Sharp: The Women Who Made an Art of Having an Opinion

Sharp: The Women Who Made an Art of Having an Opinion

The ten brilliant women who are the focus of Sharp came from different backgrounds and had vastly divergent political and artistic opinions. But they all made a significant contribution to the cultural and intellectual history of America and ultimately changed the course of the twentieth century, in spite of the men who often undervalued or dismissed their work. These ten The ten brilliant women who are the focus of Sharp came from different backgrounds and had vastly divergent political and...

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Title:Sharp: The Women Who Made an Art of Having an Opinion
Author:Michelle Dean
Rating:
Genres:Nonfiction
ISBN:B075VD7X6L
Edition Language:English
Format Type:Kindle Edition
Number of Pages:384 pages pages

Sharp: The Women Who Made an Art of Having an Opinion Reviews

  • Paul Bryant
    May 14, 2018

    Mary McCarthy saw Susan Sontag at a party, where else, and said to her ?I hear you?re the new me.? **** This account of the careers of Dorothy Parker, Hannah Arendt, Mary McCarthy, Susan Sontag, Pauline Kael, Joan Didion, Nora Ephron, Renata Adler and Janet Malcolm with ...

  • Gina
    Jun 11, 2018

    Mary McCarthy saw Susan Sontag at a party, where else, and said to her ?I hear you?re the new me.? **** This account of the careers of Dorothy Parker, Hannah Arendt, Mary McCarthy, Susan Sontag, Pauline Kael, Joan Didion, Nora Ephron, Renata Adler and Janet Malcolm with ...

    Gobbled this book up in a few sittings. Loved reading more about women I already admired, and learning a lot about a few I didn't know much about. A beautifully written and well researched book. ...

    What a disappointment. This is a book about women who built careers on criticism, yet does very little to really, truly delve into the minefield of what it means to be a person whose very existence is ?critical? (Living While Female) while turning the mirror around on the socie...

    Sharp is an exceptionally well written exploration of some of the most influential women writers of the last century. Almost every chapter explores a different woman's writing, giving details of their childhood and adolescent years as well as the intimate details of their writing caree...

    Thank you to NetGalley and the publisher for providing this book in exchange for an honest review. A recent trend in nonfiction revolves around anthologies of great women. Across ages and genres, notable women of the past are being highlighted in collections of their lives and works...

    From BBC Radio 4 - Book of the week: As part of the Algonquin Round Table, Dorothy Parker established her reputation as one of the most brilliant wits in New York and came to epitomize the liberated woman of the 1920s. Mary McCarthy As both a novelist and a critic McCarthy was not...

    (2.5) ?People have trouble with women who aren?t ?nice,? ? who have the courage to sometimes be wrong in public.? In compiling 10 mini-biographies of twentieth-century women writers and cultural critics who weren?t afraid to be unpopular, Dean (herself a literary critic) ...

    Enormously enjoyable and informative group biography of women who never shrank from voicing their opinions at a time when women were rarely encouraged to do so. From Hannah Arendt to Dorothy Parker, Rebecca West to Susan Sontag, the book covers a lot of ground and is an excellent intro...

    An outstanding, must-read book--lovers of Didion, Sontag, Dorothy Parker or all the other brilliant women explored here: this is for you. A gift to the discussion of 20th-century arts and letters. And a lovesong to smart women. ...

    A collection studying various female writers who at least began in the 20th century, all of whom were at one or another time called 'sharp' - which may seem a bit of a stretch, as premises go, but it stands for a whole constellation of qualities: women who because they weren't 'nice' w...

    1 star (audio version)--with the caveat that I read only about 3/4 of the book. I found these essays on smart and opinionated ("sharp") women writers to be dry and unimaginative. The writer's own voice was completely missing; I didn't know why she cared (or wasn't convince that she...

    I loved the profiles of each of the women and how they made their mark on criticism and essaying. That said, I wish that they had covered a group that was a little more diverse (Zora Neale Hurston is the only author of color mentioned, and she has to share a chapter) and that a little ...

    This wasn't precisely what I had expected, but seeing as this turns out to be an intellectual history of notable 20th century female public thinkers, I was quite happy with what I got. Michelle Dean has a real talent for picking choice quotes and events from her subjects, and I was del...

    Before reading Sharp by Michelle Dean, I wasn't under the impression that the women in this book were going to become some kind of role models for me, but I guess I expected them to be a little more together, maybe a little less petty. Now, don't get me wrong, I love some petty. Espe...

    A who?s who of NYC white female 20th century writers & their foibles, especially romantic ones. Anyone of color is snubbed. Men are still the movers & shakers?the women are allowed to enter their orbit, or so it would seem from the narrative. This is NOT a scholarly book no...

    An interesting exploration of 10 "sharp" women of the 20th century, all writers and feminist influencers in one way or another. The author does an excellent job of not only discussing each woman but also demonstrating links among them. Of value in relation to understanding each woman a...

    Conflicted is how I feel about this book. I enjoyed reading about Dorothy Parker; I had a hard time with the other writers. Perhaps it is because the author went to the pettiness and the criticism of each of the females authors had with each other. She threw in a good measure included ...

    Loved this. Sharp by Michelle Dean gives insights into the lives and work of some of the 20th century?s most influential women writers. Dorothy Parker, Rebecca West, Hannah Arendt, Mary McCarthy, Susan Sontag, Pauline Kael, Joan Didion Nora Ephron Renata Adler & Janet Malcolm... ...

    If this book does nothing more than get the next generations reading its subjects, it will have done enough. But it does a whole lot more. Michelle Dean is a treasure. Here, she gives us chewy, arguable opinions and rigorous research. I?m jealous of the deep reading she did for t...

    Honestly, this just felt like reading a textbook. ...

    I am fascinated by the "early" woman thinkers - those women who developed a reputation for intellectual rigor and originality in a time (the early 1900s) when such domains were considered the exclusive property of men. I was familiar with nearly all of the phenomenally talented women i...

    Sharp: The Women Who Made an Art of Having an Opinion is a biography-cum-reckoning about the legacy of ten extraordinary women: Dorothy Parker, Rebecca West, Hannah Arendt, Mary McCarthy, Nora Ephron, Susan Sontag, Renata Adler, Joan Didion, Janet Malcolm, and Zora Neale Hurston. O...

    This is a gossipy and sensationalized view of the intimacies of notable women writers of the 20th century under the guise of being a serious study of their professional achievements. Admittedly, it is hard to put down--like a bag of chips you know are not good for you. Michelle Dean's ...

    From the days when argument mattered, this is a thoughtful, thoroughly reported survey of ten public intellectuals connected by their chromosomes and the ability to write well. Michelle Dean does a little too much linking for me, but the links are there and make a decent organizing pri...

    I would give this book 4.5 stars if that were possible. I really enjoyed it. If you're looking for a brief but beautifully researched overview of the interconnected lives and works of Dorothy Parker, Rebecca West, Mary McCarthy, Hannah Arendt, Susan Sontag, Joan Didion, Janet Malcolm, ...

  • Laura
    Apr 26, 2018

    Mary McCarthy saw Susan Sontag at a party, where else, and said to her ?I hear you?re the new me.? **** This account of the careers of Dorothy Parker, Hannah Arendt, Mary McCarthy, Susan Sontag, Pauline Kael, Joan Didion, Nora Ephron, Renata Adler and Janet Malcolm with ...

    Gobbled this book up in a few sittings. Loved reading more about women I already admired, and learning a lot about a few I didn't know much about. A beautifully written and well researched book. ...

    What a disappointment. This is a book about women who built careers on criticism, yet does very little to really, truly delve into the minefield of what it means to be a person whose very existence is ?critical? (Living While Female) while turning the mirror around on the socie...

    Sharp is an exceptionally well written exploration of some of the most influential women writers of the last century. Almost every chapter explores a different woman's writing, giving details of their childhood and adolescent years as well as the intimate details of their writing caree...

    Thank you to NetGalley and the publisher for providing this book in exchange for an honest review. A recent trend in nonfiction revolves around anthologies of great women. Across ages and genres, notable women of the past are being highlighted in collections of their lives and works...

    From BBC Radio 4 - Book of the week: As part of the Algonquin Round Table, Dorothy Parker established her reputation as one of the most brilliant wits in New York and came to epitomize the liberated woman of the 1920s. Mary McCarthy As both a novelist and a critic McCarthy was not...

  • Rebecca H.
    May 21, 2018

    Mary McCarthy saw Susan Sontag at a party, where else, and said to her ?I hear you?re the new me.? **** This account of the careers of Dorothy Parker, Hannah Arendt, Mary McCarthy, Susan Sontag, Pauline Kael, Joan Didion, Nora Ephron, Renata Adler and Janet Malcolm with ...

    Gobbled this book up in a few sittings. Loved reading more about women I already admired, and learning a lot about a few I didn't know much about. A beautifully written and well researched book. ...

    What a disappointment. This is a book about women who built careers on criticism, yet does very little to really, truly delve into the minefield of what it means to be a person whose very existence is ?critical? (Living While Female) while turning the mirror around on the socie...

    Sharp is an exceptionally well written exploration of some of the most influential women writers of the last century. Almost every chapter explores a different woman's writing, giving details of their childhood and adolescent years as well as the intimate details of their writing caree...

    Thank you to NetGalley and the publisher for providing this book in exchange for an honest review. A recent trend in nonfiction revolves around anthologies of great women. Across ages and genres, notable women of the past are being highlighted in collections of their lives and works...

    From BBC Radio 4 - Book of the week: As part of the Algonquin Round Table, Dorothy Parker established her reputation as one of the most brilliant wits in New York and came to epitomize the liberated woman of the 1920s. Mary McCarthy As both a novelist and a critic McCarthy was not...

    (2.5) ?People have trouble with women who aren?t ?nice,? ? who have the courage to sometimes be wrong in public.? In compiling 10 mini-biographies of twentieth-century women writers and cultural critics who weren?t afraid to be unpopular, Dean (herself a literary critic) ...

    Enormously enjoyable and informative group biography of women who never shrank from voicing their opinions at a time when women were rarely encouraged to do so. From Hannah Arendt to Dorothy Parker, Rebecca West to Susan Sontag, the book covers a lot of ground and is an excellent intro...

    An outstanding, must-read book--lovers of Didion, Sontag, Dorothy Parker or all the other brilliant women explored here: this is for you. A gift to the discussion of 20th-century arts and letters. And a lovesong to smart women. ...

    A collection studying various female writers who at least began in the 20th century, all of whom were at one or another time called 'sharp' - which may seem a bit of a stretch, as premises go, but it stands for a whole constellation of qualities: women who because they weren't 'nice' w...

    1 star (audio version)--with the caveat that I read only about 3/4 of the book. I found these essays on smart and opinionated ("sharp") women writers to be dry and unimaginative. The writer's own voice was completely missing; I didn't know why she cared (or wasn't convince that she...

    I loved the profiles of each of the women and how they made their mark on criticism and essaying. That said, I wish that they had covered a group that was a little more diverse (Zora Neale Hurston is the only author of color mentioned, and she has to share a chapter) and that a little ...

    This wasn't precisely what I had expected, but seeing as this turns out to be an intellectual history of notable 20th century female public thinkers, I was quite happy with what I got. Michelle Dean has a real talent for picking choice quotes and events from her subjects, and I was del...

    Before reading Sharp by Michelle Dean, I wasn't under the impression that the women in this book were going to become some kind of role models for me, but I guess I expected them to be a little more together, maybe a little less petty. Now, don't get me wrong, I love some petty. Espe...

    A who?s who of NYC white female 20th century writers & their foibles, especially romantic ones. Anyone of color is snubbed. Men are still the movers & shakers?the women are allowed to enter their orbit, or so it would seem from the narrative. This is NOT a scholarly book no...

    An interesting exploration of 10 "sharp" women of the 20th century, all writers and feminist influencers in one way or another. The author does an excellent job of not only discussing each woman but also demonstrating links among them. Of value in relation to understanding each woman a...

    Conflicted is how I feel about this book. I enjoyed reading about Dorothy Parker; I had a hard time with the other writers. Perhaps it is because the author went to the pettiness and the criticism of each of the females authors had with each other. She threw in a good measure included ...

    Loved this. Sharp by Michelle Dean gives insights into the lives and work of some of the 20th century?s most influential women writers. Dorothy Parker, Rebecca West, Hannah Arendt, Mary McCarthy, Susan Sontag, Pauline Kael, Joan Didion Nora Ephron Renata Adler & Janet Malcolm... ...

    If this book does nothing more than get the next generations reading its subjects, it will have done enough. But it does a whole lot more. Michelle Dean is a treasure. Here, she gives us chewy, arguable opinions and rigorous research. I?m jealous of the deep reading she did for t...

    Honestly, this just felt like reading a textbook. ...

    I am fascinated by the "early" woman thinkers - those women who developed a reputation for intellectual rigor and originality in a time (the early 1900s) when such domains were considered the exclusive property of men. I was familiar with nearly all of the phenomenally talented women i...

    Sharp: The Women Who Made an Art of Having an Opinion is a biography-cum-reckoning about the legacy of ten extraordinary women: Dorothy Parker, Rebecca West, Hannah Arendt, Mary McCarthy, Nora Ephron, Susan Sontag, Renata Adler, Joan Didion, Janet Malcolm, and Zora Neale Hurston. O...

