The Future of Capitalism: Facing the New Anxieties

The Future of Capitalism: Facing the New Anxieties

From world-renowned economist Paul Collier, a candid diagnosis of the failures of capitalism and a pragmatic and realistic vision for how we can repair it. Deep new rifts are tearing apart the fabric of the United States and other Western societies: thriving cities versus rural counties, the highly skilled elite versus the less educated, wealthy versus developing countries. From world-renowned economist Paul Collier, a candid diagnosis of the failures of capitalism and a pragmatic and real...

DownloadRead Online
Title:The Future of Capitalism: Facing the New Anxieties
Author:Paul Collier
Rating:
Genres:Economics
ISBN:The Future of Capitalism: Facing the New Anxieties
ISBN
Edition Language:English
Format Type:Hardcover
Number of Pages:256 pages pages

The Future of Capitalism: Facing the New Anxieties Reviews

  • Max Stone
    Jan 21, 2019

    https://www.economist.com/books-and-a... ...

    I found this to be a pretty terrible book. It has the kernel of some good -- or at least interesting -- ideas but it does such a poor job of putting forward arguments in favor of its suggestions that I end up feeling like I wasted my time reading this. It doesn't help that few of his s...

    This is a wonderful book, even better than I expected. The author is a respected and well published Oxford economist. The intent of the book is to provide a thoughtful overview of the problems facing global capitalism and even offer some possible fixes, perhaps in conjunction with his ...

    What Oxford professor Paul Collier has written here is not only a very involved work of economics but also a deeply felt expression of ethics surrounding the current socio-political climate and how that has tainted and marginalized rational discussion of purely economic issues. He fram...

    Collier is an Economics Professor at Oxford. He pointed out that the current problems of capitalism stem from assuming the existence of the unreal Economic Man and promotes Utilitarianism. As a result, profits are maximised, manufacturing and back end jobs are moved overseas, machines ...

    Collier makes some excellent books in here, but the idea needed some time to mature and become clear. The book offers a hodgepodge of problems and a few hodgepodge solutions. Problems go from feminism and the decline of marriage to offshore tax havens. Basically, lack of morality infus...

    h?zl? okunan, kolay anla??l?r, ekonomi d???nda her konuya de?inen, içeri?in büyük bir k?sm? Noah Harari'den derlenmi? hissi veren, sonuç itibariyle kapitalizmden ba?ka bir gelecek görmeyen, solcularla nazileri ele?tiren, ama kapitalizmin de böyle gitmeyece?ini sö...

    This is an interesting and thoughtful book. Paul's comments about belonging resonate with me. But I remain uncertain about the duty of rescue, especially in the context of his other comments. He essentially attacks victimhood, the notion that victims somehow deserve certain treatment a...

    Solid 3.5. The ideas are very interesting; the preamble and diagnosis are well covered and the book spends a lot of time rehashing. ...

    Paul Collier?s The Future of Capitalism ? Facing the New Anxieties An economist?s prescription to challenge the charlatan extremes ruling broken societies This is Paul Collier?s best book to date. It follows his other very good ones, notably The Bottom Billion, a watershed ...

    I approached the book with much interest having listened to an LSE podcast lecture delivered by Sir Paul Collier. The introduction to the book suggested it will tackle some important issues of the day such as the increasing economic divergence of major cities and the countryside. Indee...

    This is the age for a book like this. The economy no longer seems to be working. Society no longer seems to be working. Politics no longer seems to be working. This book looks at why this might be so. The first chapter provides an analysis of where it all seems to have gone wrong and I...

    Paul Collier takes a step back from his usual battleground of third-world countries and looks at how modern-day western countries have moved in a disconcerting direction, towards increased alienation, reduced social mobility and ever widening inequalities, on a geographical as well as ...

    This book does a great job of explaining and examining the new anxieties brought about by modern day capitalist societies. How did we go from a largely united nation with common goals to one that is heavily divided along social, political, and economic lines? Collier raises interesting...

    ?We are social beings, neither economic man, nor altruistic saints. ?Ethical capitalism, built on our shared values, and pragmatic reasoning is the thesis of the book!? ?Shared Identity becomes the foundation for far-sighted reciprocity.? ?We must restore the va...

    My impression is that Paul Collier is trying to do with the left-right debate what he did with the Sachs-Easterly debates on aid for developing nations: be the respected voice in the middle that can be relied upon to evaluate the evidence rather than interpreting everything through the...

  • Mehrsa
    Jan 15, 2019

    https://www.economist.com/books-and-a... ...

    I found this to be a pretty terrible book. It has the kernel of some good -- or at least interesting -- ideas but it does such a poor job of putting forward arguments in favor of its suggestions that I end up feeling like I wasted my time reading this. It doesn't help that few of his s...

    This is a wonderful book, even better than I expected. The author is a respected and well published Oxford economist. The intent of the book is to provide a thoughtful overview of the problems facing global capitalism and even offer some possible fixes, perhaps in conjunction with his ...

    What Oxford professor Paul Collier has written here is not only a very involved work of economics but also a deeply felt expression of ethics surrounding the current socio-political climate and how that has tainted and marginalized rational discussion of purely economic issues. He fram...

    Collier is an Economics Professor at Oxford. He pointed out that the current problems of capitalism stem from assuming the existence of the unreal Economic Man and promotes Utilitarianism. As a result, profits are maximised, manufacturing and back end jobs are moved overseas, machines ...

    Collier makes some excellent books in here, but the idea needed some time to mature and become clear. The book offers a hodgepodge of problems and a few hodgepodge solutions. Problems go from feminism and the decline of marriage to offshore tax havens. Basically, lack of morality infus...

  • Karl-O
    Nov 11, 2018

    https://www.economist.com/books-and-a... ...

  • Justus
    Jan 06, 2019

    https://www.economist.com/books-and-a... ...

    I found this to be a pretty terrible book. It has the kernel of some good -- or at least interesting -- ideas but it does such a poor job of putting forward arguments in favor of its suggestions that I end up feeling like I wasted my time reading this. It doesn't help that few of his s...

  • Geoffrey Kabaservice
    Jan 10, 2019

    https://www.economist.com/books-and-a... ...

    I found this to be a pretty terrible book. It has the kernel of some good -- or at least interesting -- ideas but it does such a poor job of putting forward arguments in favor of its suggestions that I end up feeling like I wasted my time reading this. It doesn't help that few of his s...

    This is a wonderful book, even better than I expected. The author is a respected and well published Oxford economist. The intent of the book is to provide a thoughtful overview of the problems facing global capitalism and even offer some possible fixes, perhaps in conjunction with his ...

    What Oxford professor Paul Collier has written here is not only a very involved work of economics but also a deeply felt expression of ethics surrounding the current socio-political climate and how that has tainted and marginalized rational discussion of purely economic issues. He fram...

    Collier is an Economics Professor at Oxford. He pointed out that the current problems of capitalism stem from assuming the existence of the unreal Economic Man and promotes Utilitarianism. As a result, profits are maximised, manufacturing and back end jobs are moved overseas, machines ...

    Collier makes some excellent books in here, but the idea needed some time to mature and become clear. The book offers a hodgepodge of problems and a few hodgepodge solutions. Problems go from feminism and the decline of marriage to offshore tax havens. Basically, lack of morality infus...

    h?zl? okunan, kolay anla??l?r, ekonomi d???nda her konuya de?inen, içeri?in büyük bir k?sm? Noah Harari'den derlenmi? hissi veren, sonuç itibariyle kapitalizmden ba?ka bir gelecek görmeyen, solcularla nazileri ele?tiren, ama kapitalizmin de böyle gitmeyece?ini sö...

