. Aside from giving it a low rating I actually do not think that this is a bad book, I think that this is a brilliant book - for the right audience. The closest thing I can com...

    I hate to say this and maybe it was me, but I was lost with the story. The writer could write well enough. But the story seemed all over the place. In my mind there was a bit of false advertising from the blurb. It was nothing like I imagined it would be. ...

    The Third Hotel is such a complex and meaningful novel, so deceptively smooth yet so loaded with significance. It's almost too big for me to sum up without spinning into endless ruminations. It's about tourism, grief, and misogyny in the arts. It is also a startling piece of weird fict...

    Read this book if you like any of the following, or all of the following, and you'll be utterly entranced: (a) horror movies (b) smart discussions about horror movies (c) ghost stories (d) ghost stories that kind of maybe aren't ghost stories, but also maybe are? (e) strange, con...

    So this was ok, fine, mildly diverting ? It has elicited a vague shrug and nodding admiration from me but now almost 24 hours after finishing I find it leaves no real lasting impression. The writing is good, it's easy to read, even has some light humour but nothing jumped out and de...

    What is real and what is in the imagination of the mind? Laura Van Den Berg's "The Third Hotel" takes us through a surreal experience where the characters are in a liminal space between real and unreal, and between dead and not dead. Recently widowed Clare travels to Havana to atten...

    But maybe a person became even more themselves when away, liberated from their usual present tense I read this sentence only a few days after returning from my own vacation, and I paused for a minute to consider how true it was: On my first trip in a few years, I felt liberated from...

    "...the foundation of horror is a dislocation of reality, a dislocation designed to reveal the reality that has been there all along..." In this moody, liminal novel of ideas, Van den Berg immerses the reader in a hallucinatory narrative that is highly cinematic. And, like a surreal...

    I spent most of my time reading The Third Hotel in a state of déjà vu, trying to work out what it was reminding me of. This tale of an American in a foreign city, tailing a doppelgänger who may or may not be a figment of their imagination, felt so familiar but I just couldn?t plac...

    Suddenly and newly widowed Clare (5 weeks as the story opens) has gone to a Latin Horror Movie Festival in Havana, not because she?s into horror movies, but because her husband was. She mingles a little with the other attendees, but mostly wanders around isolated and alone. Then she ...

    I enjoyed the writing in this slim book about grief, losing yourself in travel, and daring to take a look at your ?secret? self. Parts of the plot are vague, which would normally bother me, but in this case the vagueness added a subtly creepy element to the story. We go deep into t...

    Cuba, zombies, and loose molars - this is a fever dream turned into a novel. Laura van den Berg writes about grief and the power of the subconscious: Clare, a traveling sales executive for an elevator company, loses her husband in a car accident. Richard was a film scholar who did rese...

    I?m really not entirely sure how I feel about this novel, so I?ve given it the benefit of the doubt. This review should be read with the understanding that I have a fairly high tolerance for ambiguity in a novel- in that I enjoy ?ideas reading? as much as I do ?plot reading?...

    A creative and atmospheric exploration of grief and, especially, the hidden depths and secret desires of ourselves and those we love. It is about the impossibility of truly knowing ourselves, let alone anyone else. The imagery is heavy handed at times, but overall, definitely worth a r...

    A strange little book that sees our protagonist, Clare, reeling from the death of her husband Richard. Richard was a horror film buff, and was planning to go to a film festival in Cuba when he died in an accident. Clare decides to honour this wish and still go. She does go to some of t...

    Unfortunately, this is another book that is going into my DNF file. I truly tried not only to like this book but to also understand what it was trying to relate to me. I managed to get to the 60% mark, but in reality have not a clue what I have read and how it all comes together. I did...

    I can?t decide whether to give this book a 2 or a 3. I keep changing the rating. The writing is beautiful and I loved the premise. The plot was intriguing and dark and kept me guessing until the end. Unfortunately, it kept me guessing a little too much because about 3/4 ways through ...