    This is a gossipy and sensationalized view of the intimacies of notable women writers of the 20th century under the guise of being a serious study of their professional achievements. Admittedly, it is hard to put down--like a bag of chips you know are not good for you. Michelle Dean's ...

    From the days when argument mattered, this is a thoughtful, thoroughly reported survey of ten public intellectuals connected by their chromosomes and the ability to write well. Michelle Dean does a little too much linking for me, but the links are there and make a decent organizing pri...

    I would give this book 4.5 stars if that were possible. I really enjoyed it. If you're looking for a brief but beautifully researched overview of the interconnected lives and works of Dorothy Parker, Rebecca West, Mary McCarthy, Hannah Arendt, Susan Sontag, Joan Didion, Janet Malcolm, ...

    A meticulously researched overview of the women who shaped twentieth century public arguments. In a society still averse to outspoken women, this book holds a mirror to a world today's women writers likely wish existed. ...

    I really wanted to like this book. It?s thoroughly researched but ultimately boring. ...

    https://ofbooksandbikes.com/2018/05/2... ...

  • Megan Abbott
    Apr 10, 2018

    Mary McCarthy saw Susan Sontag at a party, where else, and said to her ?I hear you?re the new me.? **** This account of the careers of Dorothy Parker, Hannah Arendt, Mary McCarthy, Susan Sontag, Pauline Kael, Joan Didion, Nora Ephron, Renata Adler and Janet Malcolm with ...

    Gobbled this book up in a few sittings. Loved reading more about women I already admired, and learning a lot about a few I didn't know much about. A beautifully written and well researched book. ...

    What a disappointment. This is a book about women who built careers on criticism, yet does very little to really, truly delve into the minefield of what it means to be a person whose very existence is ?critical? (Living While Female) while turning the mirror around on the socie...

    Sharp is an exceptionally well written exploration of some of the most influential women writers of the last century. Almost every chapter explores a different woman's writing, giving details of their childhood and adolescent years as well as the intimate details of their writing caree...

    Thank you to NetGalley and the publisher for providing this book in exchange for an honest review. A recent trend in nonfiction revolves around anthologies of great women. Across ages and genres, notable women of the past are being highlighted in collections of their lives and works...

    From BBC Radio 4 - Book of the week: As part of the Algonquin Round Table, Dorothy Parker established her reputation as one of the most brilliant wits in New York and came to epitomize the liberated woman of the 1920s. Mary McCarthy As both a novelist and a critic McCarthy was not...

    (2.5) ?People have trouble with women who aren?t ?nice,? ? who have the courage to sometimes be wrong in public.? In compiling 10 mini-biographies of twentieth-century women writers and cultural critics who weren?t afraid to be unpopular, Dean (herself a literary critic) ...

    Enormously enjoyable and informative group biography of women who never shrank from voicing their opinions at a time when women were rarely encouraged to do so. From Hannah Arendt to Dorothy Parker, Rebecca West to Susan Sontag, the book covers a lot of ground and is an excellent intro...

    An outstanding, must-read book--lovers of Didion, Sontag, Dorothy Parker or all the other brilliant women explored here: this is for you. A gift to the discussion of 20th-century arts and letters. And a lovesong to smart women. ...

  • Brenda
    Apr 22, 2018

    Mary McCarthy saw Susan Sontag at a party, where else, and said to her ?I hear you?re the new me.? **** This account of the careers of Dorothy Parker, Hannah Arendt, Mary McCarthy, Susan Sontag, Pauline Kael, Joan Didion, Nora Ephron, Renata Adler and Janet Malcolm with ...

    Gobbled this book up in a few sittings. Loved reading more about women I already admired, and learning a lot about a few I didn't know much about. A beautifully written and well researched book. ...

    What a disappointment. This is a book about women who built careers on criticism, yet does very little to really, truly delve into the minefield of what it means to be a person whose very existence is ?critical? (Living While Female) while turning the mirror around on the socie...

    Sharp is an exceptionally well written exploration of some of the most influential women writers of the last century. Almost every chapter explores a different woman's writing, giving details of their childhood and adolescent years as well as the intimate details of their writing caree...

    Thank you to NetGalley and the publisher for providing this book in exchange for an honest review. A recent trend in nonfiction revolves around anthologies of great women. Across ages and genres, notable women of the past are being highlighted in collections of their lives and works...

    From BBC Radio 4 - Book of the week: As part of the Algonquin Round Table, Dorothy Parker established her reputation as one of the most brilliant wits in New York and came to epitomize the liberated woman of the 1920s. Mary McCarthy As both a novelist and a critic McCarthy was not...

    (2.5) ?People have trouble with women who aren?t ?nice,? ? who have the courage to sometimes be wrong in public.? In compiling 10 mini-biographies of twentieth-century women writers and cultural critics who weren?t afraid to be unpopular, Dean (herself a literary critic) ...

    Enormously enjoyable and informative group biography of women who never shrank from voicing their opinions at a time when women were rarely encouraged to do so. From Hannah Arendt to Dorothy Parker, Rebecca West to Susan Sontag, the book covers a lot of ground and is an excellent intro...

    An outstanding, must-read book--lovers of Didion, Sontag, Dorothy Parker or all the other brilliant women explored here: this is for you. A gift to the discussion of 20th-century arts and letters. And a lovesong to smart women. ...

    A collection studying various female writers who at least began in the 20th century, all of whom were at one or another time called 'sharp' - which may seem a bit of a stretch, as premises go, but it stands for a whole constellation of qualities: women who because they weren't 'nice' w...

    1 star (audio version)--with the caveat that I read only about 3/4 of the book. I found these essays on smart and opinionated ("sharp") women writers to be dry and unimaginative. The writer's own voice was completely missing; I didn't know why she cared (or wasn't convince that she...

    I loved the profiles of each of the women and how they made their mark on criticism and essaying. That said, I wish that they had covered a group that was a little more diverse (Zora Neale Hurston is the only author of color mentioned, and she has to share a chapter) and that a little ...

    This wasn't precisely what I had expected, but seeing as this turns out to be an intellectual history of notable 20th century female public thinkers, I was quite happy with what I got. Michelle Dean has a real talent for picking choice quotes and events from her subjects, and I was del...

    Before reading Sharp by Michelle Dean, I wasn't under the impression that the women in this book were going to become some kind of role models for me, but I guess I expected them to be a little more together, maybe a little less petty. Now, don't get me wrong, I love some petty. Espe...

    A who?s who of NYC white female 20th century writers & their foibles, especially romantic ones. Anyone of color is snubbed. Men are still the movers & shakers?the women are allowed to enter their orbit, or so it would seem from the narrative. This is NOT a scholarly book no...

    An interesting exploration of 10 "sharp" women of the 20th century, all writers and feminist influencers in one way or another. The author does an excellent job of not only discussing each woman but also demonstrating links among them. Of value in relation to understanding each woman a...

    Conflicted is how I feel about this book. I enjoyed reading about Dorothy Parker; I had a hard time with the other writers. Perhaps it is because the author went to the pettiness and the criticism of each of the females authors had with each other. She threw in a good measure included ...

    Loved this. Sharp by Michelle Dean gives insights into the lives and work of some of the 20th century?s most influential women writers. Dorothy Parker, Rebecca West, Hannah Arendt, Mary McCarthy, Susan Sontag, Pauline Kael, Joan Didion Nora Ephron Renata Adler & Janet Malcolm... ...

    If this book does nothing more than get the next generations reading its subjects, it will have done enough. But it does a whole lot more. Michelle Dean is a treasure. Here, she gives us chewy, arguable opinions and rigorous research. I?m jealous of the deep reading she did for t...

  • Patricia Murphy
    Oct 11, 2018

    Mary McCarthy saw Susan Sontag at a party, where else, and said to her ?I hear you?re the new me.? **** This account of the careers of Dorothy Parker, Hannah Arendt, Mary McCarthy, Susan Sontag, Pauline Kael, Joan Didion, Nora Ephron, Renata Adler and Janet Malcolm with ...

    Gobbled this book up in a few sittings. Loved reading more about women I already admired, and learning a lot about a few I didn't know much about. A beautifully written and well researched book. ...

    What a disappointment. This is a book about women who built careers on criticism, yet does very little to really, truly delve into the minefield of what it means to be a person whose very existence is ?critical? (Living While Female) while turning the mirror around on the socie...

    Sharp is an exceptionally well written exploration of some of the most influential women writers of the last century. Almost every chapter explores a different woman's writing, giving details of their childhood and adolescent years as well as the intimate details of their writing caree...

    Thank you to NetGalley and the publisher for providing this book in exchange for an honest review. A recent trend in nonfiction revolves around anthologies of great women. Across ages and genres, notable women of the past are being highlighted in collections of their lives and works...

    From BBC Radio 4 - Book of the week: As part of the Algonquin Round Table, Dorothy Parker established her reputation as one of the most brilliant wits in New York and came to epitomize the liberated woman of the 1920s. Mary McCarthy As both a novelist and a critic McCarthy was not...

    (2.5) ?People have trouble with women who aren?t ?nice,? ? who have the courage to sometimes be wrong in public.? In compiling 10 mini-biographies of twentieth-century women writers and cultural critics who weren?t afraid to be unpopular, Dean (herself a literary critic) ...

    Enormously enjoyable and informative group biography of women who never shrank from voicing their opinions at a time when women were rarely encouraged to do so. From Hannah Arendt to Dorothy Parker, Rebecca West to Susan Sontag, the book covers a lot of ground and is an excellent intro...

    An outstanding, must-read book--lovers of Didion, Sontag, Dorothy Parker or all the other brilliant women explored here: this is for you. A gift to the discussion of 20th-century arts and letters. And a lovesong to smart women. ...

    A collection studying various female writers who at least began in the 20th century, all of whom were at one or another time called 'sharp' - which may seem a bit of a stretch, as premises go, but it stands for a whole constellation of qualities: women who because they weren't 'nice' w...

    1 star (audio version)--with the caveat that I read only about 3/4 of the book. I found these essays on smart and opinionated ("sharp") women writers to be dry and unimaginative. The writer's own voice was completely missing; I didn't know why she cared (or wasn't convince that she...

    I loved the profiles of each of the women and how they made their mark on criticism and essaying. That said, I wish that they had covered a group that was a little more diverse (Zora Neale Hurston is the only author of color mentioned, and she has to share a chapter) and that a little ...

    This wasn't precisely what I had expected, but seeing as this turns out to be an intellectual history of notable 20th century female public thinkers, I was quite happy with what I got. Michelle Dean has a real talent for picking choice quotes and events from her subjects, and I was del...

    Before reading Sharp by Michelle Dean, I wasn't under the impression that the women in this book were going to become some kind of role models for me, but I guess I expected them to be a little more together, maybe a little less petty. Now, don't get me wrong, I love some petty. Espe...

    A who?s who of NYC white female 20th century writers & their foibles, especially romantic ones. Anyone of color is snubbed. Men are still the movers & shakers?the women are allowed to enter their orbit, or so it would seem from the narrative. This is NOT a scholarly book no...

    An interesting exploration of 10 "sharp" women of the 20th century, all writers and feminist influencers in one way or another. The author does an excellent job of not only discussing each woman but also demonstrating links among them. Of value in relation to understanding each woman a...

    Conflicted is how I feel about this book. I enjoyed reading about Dorothy Parker; I had a hard time with the other writers. Perhaps it is because the author went to the pettiness and the criticism of each of the females authors had with each other. She threw in a good measure included ...

    Loved this. Sharp by Michelle Dean gives insights into the lives and work of some of the 20th century?s most influential women writers. Dorothy Parker, Rebecca West, Hannah Arendt, Mary McCarthy, Susan Sontag, Pauline Kael, Joan Didion Nora Ephron Renata Adler & Janet Malcolm... ...

    If this book does nothing more than get the next generations reading its subjects, it will have done enough. But it does a whole lot more. Michelle Dean is a treasure. Here, she gives us chewy, arguable opinions and rigorous research. I?m jealous of the deep reading she did for t...

    Honestly, this just felt like reading a textbook. ...

    I am fascinated by the "early" woman thinkers - those women who developed a reputation for intellectual rigor and originality in a time (the early 1900s) when such domains were considered the exclusive property of men. I was familiar with nearly all of the phenomenally talented women i...

    Sharp: The Women Who Made an Art of Having an Opinion is a biography-cum-reckoning about the legacy of ten extraordinary women: Dorothy Parker, Rebecca West, Hannah Arendt, Mary McCarthy, Nora Ephron, Susan Sontag, Renata Adler, Joan Didion, Janet Malcolm, and Zora Neale Hurston. O...

    This is a gossipy and sensationalized view of the intimacies of notable women writers of the 20th century under the guise of being a serious study of their professional achievements. Admittedly, it is hard to put down--like a bag of chips you know are not good for you. Michelle Dean's ...

    From the days when argument mattered, this is a thoughtful, thoroughly reported survey of ten public intellectuals connected by their chromosomes and the ability to write well. Michelle Dean does a little too much linking for me, but the links are there and make a decent organizing pri...

    I would give this book 4.5 stars if that were possible. I really enjoyed it. If you're looking for a brief but beautifully researched overview of the interconnected lives and works of Dorothy Parker, Rebecca West, Mary McCarthy, Hannah Arendt, Susan Sontag, Joan Didion, Janet Malcolm, ...