    This is an interesting and thoughtful book. Paul's comments about belonging resonate with me. But I remain uncertain about the duty of rescue, especially in the context of his other comments. He essentially attacks victimhood, the notion that victims somehow deserve certain treatment a...

    Solid 3.5. The ideas are very interesting; the preamble and diagnosis are well covered and the book spends a lot of time rehashing. ...

    Paul Collier?s The Future of Capitalism ? Facing the New Anxieties An economist?s prescription to challenge the charlatan extremes ruling broken societies This is Paul Collier?s best book to date. It follows his other very good ones, notably The Bottom Billion, a watershed ...

    I approached the book with much interest having listened to an LSE podcast lecture delivered by Sir Paul Collier. The introduction to the book suggested it will tackle some important issues of the day such as the increasing economic divergence of major cities and the countryside. Indee...

    This is the age for a book like this. The economy no longer seems to be working. Society no longer seems to be working. Politics no longer seems to be working. This book looks at why this might be so. The first chapter provides an analysis of where it all seems to have gone wrong and I...

    Paul Collier takes a step back from his usual battleground of third-world countries and looks at how modern-day western countries have moved in a disconcerting direction, towards increased alienation, reduced social mobility and ever widening inequalities, on a geographical as well as ...

    This book does a great job of explaining and examining the new anxieties brought about by modern day capitalist societies. How did we go from a largely united nation with common goals to one that is heavily divided along social, political, and economic lines? Collier raises interesting...

    ?We are social beings, neither economic man, nor altruistic saints. ?Ethical capitalism, built on our shared values, and pragmatic reasoning is the thesis of the book!? ?Shared Identity becomes the foundation for far-sighted reciprocity.? ?We must restore the va...

    My impression is that Paul Collier is trying to do with the left-right debate what he did with the Sachs-Easterly debates on aid for developing nations: be the respected voice in the middle that can be relied upon to evaluate the evidence rather than interpreting everything through the...

    It was an entertaining book to listen to (I have the audiobook version), but at times I felt like it was very dragged out and wished I could speed it up. I think it could have been shorter. I would still recommend it to someone interested in the topic for a one time read. Not the type ...

    It's hilarious how the author consistently uses Marxist as a pejorative and completely misunderstands Marx (as do most economists), but the book is basically advocating for socialism with extra steps. What a joke. ...

    A good perspective about some bad situations directly or indirectly associated with capitalism. Some chapters go too deep in subjects and sometimes it gets a little hard to follow but overall a good book with nice dissection of problems and good proposition of solutions. ...

    This book is a good read. Relevant and explains the ups/down sides to capitalism as well as offers constructive criticism on how to do things better. Uses real world examples and policies. ...

    The best parts pulls this all the way up; others are a bit light on substance. A very nuanced discussion from the hard (political) centre. ...

    not enough details in the part about how to change his perceived problems with capitalism ...

    The first coherent explanation for our world today, that I've read. ...

    Heavy going but worth persevering for a sustainable and equitable future. ...

    One of the best books I read all year. Enormously relevant and so full of provocative ideas that I will be thinking them over for years to come. ...

  • Jacob Vorstrup Goldman
    Jan 24, 2019

    https://www.economist.com/books-and-a... ...

    I found this to be a pretty terrible book. It has the kernel of some good -- or at least interesting -- ideas but it does such a poor job of putting forward arguments in favor of its suggestions that I end up feeling like I wasted my time reading this. It doesn't help that few of his s...

    This is a wonderful book, even better than I expected. The author is a respected and well published Oxford economist. The intent of the book is to provide a thoughtful overview of the problems facing global capitalism and even offer some possible fixes, perhaps in conjunction with his ...

    What Oxford professor Paul Collier has written here is not only a very involved work of economics but also a deeply felt expression of ethics surrounding the current socio-political climate and how that has tainted and marginalized rational discussion of purely economic issues. He fram...

    Collier is an Economics Professor at Oxford. He pointed out that the current problems of capitalism stem from assuming the existence of the unreal Economic Man and promotes Utilitarianism. As a result, profits are maximised, manufacturing and back end jobs are moved overseas, machines ...

    Collier makes some excellent books in here, but the idea needed some time to mature and become clear. The book offers a hodgepodge of problems and a few hodgepodge solutions. Problems go from feminism and the decline of marriage to offshore tax havens. Basically, lack of morality infus...

    h?zl? okunan, kolay anla??l?r, ekonomi d???nda her konuya de?inen, içeri?in büyük bir k?sm? Noah Harari'den derlenmi? hissi veren, sonuç itibariyle kapitalizmden ba?ka bir gelecek görmeyen, solcularla nazileri ele?tiren, ama kapitalizmin de böyle gitmeyece?ini sö...

    This is an interesting and thoughtful book. Paul's comments about belonging resonate with me. But I remain uncertain about the duty of rescue, especially in the context of his other comments. He essentially attacks victimhood, the notion that victims somehow deserve certain treatment a...

    Solid 3.5. The ideas are very interesting; the preamble and diagnosis are well covered and the book spends a lot of time rehashing. ...

    Paul Collier?s The Future of Capitalism ? Facing the New Anxieties An economist?s prescription to challenge the charlatan extremes ruling broken societies This is Paul Collier?s best book to date. It follows his other very good ones, notably The Bottom Billion, a watershed ...

    I approached the book with much interest having listened to an LSE podcast lecture delivered by Sir Paul Collier. The introduction to the book suggested it will tackle some important issues of the day such as the increasing economic divergence of major cities and the countryside. Indee...

    This is the age for a book like this. The economy no longer seems to be working. Society no longer seems to be working. Politics no longer seems to be working. This book looks at why this might be so. The first chapter provides an analysis of where it all seems to have gone wrong and I...

    Paul Collier takes a step back from his usual battleground of third-world countries and looks at how modern-day western countries have moved in a disconcerting direction, towards increased alienation, reduced social mobility and ever widening inequalities, on a geographical as well as ...

    This book does a great job of explaining and examining the new anxieties brought about by modern day capitalist societies. How did we go from a largely united nation with common goals to one that is heavily divided along social, political, and economic lines? Collier raises interesting...

    ?We are social beings, neither economic man, nor altruistic saints. ?Ethical capitalism, built on our shared values, and pragmatic reasoning is the thesis of the book!? ?Shared Identity becomes the foundation for far-sighted reciprocity.? ?We must restore the va...

    My impression is that Paul Collier is trying to do with the left-right debate what he did with the Sachs-Easterly debates on aid for developing nations: be the respected voice in the middle that can be relied upon to evaluate the evidence rather than interpreting everything through the...

    It was an entertaining book to listen to (I have the audiobook version), but at times I felt like it was very dragged out and wished I could speed it up. I think it could have been shorter. I would still recommend it to someone interested in the topic for a one time read. Not the type ...

    It's hilarious how the author consistently uses Marxist as a pejorative and completely misunderstands Marx (as do most economists), but the book is basically advocating for socialism with extra steps. What a joke. ...

    A good perspective about some bad situations directly or indirectly associated with capitalism. Some chapters go too deep in subjects and sometimes it gets a little hard to follow but overall a good book with nice dissection of problems and good proposition of solutions. ...