    I just didn't get this one and I suspect it's more me than the book itself. I'm actually sitting here feeling rather stupid that I didn't get this one, pretty much at all. I suspect that if you're a fan of horror films and books, you'll get it and that's who I recommend it for. I a...

    This is a cerebral text about liminal spaces. A woman pursues the ghost of her dead husband through Havana. He was a academic specializing in horror films which leads to some gorgeous brilliant insights on the techniques, purposes, and psychology of horror films. ...

    I liked it and the writing but I still don?t know quite what to make of it. The book felt unfinished. ...

    There is an amount of ambiguity and vagueness that can be great in a novel, but unfortunately that is almost all there was in The Third Hotel. Quite readable but I had absolutely no idea what was going on for almost the entire book - safe to say this was just not for me. ...

    This is a highly unusual take on a familiar subject, accomplished with originality and wit. Laura van den Berg had me at the location and setting, but her protagonist stepped off the page and became real, a viable character flaws and all. I was even intrigued by her line of work. Havan...

    The two impulses cannot be separated. The desire to have a life and the desire to disappear from it. The world is unlivable and yet we live in it every day. ? Laura van den Berg, The Third Hotel . . Laura van den Berg?s ?The Third Hotel? is one of those books that may be sli...

    I just never fully connected with The Third Hotel. I appreciated many aspects of the novel, and van den Berg does a great job with the setting. I almost feel like I had visited Havana in some ways by the time I was done. But ultimately I think there was a bit too much going on, and...

    Grief is a monster that?s never been rawly explored- this novel attempts that and does so much justice to the human soul. I loved this! Making it one of my favorites of 2018. Strange, eerie yet so very beautifully written. ...

    A lovely, haunting book that recalls Deb Olin Unferth's "Vacation" crossed with Samantha Hunt "The Seas." If you enjoyed the film, "A Ghost Story", you will love this book. It's complex, lush, sensual and wholly original. An enchanting read. ...

  • Katie Long
    Oct 05, 2018

    Beautifully written, atmospheric novel about marriage and grief. Also very strange, diffuse. Mostly set in Cuba, and the country is rendered in lovely ways. So much precision of language. The ending... doesn't quite work for me, or, better put, I did not understand the ending. I admire...

    This is my favorite work of the author's yet. After her husband's death, Clare travels to Cuba on the trip they were supposed to make together, to a horror film festival. Her husband was an academic studying the genre. But then she sees him in Havana.... The remarkable thing is tha...

    2.5/5 (rounded down) "What in the world did I just read" - sums up this book very well. At least for me. Aside from giving it a low rating I actually do not think that this is a bad book, I think that this is a brilliant book - for the right audience. The closest thing I can com...

    I hate to say this and maybe it was me, but I was lost with the story. The writer could write well enough. But the story seemed all over the place. In my mind there was a bit of false advertising from the blurb. It was nothing like I imagined it would be. ...

    The Third Hotel is such a complex and meaningful novel, so deceptively smooth yet so loaded with significance. It's almost too big for me to sum up without spinning into endless ruminations. It's about tourism, grief, and misogyny in the arts. It is also a startling piece of weird fict...

    Read this book if you like any of the following, or all of the following, and you'll be utterly entranced: (a) horror movies (b) smart discussions about horror movies (c) ghost stories (d) ghost stories that kind of maybe aren't ghost stories, but also maybe are? (e) strange, con...

    So this was ok, fine, mildly diverting ? It has elicited a vague shrug and nodding admiration from me but now almost 24 hours after finishing I find it leaves no real lasting impression. The writing is good, it's easy to read, even has some light humour but nothing jumped out and de...

    What is real and what is in the imagination of the mind? Laura Van Den Berg's "The Third Hotel" takes us through a surreal experience where the characters are in a liminal space between real and unreal, and between dead and not dead. Recently widowed Clare travels to Havana to atten...