    A meticulously researched overview of the women who shaped twentieth century public arguments. In a society still averse to outspoken women, this book holds a mirror to a world today's women writers likely wish existed. ...

    I really wanted to like this book. It?s thoroughly researched but ultimately boring. ...

    https://ofbooksandbikes.com/2018/05/2... ...

    I really enjoyed this study of what wit is. ...

  • Tess
    Feb 16, 2018

    Mary McCarthy saw Susan Sontag at a party, where else, and said to her ?I hear you?re the new me.? **** This account of the careers of Dorothy Parker, Hannah Arendt, Mary McCarthy, Susan Sontag, Pauline Kael, Joan Didion, Nora Ephron, Renata Adler and Janet Malcolm with ...

    Gobbled this book up in a few sittings. Loved reading more about women I already admired, and learning a lot about a few I didn't know much about. A beautifully written and well researched book. ...

  • Nanette
    Sep 01, 2018

    Mary McCarthy saw Susan Sontag at a party, where else, and said to her ?I hear you?re the new me.? **** This account of the careers of Dorothy Parker, Hannah Arendt, Mary McCarthy, Susan Sontag, Pauline Kael, Joan Didion, Nora Ephron, Renata Adler and Janet Malcolm with ...

    Gobbled this book up in a few sittings. Loved reading more about women I already admired, and learning a lot about a few I didn't know much about. A beautifully written and well researched book. ...

    What a disappointment. This is a book about women who built careers on criticism, yet does very little to really, truly delve into the minefield of what it means to be a person whose very existence is ?critical? (Living While Female) while turning the mirror around on the socie...

    Sharp is an exceptionally well written exploration of some of the most influential women writers of the last century. Almost every chapter explores a different woman's writing, giving details of their childhood and adolescent years as well as the intimate details of their writing caree...

    Thank you to NetGalley and the publisher for providing this book in exchange for an honest review. A recent trend in nonfiction revolves around anthologies of great women. Across ages and genres, notable women of the past are being highlighted in collections of their lives and works...

    From BBC Radio 4 - Book of the week: As part of the Algonquin Round Table, Dorothy Parker established her reputation as one of the most brilliant wits in New York and came to epitomize the liberated woman of the 1920s. Mary McCarthy As both a novelist and a critic McCarthy was not...

    (2.5) ?People have trouble with women who aren?t ?nice,? ? who have the courage to sometimes be wrong in public.? In compiling 10 mini-biographies of twentieth-century women writers and cultural critics who weren?t afraid to be unpopular, Dean (herself a literary critic) ...

    Enormously enjoyable and informative group biography of women who never shrank from voicing their opinions at a time when women were rarely encouraged to do so. From Hannah Arendt to Dorothy Parker, Rebecca West to Susan Sontag, the book covers a lot of ground and is an excellent intro...

    An outstanding, must-read book--lovers of Didion, Sontag, Dorothy Parker or all the other brilliant women explored here: this is for you. A gift to the discussion of 20th-century arts and letters. And a lovesong to smart women. ...

    A collection studying various female writers who at least began in the 20th century, all of whom were at one or another time called 'sharp' - which may seem a bit of a stretch, as premises go, but it stands for a whole constellation of qualities: women who because they weren't 'nice' w...

    1 star (audio version)--with the caveat that I read only about 3/4 of the book. I found these essays on smart and opinionated ("sharp") women writers to be dry and unimaginative. The writer's own voice was completely missing; I didn't know why she cared (or wasn't convince that she...

    I loved the profiles of each of the women and how they made their mark on criticism and essaying. That said, I wish that they had covered a group that was a little more diverse (Zora Neale Hurston is the only author of color mentioned, and she has to share a chapter) and that a little ...

    This wasn't precisely what I had expected, but seeing as this turns out to be an intellectual history of notable 20th century female public thinkers, I was quite happy with what I got. Michelle Dean has a real talent for picking choice quotes and events from her subjects, and I was del...

    Before reading Sharp by Michelle Dean, I wasn't under the impression that the women in this book were going to become some kind of role models for me, but I guess I expected them to be a little more together, maybe a little less petty. Now, don't get me wrong, I love some petty. Espe...

    A who?s who of NYC white female 20th century writers & their foibles, especially romantic ones. Anyone of color is snubbed. Men are still the movers & shakers?the women are allowed to enter their orbit, or so it would seem from the narrative. This is NOT a scholarly book no...

  • Jill Elizabeth
    May 02, 2018

    Mary McCarthy saw Susan Sontag at a party, where else, and said to her ?I hear you?re the new me.? **** This account of the careers of Dorothy Parker, Hannah Arendt, Mary McCarthy, Susan Sontag, Pauline Kael, Joan Didion, Nora Ephron, Renata Adler and Janet Malcolm with ...

    Gobbled this book up in a few sittings. Loved reading more about women I already admired, and learning a lot about a few I didn't know much about. A beautifully written and well researched book. ...

    What a disappointment. This is a book about women who built careers on criticism, yet does very little to really, truly delve into the minefield of what it means to be a person whose very existence is ?critical? (Living While Female) while turning the mirror around on the socie...

    Sharp is an exceptionally well written exploration of some of the most influential women writers of the last century. Almost every chapter explores a different woman's writing, giving details of their childhood and adolescent years as well as the intimate details of their writing caree...

    Thank you to NetGalley and the publisher for providing this book in exchange for an honest review. A recent trend in nonfiction revolves around anthologies of great women. Across ages and genres, notable women of the past are being highlighted in collections of their lives and works...

    From BBC Radio 4 - Book of the week: As part of the Algonquin Round Table, Dorothy Parker established her reputation as one of the most brilliant wits in New York and came to epitomize the liberated woman of the 1920s. Mary McCarthy As both a novelist and a critic McCarthy was not...

    (2.5) ?People have trouble with women who aren?t ?nice,? ? who have the courage to sometimes be wrong in public.? In compiling 10 mini-biographies of twentieth-century women writers and cultural critics who weren?t afraid to be unpopular, Dean (herself a literary critic) ...

    Enormously enjoyable and informative group biography of women who never shrank from voicing their opinions at a time when women were rarely encouraged to do so. From Hannah Arendt to Dorothy Parker, Rebecca West to Susan Sontag, the book covers a lot of ground and is an excellent intro...

    An outstanding, must-read book--lovers of Didion, Sontag, Dorothy Parker or all the other brilliant women explored here: this is for you. A gift to the discussion of 20th-century arts and letters. And a lovesong to smart women. ...

    A collection studying various female writers who at least began in the 20th century, all of whom were at one or another time called 'sharp' - which may seem a bit of a stretch, as premises go, but it stands for a whole constellation of qualities: women who because they weren't 'nice' w...

    1 star (audio version)--with the caveat that I read only about 3/4 of the book. I found these essays on smart and opinionated ("sharp") women writers to be dry and unimaginative. The writer's own voice was completely missing; I didn't know why she cared (or wasn't convince that she...

    I loved the profiles of each of the women and how they made their mark on criticism and essaying. That said, I wish that they had covered a group that was a little more diverse (Zora Neale Hurston is the only author of color mentioned, and she has to share a chapter) and that a little ...

    This wasn't precisely what I had expected, but seeing as this turns out to be an intellectual history of notable 20th century female public thinkers, I was quite happy with what I got. Michelle Dean has a real talent for picking choice quotes and events from her subjects, and I was del...

    Before reading Sharp by Michelle Dean, I wasn't under the impression that the women in this book were going to become some kind of role models for me, but I guess I expected them to be a little more together, maybe a little less petty. Now, don't get me wrong, I love some petty. Espe...

    A who?s who of NYC white female 20th century writers & their foibles, especially romantic ones. Anyone of color is snubbed. Men are still the movers & shakers?the women are allowed to enter their orbit, or so it would seem from the narrative. This is NOT a scholarly book no...

    An interesting exploration of 10 "sharp" women of the 20th century, all writers and feminist influencers in one way or another. The author does an excellent job of not only discussing each woman but also demonstrating links among them. Of value in relation to understanding each woman a...

    Conflicted is how I feel about this book. I enjoyed reading about Dorothy Parker; I had a hard time with the other writers. Perhaps it is because the author went to the pettiness and the criticism of each of the females authors had with each other. She threw in a good measure included ...

    Loved this. Sharp by Michelle Dean gives insights into the lives and work of some of the 20th century?s most influential women writers. Dorothy Parker, Rebecca West, Hannah Arendt, Mary McCarthy, Susan Sontag, Pauline Kael, Joan Didion Nora Ephron Renata Adler & Janet Malcolm... ...

    If this book does nothing more than get the next generations reading its subjects, it will have done enough. But it does a whole lot more. Michelle Dean is a treasure. Here, she gives us chewy, arguable opinions and rigorous research. I?m jealous of the deep reading she did for t...

    Honestly, this just felt like reading a textbook. ...

    I am fascinated by the "early" woman thinkers - those women who developed a reputation for intellectual rigor and originality in a time (the early 1900s) when such domains were considered the exclusive property of men. I was familiar with nearly all of the phenomenally talented women i...

  • Mandy
    Jun 23, 2018

    Mary McCarthy saw Susan Sontag at a party, where else, and said to her ?I hear you?re the new me.? **** This account of the careers of Dorothy Parker, Hannah Arendt, Mary McCarthy, Susan Sontag, Pauline Kael, Joan Didion, Nora Ephron, Renata Adler and Janet Malcolm with ...

    Gobbled this book up in a few sittings. Loved reading more about women I already admired, and learning a lot about a few I didn't know much about. A beautifully written and well researched book. ...

    What a disappointment. This is a book about women who built careers on criticism, yet does very little to really, truly delve into the minefield of what it means to be a person whose very existence is ?critical? (Living While Female) while turning the mirror around on the socie...

    Sharp is an exceptionally well written exploration of some of the most influential women writers of the last century. Almost every chapter explores a different woman's writing, giving details of their childhood and adolescent years as well as the intimate details of their writing caree...

    Thank you to NetGalley and the publisher for providing this book in exchange for an honest review. A recent trend in nonfiction revolves around anthologies of great women. Across ages and genres, notable women of the past are being highlighted in collections of their lives and works...

    From BBC Radio 4 - Book of the week: As part of the Algonquin Round Table, Dorothy Parker established her reputation as one of the most brilliant wits in New York and came to epitomize the liberated woman of the 1920s. Mary McCarthy As both a novelist and a critic McCarthy was not...

    (2.5) ?People have trouble with women who aren?t ?nice,? ? who have the courage to sometimes be wrong in public.? In compiling 10 mini-biographies of twentieth-century women writers and cultural critics who weren?t afraid to be unpopular, Dean (herself a literary critic) ...

    Enormously enjoyable and informative group biography of women who never shrank from voicing their opinions at a time when women were rarely encouraged to do so. From Hannah Arendt to Dorothy Parker, Rebecca West to Susan Sontag, the book covers a lot of ground and is an excellent intro...

  • Alex Sarll
    Feb 02, 2018

    Mary McCarthy saw Susan Sontag at a party, where else, and said to her ?I hear you?re the new me.? **** This account of the careers of Dorothy Parker, Hannah Arendt, Mary McCarthy, Susan Sontag, Pauline Kael, Joan Didion, Nora Ephron, Renata Adler and Janet Malcolm with ...

    Gobbled this book up in a few sittings. Loved reading more about women I already admired, and learning a lot about a few I didn't know much about. A beautifully written and well researched book. ...

    What a disappointment. This is a book about women who built careers on criticism, yet does very little to really, truly delve into the minefield of what it means to be a person whose very existence is ?critical? (Living While Female) while turning the mirror around on the socie...

    Sharp is an exceptionally well written exploration of some of the most influential women writers of the last century. Almost every chapter explores a different woman's writing, giving details of their childhood and adolescent years as well as the intimate details of their writing caree...

    Thank you to NetGalley and the publisher for providing this book in exchange for an honest review. A recent trend in nonfiction revolves around anthologies of great women. Across ages and genres, notable women of the past are being highlighted in collections of their lives and works...

    From BBC Radio 4 - Book of the week: As part of the Algonquin Round Table, Dorothy Parker established her reputation as one of the most brilliant wits in New York and came to epitomize the liberated woman of the 1920s. Mary McCarthy As both a novelist and a critic McCarthy was not...

    (2.5) ?People have trouble with women who aren?t ?nice,? ? who have the courage to sometimes be wrong in public.? In compiling 10 mini-biographies of twentieth-century women writers and cultural critics who weren?t afraid to be unpopular, Dean (herself a literary critic) ...

    Enormously enjoyable and informative group biography of women who never shrank from voicing their opinions at a time when women were rarely encouraged to do so. From Hannah Arendt to Dorothy Parker, Rebecca West to Susan Sontag, the book covers a lot of ground and is an excellent intro...

    An outstanding, must-read book--lovers of Didion, Sontag, Dorothy Parker or all the other brilliant women explored here: this is for you. A gift to the discussion of 20th-century arts and letters. And a lovesong to smart women. ...

    A collection studying various female writers who at least began in the 20th century, all of whom were at one or another time called 'sharp' - which may seem a bit of a stretch, as premises go, but it stands for a whole constellation of qualities: women who because they weren't 'nice' w...