    This book is a good read. Relevant and explains the ups/down sides to capitalism as well as offers constructive criticism on how to do things better. Uses real world examples and policies. ...

    The best parts pulls this all the way up; others are a bit light on substance. A very nuanced discussion from the hard (political) centre. ...

  • Popup-ch
    Feb 10, 2019

    https://www.economist.com/books-and-a... ...

    I found this to be a pretty terrible book. It has the kernel of some good -- or at least interesting -- ideas but it does such a poor job of putting forward arguments in favor of its suggestions that I end up feeling like I wasted my time reading this. It doesn't help that few of his s...

    This is a wonderful book, even better than I expected. The author is a respected and well published Oxford economist. The intent of the book is to provide a thoughtful overview of the problems facing global capitalism and even offer some possible fixes, perhaps in conjunction with his ...

    What Oxford professor Paul Collier has written here is not only a very involved work of economics but also a deeply felt expression of ethics surrounding the current socio-political climate and how that has tainted and marginalized rational discussion of purely economic issues. He fram...

    Collier is an Economics Professor at Oxford. He pointed out that the current problems of capitalism stem from assuming the existence of the unreal Economic Man and promotes Utilitarianism. As a result, profits are maximised, manufacturing and back end jobs are moved overseas, machines ...

    Collier makes some excellent books in here, but the idea needed some time to mature and become clear. The book offers a hodgepodge of problems and a few hodgepodge solutions. Problems go from feminism and the decline of marriage to offshore tax havens. Basically, lack of morality infus...

    h?zl? okunan, kolay anla??l?r, ekonomi d???nda her konuya de?inen, içeri?in büyük bir k?sm? Noah Harari'den derlenmi? hissi veren, sonuç itibariyle kapitalizmden ba?ka bir gelecek görmeyen, solcularla nazileri ele?tiren, ama kapitalizmin de böyle gitmeyece?ini sö...

    This is an interesting and thoughtful book. Paul's comments about belonging resonate with me. But I remain uncertain about the duty of rescue, especially in the context of his other comments. He essentially attacks victimhood, the notion that victims somehow deserve certain treatment a...

    Solid 3.5. The ideas are very interesting; the preamble and diagnosis are well covered and the book spends a lot of time rehashing. ...

    Paul Collier?s The Future of Capitalism ? Facing the New Anxieties An economist?s prescription to challenge the charlatan extremes ruling broken societies This is Paul Collier?s best book to date. It follows his other very good ones, notably The Bottom Billion, a watershed ...

    I approached the book with much interest having listened to an LSE podcast lecture delivered by Sir Paul Collier. The introduction to the book suggested it will tackle some important issues of the day such as the increasing economic divergence of major cities and the countryside. Indee...

    This is the age for a book like this. The economy no longer seems to be working. Society no longer seems to be working. Politics no longer seems to be working. This book looks at why this might be so. The first chapter provides an analysis of where it all seems to have gone wrong and I...

    Paul Collier takes a step back from his usual battleground of third-world countries and looks at how modern-day western countries have moved in a disconcerting direction, towards increased alienation, reduced social mobility and ever widening inequalities, on a geographical as well as ...

  • Daniel
    Jan 10, 2019

    https://www.economist.com/books-and-a... ...

    I found this to be a pretty terrible book. It has the kernel of some good -- or at least interesting -- ideas but it does such a poor job of putting forward arguments in favor of its suggestions that I end up feeling like I wasted my time reading this. It doesn't help that few of his s...

    This is a wonderful book, even better than I expected. The author is a respected and well published Oxford economist. The intent of the book is to provide a thoughtful overview of the problems facing global capitalism and even offer some possible fixes, perhaps in conjunction with his ...

    What Oxford professor Paul Collier has written here is not only a very involved work of economics but also a deeply felt expression of ethics surrounding the current socio-political climate and how that has tainted and marginalized rational discussion of purely economic issues. He fram...

    Collier is an Economics Professor at Oxford. He pointed out that the current problems of capitalism stem from assuming the existence of the unreal Economic Man and promotes Utilitarianism. As a result, profits are maximised, manufacturing and back end jobs are moved overseas, machines ...

  • Dan Graser
    Dec 18, 2018

    https://www.economist.com/books-and-a... ...

    I found this to be a pretty terrible book. It has the kernel of some good -- or at least interesting -- ideas but it does such a poor job of putting forward arguments in favor of its suggestions that I end up feeling like I wasted my time reading this. It doesn't help that few of his s...

    This is a wonderful book, even better than I expected. The author is a respected and well published Oxford economist. The intent of the book is to provide a thoughtful overview of the problems facing global capitalism and even offer some possible fixes, perhaps in conjunction with his ...

    What Oxford professor Paul Collier has written here is not only a very involved work of economics but also a deeply felt expression of ethics surrounding the current socio-political climate and how that has tainted and marginalized rational discussion of purely economic issues. He fram...

  • Stephen
    Jan 11, 2019

    https://www.economist.com/books-and-a... ...

    I found this to be a pretty terrible book. It has the kernel of some good -- or at least interesting -- ideas but it does such a poor job of putting forward arguments in favor of its suggestions that I end up feeling like I wasted my time reading this. It doesn't help that few of his s...

    This is a wonderful book, even better than I expected. The author is a respected and well published Oxford economist. The intent of the book is to provide a thoughtful overview of the problems facing global capitalism and even offer some possible fixes, perhaps in conjunction with his ...

    What Oxford professor Paul Collier has written here is not only a very involved work of economics but also a deeply felt expression of ethics surrounding the current socio-political climate and how that has tainted and marginalized rational discussion of purely economic issues. He fram...

    Collier is an Economics Professor at Oxford. He pointed out that the current problems of capitalism stem from assuming the existence of the unreal Economic Man and promotes Utilitarianism. As a result, profits are maximised, manufacturing and back end jobs are moved overseas, machines ...

    Collier makes some excellent books in here, but the idea needed some time to mature and become clear. The book offers a hodgepodge of problems and a few hodgepodge solutions. Problems go from feminism and the decline of marriage to offshore tax havens. Basically, lack of morality infus...

    h?zl? okunan, kolay anla??l?r, ekonomi d???nda her konuya de?inen, içeri?in büyük bir k?sm? Noah Harari'den derlenmi? hissi veren, sonuç itibariyle kapitalizmden ba?ka bir gelecek görmeyen, solcularla nazileri ele?tiren, ama kapitalizmin de böyle gitmeyece?ini sö...

    This is an interesting and thoughtful book. Paul's comments about belonging resonate with me. But I remain uncertain about the duty of rescue, especially in the context of his other comments. He essentially attacks victimhood, the notion that victims somehow deserve certain treatment a...

    Solid 3.5. The ideas are very interesting; the preamble and diagnosis are well covered and the book spends a lot of time rehashing. ...

    Paul Collier?s The Future of Capitalism ? Facing the New Anxieties An economist?s prescription to challenge the charlatan extremes ruling broken societies This is Paul Collier?s best book to date. It follows his other very good ones, notably The Bottom Billion, a watershed ...

    I approached the book with much interest having listened to an LSE podcast lecture delivered by Sir Paul Collier. The introduction to the book suggested it will tackle some important issues of the day such as the increasing economic divergence of major cities and the countryside. Indee...