    But maybe a person became even more themselves when away, liberated from their usual present tense I read this sentence only a few days after returning from my own vacation, and I paused for a minute to consider how true it was: On my first trip in a few years, I felt liberated from...

    "...the foundation of horror is a dislocation of reality, a dislocation designed to reveal the reality that has been there all along..." In this moody, liminal novel of ideas, Van den Berg immerses the reader in a hallucinatory narrative that is highly cinematic. And, like a surreal...

    I spent most of my time reading The Third Hotel in a state of déjà vu, trying to work out what it was reminding me of. This tale of an American in a foreign city, tailing a doppelgänger who may or may not be a figment of their imagination, felt so familiar but I just couldn?t plac...

    Suddenly and newly widowed Clare (5 weeks as the story opens) has gone to a Latin Horror Movie Festival in Havana, not because she?s into horror movies, but because her husband was. She mingles a little with the other attendees, but mostly wanders around isolated and alone. Then she ...

    I enjoyed the writing in this slim book about grief, losing yourself in travel, and daring to take a look at your ?secret? self. Parts of the plot are vague, which would normally bother me, but in this case the vagueness added a subtly creepy element to the story. We go deep into t...

    Cuba, zombies, and loose molars - this is a fever dream turned into a novel. Laura van den Berg writes about grief and the power of the subconscious: Clare, a traveling sales executive for an elevator company, loses her husband in a car accident. Richard was a film scholar who did rese...

    I?m really not entirely sure how I feel about this novel, so I?ve given it the benefit of the doubt. This review should be read with the understanding that I have a fairly high tolerance for ambiguity in a novel- in that I enjoy ?ideas reading? as much as I do ?plot reading?...

    A creative and atmospheric exploration of grief and, especially, the hidden depths and secret desires of ourselves and those we love. It is about the impossibility of truly knowing ourselves, let alone anyone else. The imagery is heavy handed at times, but overall, definitely worth a r...

  • Mike Scalise
    Dec 14, 2017

    Beautifully written, atmospheric novel about marriage and grief. Also very strange, diffuse. Mostly set in Cuba, and the country is rendered in lovely ways. So much precision of language. The ending... doesn't quite work for me, or, better put, I did not understand the ending. I admire...

    This is my favorite work of the author's yet. After her husband's death, Clare travels to Cuba on the trip they were supposed to make together, to a horror film festival. Her husband was an academic studying the genre. But then she sees him in Havana.... The remarkable thing is tha...

    2.5/5 (rounded down) "What in the world did I just read" - sums up this book very well. At least for me. Aside from giving it a low rating I actually do not think that this is a bad book, I think that this is a brilliant book - for the right audience. The closest thing I can com...

    I hate to say this and maybe it was me, but I was lost with the story. The writer could write well enough. But the story seemed all over the place. In my mind there was a bit of false advertising from the blurb. It was nothing like I imagined it would be. ...

    The Third Hotel is such a complex and meaningful novel, so deceptively smooth yet so loaded with significance. It's almost too big for me to sum up without spinning into endless ruminations. It's about tourism, grief, and misogyny in the arts. It is also a startling piece of weird fict...

    Read this book if you like any of the following, or all of the following, and you'll be utterly entranced: (a) horror movies (b) smart discussions about horror movies (c) ghost stories (d) ghost stories that kind of maybe aren't ghost stories, but also maybe are? (e) strange, con...

  • Iryna (Book and Sword)
    Jun 10, 2018

    Beautifully written, atmospheric novel about marriage and grief. Also very strange, diffuse. Mostly set in Cuba, and the country is rendered in lovely ways. So much precision of language. The ending... doesn't quite work for me, or, better put, I did not understand the ending. I admire...

    This is my favorite work of the author's yet. After her husband's death, Clare travels to Cuba on the trip they were supposed to make together, to a horror film festival. Her husband was an academic studying the genre. But then she sees him in Havana.... The remarkable thing is tha...