  • Rebecca
    May 09, 2018

    Mary McCarthy saw Susan Sontag at a party, where else, and said to her ?I hear you?re the new me.? **** This account of the careers of Dorothy Parker, Hannah Arendt, Mary McCarthy, Susan Sontag, Pauline Kael, Joan Didion, Nora Ephron, Renata Adler and Janet Malcolm with ...

    Gobbled this book up in a few sittings. Loved reading more about women I already admired, and learning a lot about a few I didn't know much about. A beautifully written and well researched book. ...

    What a disappointment. This is a book about women who built careers on criticism, yet does very little to really, truly delve into the minefield of what it means to be a person whose very existence is ?critical? (Living While Female) while turning the mirror around on the socie...

    Sharp is an exceptionally well written exploration of some of the most influential women writers of the last century. Almost every chapter explores a different woman's writing, giving details of their childhood and adolescent years as well as the intimate details of their writing caree...

    Thank you to NetGalley and the publisher for providing this book in exchange for an honest review. A recent trend in nonfiction revolves around anthologies of great women. Across ages and genres, notable women of the past are being highlighted in collections of their lives and works...

    From BBC Radio 4 - Book of the week: As part of the Algonquin Round Table, Dorothy Parker established her reputation as one of the most brilliant wits in New York and came to epitomize the liberated woman of the 1920s. Mary McCarthy As both a novelist and a critic McCarthy was not...

    (2.5) ?People have trouble with women who aren?t ?nice,? ? who have the courage to sometimes be wrong in public.? In compiling 10 mini-biographies of twentieth-century women writers and cultural critics who weren?t afraid to be unpopular, Dean (herself a literary critic) ...

  • Claudia Tessier
    Feb 22, 2018

    Mary McCarthy saw Susan Sontag at a party, where else, and said to her ?I hear you?re the new me.? **** This account of the careers of Dorothy Parker, Hannah Arendt, Mary McCarthy, Susan Sontag, Pauline Kael, Joan Didion, Nora Ephron, Renata Adler and Janet Malcolm with ...

    Gobbled this book up in a few sittings. Loved reading more about women I already admired, and learning a lot about a few I didn't know much about. A beautifully written and well researched book. ...

    What a disappointment. This is a book about women who built careers on criticism, yet does very little to really, truly delve into the minefield of what it means to be a person whose very existence is ?critical? (Living While Female) while turning the mirror around on the socie...

    Sharp is an exceptionally well written exploration of some of the most influential women writers of the last century. Almost every chapter explores a different woman's writing, giving details of their childhood and adolescent years as well as the intimate details of their writing caree...

    Thank you to NetGalley and the publisher for providing this book in exchange for an honest review. A recent trend in nonfiction revolves around anthologies of great women. Across ages and genres, notable women of the past are being highlighted in collections of their lives and works...

    From BBC Radio 4 - Book of the week: As part of the Algonquin Round Table, Dorothy Parker established her reputation as one of the most brilliant wits in New York and came to epitomize the liberated woman of the 1920s. Mary McCarthy As both a novelist and a critic McCarthy was not...

    (2.5) ?People have trouble with women who aren?t ?nice,? ? who have the courage to sometimes be wrong in public.? In compiling 10 mini-biographies of twentieth-century women writers and cultural critics who weren?t afraid to be unpopular, Dean (herself a literary critic) ...

    Enormously enjoyable and informative group biography of women who never shrank from voicing their opinions at a time when women were rarely encouraged to do so. From Hannah Arendt to Dorothy Parker, Rebecca West to Susan Sontag, the book covers a lot of ground and is an excellent intro...

    An outstanding, must-read book--lovers of Didion, Sontag, Dorothy Parker or all the other brilliant women explored here: this is for you. A gift to the discussion of 20th-century arts and letters. And a lovesong to smart women. ...

    A collection studying various female writers who at least began in the 20th century, all of whom were at one or another time called 'sharp' - which may seem a bit of a stretch, as premises go, but it stands for a whole constellation of qualities: women who because they weren't 'nice' w...

    1 star (audio version)--with the caveat that I read only about 3/4 of the book. I found these essays on smart and opinionated ("sharp") women writers to be dry and unimaginative. The writer's own voice was completely missing; I didn't know why she cared (or wasn't convince that she...

    I loved the profiles of each of the women and how they made their mark on criticism and essaying. That said, I wish that they had covered a group that was a little more diverse (Zora Neale Hurston is the only author of color mentioned, and she has to share a chapter) and that a little ...

    This wasn't precisely what I had expected, but seeing as this turns out to be an intellectual history of notable 20th century female public thinkers, I was quite happy with what I got. Michelle Dean has a real talent for picking choice quotes and events from her subjects, and I was del...

    Before reading Sharp by Michelle Dean, I wasn't under the impression that the women in this book were going to become some kind of role models for me, but I guess I expected them to be a little more together, maybe a little less petty. Now, don't get me wrong, I love some petty. Espe...

    A who?s who of NYC white female 20th century writers & their foibles, especially romantic ones. Anyone of color is snubbed. Men are still the movers & shakers?the women are allowed to enter their orbit, or so it would seem from the narrative. This is NOT a scholarly book no...

    An interesting exploration of 10 "sharp" women of the 20th century, all writers and feminist influencers in one way or another. The author does an excellent job of not only discussing each woman but also demonstrating links among them. Of value in relation to understanding each woman a...

  • Marissa
    Jan 27, 2018

    Mary McCarthy saw Susan Sontag at a party, where else, and said to her ?I hear you?re the new me.? **** This account of the careers of Dorothy Parker, Hannah Arendt, Mary McCarthy, Susan Sontag, Pauline Kael, Joan Didion, Nora Ephron, Renata Adler and Janet Malcolm with ...

    Gobbled this book up in a few sittings. Loved reading more about women I already admired, and learning a lot about a few I didn't know much about. A beautifully written and well researched book. ...

    What a disappointment. This is a book about women who built careers on criticism, yet does very little to really, truly delve into the minefield of what it means to be a person whose very existence is ?critical? (Living While Female) while turning the mirror around on the socie...

    Sharp is an exceptionally well written exploration of some of the most influential women writers of the last century. Almost every chapter explores a different woman's writing, giving details of their childhood and adolescent years as well as the intimate details of their writing caree...

    Thank you to NetGalley and the publisher for providing this book in exchange for an honest review. A recent trend in nonfiction revolves around anthologies of great women. Across ages and genres, notable women of the past are being highlighted in collections of their lives and works...

  • Ben
    Jul 26, 2018

    Mary McCarthy saw Susan Sontag at a party, where else, and said to her ?I hear you?re the new me.? **** This account of the careers of Dorothy Parker, Hannah Arendt, Mary McCarthy, Susan Sontag, Pauline Kael, Joan Didion, Nora Ephron, Renata Adler and Janet Malcolm with ...

    Gobbled this book up in a few sittings. Loved reading more about women I already admired, and learning a lot about a few I didn't know much about. A beautifully written and well researched book. ...

    What a disappointment. This is a book about women who built careers on criticism, yet does very little to really, truly delve into the minefield of what it means to be a person whose very existence is ?critical? (Living While Female) while turning the mirror around on the socie...

    Sharp is an exceptionally well written exploration of some of the most influential women writers of the last century. Almost every chapter explores a different woman's writing, giving details of their childhood and adolescent years as well as the intimate details of their writing caree...

    Thank you to NetGalley and the publisher for providing this book in exchange for an honest review. A recent trend in nonfiction revolves around anthologies of great women. Across ages and genres, notable women of the past are being highlighted in collections of their lives and works...

    From BBC Radio 4 - Book of the week: As part of the Algonquin Round Table, Dorothy Parker established her reputation as one of the most brilliant wits in New York and came to epitomize the liberated woman of the 1920s. Mary McCarthy As both a novelist and a critic McCarthy was not...

    (2.5) ?People have trouble with women who aren?t ?nice,? ? who have the courage to sometimes be wrong in public.? In compiling 10 mini-biographies of twentieth-century women writers and cultural critics who weren?t afraid to be unpopular, Dean (herself a literary critic) ...

    Enormously enjoyable and informative group biography of women who never shrank from voicing their opinions at a time when women were rarely encouraged to do so. From Hannah Arendt to Dorothy Parker, Rebecca West to Susan Sontag, the book covers a lot of ground and is an excellent intro...

    An outstanding, must-read book--lovers of Didion, Sontag, Dorothy Parker or all the other brilliant women explored here: this is for you. A gift to the discussion of 20th-century arts and letters. And a lovesong to smart women. ...

    A collection studying various female writers who at least began in the 20th century, all of whom were at one or another time called 'sharp' - which may seem a bit of a stretch, as premises go, but it stands for a whole constellation of qualities: women who because they weren't 'nice' w...

    1 star (audio version)--with the caveat that I read only about 3/4 of the book. I found these essays on smart and opinionated ("sharp") women writers to be dry and unimaginative. The writer's own voice was completely missing; I didn't know why she cared (or wasn't convince that she...

    I loved the profiles of each of the women and how they made their mark on criticism and essaying. That said, I wish that they had covered a group that was a little more diverse (Zora Neale Hurston is the only author of color mentioned, and she has to share a chapter) and that a little ...

  • Rachel
    Jul 09, 2018

    Mary McCarthy saw Susan Sontag at a party, where else, and said to her ?I hear you?re the new me.? **** This account of the careers of Dorothy Parker, Hannah Arendt, Mary McCarthy, Susan Sontag, Pauline Kael, Joan Didion, Nora Ephron, Renata Adler and Janet Malcolm with ...

    Gobbled this book up in a few sittings. Loved reading more about women I already admired, and learning a lot about a few I didn't know much about. A beautifully written and well researched book. ...

    What a disappointment. This is a book about women who built careers on criticism, yet does very little to really, truly delve into the minefield of what it means to be a person whose very existence is ?critical? (Living While Female) while turning the mirror around on the socie...

    Sharp is an exceptionally well written exploration of some of the most influential women writers of the last century. Almost every chapter explores a different woman's writing, giving details of their childhood and adolescent years as well as the intimate details of their writing caree...

    Thank you to NetGalley and the publisher for providing this book in exchange for an honest review. A recent trend in nonfiction revolves around anthologies of great women. Across ages and genres, notable women of the past are being highlighted in collections of their lives and works...

    From BBC Radio 4 - Book of the week: As part of the Algonquin Round Table, Dorothy Parker established her reputation as one of the most brilliant wits in New York and came to epitomize the liberated woman of the 1920s. Mary McCarthy As both a novelist and a critic McCarthy was not...

    (2.5) ?People have trouble with women who aren?t ?nice,? ? who have the courage to sometimes be wrong in public.? In compiling 10 mini-biographies of twentieth-century women writers and cultural critics who weren?t afraid to be unpopular, Dean (herself a literary critic) ...

    Enormously enjoyable and informative group biography of women who never shrank from voicing their opinions at a time when women were rarely encouraged to do so. From Hannah Arendt to Dorothy Parker, Rebecca West to Susan Sontag, the book covers a lot of ground and is an excellent intro...

    An outstanding, must-read book--lovers of Didion, Sontag, Dorothy Parker or all the other brilliant women explored here: this is for you. A gift to the discussion of 20th-century arts and letters. And a lovesong to smart women. ...

    A collection studying various female writers who at least began in the 20th century, all of whom were at one or another time called 'sharp' - which may seem a bit of a stretch, as premises go, but it stands for a whole constellation of qualities: women who because they weren't 'nice' w...

    1 star (audio version)--with the caveat that I read only about 3/4 of the book. I found these essays on smart and opinionated ("sharp") women writers to be dry and unimaginative. The writer's own voice was completely missing; I didn't know why she cared (or wasn't convince that she...

    I loved the profiles of each of the women and how they made their mark on criticism and essaying. That said, I wish that they had covered a group that was a little more diverse (Zora Neale Hurston is the only author of color mentioned, and she has to share a chapter) and that a little ...

    This wasn't precisely what I had expected, but seeing as this turns out to be an intellectual history of notable 20th century female public thinkers, I was quite happy with what I got. Michelle Dean has a real talent for picking choice quotes and events from her subjects, and I was del...

    Before reading Sharp by Michelle Dean, I wasn't under the impression that the women in this book were going to become some kind of role models for me, but I guess I expected them to be a little more together, maybe a little less petty. Now, don't get me wrong, I love some petty. Espe...

    A who?s who of NYC white female 20th century writers & their foibles, especially romantic ones. Anyone of color is snubbed. Men are still the movers & shakers?the women are allowed to enter their orbit, or so it would seem from the narrative. This is NOT a scholarly book no...

    An interesting exploration of 10 "sharp" women of the 20th century, all writers and feminist influencers in one way or another. The author does an excellent job of not only discussing each woman but also demonstrating links among them. Of value in relation to understanding each woman a...

    Conflicted is how I feel about this book. I enjoyed reading about Dorothy Parker; I had a hard time with the other writers. Perhaps it is because the author went to the pettiness and the criticism of each of the females authors had with each other. She threw in a good measure included ...