    This is the age for a book like this. The economy no longer seems to be working. Society no longer seems to be working. Politics no longer seems to be working. This book looks at why this might be so. The first chapter provides an analysis of where it all seems to have gone wrong and I...

  • Zach
    Jan 31, 2019

    https://www.economist.com/books-and-a... ...

    I found this to be a pretty terrible book. It has the kernel of some good -- or at least interesting -- ideas but it does such a poor job of putting forward arguments in favor of its suggestions that I end up feeling like I wasted my time reading this. It doesn't help that few of his s...

    This is a wonderful book, even better than I expected. The author is a respected and well published Oxford economist. The intent of the book is to provide a thoughtful overview of the problems facing global capitalism and even offer some possible fixes, perhaps in conjunction with his ...

    What Oxford professor Paul Collier has written here is not only a very involved work of economics but also a deeply felt expression of ethics surrounding the current socio-political climate and how that has tainted and marginalized rational discussion of purely economic issues. He fram...

    Collier is an Economics Professor at Oxford. He pointed out that the current problems of capitalism stem from assuming the existence of the unreal Economic Man and promotes Utilitarianism. As a result, profits are maximised, manufacturing and back end jobs are moved overseas, machines ...

    Collier makes some excellent books in here, but the idea needed some time to mature and become clear. The book offers a hodgepodge of problems and a few hodgepodge solutions. Problems go from feminism and the decline of marriage to offshore tax havens. Basically, lack of morality infus...

    h?zl? okunan, kolay anla??l?r, ekonomi d???nda her konuya de?inen, içeri?in büyük bir k?sm? Noah Harari'den derlenmi? hissi veren, sonuç itibariyle kapitalizmden ba?ka bir gelecek görmeyen, solcularla nazileri ele?tiren, ama kapitalizmin de böyle gitmeyece?ini sö...

    This is an interesting and thoughtful book. Paul's comments about belonging resonate with me. But I remain uncertain about the duty of rescue, especially in the context of his other comments. He essentially attacks victimhood, the notion that victims somehow deserve certain treatment a...

    Solid 3.5. The ideas are very interesting; the preamble and diagnosis are well covered and the book spends a lot of time rehashing. ...

  • Pinar
    Nov 26, 2018

    https://www.economist.com/books-and-a... ...

    I found this to be a pretty terrible book. It has the kernel of some good -- or at least interesting -- ideas but it does such a poor job of putting forward arguments in favor of its suggestions that I end up feeling like I wasted my time reading this. It doesn't help that few of his s...

    This is a wonderful book, even better than I expected. The author is a respected and well published Oxford economist. The intent of the book is to provide a thoughtful overview of the problems facing global capitalism and even offer some possible fixes, perhaps in conjunction with his ...

    What Oxford professor Paul Collier has written here is not only a very involved work of economics but also a deeply felt expression of ethics surrounding the current socio-political climate and how that has tainted and marginalized rational discussion of purely economic issues. He fram...

    Collier is an Economics Professor at Oxford. He pointed out that the current problems of capitalism stem from assuming the existence of the unreal Economic Man and promotes Utilitarianism. As a result, profits are maximised, manufacturing and back end jobs are moved overseas, machines ...

    Collier makes some excellent books in here, but the idea needed some time to mature and become clear. The book offers a hodgepodge of problems and a few hodgepodge solutions. Problems go from feminism and the decline of marriage to offshore tax havens. Basically, lack of morality infus...

    h?zl? okunan, kolay anla??l?r, ekonomi d???nda her konuya de?inen, içeri?in büyük bir k?sm? Noah Harari'den derlenmi? hissi veren, sonuç itibariyle kapitalizmden ba?ka bir gelecek görmeyen, solcularla nazileri ele?tiren, ama kapitalizmin de böyle gitmeyece?ini sö...

  • Nora
    Feb 08, 2019

    https://www.economist.com/books-and-a... ...

    I found this to be a pretty terrible book. It has the kernel of some good -- or at least interesting -- ideas but it does such a poor job of putting forward arguments in favor of its suggestions that I end up feeling like I wasted my time reading this. It doesn't help that few of his s...

    This is a wonderful book, even better than I expected. The author is a respected and well published Oxford economist. The intent of the book is to provide a thoughtful overview of the problems facing global capitalism and even offer some possible fixes, perhaps in conjunction with his ...

    What Oxford professor Paul Collier has written here is not only a very involved work of economics but also a deeply felt expression of ethics surrounding the current socio-political climate and how that has tainted and marginalized rational discussion of purely economic issues. He fram...

    Collier is an Economics Professor at Oxford. He pointed out that the current problems of capitalism stem from assuming the existence of the unreal Economic Man and promotes Utilitarianism. As a result, profits are maximised, manufacturing and back end jobs are moved overseas, machines ...

    Collier makes some excellent books in here, but the idea needed some time to mature and become clear. The book offers a hodgepodge of problems and a few hodgepodge solutions. Problems go from feminism and the decline of marriage to offshore tax havens. Basically, lack of morality infus...

    h?zl? okunan, kolay anla??l?r, ekonomi d???nda her konuya de?inen, içeri?in büyük bir k?sm? Noah Harari'den derlenmi? hissi veren, sonuç itibariyle kapitalizmden ba?ka bir gelecek görmeyen, solcularla nazileri ele?tiren, ama kapitalizmin de böyle gitmeyece?ini sö...

    This is an interesting and thoughtful book. Paul's comments about belonging resonate with me. But I remain uncertain about the duty of rescue, especially in the context of his other comments. He essentially attacks victimhood, the notion that victims somehow deserve certain treatment a...

    Solid 3.5. The ideas are very interesting; the preamble and diagnosis are well covered and the book spends a lot of time rehashing. ...

    Paul Collier?s The Future of Capitalism ? Facing the New Anxieties An economist?s prescription to challenge the charlatan extremes ruling broken societies This is Paul Collier?s best book to date. It follows his other very good ones, notably The Bottom Billion, a watershed ...

    I approached the book with much interest having listened to an LSE podcast lecture delivered by Sir Paul Collier. The introduction to the book suggested it will tackle some important issues of the day such as the increasing economic divergence of major cities and the countryside. Indee...

    This is the age for a book like this. The economy no longer seems to be working. Society no longer seems to be working. Politics no longer seems to be working. This book looks at why this might be so. The first chapter provides an analysis of where it all seems to have gone wrong and I...

    Paul Collier takes a step back from his usual battleground of third-world countries and looks at how modern-day western countries have moved in a disconcerting direction, towards increased alienation, reduced social mobility and ever widening inequalities, on a geographical as well as ...

    This book does a great job of explaining and examining the new anxieties brought about by modern day capitalist societies. How did we go from a largely united nation with common goals to one that is heavily divided along social, political, and economic lines? Collier raises interesting...

    ?We are social beings, neither economic man, nor altruistic saints. ?Ethical capitalism, built on our shared values, and pragmatic reasoning is the thesis of the book!? ?Shared Identity becomes the foundation for far-sighted reciprocity.? ?We must restore the va...

    My impression is that Paul Collier is trying to do with the left-right debate what he did with the Sachs-Easterly debates on aid for developing nations: be the respected voice in the middle that can be relied upon to evaluate the evidence rather than interpreting everything through the...

    It was an entertaining book to listen to (I have the audiobook version), but at times I felt like it was very dragged out and wished I could speed it up. I think it could have been shorter. I would still recommend it to someone interested in the topic for a one time read. Not the type ...