    2.5/5 (rounded down) "What in the world did I just read" - sums up this book very well. At least for me. Aside from giving it a low rating I actually do not think that this is a bad book, I think that this is a brilliant book - for the right audience. The closest thing I can com...

  • Meike
    Sep 17, 2018

    Beautifully written, atmospheric novel about marriage and grief. Also very strange, diffuse. Mostly set in Cuba, and the country is rendered in lovely ways. So much precision of language. The ending... doesn't quite work for me, or, better put, I did not understand the ending. I admire...

    This is my favorite work of the author's yet. After her husband's death, Clare travels to Cuba on the trip they were supposed to make together, to a horror film festival. Her husband was an academic studying the genre. But then she sees him in Havana.... The remarkable thing is tha...

    2.5/5 (rounded down) "What in the world did I just read" - sums up this book very well. At least for me. Aside from giving it a low rating I actually do not think that this is a bad book, I think that this is a brilliant book - for the right audience. The closest thing I can com...

    I hate to say this and maybe it was me, but I was lost with the story. The writer could write well enough. But the story seemed all over the place. In my mind there was a bit of false advertising from the blurb. It was nothing like I imagined it would be. ...

    The Third Hotel is such a complex and meaningful novel, so deceptively smooth yet so loaded with significance. It's almost too big for me to sum up without spinning into endless ruminations. It's about tourism, grief, and misogyny in the arts. It is also a startling piece of weird fict...

    Read this book if you like any of the following, or all of the following, and you'll be utterly entranced: (a) horror movies (b) smart discussions about horror movies (c) ghost stories (d) ghost stories that kind of maybe aren't ghost stories, but also maybe are? (e) strange, con...

    So this was ok, fine, mildly diverting ? It has elicited a vague shrug and nodding admiration from me but now almost 24 hours after finishing I find it leaves no real lasting impression. The writing is good, it's easy to read, even has some light humour but nothing jumped out and de...

    What is real and what is in the imagination of the mind? Laura Van Den Berg's "The Third Hotel" takes us through a surreal experience where the characters are in a liminal space between real and unreal, and between dead and not dead. Recently widowed Clare travels to Havana to atten...

    But maybe a person became even more themselves when away, liberated from their usual present tense I read this sentence only a few days after returning from my own vacation, and I paused for a minute to consider how true it was: On my first trip in a few years, I felt liberated from...

    "...the foundation of horror is a dislocation of reality, a dislocation designed to reveal the reality that has been there all along..." In this moody, liminal novel of ideas, Van den Berg immerses the reader in a hallucinatory narrative that is highly cinematic. And, like a surreal...

    I spent most of my time reading The Third Hotel in a state of déjà vu, trying to work out what it was reminding me of. This tale of an American in a foreign city, tailing a doppelgänger who may or may not be a figment of their imagination, felt so familiar but I just couldn?t plac...

    Suddenly and newly widowed Clare (5 weeks as the story opens) has gone to a Latin Horror Movie Festival in Havana, not because she?s into horror movies, but because her husband was. She mingles a little with the other attendees, but mostly wanders around isolated and alone. Then she ...

    I enjoyed the writing in this slim book about grief, losing yourself in travel, and daring to take a look at your ?secret? self. Parts of the plot are vague, which would normally bother me, but in this case the vagueness added a subtly creepy element to the story. We go deep into t...

    Cuba, zombies, and loose molars - this is a fever dream turned into a novel. Laura van den Berg writes about grief and the power of the subconscious: Clare, a traveling sales executive for an elevator company, loses her husband in a car accident. Richard was a film scholar who did rese...

  • Monica Kim
    Oct 10, 2018

    Beautifully written, atmospheric novel about marriage and grief. Also very strange, diffuse. Mostly set in Cuba, and the country is rendered in lovely ways. So much precision of language. The ending... doesn't quite work for me, or, better put, I did not understand the ending. I admire...