    Loved this. Sharp by Michelle Dean gives insights into the lives and work of some of the 20th century?s most influential women writers. Dorothy Parker, Rebecca West, Hannah Arendt, Mary McCarthy, Susan Sontag, Pauline Kael, Joan Didion Nora Ephron Renata Adler & Janet Malcolm... ...

    If this book does nothing more than get the next generations reading its subjects, it will have done enough. But it does a whole lot more. Michelle Dean is a treasure. Here, she gives us chewy, arguable opinions and rigorous research. I?m jealous of the deep reading she did for t...

    Honestly, this just felt like reading a textbook. ...

    I am fascinated by the "early" woman thinkers - those women who developed a reputation for intellectual rigor and originality in a time (the early 1900s) when such domains were considered the exclusive property of men. I was familiar with nearly all of the phenomenally talented women i...

    Sharp: The Women Who Made an Art of Having an Opinion is a biography-cum-reckoning about the legacy of ten extraordinary women: Dorothy Parker, Rebecca West, Hannah Arendt, Mary McCarthy, Nora Ephron, Susan Sontag, Renata Adler, Joan Didion, Janet Malcolm, and Zora Neale Hurston. O...

    This is a gossipy and sensationalized view of the intimacies of notable women writers of the 20th century under the guise of being a serious study of their professional achievements. Admittedly, it is hard to put down--like a bag of chips you know are not good for you. Michelle Dean's ...

  • Christen
    Apr 22, 2018

    Mary McCarthy saw Susan Sontag at a party, where else, and said to her ?I hear you?re the new me.? **** This account of the careers of Dorothy Parker, Hannah Arendt, Mary McCarthy, Susan Sontag, Pauline Kael, Joan Didion, Nora Ephron, Renata Adler and Janet Malcolm with ...

    Gobbled this book up in a few sittings. Loved reading more about women I already admired, and learning a lot about a few I didn't know much about. A beautifully written and well researched book. ...

    What a disappointment. This is a book about women who built careers on criticism, yet does very little to really, truly delve into the minefield of what it means to be a person whose very existence is ?critical? (Living While Female) while turning the mirror around on the socie...

    Sharp is an exceptionally well written exploration of some of the most influential women writers of the last century. Almost every chapter explores a different woman's writing, giving details of their childhood and adolescent years as well as the intimate details of their writing caree...

    Thank you to NetGalley and the publisher for providing this book in exchange for an honest review. A recent trend in nonfiction revolves around anthologies of great women. Across ages and genres, notable women of the past are being highlighted in collections of their lives and works...

    From BBC Radio 4 - Book of the week: As part of the Algonquin Round Table, Dorothy Parker established her reputation as one of the most brilliant wits in New York and came to epitomize the liberated woman of the 1920s. Mary McCarthy As both a novelist and a critic McCarthy was not...

    (2.5) ?People have trouble with women who aren?t ?nice,? ? who have the courage to sometimes be wrong in public.? In compiling 10 mini-biographies of twentieth-century women writers and cultural critics who weren?t afraid to be unpopular, Dean (herself a literary critic) ...

    Enormously enjoyable and informative group biography of women who never shrank from voicing their opinions at a time when women were rarely encouraged to do so. From Hannah Arendt to Dorothy Parker, Rebecca West to Susan Sontag, the book covers a lot of ground and is an excellent intro...

    An outstanding, must-read book--lovers of Didion, Sontag, Dorothy Parker or all the other brilliant women explored here: this is for you. A gift to the discussion of 20th-century arts and letters. And a lovesong to smart women. ...

    A collection studying various female writers who at least began in the 20th century, all of whom were at one or another time called 'sharp' - which may seem a bit of a stretch, as premises go, but it stands for a whole constellation of qualities: women who because they weren't 'nice' w...

    1 star (audio version)--with the caveat that I read only about 3/4 of the book. I found these essays on smart and opinionated ("sharp") women writers to be dry and unimaginative. The writer's own voice was completely missing; I didn't know why she cared (or wasn't convince that she...

    I loved the profiles of each of the women and how they made their mark on criticism and essaying. That said, I wish that they had covered a group that was a little more diverse (Zora Neale Hurston is the only author of color mentioned, and she has to share a chapter) and that a little ...

    This wasn't precisely what I had expected, but seeing as this turns out to be an intellectual history of notable 20th century female public thinkers, I was quite happy with what I got. Michelle Dean has a real talent for picking choice quotes and events from her subjects, and I was del...

    Before reading Sharp by Michelle Dean, I wasn't under the impression that the women in this book were going to become some kind of role models for me, but I guess I expected them to be a little more together, maybe a little less petty. Now, don't get me wrong, I love some petty. Espe...

    A who?s who of NYC white female 20th century writers & their foibles, especially romantic ones. Anyone of color is snubbed. Men are still the movers & shakers?the women are allowed to enter their orbit, or so it would seem from the narrative. This is NOT a scholarly book no...

    An interesting exploration of 10 "sharp" women of the 20th century, all writers and feminist influencers in one way or another. The author does an excellent job of not only discussing each woman but also demonstrating links among them. Of value in relation to understanding each woman a...

    Conflicted is how I feel about this book. I enjoyed reading about Dorothy Parker; I had a hard time with the other writers. Perhaps it is because the author went to the pettiness and the criticism of each of the females authors had with each other. She threw in a good measure included ...

  • Sarah Perchikoff
    Dec 29, 2017

    Mary McCarthy saw Susan Sontag at a party, where else, and said to her ?I hear you?re the new me.? **** This account of the careers of Dorothy Parker, Hannah Arendt, Mary McCarthy, Susan Sontag, Pauline Kael, Joan Didion, Nora Ephron, Renata Adler and Janet Malcolm with ...

    Gobbled this book up in a few sittings. Loved reading more about women I already admired, and learning a lot about a few I didn't know much about. A beautifully written and well researched book. ...

    What a disappointment. This is a book about women who built careers on criticism, yet does very little to really, truly delve into the minefield of what it means to be a person whose very existence is ?critical? (Living While Female) while turning the mirror around on the socie...

    Sharp is an exceptionally well written exploration of some of the most influential women writers of the last century. Almost every chapter explores a different woman's writing, giving details of their childhood and adolescent years as well as the intimate details of their writing caree...

    Thank you to NetGalley and the publisher for providing this book in exchange for an honest review. A recent trend in nonfiction revolves around anthologies of great women. Across ages and genres, notable women of the past are being highlighted in collections of their lives and works...

    From BBC Radio 4 - Book of the week: As part of the Algonquin Round Table, Dorothy Parker established her reputation as one of the most brilliant wits in New York and came to epitomize the liberated woman of the 1920s. Mary McCarthy As both a novelist and a critic McCarthy was not...

    (2.5) ?People have trouble with women who aren?t ?nice,? ? who have the courage to sometimes be wrong in public.? In compiling 10 mini-biographies of twentieth-century women writers and cultural critics who weren?t afraid to be unpopular, Dean (herself a literary critic) ...

    Enormously enjoyable and informative group biography of women who never shrank from voicing their opinions at a time when women were rarely encouraged to do so. From Hannah Arendt to Dorothy Parker, Rebecca West to Susan Sontag, the book covers a lot of ground and is an excellent intro...

    An outstanding, must-read book--lovers of Didion, Sontag, Dorothy Parker or all the other brilliant women explored here: this is for you. A gift to the discussion of 20th-century arts and letters. And a lovesong to smart women. ...

    A collection studying various female writers who at least began in the 20th century, all of whom were at one or another time called 'sharp' - which may seem a bit of a stretch, as premises go, but it stands for a whole constellation of qualities: women who because they weren't 'nice' w...

    1 star (audio version)--with the caveat that I read only about 3/4 of the book. I found these essays on smart and opinionated ("sharp") women writers to be dry and unimaginative. The writer's own voice was completely missing; I didn't know why she cared (or wasn't convince that she...

    I loved the profiles of each of the women and how they made their mark on criticism and essaying. That said, I wish that they had covered a group that was a little more diverse (Zora Neale Hurston is the only author of color mentioned, and she has to share a chapter) and that a little ...

    This wasn't precisely what I had expected, but seeing as this turns out to be an intellectual history of notable 20th century female public thinkers, I was quite happy with what I got. Michelle Dean has a real talent for picking choice quotes and events from her subjects, and I was del...

    Before reading Sharp by Michelle Dean, I wasn't under the impression that the women in this book were going to become some kind of role models for me, but I guess I expected them to be a little more together, maybe a little less petty. Now, don't get me wrong, I love some petty. Espe...

  • Victoria Sadler
    Mar 05, 2018

    Mary McCarthy saw Susan Sontag at a party, where else, and said to her ?I hear you?re the new me.? **** This account of the careers of Dorothy Parker, Hannah Arendt, Mary McCarthy, Susan Sontag, Pauline Kael, Joan Didion, Nora Ephron, Renata Adler and Janet Malcolm with ...

    Gobbled this book up in a few sittings. Loved reading more about women I already admired, and learning a lot about a few I didn't know much about. A beautifully written and well researched book. ...

    What a disappointment. This is a book about women who built careers on criticism, yet does very little to really, truly delve into the minefield of what it means to be a person whose very existence is ?critical? (Living While Female) while turning the mirror around on the socie...

    Sharp is an exceptionally well written exploration of some of the most influential women writers of the last century. Almost every chapter explores a different woman's writing, giving details of their childhood and adolescent years as well as the intimate details of their writing caree...

    Thank you to NetGalley and the publisher for providing this book in exchange for an honest review. A recent trend in nonfiction revolves around anthologies of great women. Across ages and genres, notable women of the past are being highlighted in collections of their lives and works...

    From BBC Radio 4 - Book of the week: As part of the Algonquin Round Table, Dorothy Parker established her reputation as one of the most brilliant wits in New York and came to epitomize the liberated woman of the 1920s. Mary McCarthy As both a novelist and a critic McCarthy was not...

    (2.5) ?People have trouble with women who aren?t ?nice,? ? who have the courage to sometimes be wrong in public.? In compiling 10 mini-biographies of twentieth-century women writers and cultural critics who weren?t afraid to be unpopular, Dean (herself a literary critic) ...

    Enormously enjoyable and informative group biography of women who never shrank from voicing their opinions at a time when women were rarely encouraged to do so. From Hannah Arendt to Dorothy Parker, Rebecca West to Susan Sontag, the book covers a lot of ground and is an excellent intro...

    An outstanding, must-read book--lovers of Didion, Sontag, Dorothy Parker or all the other brilliant women explored here: this is for you. A gift to the discussion of 20th-century arts and letters. And a lovesong to smart women. ...

    A collection studying various female writers who at least began in the 20th century, all of whom were at one or another time called 'sharp' - which may seem a bit of a stretch, as premises go, but it stands for a whole constellation of qualities: women who because they weren't 'nice' w...

    1 star (audio version)--with the caveat that I read only about 3/4 of the book. I found these essays on smart and opinionated ("sharp") women writers to be dry and unimaginative. The writer's own voice was completely missing; I didn't know why she cared (or wasn't convince that she...

    I loved the profiles of each of the women and how they made their mark on criticism and essaying. That said, I wish that they had covered a group that was a little more diverse (Zora Neale Hurston is the only author of color mentioned, and she has to share a chapter) and that a little ...

    This wasn't precisely what I had expected, but seeing as this turns out to be an intellectual history of notable 20th century female public thinkers, I was quite happy with what I got. Michelle Dean has a real talent for picking choice quotes and events from her subjects, and I was del...

    Before reading Sharp by Michelle Dean, I wasn't under the impression that the women in this book were going to become some kind of role models for me, but I guess I expected them to be a little more together, maybe a little less petty. Now, don't get me wrong, I love some petty. Espe...

    A who?s who of NYC white female 20th century writers & their foibles, especially romantic ones. Anyone of color is snubbed. Men are still the movers & shakers?the women are allowed to enter their orbit, or so it would seem from the narrative. This is NOT a scholarly book no...

    An interesting exploration of 10 "sharp" women of the 20th century, all writers and feminist influencers in one way or another. The author does an excellent job of not only discussing each woman but also demonstrating links among them. Of value in relation to understanding each woman a...

    Conflicted is how I feel about this book. I enjoyed reading about Dorothy Parker; I had a hard time with the other writers. Perhaps it is because the author went to the pettiness and the criticism of each of the females authors had with each other. She threw in a good measure included ...

    Loved this. Sharp by Michelle Dean gives insights into the lives and work of some of the 20th century?s most influential women writers. Dorothy Parker, Rebecca West, Hannah Arendt, Mary McCarthy, Susan Sontag, Pauline Kael, Joan Didion Nora Ephron Renata Adler & Janet Malcolm... ...

  • Samantha
    Apr 18, 2018

    Mary McCarthy saw Susan Sontag at a party, where else, and said to her ?I hear you?re the new me.? **** This account of the careers of Dorothy Parker, Hannah Arendt, Mary McCarthy, Susan Sontag, Pauline Kael, Joan Didion, Nora Ephron, Renata Adler and Janet Malcolm with ...

    Gobbled this book up in a few sittings. Loved reading more about women I already admired, and learning a lot about a few I didn't know much about. A beautifully written and well researched book. ...

    What a disappointment. This is a book about women who built careers on criticism, yet does very little to really, truly delve into the minefield of what it means to be a person whose very existence is ?critical? (Living While Female) while turning the mirror around on the socie...