    It's hilarious how the author consistently uses Marxist as a pejorative and completely misunderstands Marx (as do most economists), but the book is basically advocating for socialism with extra steps. What a joke. ...

    A good perspective about some bad situations directly or indirectly associated with capitalism. Some chapters go too deep in subjects and sometimes it gets a little hard to follow but overall a good book with nice dissection of problems and good proposition of solutions. ...

    This book is a good read. Relevant and explains the ups/down sides to capitalism as well as offers constructive criticism on how to do things better. Uses real world examples and policies. ...

    The best parts pulls this all the way up; others are a bit light on substance. A very nuanced discussion from the hard (political) centre. ...

    not enough details in the part about how to change his perceived problems with capitalism ...

    The first coherent explanation for our world today, that I've read. ...

  • Christopher Neal
    Jan 31, 2019

    https://www.economist.com/books-and-a... ...

    I found this to be a pretty terrible book. It has the kernel of some good -- or at least interesting -- ideas but it does such a poor job of putting forward arguments in favor of its suggestions that I end up feeling like I wasted my time reading this. It doesn't help that few of his s...

    This is a wonderful book, even better than I expected. The author is a respected and well published Oxford economist. The intent of the book is to provide a thoughtful overview of the problems facing global capitalism and even offer some possible fixes, perhaps in conjunction with his ...

    What Oxford professor Paul Collier has written here is not only a very involved work of economics but also a deeply felt expression of ethics surrounding the current socio-political climate and how that has tainted and marginalized rational discussion of purely economic issues. He fram...

    Collier is an Economics Professor at Oxford. He pointed out that the current problems of capitalism stem from assuming the existence of the unreal Economic Man and promotes Utilitarianism. As a result, profits are maximised, manufacturing and back end jobs are moved overseas, machines ...

    Collier makes some excellent books in here, but the idea needed some time to mature and become clear. The book offers a hodgepodge of problems and a few hodgepodge solutions. Problems go from feminism and the decline of marriage to offshore tax havens. Basically, lack of morality infus...

    h?zl? okunan, kolay anla??l?r, ekonomi d???nda her konuya de?inen, içeri?in büyük bir k?sm? Noah Harari'den derlenmi? hissi veren, sonuç itibariyle kapitalizmden ba?ka bir gelecek görmeyen, solcularla nazileri ele?tiren, ama kapitalizmin de böyle gitmeyece?ini sö...

    This is an interesting and thoughtful book. Paul's comments about belonging resonate with me. But I remain uncertain about the duty of rescue, especially in the context of his other comments. He essentially attacks victimhood, the notion that victims somehow deserve certain treatment a...

    Solid 3.5. The ideas are very interesting; the preamble and diagnosis are well covered and the book spends a lot of time rehashing. ...

    Paul Collier?s The Future of Capitalism ? Facing the New Anxieties An economist?s prescription to challenge the charlatan extremes ruling broken societies This is Paul Collier?s best book to date. It follows his other very good ones, notably The Bottom Billion, a watershed ...

  • Anthony Risi
    Jan 26, 2019

    https://www.economist.com/books-and-a... ...

    I found this to be a pretty terrible book. It has the kernel of some good -- or at least interesting -- ideas but it does such a poor job of putting forward arguments in favor of its suggestions that I end up feeling like I wasted my time reading this. It doesn't help that few of his s...

    This is a wonderful book, even better than I expected. The author is a respected and well published Oxford economist. The intent of the book is to provide a thoughtful overview of the problems facing global capitalism and even offer some possible fixes, perhaps in conjunction with his ...

    What Oxford professor Paul Collier has written here is not only a very involved work of economics but also a deeply felt expression of ethics surrounding the current socio-political climate and how that has tainted and marginalized rational discussion of purely economic issues. He fram...

    Collier is an Economics Professor at Oxford. He pointed out that the current problems of capitalism stem from assuming the existence of the unreal Economic Man and promotes Utilitarianism. As a result, profits are maximised, manufacturing and back end jobs are moved overseas, machines ...

    Collier makes some excellent books in here, but the idea needed some time to mature and become clear. The book offers a hodgepodge of problems and a few hodgepodge solutions. Problems go from feminism and the decline of marriage to offshore tax havens. Basically, lack of morality infus...

    h?zl? okunan, kolay anla??l?r, ekonomi d???nda her konuya de?inen, içeri?in büyük bir k?sm? Noah Harari'den derlenmi? hissi veren, sonuç itibariyle kapitalizmden ba?ka bir gelecek görmeyen, solcularla nazileri ele?tiren, ama kapitalizmin de böyle gitmeyece?ini sö...

    This is an interesting and thoughtful book. Paul's comments about belonging resonate with me. But I remain uncertain about the duty of rescue, especially in the context of his other comments. He essentially attacks victimhood, the notion that victims somehow deserve certain treatment a...

    Solid 3.5. The ideas are very interesting; the preamble and diagnosis are well covered and the book spends a lot of time rehashing. ...

    Paul Collier?s The Future of Capitalism ? Facing the New Anxieties An economist?s prescription to challenge the charlatan extremes ruling broken societies This is Paul Collier?s best book to date. It follows his other very good ones, notably The Bottom Billion, a watershed ...

    I approached the book with much interest having listened to an LSE podcast lecture delivered by Sir Paul Collier. The introduction to the book suggested it will tackle some important issues of the day such as the increasing economic divergence of major cities and the countryside. Indee...

    This is the age for a book like this. The economy no longer seems to be working. Society no longer seems to be working. Politics no longer seems to be working. This book looks at why this might be so. The first chapter provides an analysis of where it all seems to have gone wrong and I...

    Paul Collier takes a step back from his usual battleground of third-world countries and looks at how modern-day western countries have moved in a disconcerting direction, towards increased alienation, reduced social mobility and ever widening inequalities, on a geographical as well as ...

    This book does a great job of explaining and examining the new anxieties brought about by modern day capitalist societies. How did we go from a largely united nation with common goals to one that is heavily divided along social, political, and economic lines? Collier raises interesting...

  • Scott
    Jan 18, 2019

    https://www.economist.com/books-and-a... ...

    I found this to be a pretty terrible book. It has the kernel of some good -- or at least interesting -- ideas but it does such a poor job of putting forward arguments in favor of its suggestions that I end up feeling like I wasted my time reading this. It doesn't help that few of his s...

    This is a wonderful book, even better than I expected. The author is a respected and well published Oxford economist. The intent of the book is to provide a thoughtful overview of the problems facing global capitalism and even offer some possible fixes, perhaps in conjunction with his ...

    What Oxford professor Paul Collier has written here is not only a very involved work of economics but also a deeply felt expression of ethics surrounding the current socio-political climate and how that has tainted and marginalized rational discussion of purely economic issues. He fram...

    Collier is an Economics Professor at Oxford. He pointed out that the current problems of capitalism stem from assuming the existence of the unreal Economic Man and promotes Utilitarianism. As a result, profits are maximised, manufacturing and back end jobs are moved overseas, machines ...

    Collier makes some excellent books in here, but the idea needed some time to mature and become clear. The book offers a hodgepodge of problems and a few hodgepodge solutions. Problems go from feminism and the decline of marriage to offshore tax havens. Basically, lack of morality infus...

    h?zl? okunan, kolay anla??l?r, ekonomi d???nda her konuya de?inen, içeri?in büyük bir k?sm? Noah Harari'den derlenmi? hissi veren, sonuç itibariyle kapitalizmden ba?ka bir gelecek görmeyen, solcularla nazileri ele?tiren, ama kapitalizmin de böyle gitmeyece?ini sö...