    This is my favorite work of the author's yet. After her husband's death, Clare travels to Cuba on the trip they were supposed to make together, to a horror film festival. Her husband was an academic studying the genre. But then she sees him in Havana.... The remarkable thing is tha...

    2.5/5 (rounded down) "What in the world did I just read" - sums up this book very well. At least for me. Aside from giving it a low rating I actually do not think that this is a bad book, I think that this is a brilliant book - for the right audience. The closest thing I can com...

    I hate to say this and maybe it was me, but I was lost with the story. The writer could write well enough. But the story seemed all over the place. In my mind there was a bit of false advertising from the blurb. It was nothing like I imagined it would be. ...

    The Third Hotel is such a complex and meaningful novel, so deceptively smooth yet so loaded with significance. It's almost too big for me to sum up without spinning into endless ruminations. It's about tourism, grief, and misogyny in the arts. It is also a startling piece of weird fict...

    Read this book if you like any of the following, or all of the following, and you'll be utterly entranced: (a) horror movies (b) smart discussions about horror movies (c) ghost stories (d) ghost stories that kind of maybe aren't ghost stories, but also maybe are? (e) strange, con...

    So this was ok, fine, mildly diverting ? It has elicited a vague shrug and nodding admiration from me but now almost 24 hours after finishing I find it leaves no real lasting impression. The writing is good, it's easy to read, even has some light humour but nothing jumped out and de...

    What is real and what is in the imagination of the mind? Laura Van Den Berg's "The Third Hotel" takes us through a surreal experience where the characters are in a liminal space between real and unreal, and between dead and not dead. Recently widowed Clare travels to Havana to atten...

    But maybe a person became even more themselves when away, liberated from their usual present tense I read this sentence only a few days after returning from my own vacation, and I paused for a minute to consider how true it was: On my first trip in a few years, I felt liberated from...

    "...the foundation of horror is a dislocation of reality, a dislocation designed to reveal the reality that has been there all along..." In this moody, liminal novel of ideas, Van den Berg immerses the reader in a hallucinatory narrative that is highly cinematic. And, like a surreal...

    I spent most of my time reading The Third Hotel in a state of déjà vu, trying to work out what it was reminding me of. This tale of an American in a foreign city, tailing a doppelgänger who may or may not be a figment of their imagination, felt so familiar but I just couldn?t plac...

    Suddenly and newly widowed Clare (5 weeks as the story opens) has gone to a Latin Horror Movie Festival in Havana, not because she?s into horror movies, but because her husband was. She mingles a little with the other attendees, but mostly wanders around isolated and alone. Then she ...

    I enjoyed the writing in this slim book about grief, losing yourself in travel, and daring to take a look at your ?secret? self. Parts of the plot are vague, which would normally bother me, but in this case the vagueness added a subtly creepy element to the story. We go deep into t...

    Cuba, zombies, and loose molars - this is a fever dream turned into a novel. Laura van den Berg writes about grief and the power of the subconscious: Clare, a traveling sales executive for an elevator company, loses her husband in a car accident. Richard was a film scholar who did rese...

    I?m really not entirely sure how I feel about this novel, so I?ve given it the benefit of the doubt. This review should be read with the understanding that I have a fairly high tolerance for ambiguity in a novel- in that I enjoy ?ideas reading? as much as I do ?plot reading?...

    A creative and atmospheric exploration of grief and, especially, the hidden depths and secret desires of ourselves and those we love. It is about the impossibility of truly knowing ourselves, let alone anyone else. The imagery is heavy handed at times, but overall, definitely worth a r...

    A strange little book that sees our protagonist, Clare, reeling from the death of her husband Richard. Richard was a horror film buff, and was planning to go to a film festival in Cuba when he died in an accident. Clare decides to honour this wish and still go. She does go to some of t...

    Unfortunately, this is another book that is going into my DNF file. I truly tried not only to like this book but to also understand what it was trying to relate to me. I managed to get to the 60% mark, but in reality have not a clue what I have read and how it all comes together. I did...