  • Natalie Daher
    Apr 22, 2018

    Mary McCarthy saw Susan Sontag at a party, where else, and said to her ?I hear you?re the new me.? **** This account of the careers of Dorothy Parker, Hannah Arendt, Mary McCarthy, Susan Sontag, Pauline Kael, Joan Didion, Nora Ephron, Renata Adler and Janet Malcolm with ...

    Gobbled this book up in a few sittings. Loved reading more about women I already admired, and learning a lot about a few I didn't know much about. A beautifully written and well researched book. ...

    What a disappointment. This is a book about women who built careers on criticism, yet does very little to really, truly delve into the minefield of what it means to be a person whose very existence is ?critical? (Living While Female) while turning the mirror around on the socie...

    Sharp is an exceptionally well written exploration of some of the most influential women writers of the last century. Almost every chapter explores a different woman's writing, giving details of their childhood and adolescent years as well as the intimate details of their writing caree...

    Thank you to NetGalley and the publisher for providing this book in exchange for an honest review. A recent trend in nonfiction revolves around anthologies of great women. Across ages and genres, notable women of the past are being highlighted in collections of their lives and works...

    From BBC Radio 4 - Book of the week: As part of the Algonquin Round Table, Dorothy Parker established her reputation as one of the most brilliant wits in New York and came to epitomize the liberated woman of the 1920s. Mary McCarthy As both a novelist and a critic McCarthy was not...

    (2.5) ?People have trouble with women who aren?t ?nice,? ? who have the courage to sometimes be wrong in public.? In compiling 10 mini-biographies of twentieth-century women writers and cultural critics who weren?t afraid to be unpopular, Dean (herself a literary critic) ...

    Enormously enjoyable and informative group biography of women who never shrank from voicing their opinions at a time when women were rarely encouraged to do so. From Hannah Arendt to Dorothy Parker, Rebecca West to Susan Sontag, the book covers a lot of ground and is an excellent intro...

    An outstanding, must-read book--lovers of Didion, Sontag, Dorothy Parker or all the other brilliant women explored here: this is for you. A gift to the discussion of 20th-century arts and letters. And a lovesong to smart women. ...

    A collection studying various female writers who at least began in the 20th century, all of whom were at one or another time called 'sharp' - which may seem a bit of a stretch, as premises go, but it stands for a whole constellation of qualities: women who because they weren't 'nice' w...

    1 star (audio version)--with the caveat that I read only about 3/4 of the book. I found these essays on smart and opinionated ("sharp") women writers to be dry and unimaginative. The writer's own voice was completely missing; I didn't know why she cared (or wasn't convince that she...

    I loved the profiles of each of the women and how they made their mark on criticism and essaying. That said, I wish that they had covered a group that was a little more diverse (Zora Neale Hurston is the only author of color mentioned, and she has to share a chapter) and that a little ...

    This wasn't precisely what I had expected, but seeing as this turns out to be an intellectual history of notable 20th century female public thinkers, I was quite happy with what I got. Michelle Dean has a real talent for picking choice quotes and events from her subjects, and I was del...

    Before reading Sharp by Michelle Dean, I wasn't under the impression that the women in this book were going to become some kind of role models for me, but I guess I expected them to be a little more together, maybe a little less petty. Now, don't get me wrong, I love some petty. Espe...

    A who?s who of NYC white female 20th century writers & their foibles, especially romantic ones. Anyone of color is snubbed. Men are still the movers & shakers?the women are allowed to enter their orbit, or so it would seem from the narrative. This is NOT a scholarly book no...

    An interesting exploration of 10 "sharp" women of the 20th century, all writers and feminist influencers in one way or another. The author does an excellent job of not only discussing each woman but also demonstrating links among them. Of value in relation to understanding each woman a...

    Conflicted is how I feel about this book. I enjoyed reading about Dorothy Parker; I had a hard time with the other writers. Perhaps it is because the author went to the pettiness and the criticism of each of the females authors had with each other. She threw in a good measure included ...

    Loved this. Sharp by Michelle Dean gives insights into the lives and work of some of the 20th century?s most influential women writers. Dorothy Parker, Rebecca West, Hannah Arendt, Mary McCarthy, Susan Sontag, Pauline Kael, Joan Didion Nora Ephron Renata Adler & Janet Malcolm... ...

    If this book does nothing more than get the next generations reading its subjects, it will have done enough. But it does a whole lot more. Michelle Dean is a treasure. Here, she gives us chewy, arguable opinions and rigorous research. I?m jealous of the deep reading she did for t...

    Honestly, this just felt like reading a textbook. ...

    I am fascinated by the "early" woman thinkers - those women who developed a reputation for intellectual rigor and originality in a time (the early 1900s) when such domains were considered the exclusive property of men. I was familiar with nearly all of the phenomenally talented women i...

    Sharp: The Women Who Made an Art of Having an Opinion is a biography-cum-reckoning about the legacy of ten extraordinary women: Dorothy Parker, Rebecca West, Hannah Arendt, Mary McCarthy, Nora Ephron, Susan Sontag, Renata Adler, Joan Didion, Janet Malcolm, and Zora Neale Hurston. O...

    This is a gossipy and sensationalized view of the intimacies of notable women writers of the 20th century under the guise of being a serious study of their professional achievements. Admittedly, it is hard to put down--like a bag of chips you know are not good for you. Michelle Dean's ...

    From the days when argument mattered, this is a thoughtful, thoroughly reported survey of ten public intellectuals connected by their chromosomes and the ability to write well. Michelle Dean does a little too much linking for me, but the links are there and make a decent organizing pri...

    I would give this book 4.5 stars if that were possible. I really enjoyed it. If you're looking for a brief but beautifully researched overview of the interconnected lives and works of Dorothy Parker, Rebecca West, Mary McCarthy, Hannah Arendt, Susan Sontag, Joan Didion, Janet Malcolm, ...

    A meticulously researched overview of the women who shaped twentieth century public arguments. In a society still averse to outspoken women, this book holds a mirror to a world today's women writers likely wish existed. ...

  • Robert Stevenson
    Oct 19, 2018

    Mary McCarthy saw Susan Sontag at a party, where else, and said to her ?I hear you?re the new me.? **** This account of the careers of Dorothy Parker, Hannah Arendt, Mary McCarthy, Susan Sontag, Pauline Kael, Joan Didion, Nora Ephron, Renata Adler and Janet Malcolm with ...

    Gobbled this book up in a few sittings. Loved reading more about women I already admired, and learning a lot about a few I didn't know much about. A beautifully written and well researched book. ...

    What a disappointment. This is a book about women who built careers on criticism, yet does very little to really, truly delve into the minefield of what it means to be a person whose very existence is ?critical? (Living While Female) while turning the mirror around on the socie...

    Sharp is an exceptionally well written exploration of some of the most influential women writers of the last century. Almost every chapter explores a different woman's writing, giving details of their childhood and adolescent years as well as the intimate details of their writing caree...

    Thank you to NetGalley and the publisher for providing this book in exchange for an honest review. A recent trend in nonfiction revolves around anthologies of great women. Across ages and genres, notable women of the past are being highlighted in collections of their lives and works...

    From BBC Radio 4 - Book of the week: As part of the Algonquin Round Table, Dorothy Parker established her reputation as one of the most brilliant wits in New York and came to epitomize the liberated woman of the 1920s. Mary McCarthy As both a novelist and a critic McCarthy was not...

    (2.5) ?People have trouble with women who aren?t ?nice,? ? who have the courage to sometimes be wrong in public.? In compiling 10 mini-biographies of twentieth-century women writers and cultural critics who weren?t afraid to be unpopular, Dean (herself a literary critic) ...

    Enormously enjoyable and informative group biography of women who never shrank from voicing their opinions at a time when women were rarely encouraged to do so. From Hannah Arendt to Dorothy Parker, Rebecca West to Susan Sontag, the book covers a lot of ground and is an excellent intro...

    An outstanding, must-read book--lovers of Didion, Sontag, Dorothy Parker or all the other brilliant women explored here: this is for you. A gift to the discussion of 20th-century arts and letters. And a lovesong to smart women. ...

    A collection studying various female writers who at least began in the 20th century, all of whom were at one or another time called 'sharp' - which may seem a bit of a stretch, as premises go, but it stands for a whole constellation of qualities: women who because they weren't 'nice' w...

    1 star (audio version)--with the caveat that I read only about 3/4 of the book. I found these essays on smart and opinionated ("sharp") women writers to be dry and unimaginative. The writer's own voice was completely missing; I didn't know why she cared (or wasn't convince that she...

    I loved the profiles of each of the women and how they made their mark on criticism and essaying. That said, I wish that they had covered a group that was a little more diverse (Zora Neale Hurston is the only author of color mentioned, and she has to share a chapter) and that a little ...

    This wasn't precisely what I had expected, but seeing as this turns out to be an intellectual history of notable 20th century female public thinkers, I was quite happy with what I got. Michelle Dean has a real talent for picking choice quotes and events from her subjects, and I was del...

    Before reading Sharp by Michelle Dean, I wasn't under the impression that the women in this book were going to become some kind of role models for me, but I guess I expected them to be a little more together, maybe a little less petty. Now, don't get me wrong, I love some petty. Espe...

    A who?s who of NYC white female 20th century writers & their foibles, especially romantic ones. Anyone of color is snubbed. Men are still the movers & shakers?the women are allowed to enter their orbit, or so it would seem from the narrative. This is NOT a scholarly book no...

    An interesting exploration of 10 "sharp" women of the 20th century, all writers and feminist influencers in one way or another. The author does an excellent job of not only discussing each woman but also demonstrating links among them. Of value in relation to understanding each woman a...

    Conflicted is how I feel about this book. I enjoyed reading about Dorothy Parker; I had a hard time with the other writers. Perhaps it is because the author went to the pettiness and the criticism of each of the females authors had with each other. She threw in a good measure included ...

    Loved this. Sharp by Michelle Dean gives insights into the lives and work of some of the 20th century?s most influential women writers. Dorothy Parker, Rebecca West, Hannah Arendt, Mary McCarthy, Susan Sontag, Pauline Kael, Joan Didion Nora Ephron Renata Adler & Janet Malcolm... ...

    If this book does nothing more than get the next generations reading its subjects, it will have done enough. But it does a whole lot more. Michelle Dean is a treasure. Here, she gives us chewy, arguable opinions and rigorous research. I?m jealous of the deep reading she did for t...

    Honestly, this just felt like reading a textbook. ...

    I am fascinated by the "early" woman thinkers - those women who developed a reputation for intellectual rigor and originality in a time (the early 1900s) when such domains were considered the exclusive property of men. I was familiar with nearly all of the phenomenally talented women i...

    Sharp: The Women Who Made an Art of Having an Opinion is a biography-cum-reckoning about the legacy of ten extraordinary women: Dorothy Parker, Rebecca West, Hannah Arendt, Mary McCarthy, Nora Ephron, Susan Sontag, Renata Adler, Joan Didion, Janet Malcolm, and Zora Neale Hurston. O...

    This is a gossipy and sensationalized view of the intimacies of notable women writers of the 20th century under the guise of being a serious study of their professional achievements. Admittedly, it is hard to put down--like a bag of chips you know are not good for you. Michelle Dean's ...

    From the days when argument mattered, this is a thoughtful, thoroughly reported survey of ten public intellectuals connected by their chromosomes and the ability to write well. Michelle Dean does a little too much linking for me, but the links are there and make a decent organizing pri...

    I would give this book 4.5 stars if that were possible. I really enjoyed it. If you're looking for a brief but beautifully researched overview of the interconnected lives and works of Dorothy Parker, Rebecca West, Mary McCarthy, Hannah Arendt, Susan Sontag, Joan Didion, Janet Malcolm, ...

    A meticulously researched overview of the women who shaped twentieth century public arguments. In a society still averse to outspoken women, this book holds a mirror to a world today's women writers likely wish existed. ...

    I really wanted to like this book. It?s thoroughly researched but ultimately boring. ...

    https://ofbooksandbikes.com/2018/05/2... ...

    I really enjoyed this study of what wit is. ...

    I enjoyed Michelle Dean?s book, I give it 4 our of 5 stars. All these amazing 20th century women Dean writes about shaped journalism, writing and criticism in novel and creative ways. With Trump and most of the GOP ideologues all you hear is their bashing of the media, but jou...

  • Kate Klassa
    Jan 11, 2018

    Mary McCarthy saw Susan Sontag at a party, where else, and said to her ?I hear you?re the new me.? **** This account of the careers of Dorothy Parker, Hannah Arendt, Mary McCarthy, Susan Sontag, Pauline Kael, Joan Didion, Nora Ephron, Renata Adler and Janet Malcolm with ...

    Gobbled this book up in a few sittings. Loved reading more about women I already admired, and learning a lot about a few I didn't know much about. A beautifully written and well researched book. ...

    What a disappointment. This is a book about women who built careers on criticism, yet does very little to really, truly delve into the minefield of what it means to be a person whose very existence is ?critical? (Living While Female) while turning the mirror around on the socie...

    Sharp is an exceptionally well written exploration of some of the most influential women writers of the last century. Almost every chapter explores a different woman's writing, giving details of their childhood and adolescent years as well as the intimate details of their writing caree...