    This is an interesting and thoughtful book. Paul's comments about belonging resonate with me. But I remain uncertain about the duty of rescue, especially in the context of his other comments. He essentially attacks victimhood, the notion that victims somehow deserve certain treatment a...

  • Lorrie
    Jan 29, 2019

    https://www.economist.com/books-and-a... ...

    I found this to be a pretty terrible book. It has the kernel of some good -- or at least interesting -- ideas but it does such a poor job of putting forward arguments in favor of its suggestions that I end up feeling like I wasted my time reading this. It doesn't help that few of his s...

    This is a wonderful book, even better than I expected. The author is a respected and well published Oxford economist. The intent of the book is to provide a thoughtful overview of the problems facing global capitalism and even offer some possible fixes, perhaps in conjunction with his ...

    What Oxford professor Paul Collier has written here is not only a very involved work of economics but also a deeply felt expression of ethics surrounding the current socio-political climate and how that has tainted and marginalized rational discussion of purely economic issues. He fram...

    Collier is an Economics Professor at Oxford. He pointed out that the current problems of capitalism stem from assuming the existence of the unreal Economic Man and promotes Utilitarianism. As a result, profits are maximised, manufacturing and back end jobs are moved overseas, machines ...

    Collier makes some excellent books in here, but the idea needed some time to mature and become clear. The book offers a hodgepodge of problems and a few hodgepodge solutions. Problems go from feminism and the decline of marriage to offshore tax havens. Basically, lack of morality infus...

    h?zl? okunan, kolay anla??l?r, ekonomi d???nda her konuya de?inen, içeri?in büyük bir k?sm? Noah Harari'den derlenmi? hissi veren, sonuç itibariyle kapitalizmden ba?ka bir gelecek görmeyen, solcularla nazileri ele?tiren, ama kapitalizmin de böyle gitmeyece?ini sö...

    This is an interesting and thoughtful book. Paul's comments about belonging resonate with me. But I remain uncertain about the duty of rescue, especially in the context of his other comments. He essentially attacks victimhood, the notion that victims somehow deserve certain treatment a...

    Solid 3.5. The ideas are very interesting; the preamble and diagnosis are well covered and the book spends a lot of time rehashing. ...

    Paul Collier?s The Future of Capitalism ? Facing the New Anxieties An economist?s prescription to challenge the charlatan extremes ruling broken societies This is Paul Collier?s best book to date. It follows his other very good ones, notably The Bottom Billion, a watershed ...

    I approached the book with much interest having listened to an LSE podcast lecture delivered by Sir Paul Collier. The introduction to the book suggested it will tackle some important issues of the day such as the increasing economic divergence of major cities and the countryside. Indee...

    This is the age for a book like this. The economy no longer seems to be working. Society no longer seems to be working. Politics no longer seems to be working. This book looks at why this might be so. The first chapter provides an analysis of where it all seems to have gone wrong and I...

    Paul Collier takes a step back from his usual battleground of third-world countries and looks at how modern-day western countries have moved in a disconcerting direction, towards increased alienation, reduced social mobility and ever widening inequalities, on a geographical as well as ...

    This book does a great job of explaining and examining the new anxieties brought about by modern day capitalist societies. How did we go from a largely united nation with common goals to one that is heavily divided along social, political, and economic lines? Collier raises interesting...

    ?We are social beings, neither economic man, nor altruistic saints. ?Ethical capitalism, built on our shared values, and pragmatic reasoning is the thesis of the book!? ?Shared Identity becomes the foundation for far-sighted reciprocity.? ?We must restore the va...

    My impression is that Paul Collier is trying to do with the left-right debate what he did with the Sachs-Easterly debates on aid for developing nations: be the respected voice in the middle that can be relied upon to evaluate the evidence rather than interpreting everything through the...

    It was an entertaining book to listen to (I have the audiobook version), but at times I felt like it was very dragged out and wished I could speed it up. I think it could have been shorter. I would still recommend it to someone interested in the topic for a one time read. Not the type ...

    It's hilarious how the author consistently uses Marxist as a pejorative and completely misunderstands Marx (as do most economists), but the book is basically advocating for socialism with extra steps. What a joke. ...

    A good perspective about some bad situations directly or indirectly associated with capitalism. Some chapters go too deep in subjects and sometimes it gets a little hard to follow but overall a good book with nice dissection of problems and good proposition of solutions. ...

    This book is a good read. Relevant and explains the ups/down sides to capitalism as well as offers constructive criticism on how to do things better. Uses real world examples and policies. ...

  • Emil Gigov
    Feb 10, 2019

    https://www.economist.com/books-and-a... ...

    I found this to be a pretty terrible book. It has the kernel of some good -- or at least interesting -- ideas but it does such a poor job of putting forward arguments in favor of its suggestions that I end up feeling like I wasted my time reading this. It doesn't help that few of his s...

    This is a wonderful book, even better than I expected. The author is a respected and well published Oxford economist. The intent of the book is to provide a thoughtful overview of the problems facing global capitalism and even offer some possible fixes, perhaps in conjunction with his ...

    What Oxford professor Paul Collier has written here is not only a very involved work of economics but also a deeply felt expression of ethics surrounding the current socio-political climate and how that has tainted and marginalized rational discussion of purely economic issues. He fram...

    Collier is an Economics Professor at Oxford. He pointed out that the current problems of capitalism stem from assuming the existence of the unreal Economic Man and promotes Utilitarianism. As a result, profits are maximised, manufacturing and back end jobs are moved overseas, machines ...

    Collier makes some excellent books in here, but the idea needed some time to mature and become clear. The book offers a hodgepodge of problems and a few hodgepodge solutions. Problems go from feminism and the decline of marriage to offshore tax havens. Basically, lack of morality infus...

    h?zl? okunan, kolay anla??l?r, ekonomi d???nda her konuya de?inen, içeri?in büyük bir k?sm? Noah Harari'den derlenmi? hissi veren, sonuç itibariyle kapitalizmden ba?ka bir gelecek görmeyen, solcularla nazileri ele?tiren, ama kapitalizmin de böyle gitmeyece?ini sö...

    This is an interesting and thoughtful book. Paul's comments about belonging resonate with me. But I remain uncertain about the duty of rescue, especially in the context of his other comments. He essentially attacks victimhood, the notion that victims somehow deserve certain treatment a...

    Solid 3.5. The ideas are very interesting; the preamble and diagnosis are well covered and the book spends a lot of time rehashing. ...

    Paul Collier?s The Future of Capitalism ? Facing the New Anxieties An economist?s prescription to challenge the charlatan extremes ruling broken societies This is Paul Collier?s best book to date. It follows his other very good ones, notably The Bottom Billion, a watershed ...

    I approached the book with much interest having listened to an LSE podcast lecture delivered by Sir Paul Collier. The introduction to the book suggested it will tackle some important issues of the day such as the increasing economic divergence of major cities and the countryside. Indee...

  • Cynthia Dalton
    Feb 01, 2019

    https://www.economist.com/books-and-a... ...

    I found this to be a pretty terrible book. It has the kernel of some good -- or at least interesting -- ideas but it does such a poor job of putting forward arguments in favor of its suggestions that I end up feeling like I wasted my time reading this. It doesn't help that few of his s...