    I can?t decide whether to give this book a 2 or a 3. I keep changing the rating. The writing is beautiful and I loved the premise. The plot was intriguing and dark and kept me guessing until the end. Unfortunately, it kept me guessing a little too much because about 3/4 ways through ...

    I just didn't get this one and I suspect it's more me than the book itself. I'm actually sitting here feeling rather stupid that I didn't get this one, pretty much at all. I suspect that if you're a fan of horror films and books, you'll get it and that's who I recommend it for. I a...

    This is a cerebral text about liminal spaces. A woman pursues the ghost of her dead husband through Havana. He was a academic specializing in horror films which leads to some gorgeous brilliant insights on the techniques, purposes, and psychology of horror films. ...

    I liked it and the writing but I still don?t know quite what to make of it. The book felt unfinished. ...

    There is an amount of ambiguity and vagueness that can be great in a novel, but unfortunately that is almost all there was in The Third Hotel. Quite readable but I had absolutely no idea what was going on for almost the entire book - safe to say this was just not for me. ...

    This is a highly unusual take on a familiar subject, accomplished with originality and wit. Laura van den Berg had me at the location and setting, but her protagonist stepped off the page and became real, a viable character flaws and all. I was even intrigued by her line of work. Havan...

    The two impulses cannot be separated. The desire to have a life and the desire to disappear from it. The world is unlivable and yet we live in it every day. ? Laura van den Berg, The Third Hotel . . Laura van den Berg?s ?The Third Hotel? is one of those books that may be sli...

  • Nicky
    Oct 07, 2018

    Beautifully written, atmospheric novel about marriage and grief. Also very strange, diffuse. Mostly set in Cuba, and the country is rendered in lovely ways. So much precision of language. The ending... doesn't quite work for me, or, better put, I did not understand the ending. I admire...

    This is my favorite work of the author's yet. After her husband's death, Clare travels to Cuba on the trip they were supposed to make together, to a horror film festival. Her husband was an academic studying the genre. But then she sees him in Havana.... The remarkable thing is tha...

    2.5/5 (rounded down) "What in the world did I just read" - sums up this book very well. At least for me. Aside from giving it a low rating I actually do not think that this is a bad book, I think that this is a brilliant book - for the right audience. The closest thing I can com...

    I hate to say this and maybe it was me, but I was lost with the story. The writer could write well enough. But the story seemed all over the place. In my mind there was a bit of false advertising from the blurb. It was nothing like I imagined it would be. ...

    The Third Hotel is such a complex and meaningful novel, so deceptively smooth yet so loaded with significance. It's almost too big for me to sum up without spinning into endless ruminations. It's about tourism, grief, and misogyny in the arts. It is also a startling piece of weird fict...

    Read this book if you like any of the following, or all of the following, and you'll be utterly entranced: (a) horror movies (b) smart discussions about horror movies (c) ghost stories (d) ghost stories that kind of maybe aren't ghost stories, but also maybe are? (e) strange, con...

    So this was ok, fine, mildly diverting ? It has elicited a vague shrug and nodding admiration from me but now almost 24 hours after finishing I find it leaves no real lasting impression. The writing is good, it's easy to read, even has some light humour but nothing jumped out and de...

    What is real and what is in the imagination of the mind? Laura Van Den Berg's "The Third Hotel" takes us through a surreal experience where the characters are in a liminal space between real and unreal, and between dead and not dead. Recently widowed Clare travels to Havana to atten...

    But maybe a person became even more themselves when away, liberated from their usual present tense I read this sentence only a few days after returning from my own vacation, and I paused for a minute to consider how true it was: On my first trip in a few years, I felt liberated from...

    "...the foundation of horror is a dislocation of reality, a dislocation designed to reveal the reality that has been there all along..." In this moody, liminal novel of ideas, Van den Berg immerses the reader in a hallucinatory narrative that is highly cinematic. And, like a surreal...