  • Christine Henneberg
    Jul 03, 2018

    Mary McCarthy saw Susan Sontag at a party, where else, and said to her ?I hear you?re the new me.? **** This account of the careers of Dorothy Parker, Hannah Arendt, Mary McCarthy, Susan Sontag, Pauline Kael, Joan Didion, Nora Ephron, Renata Adler and Janet Malcolm with ...

    Gobbled this book up in a few sittings. Loved reading more about women I already admired, and learning a lot about a few I didn't know much about. A beautifully written and well researched book. ...

    What a disappointment. This is a book about women who built careers on criticism, yet does very little to really, truly delve into the minefield of what it means to be a person whose very existence is ?critical? (Living While Female) while turning the mirror around on the socie...

    Sharp is an exceptionally well written exploration of some of the most influential women writers of the last century. Almost every chapter explores a different woman's writing, giving details of their childhood and adolescent years as well as the intimate details of their writing caree...

    Thank you to NetGalley and the publisher for providing this book in exchange for an honest review. A recent trend in nonfiction revolves around anthologies of great women. Across ages and genres, notable women of the past are being highlighted in collections of their lives and works...

    From BBC Radio 4 - Book of the week: As part of the Algonquin Round Table, Dorothy Parker established her reputation as one of the most brilliant wits in New York and came to epitomize the liberated woman of the 1920s. Mary McCarthy As both a novelist and a critic McCarthy was not...

    (2.5) ?People have trouble with women who aren?t ?nice,? ? who have the courage to sometimes be wrong in public.? In compiling 10 mini-biographies of twentieth-century women writers and cultural critics who weren?t afraid to be unpopular, Dean (herself a literary critic) ...

    Enormously enjoyable and informative group biography of women who never shrank from voicing their opinions at a time when women were rarely encouraged to do so. From Hannah Arendt to Dorothy Parker, Rebecca West to Susan Sontag, the book covers a lot of ground and is an excellent intro...

    An outstanding, must-read book--lovers of Didion, Sontag, Dorothy Parker or all the other brilliant women explored here: this is for you. A gift to the discussion of 20th-century arts and letters. And a lovesong to smart women. ...

    A collection studying various female writers who at least began in the 20th century, all of whom were at one or another time called 'sharp' - which may seem a bit of a stretch, as premises go, but it stands for a whole constellation of qualities: women who because they weren't 'nice' w...

    1 star (audio version)--with the caveat that I read only about 3/4 of the book. I found these essays on smart and opinionated ("sharp") women writers to be dry and unimaginative. The writer's own voice was completely missing; I didn't know why she cared (or wasn't convince that she...

  • Kristina Reads -  Books. Blogs. Memes.
    Mar 08, 2018

    Mary McCarthy saw Susan Sontag at a party, where else, and said to her ?I hear you?re the new me.? **** This account of the careers of Dorothy Parker, Hannah Arendt, Mary McCarthy, Susan Sontag, Pauline Kael, Joan Didion, Nora Ephron, Renata Adler and Janet Malcolm with ...

    Gobbled this book up in a few sittings. Loved reading more about women I already admired, and learning a lot about a few I didn't know much about. A beautifully written and well researched book. ...

    What a disappointment. This is a book about women who built careers on criticism, yet does very little to really, truly delve into the minefield of what it means to be a person whose very existence is ?critical? (Living While Female) while turning the mirror around on the socie...

    Sharp is an exceptionally well written exploration of some of the most influential women writers of the last century. Almost every chapter explores a different woman's writing, giving details of their childhood and adolescent years as well as the intimate details of their writing caree...

    Thank you to NetGalley and the publisher for providing this book in exchange for an honest review. A recent trend in nonfiction revolves around anthologies of great women. Across ages and genres, notable women of the past are being highlighted in collections of their lives and works...

    From BBC Radio 4 - Book of the week: As part of the Algonquin Round Table, Dorothy Parker established her reputation as one of the most brilliant wits in New York and came to epitomize the liberated woman of the 1920s. Mary McCarthy As both a novelist and a critic McCarthy was not...

    (2.5) ?People have trouble with women who aren?t ?nice,? ? who have the courage to sometimes be wrong in public.? In compiling 10 mini-biographies of twentieth-century women writers and cultural critics who weren?t afraid to be unpopular, Dean (herself a literary critic) ...

    Enormously enjoyable and informative group biography of women who never shrank from voicing their opinions at a time when women were rarely encouraged to do so. From Hannah Arendt to Dorothy Parker, Rebecca West to Susan Sontag, the book covers a lot of ground and is an excellent intro...

    An outstanding, must-read book--lovers of Didion, Sontag, Dorothy Parker or all the other brilliant women explored here: this is for you. A gift to the discussion of 20th-century arts and letters. And a lovesong to smart women. ...

    A collection studying various female writers who at least began in the 20th century, all of whom were at one or another time called 'sharp' - which may seem a bit of a stretch, as premises go, but it stands for a whole constellation of qualities: women who because they weren't 'nice' w...

    1 star (audio version)--with the caveat that I read only about 3/4 of the book. I found these essays on smart and opinionated ("sharp") women writers to be dry and unimaginative. The writer's own voice was completely missing; I didn't know why she cared (or wasn't convince that she...

    I loved the profiles of each of the women and how they made their mark on criticism and essaying. That said, I wish that they had covered a group that was a little more diverse (Zora Neale Hurston is the only author of color mentioned, and she has to share a chapter) and that a little ...

    This wasn't precisely what I had expected, but seeing as this turns out to be an intellectual history of notable 20th century female public thinkers, I was quite happy with what I got. Michelle Dean has a real talent for picking choice quotes and events from her subjects, and I was del...

    Before reading Sharp by Michelle Dean, I wasn't under the impression that the women in this book were going to become some kind of role models for me, but I guess I expected them to be a little more together, maybe a little less petty. Now, don't get me wrong, I love some petty. Espe...

    A who?s who of NYC white female 20th century writers & their foibles, especially romantic ones. Anyone of color is snubbed. Men are still the movers & shakers?the women are allowed to enter their orbit, or so it would seem from the narrative. This is NOT a scholarly book no...

    An interesting exploration of 10 "sharp" women of the 20th century, all writers and feminist influencers in one way or another. The author does an excellent job of not only discussing each woman but also demonstrating links among them. Of value in relation to understanding each woman a...

    Conflicted is how I feel about this book. I enjoyed reading about Dorothy Parker; I had a hard time with the other writers. Perhaps it is because the author went to the pettiness and the criticism of each of the females authors had with each other. She threw in a good measure included ...

    Loved this. Sharp by Michelle Dean gives insights into the lives and work of some of the 20th century?s most influential women writers. Dorothy Parker, Rebecca West, Hannah Arendt, Mary McCarthy, Susan Sontag, Pauline Kael, Joan Didion Nora Ephron Renata Adler & Janet Malcolm... ...

    If this book does nothing more than get the next generations reading its subjects, it will have done enough. But it does a whole lot more. Michelle Dean is a treasure. Here, she gives us chewy, arguable opinions and rigorous research. I?m jealous of the deep reading she did for t...

    Honestly, this just felt like reading a textbook. ...

  • Maggie Tiede
    May 07, 2018

    Mary McCarthy saw Susan Sontag at a party, where else, and said to her ?I hear you?re the new me.? **** This account of the careers of Dorothy Parker, Hannah Arendt, Mary McCarthy, Susan Sontag, Pauline Kael, Joan Didion, Nora Ephron, Renata Adler and Janet Malcolm with ...

    Gobbled this book up in a few sittings. Loved reading more about women I already admired, and learning a lot about a few I didn't know much about. A beautifully written and well researched book. ...

    What a disappointment. This is a book about women who built careers on criticism, yet does very little to really, truly delve into the minefield of what it means to be a person whose very existence is ?critical? (Living While Female) while turning the mirror around on the socie...

    Sharp is an exceptionally well written exploration of some of the most influential women writers of the last century. Almost every chapter explores a different woman's writing, giving details of their childhood and adolescent years as well as the intimate details of their writing caree...

    Thank you to NetGalley and the publisher for providing this book in exchange for an honest review. A recent trend in nonfiction revolves around anthologies of great women. Across ages and genres, notable women of the past are being highlighted in collections of their lives and works...

    From BBC Radio 4 - Book of the week: As part of the Algonquin Round Table, Dorothy Parker established her reputation as one of the most brilliant wits in New York and came to epitomize the liberated woman of the 1920s. Mary McCarthy As both a novelist and a critic McCarthy was not...

    (2.5) ?People have trouble with women who aren?t ?nice,? ? who have the courage to sometimes be wrong in public.? In compiling 10 mini-biographies of twentieth-century women writers and cultural critics who weren?t afraid to be unpopular, Dean (herself a literary critic) ...

    Enormously enjoyable and informative group biography of women who never shrank from voicing their opinions at a time when women were rarely encouraged to do so. From Hannah Arendt to Dorothy Parker, Rebecca West to Susan Sontag, the book covers a lot of ground and is an excellent intro...

    An outstanding, must-read book--lovers of Didion, Sontag, Dorothy Parker or all the other brilliant women explored here: this is for you. A gift to the discussion of 20th-century arts and letters. And a lovesong to smart women. ...

    A collection studying various female writers who at least began in the 20th century, all of whom were at one or another time called 'sharp' - which may seem a bit of a stretch, as premises go, but it stands for a whole constellation of qualities: women who because they weren't 'nice' w...

    1 star (audio version)--with the caveat that I read only about 3/4 of the book. I found these essays on smart and opinionated ("sharp") women writers to be dry and unimaginative. The writer's own voice was completely missing; I didn't know why she cared (or wasn't convince that she...

    I loved the profiles of each of the women and how they made their mark on criticism and essaying. That said, I wish that they had covered a group that was a little more diverse (Zora Neale Hurston is the only author of color mentioned, and she has to share a chapter) and that a little ...

    This wasn't precisely what I had expected, but seeing as this turns out to be an intellectual history of notable 20th century female public thinkers, I was quite happy with what I got. Michelle Dean has a real talent for picking choice quotes and events from her subjects, and I was del...

    Before reading Sharp by Michelle Dean, I wasn't under the impression that the women in this book were going to become some kind of role models for me, but I guess I expected them to be a little more together, maybe a little less petty. Now, don't get me wrong, I love some petty. Espe...

    A who?s who of NYC white female 20th century writers & their foibles, especially romantic ones. Anyone of color is snubbed. Men are still the movers & shakers?the women are allowed to enter their orbit, or so it would seem from the narrative. This is NOT a scholarly book no...

    An interesting exploration of 10 "sharp" women of the 20th century, all writers and feminist influencers in one way or another. The author does an excellent job of not only discussing each woman but also demonstrating links among them. Of value in relation to understanding each woman a...

    Conflicted is how I feel about this book. I enjoyed reading about Dorothy Parker; I had a hard time with the other writers. Perhaps it is because the author went to the pettiness and the criticism of each of the females authors had with each other. She threw in a good measure included ...

    Loved this. Sharp by Michelle Dean gives insights into the lives and work of some of the 20th century?s most influential women writers. Dorothy Parker, Rebecca West, Hannah Arendt, Mary McCarthy, Susan Sontag, Pauline Kael, Joan Didion Nora Ephron Renata Adler & Janet Malcolm... ...

    If this book does nothing more than get the next generations reading its subjects, it will have done enough. But it does a whole lot more. Michelle Dean is a treasure. Here, she gives us chewy, arguable opinions and rigorous research. I?m jealous of the deep reading she did for t...

    Honestly, this just felt like reading a textbook. ...

    I am fascinated by the "early" woman thinkers - those women who developed a reputation for intellectual rigor and originality in a time (the early 1900s) when such domains were considered the exclusive property of men. I was familiar with nearly all of the phenomenally talented women i...

    Sharp: The Women Who Made an Art of Having an Opinion is a biography-cum-reckoning about the legacy of ten extraordinary women: Dorothy Parker, Rebecca West, Hannah Arendt, Mary McCarthy, Nora Ephron, Susan Sontag, Renata Adler, Joan Didion, Janet Malcolm, and Zora Neale Hurston. O...

  • Jennifer Burk
    Aug 12, 2018

    Mary McCarthy saw Susan Sontag at a party, where else, and said to her ?I hear you?re the new me.? **** This account of the careers of Dorothy Parker, Hannah Arendt, Mary McCarthy, Susan Sontag, Pauline Kael, Joan Didion, Nora Ephron, Renata Adler and Janet Malcolm with ...

    Gobbled this book up in a few sittings. Loved reading more about women I already admired, and learning a lot about a few I didn't know much about. A beautifully written and well researched book. ...

    What a disappointment. This is a book about women who built careers on criticism, yet does very little to really, truly delve into the minefield of what it means to be a person whose very existence is ?critical? (Living While Female) while turning the mirror around on the socie...

    Sharp is an exceptionally well written exploration of some of the most influential women writers of the last century. Almost every chapter explores a different woman's writing, giving details of their childhood and adolescent years as well as the intimate details of their writing caree...

    Thank you to NetGalley and the publisher for providing this book in exchange for an honest review. A recent trend in nonfiction revolves around anthologies of great women. Across ages and genres, notable women of the past are being highlighted in collections of their lives and works...