    This is a wonderful book, even better than I expected. The author is a respected and well published Oxford economist. The intent of the book is to provide a thoughtful overview of the problems facing global capitalism and even offer some possible fixes, perhaps in conjunction with his ...

    What Oxford professor Paul Collier has written here is not only a very involved work of economics but also a deeply felt expression of ethics surrounding the current socio-political climate and how that has tainted and marginalized rational discussion of purely economic issues. He fram...

    Collier is an Economics Professor at Oxford. He pointed out that the current problems of capitalism stem from assuming the existence of the unreal Economic Man and promotes Utilitarianism. As a result, profits are maximised, manufacturing and back end jobs are moved overseas, machines ...

    Collier makes some excellent books in here, but the idea needed some time to mature and become clear. The book offers a hodgepodge of problems and a few hodgepodge solutions. Problems go from feminism and the decline of marriage to offshore tax havens. Basically, lack of morality infus...

    h?zl? okunan, kolay anla??l?r, ekonomi d???nda her konuya de?inen, içeri?in büyük bir k?sm? Noah Harari'den derlenmi? hissi veren, sonuç itibariyle kapitalizmden ba?ka bir gelecek görmeyen, solcularla nazileri ele?tiren, ama kapitalizmin de böyle gitmeyece?ini sö...

    This is an interesting and thoughtful book. Paul's comments about belonging resonate with me. But I remain uncertain about the duty of rescue, especially in the context of his other comments. He essentially attacks victimhood, the notion that victims somehow deserve certain treatment a...

    Solid 3.5. The ideas are very interesting; the preamble and diagnosis are well covered and the book spends a lot of time rehashing. ...

    Paul Collier?s The Future of Capitalism ? Facing the New Anxieties An economist?s prescription to challenge the charlatan extremes ruling broken societies This is Paul Collier?s best book to date. It follows his other very good ones, notably The Bottom Billion, a watershed ...

    I approached the book with much interest having listened to an LSE podcast lecture delivered by Sir Paul Collier. The introduction to the book suggested it will tackle some important issues of the day such as the increasing economic divergence of major cities and the countryside. Indee...

    This is the age for a book like this. The economy no longer seems to be working. Society no longer seems to be working. Politics no longer seems to be working. This book looks at why this might be so. The first chapter provides an analysis of where it all seems to have gone wrong and I...

    Paul Collier takes a step back from his usual battleground of third-world countries and looks at how modern-day western countries have moved in a disconcerting direction, towards increased alienation, reduced social mobility and ever widening inequalities, on a geographical as well as ...

    This book does a great job of explaining and examining the new anxieties brought about by modern day capitalist societies. How did we go from a largely united nation with common goals to one that is heavily divided along social, political, and economic lines? Collier raises interesting...

    ?We are social beings, neither economic man, nor altruistic saints. ?Ethical capitalism, built on our shared values, and pragmatic reasoning is the thesis of the book!? ?Shared Identity becomes the foundation for far-sighted reciprocity.? ?We must restore the va...

    My impression is that Paul Collier is trying to do with the left-right debate what he did with the Sachs-Easterly debates on aid for developing nations: be the respected voice in the middle that can be relied upon to evaluate the evidence rather than interpreting everything through the...

    It was an entertaining book to listen to (I have the audiobook version), but at times I felt like it was very dragged out and wished I could speed it up. I think it could have been shorter. I would still recommend it to someone interested in the topic for a one time read. Not the type ...

    It's hilarious how the author consistently uses Marxist as a pejorative and completely misunderstands Marx (as do most economists), but the book is basically advocating for socialism with extra steps. What a joke. ...

    A good perspective about some bad situations directly or indirectly associated with capitalism. Some chapters go too deep in subjects and sometimes it gets a little hard to follow but overall a good book with nice dissection of problems and good proposition of solutions. ...

    This book is a good read. Relevant and explains the ups/down sides to capitalism as well as offers constructive criticism on how to do things better. Uses real world examples and policies. ...

    The best parts pulls this all the way up; others are a bit light on substance. A very nuanced discussion from the hard (political) centre. ...

    not enough details in the part about how to change his perceived problems with capitalism ...

  • Scotty
    Feb 18, 2019

    https://www.economist.com/books-and-a... ...

    I found this to be a pretty terrible book. It has the kernel of some good -- or at least interesting -- ideas but it does such a poor job of putting forward arguments in favor of its suggestions that I end up feeling like I wasted my time reading this. It doesn't help that few of his s...

    This is a wonderful book, even better than I expected. The author is a respected and well published Oxford economist. The intent of the book is to provide a thoughtful overview of the problems facing global capitalism and even offer some possible fixes, perhaps in conjunction with his ...

    What Oxford professor Paul Collier has written here is not only a very involved work of economics but also a deeply felt expression of ethics surrounding the current socio-political climate and how that has tainted and marginalized rational discussion of purely economic issues. He fram...

    Collier is an Economics Professor at Oxford. He pointed out that the current problems of capitalism stem from assuming the existence of the unreal Economic Man and promotes Utilitarianism. As a result, profits are maximised, manufacturing and back end jobs are moved overseas, machines ...

    Collier makes some excellent books in here, but the idea needed some time to mature and become clear. The book offers a hodgepodge of problems and a few hodgepodge solutions. Problems go from feminism and the decline of marriage to offshore tax havens. Basically, lack of morality infus...

    h?zl? okunan, kolay anla??l?r, ekonomi d???nda her konuya de?inen, içeri?in büyük bir k?sm? Noah Harari'den derlenmi? hissi veren, sonuç itibariyle kapitalizmden ba?ka bir gelecek görmeyen, solcularla nazileri ele?tiren, ama kapitalizmin de böyle gitmeyece?ini sö...

    This is an interesting and thoughtful book. Paul's comments about belonging resonate with me. But I remain uncertain about the duty of rescue, especially in the context of his other comments. He essentially attacks victimhood, the notion that victims somehow deserve certain treatment a...

    Solid 3.5. The ideas are very interesting; the preamble and diagnosis are well covered and the book spends a lot of time rehashing. ...

    Paul Collier?s The Future of Capitalism ? Facing the New Anxieties An economist?s prescription to challenge the charlatan extremes ruling broken societies This is Paul Collier?s best book to date. It follows his other very good ones, notably The Bottom Billion, a watershed ...

    I approached the book with much interest having listened to an LSE podcast lecture delivered by Sir Paul Collier. The introduction to the book suggested it will tackle some important issues of the day such as the increasing economic divergence of major cities and the countryside. Indee...

    This is the age for a book like this. The economy no longer seems to be working. Society no longer seems to be working. Politics no longer seems to be working. This book looks at why this might be so. The first chapter provides an analysis of where it all seems to have gone wrong and I...

    Paul Collier takes a step back from his usual battleground of third-world countries and looks at how modern-day western countries have moved in a disconcerting direction, towards increased alienation, reduced social mobility and ever widening inequalities, on a geographical as well as ...

    This book does a great job of explaining and examining the new anxieties brought about by modern day capitalist societies. How did we go from a largely united nation with common goals to one that is heavily divided along social, political, and economic lines? Collier raises interesting...

    ?We are social beings, neither economic man, nor altruistic saints. ?Ethical capitalism, built on our shared values, and pragmatic reasoning is the thesis of the book!? ?Shared Identity becomes the foundation for far-sighted reciprocity.? ?We must restore the va...