    I spent most of my time reading The Third Hotel in a state of déjà vu, trying to work out what it was reminding me of. This tale of an American in a foreign city, tailing a doppelgänger who may or may not be a figment of their imagination, felt so familiar but I just couldn?t plac...

    Suddenly and newly widowed Clare (5 weeks as the story opens) has gone to a Latin Horror Movie Festival in Havana, not because she?s into horror movies, but because her husband was. She mingles a little with the other attendees, but mostly wanders around isolated and alone. Then she ...

    I enjoyed the writing in this slim book about grief, losing yourself in travel, and daring to take a look at your ?secret? self. Parts of the plot are vague, which would normally bother me, but in this case the vagueness added a subtly creepy element to the story. We go deep into t...

    Cuba, zombies, and loose molars - this is a fever dream turned into a novel. Laura van den Berg writes about grief and the power of the subconscious: Clare, a traveling sales executive for an elevator company, loses her husband in a car accident. Richard was a film scholar who did rese...

    I?m really not entirely sure how I feel about this novel, so I?ve given it the benefit of the doubt. This review should be read with the understanding that I have a fairly high tolerance for ambiguity in a novel- in that I enjoy ?ideas reading? as much as I do ?plot reading?...

    A creative and atmospheric exploration of grief and, especially, the hidden depths and secret desires of ourselves and those we love. It is about the impossibility of truly knowing ourselves, let alone anyone else. The imagery is heavy handed at times, but overall, definitely worth a r...

    A strange little book that sees our protagonist, Clare, reeling from the death of her husband Richard. Richard was a horror film buff, and was planning to go to a film festival in Cuba when he died in an accident. Clare decides to honour this wish and still go. She does go to some of t...

    Unfortunately, this is another book that is going into my DNF file. I truly tried not only to like this book but to also understand what it was trying to relate to me. I managed to get to the 60% mark, but in reality have not a clue what I have read and how it all comes together. I did...

    I can?t decide whether to give this book a 2 or a 3. I keep changing the rating. The writing is beautiful and I loved the premise. The plot was intriguing and dark and kept me guessing until the end. Unfortunately, it kept me guessing a little too much because about 3/4 ways through ...

    I just didn't get this one and I suspect it's more me than the book itself. I'm actually sitting here feeling rather stupid that I didn't get this one, pretty much at all. I suspect that if you're a fan of horror films and books, you'll get it and that's who I recommend it for. I a...

    This is a cerebral text about liminal spaces. A woman pursues the ghost of her dead husband through Havana. He was a academic specializing in horror films which leads to some gorgeous brilliant insights on the techniques, purposes, and psychology of horror films. ...

    I liked it and the writing but I still don?t know quite what to make of it. The book felt unfinished. ...

  • Tziggy
    Aug 27, 2018

    Beautifully written, atmospheric novel about marriage and grief. Also very strange, diffuse. Mostly set in Cuba, and the country is rendered in lovely ways. So much precision of language. The ending... doesn't quite work for me, or, better put, I did not understand the ending. I admire...

    This is my favorite work of the author's yet. After her husband's death, Clare travels to Cuba on the trip they were supposed to make together, to a horror film festival. Her husband was an academic studying the genre. But then she sees him in Havana.... The remarkable thing is tha...

    2.5/5 (rounded down) "What in the world did I just read" - sums up this book very well. At least for me. Aside from giving it a low rating I actually do not think that this is a bad book, I think that this is a brilliant book - for the right audience. The closest thing I can com...

    I hate to say this and maybe it was me, but I was lost with the story. The writer could write well enough. But the story seemed all over the place. In my mind there was a bit of false advertising from the blurb. It was nothing like I imagined it would be. ...

  • Kylie D
    Jul 25, 2018

    Beautifully written, atmospheric novel about marriage and grief. Also very strange, diffuse. Mostly set in Cuba, and the country is rendered in lovely ways. So much precision of language. The ending... doesn't quite work for me, or, better put, I did not understand the ending. I admire...