    From BBC Radio 4 - Book of the week: As part of the Algonquin Round Table, Dorothy Parker established her reputation as one of the most brilliant wits in New York and came to epitomize the liberated woman of the 1920s. Mary McCarthy As both a novelist and a critic McCarthy was not...

    (2.5) ?People have trouble with women who aren?t ?nice,? ? who have the courage to sometimes be wrong in public.? In compiling 10 mini-biographies of twentieth-century women writers and cultural critics who weren?t afraid to be unpopular, Dean (herself a literary critic) ...

    Enormously enjoyable and informative group biography of women who never shrank from voicing their opinions at a time when women were rarely encouraged to do so. From Hannah Arendt to Dorothy Parker, Rebecca West to Susan Sontag, the book covers a lot of ground and is an excellent intro...

    An outstanding, must-read book--lovers of Didion, Sontag, Dorothy Parker or all the other brilliant women explored here: this is for you. A gift to the discussion of 20th-century arts and letters. And a lovesong to smart women. ...

    A collection studying various female writers who at least began in the 20th century, all of whom were at one or another time called 'sharp' - which may seem a bit of a stretch, as premises go, but it stands for a whole constellation of qualities: women who because they weren't 'nice' w...

    1 star (audio version)--with the caveat that I read only about 3/4 of the book. I found these essays on smart and opinionated ("sharp") women writers to be dry and unimaginative. The writer's own voice was completely missing; I didn't know why she cared (or wasn't convince that she...

    I loved the profiles of each of the women and how they made their mark on criticism and essaying. That said, I wish that they had covered a group that was a little more diverse (Zora Neale Hurston is the only author of color mentioned, and she has to share a chapter) and that a little ...

    This wasn't precisely what I had expected, but seeing as this turns out to be an intellectual history of notable 20th century female public thinkers, I was quite happy with what I got. Michelle Dean has a real talent for picking choice quotes and events from her subjects, and I was del...

    Before reading Sharp by Michelle Dean, I wasn't under the impression that the women in this book were going to become some kind of role models for me, but I guess I expected them to be a little more together, maybe a little less petty. Now, don't get me wrong, I love some petty. Espe...

    A who?s who of NYC white female 20th century writers & their foibles, especially romantic ones. Anyone of color is snubbed. Men are still the movers & shakers?the women are allowed to enter their orbit, or so it would seem from the narrative. This is NOT a scholarly book no...

    An interesting exploration of 10 "sharp" women of the 20th century, all writers and feminist influencers in one way or another. The author does an excellent job of not only discussing each woman but also demonstrating links among them. Of value in relation to understanding each woman a...

    Conflicted is how I feel about this book. I enjoyed reading about Dorothy Parker; I had a hard time with the other writers. Perhaps it is because the author went to the pettiness and the criticism of each of the females authors had with each other. She threw in a good measure included ...

    Loved this. Sharp by Michelle Dean gives insights into the lives and work of some of the 20th century?s most influential women writers. Dorothy Parker, Rebecca West, Hannah Arendt, Mary McCarthy, Susan Sontag, Pauline Kael, Joan Didion Nora Ephron Renata Adler & Janet Malcolm... ...

    If this book does nothing more than get the next generations reading its subjects, it will have done enough. But it does a whole lot more. Michelle Dean is a treasure. Here, she gives us chewy, arguable opinions and rigorous research. I?m jealous of the deep reading she did for t...

    Honestly, this just felt like reading a textbook. ...

    I am fascinated by the "early" woman thinkers - those women who developed a reputation for intellectual rigor and originality in a time (the early 1900s) when such domains were considered the exclusive property of men. I was familiar with nearly all of the phenomenally talented women i...

    Sharp: The Women Who Made an Art of Having an Opinion is a biography-cum-reckoning about the legacy of ten extraordinary women: Dorothy Parker, Rebecca West, Hannah Arendt, Mary McCarthy, Nora Ephron, Susan Sontag, Renata Adler, Joan Didion, Janet Malcolm, and Zora Neale Hurston. O...

    This is a gossipy and sensationalized view of the intimacies of notable women writers of the 20th century under the guise of being a serious study of their professional achievements. Admittedly, it is hard to put down--like a bag of chips you know are not good for you. Michelle Dean's ...

    From the days when argument mattered, this is a thoughtful, thoroughly reported survey of ten public intellectuals connected by their chromosomes and the ability to write well. Michelle Dean does a little too much linking for me, but the links are there and make a decent organizing pri...

    I would give this book 4.5 stars if that were possible. I really enjoyed it. If you're looking for a brief but beautifully researched overview of the interconnected lives and works of Dorothy Parker, Rebecca West, Mary McCarthy, Hannah Arendt, Susan Sontag, Joan Didion, Janet Malcolm, ...

    A meticulously researched overview of the women who shaped twentieth century public arguments. In a society still averse to outspoken women, this book holds a mirror to a world today's women writers likely wish existed. ...

    I really wanted to like this book. It?s thoroughly researched but ultimately boring. ...

  • Mara
    Mar 29, 2018

    Mary McCarthy saw Susan Sontag at a party, where else, and said to her ?I hear you?re the new me.? **** This account of the careers of Dorothy Parker, Hannah Arendt, Mary McCarthy, Susan Sontag, Pauline Kael, Joan Didion, Nora Ephron, Renata Adler and Janet Malcolm with ...

    Gobbled this book up in a few sittings. Loved reading more about women I already admired, and learning a lot about a few I didn't know much about. A beautifully written and well researched book. ...

    What a disappointment. This is a book about women who built careers on criticism, yet does very little to really, truly delve into the minefield of what it means to be a person whose very existence is ?critical? (Living While Female) while turning the mirror around on the socie...

    Sharp is an exceptionally well written exploration of some of the most influential women writers of the last century. Almost every chapter explores a different woman's writing, giving details of their childhood and adolescent years as well as the intimate details of their writing caree...

    Thank you to NetGalley and the publisher for providing this book in exchange for an honest review. A recent trend in nonfiction revolves around anthologies of great women. Across ages and genres, notable women of the past are being highlighted in collections of their lives and works...

    From BBC Radio 4 - Book of the week: As part of the Algonquin Round Table, Dorothy Parker established her reputation as one of the most brilliant wits in New York and came to epitomize the liberated woman of the 1920s. Mary McCarthy As both a novelist and a critic McCarthy was not...

    (2.5) ?People have trouble with women who aren?t ?nice,? ? who have the courage to sometimes be wrong in public.? In compiling 10 mini-biographies of twentieth-century women writers and cultural critics who weren?t afraid to be unpopular, Dean (herself a literary critic) ...

    Enormously enjoyable and informative group biography of women who never shrank from voicing their opinions at a time when women were rarely encouraged to do so. From Hannah Arendt to Dorothy Parker, Rebecca West to Susan Sontag, the book covers a lot of ground and is an excellent intro...

    An outstanding, must-read book--lovers of Didion, Sontag, Dorothy Parker or all the other brilliant women explored here: this is for you. A gift to the discussion of 20th-century arts and letters. And a lovesong to smart women. ...

    A collection studying various female writers who at least began in the 20th century, all of whom were at one or another time called 'sharp' - which may seem a bit of a stretch, as premises go, but it stands for a whole constellation of qualities: women who because they weren't 'nice' w...

    1 star (audio version)--with the caveat that I read only about 3/4 of the book. I found these essays on smart and opinionated ("sharp") women writers to be dry and unimaginative. The writer's own voice was completely missing; I didn't know why she cared (or wasn't convince that she...

    I loved the profiles of each of the women and how they made their mark on criticism and essaying. That said, I wish that they had covered a group that was a little more diverse (Zora Neale Hurston is the only author of color mentioned, and she has to share a chapter) and that a little ...

    This wasn't precisely what I had expected, but seeing as this turns out to be an intellectual history of notable 20th century female public thinkers, I was quite happy with what I got. Michelle Dean has a real talent for picking choice quotes and events from her subjects, and I was del...

  • Pat Carroll
    May 16, 2018

    Mary McCarthy saw Susan Sontag at a party, where else, and said to her ?I hear you?re the new me.? **** This account of the careers of Dorothy Parker, Hannah Arendt, Mary McCarthy, Susan Sontag, Pauline Kael, Joan Didion, Nora Ephron, Renata Adler and Janet Malcolm with ...

    Gobbled this book up in a few sittings. Loved reading more about women I already admired, and learning a lot about a few I didn't know much about. A beautifully written and well researched book. ...

    What a disappointment. This is a book about women who built careers on criticism, yet does very little to really, truly delve into the minefield of what it means to be a person whose very existence is ?critical? (Living While Female) while turning the mirror around on the socie...

    Sharp is an exceptionally well written exploration of some of the most influential women writers of the last century. Almost every chapter explores a different woman's writing, giving details of their childhood and adolescent years as well as the intimate details of their writing caree...

    Thank you to NetGalley and the publisher for providing this book in exchange for an honest review. A recent trend in nonfiction revolves around anthologies of great women. Across ages and genres, notable women of the past are being highlighted in collections of their lives and works...

    From BBC Radio 4 - Book of the week: As part of the Algonquin Round Table, Dorothy Parker established her reputation as one of the most brilliant wits in New York and came to epitomize the liberated woman of the 1920s. Mary McCarthy As both a novelist and a critic McCarthy was not...

    (2.5) ?People have trouble with women who aren?t ?nice,? ? who have the courage to sometimes be wrong in public.? In compiling 10 mini-biographies of twentieth-century women writers and cultural critics who weren?t afraid to be unpopular, Dean (herself a literary critic) ...

    Enormously enjoyable and informative group biography of women who never shrank from voicing their opinions at a time when women were rarely encouraged to do so. From Hannah Arendt to Dorothy Parker, Rebecca West to Susan Sontag, the book covers a lot of ground and is an excellent intro...

    An outstanding, must-read book--lovers of Didion, Sontag, Dorothy Parker or all the other brilliant women explored here: this is for you. A gift to the discussion of 20th-century arts and letters. And a lovesong to smart women. ...

    A collection studying various female writers who at least began in the 20th century, all of whom were at one or another time called 'sharp' - which may seem a bit of a stretch, as premises go, but it stands for a whole constellation of qualities: women who because they weren't 'nice' w...

    1 star (audio version)--with the caveat that I read only about 3/4 of the book. I found these essays on smart and opinionated ("sharp") women writers to be dry and unimaginative. The writer's own voice was completely missing; I didn't know why she cared (or wasn't convince that she...

    I loved the profiles of each of the women and how they made their mark on criticism and essaying. That said, I wish that they had covered a group that was a little more diverse (Zora Neale Hurston is the only author of color mentioned, and she has to share a chapter) and that a little ...

    This wasn't precisely what I had expected, but seeing as this turns out to be an intellectual history of notable 20th century female public thinkers, I was quite happy with what I got. Michelle Dean has a real talent for picking choice quotes and events from her subjects, and I was del...

    Before reading Sharp by Michelle Dean, I wasn't under the impression that the women in this book were going to become some kind of role models for me, but I guess I expected them to be a little more together, maybe a little less petty. Now, don't get me wrong, I love some petty. Espe...

    A who?s who of NYC white female 20th century writers & their foibles, especially romantic ones. Anyone of color is snubbed. Men are still the movers & shakers?the women are allowed to enter their orbit, or so it would seem from the narrative. This is NOT a scholarly book no...

    An interesting exploration of 10 "sharp" women of the 20th century, all writers and feminist influencers in one way or another. The author does an excellent job of not only discussing each woman but also demonstrating links among them. Of value in relation to understanding each woman a...

    Conflicted is how I feel about this book. I enjoyed reading about Dorothy Parker; I had a hard time with the other writers. Perhaps it is because the author went to the pettiness and the criticism of each of the females authors had with each other. She threw in a good measure included ...

    Loved this. Sharp by Michelle Dean gives insights into the lives and work of some of the 20th century?s most influential women writers. Dorothy Parker, Rebecca West, Hannah Arendt, Mary McCarthy, Susan Sontag, Pauline Kael, Joan Didion Nora Ephron Renata Adler & Janet Malcolm... ...

    If this book does nothing more than get the next generations reading its subjects, it will have done enough. But it does a whole lot more. Michelle Dean is a treasure. Here, she gives us chewy, arguable opinions and rigorous research. I?m jealous of the deep reading she did for t...

    Honestly, this just felt like reading a textbook. ...

    I am fascinated by the "early" woman thinkers - those women who developed a reputation for intellectual rigor and originality in a time (the early 1900s) when such domains were considered the exclusive property of men. I was familiar with nearly all of the phenomenally talented women i...

    Sharp: The Women Who Made an Art of Having an Opinion is a biography-cum-reckoning about the legacy of ten extraordinary women: Dorothy Parker, Rebecca West, Hannah Arendt, Mary McCarthy, Nora Ephron, Susan Sontag, Renata Adler, Joan Didion, Janet Malcolm, and Zora Neale Hurston. O...

    This is a gossipy and sensationalized view of the intimacies of notable women writers of the 20th century under the guise of being a serious study of their professional achievements. Admittedly, it is hard to put down--like a bag of chips you know are not good for you. Michelle Dean's ...

    From the days when argument mattered, this is a thoughtful, thoroughly reported survey of ten public intellectuals connected by their chromosomes and the ability to write well. Michelle Dean does a little too much linking for me, but the links are there and make a decent organizing pri...