    This is my favorite work of the author's yet. After her husband's death, Clare travels to Cuba on the trip they were supposed to make together, to a horror film festival. Her husband was an academic studying the genre. But then she sees him in Havana.... The remarkable thing is tha...

    2.5/5 (rounded down) "What in the world did I just read" - sums up this book very well. At least for me. Aside from giving it a low rating I actually do not think that this is a bad book, I think that this is a brilliant book - for the right audience. The closest thing I can com...

    I hate to say this and maybe it was me, but I was lost with the story. The writer could write well enough. But the story seemed all over the place. In my mind there was a bit of false advertising from the blurb. It was nothing like I imagined it would be. ...

    The Third Hotel is such a complex and meaningful novel, so deceptively smooth yet so loaded with significance. It's almost too big for me to sum up without spinning into endless ruminations. It's about tourism, grief, and misogyny in the arts. It is also a startling piece of weird fict...

    Read this book if you like any of the following, or all of the following, and you'll be utterly entranced: (a) horror movies (b) smart discussions about horror movies (c) ghost stories (d) ghost stories that kind of maybe aren't ghost stories, but also maybe are? (e) strange, con...

    So this was ok, fine, mildly diverting ? It has elicited a vague shrug and nodding admiration from me but now almost 24 hours after finishing I find it leaves no real lasting impression. The writing is good, it's easy to read, even has some light humour but nothing jumped out and de...

    What is real and what is in the imagination of the mind? Laura Van Den Berg's "The Third Hotel" takes us through a surreal experience where the characters are in a liminal space between real and unreal, and between dead and not dead. Recently widowed Clare travels to Havana to atten...

    But maybe a person became even more themselves when away, liberated from their usual present tense I read this sentence only a few days after returning from my own vacation, and I paused for a minute to consider how true it was: On my first trip in a few years, I felt liberated from...

    "...the foundation of horror is a dislocation of reality, a dislocation designed to reveal the reality that has been there all along..." In this moody, liminal novel of ideas, Van den Berg immerses the reader in a hallucinatory narrative that is highly cinematic. And, like a surreal...

    I spent most of my time reading The Third Hotel in a state of déjà vu, trying to work out what it was reminding me of. This tale of an American in a foreign city, tailing a doppelgänger who may or may not be a figment of their imagination, felt so familiar but I just couldn?t plac...

    Suddenly and newly widowed Clare (5 weeks as the story opens) has gone to a Latin Horror Movie Festival in Havana, not because she?s into horror movies, but because her husband was. She mingles a little with the other attendees, but mostly wanders around isolated and alone. Then she ...

    I enjoyed the writing in this slim book about grief, losing yourself in travel, and daring to take a look at your ?secret? self. Parts of the plot are vague, which would normally bother me, but in this case the vagueness added a subtly creepy element to the story. We go deep into t...

    Cuba, zombies, and loose molars - this is a fever dream turned into a novel. Laura van den Berg writes about grief and the power of the subconscious: Clare, a traveling sales executive for an elevator company, loses her husband in a car accident. Richard was a film scholar who did rese...

    I?m really not entirely sure how I feel about this novel, so I?ve given it the benefit of the doubt. This review should be read with the understanding that I have a fairly high tolerance for ambiguity in a novel- in that I enjoy ?ideas reading? as much as I do ?plot reading?...

    A creative and atmospheric exploration of grief and, especially, the hidden depths and secret desires of ourselves and those we love. It is about the impossibility of truly knowing ourselves, let alone anyone else. The imagery is heavy handed at times, but overall, definitely worth a r...

    A strange little book that sees our protagonist, Clare, reeling from the death of her husband Richard. Richard was a horror film buff, and was planning to go to a film festival in Cuba when he died in an accident. Clare decides to honour this wish and still go. She does go to some of t...