    My impression is that Paul Collier is trying to do with the left-right debate what he did with the Sachs-Easterly debates on aid for developing nations: be the respected voice in the middle that can be relied upon to evaluate the evidence rather than interpreting everything through the...

    It was an entertaining book to listen to (I have the audiobook version), but at times I felt like it was very dragged out and wished I could speed it up. I think it could have been shorter. I would still recommend it to someone interested in the topic for a one time read. Not the type ...

    It's hilarious how the author consistently uses Marxist as a pejorative and completely misunderstands Marx (as do most economists), but the book is basically advocating for socialism with extra steps. What a joke. ...

    A good perspective about some bad situations directly or indirectly associated with capitalism. Some chapters go too deep in subjects and sometimes it gets a little hard to follow but overall a good book with nice dissection of problems and good proposition of solutions. ...

    This book is a good read. Relevant and explains the ups/down sides to capitalism as well as offers constructive criticism on how to do things better. Uses real world examples and policies. ...

    The best parts pulls this all the way up; others are a bit light on substance. A very nuanced discussion from the hard (political) centre. ...

    not enough details in the part about how to change his perceived problems with capitalism ...

    The first coherent explanation for our world today, that I've read. ...

    Heavy going but worth persevering for a sustainable and equitable future. ...

    One of the best books I read all year. Enormously relevant and so full of provocative ideas that I will be thinking them over for years to come. ...

    Enlightened view on where Capitalism has led us. Some ideas on how to improve things but light on specifics. ...

  • Cary Giese
    Jan 17, 2019

    https://www.economist.com/books-and-a... ...

    I found this to be a pretty terrible book. It has the kernel of some good -- or at least interesting -- ideas but it does such a poor job of putting forward arguments in favor of its suggestions that I end up feeling like I wasted my time reading this. It doesn't help that few of his s...

    This is a wonderful book, even better than I expected. The author is a respected and well published Oxford economist. The intent of the book is to provide a thoughtful overview of the problems facing global capitalism and even offer some possible fixes, perhaps in conjunction with his ...

    What Oxford professor Paul Collier has written here is not only a very involved work of economics but also a deeply felt expression of ethics surrounding the current socio-political climate and how that has tainted and marginalized rational discussion of purely economic issues. He fram...

    Collier is an Economics Professor at Oxford. He pointed out that the current problems of capitalism stem from assuming the existence of the unreal Economic Man and promotes Utilitarianism. As a result, profits are maximised, manufacturing and back end jobs are moved overseas, machines ...

    Collier makes some excellent books in here, but the idea needed some time to mature and become clear. The book offers a hodgepodge of problems and a few hodgepodge solutions. Problems go from feminism and the decline of marriage to offshore tax havens. Basically, lack of morality infus...

    h?zl? okunan, kolay anla??l?r, ekonomi d???nda her konuya de?inen, içeri?in büyük bir k?sm? Noah Harari'den derlenmi? hissi veren, sonuç itibariyle kapitalizmden ba?ka bir gelecek görmeyen, solcularla nazileri ele?tiren, ama kapitalizmin de böyle gitmeyece?ini sö...

    This is an interesting and thoughtful book. Paul's comments about belonging resonate with me. But I remain uncertain about the duty of rescue, especially in the context of his other comments. He essentially attacks victimhood, the notion that victims somehow deserve certain treatment a...

    Solid 3.5. The ideas are very interesting; the preamble and diagnosis are well covered and the book spends a lot of time rehashing. ...

    Paul Collier?s The Future of Capitalism ? Facing the New Anxieties An economist?s prescription to challenge the charlatan extremes ruling broken societies This is Paul Collier?s best book to date. It follows his other very good ones, notably The Bottom Billion, a watershed ...

    I approached the book with much interest having listened to an LSE podcast lecture delivered by Sir Paul Collier. The introduction to the book suggested it will tackle some important issues of the day such as the increasing economic divergence of major cities and the countryside. Indee...

    This is the age for a book like this. The economy no longer seems to be working. Society no longer seems to be working. Politics no longer seems to be working. This book looks at why this might be so. The first chapter provides an analysis of where it all seems to have gone wrong and I...

    Paul Collier takes a step back from his usual battleground of third-world countries and looks at how modern-day western countries have moved in a disconcerting direction, towards increased alienation, reduced social mobility and ever widening inequalities, on a geographical as well as ...

    This book does a great job of explaining and examining the new anxieties brought about by modern day capitalist societies. How did we go from a largely united nation with common goals to one that is heavily divided along social, political, and economic lines? Collier raises interesting...

    ?We are social beings, neither economic man, nor altruistic saints. ?Ethical capitalism, built on our shared values, and pragmatic reasoning is the thesis of the book!? ?Shared Identity becomes the foundation for far-sighted reciprocity.? ?We must restore the va...

  • Thales Monteiro
    Jan 07, 2019

    https://www.economist.com/books-and-a... ...

    I found this to be a pretty terrible book. It has the kernel of some good -- or at least interesting -- ideas but it does such a poor job of putting forward arguments in favor of its suggestions that I end up feeling like I wasted my time reading this. It doesn't help that few of his s...

    This is a wonderful book, even better than I expected. The author is a respected and well published Oxford economist. The intent of the book is to provide a thoughtful overview of the problems facing global capitalism and even offer some possible fixes, perhaps in conjunction with his ...

    What Oxford professor Paul Collier has written here is not only a very involved work of economics but also a deeply felt expression of ethics surrounding the current socio-political climate and how that has tainted and marginalized rational discussion of purely economic issues. He fram...

    Collier is an Economics Professor at Oxford. He pointed out that the current problems of capitalism stem from assuming the existence of the unreal Economic Man and promotes Utilitarianism. As a result, profits are maximised, manufacturing and back end jobs are moved overseas, machines ...

    Collier makes some excellent books in here, but the idea needed some time to mature and become clear. The book offers a hodgepodge of problems and a few hodgepodge solutions. Problems go from feminism and the decline of marriage to offshore tax havens. Basically, lack of morality infus...

    h?zl? okunan, kolay anla??l?r, ekonomi d???nda her konuya de?inen, içeri?in büyük bir k?sm? Noah Harari'den derlenmi? hissi veren, sonuç itibariyle kapitalizmden ba?ka bir gelecek görmeyen, solcularla nazileri ele?tiren, ama kapitalizmin de böyle gitmeyece?ini sö...

    This is an interesting and thoughtful book. Paul's comments about belonging resonate with me. But I remain uncertain about the duty of rescue, especially in the context of his other comments. He essentially attacks victimhood, the notion that victims somehow deserve certain treatment a...

    Solid 3.5. The ideas are very interesting; the preamble and diagnosis are well covered and the book spends a lot of time rehashing. ...

    Paul Collier?s The Future of Capitalism ? Facing the New Anxieties An economist?s prescription to challenge the charlatan extremes ruling broken societies This is Paul Collier?s best book to date. It follows his other very good ones, notably The Bottom Billion, a watershed ...

    I approached the book with much interest having listened to an LSE podcast lecture delivered by Sir Paul Collier. The introduction to the book suggested it will tackle some important issues of the day such as the increasing economic divergence of major cities and the countryside. Indee...

    This is the age for a book like this. The economy no longer seems to be working. Society no longer seems to be working. Politics no longer seems to be working. This book looks at why this might be so. The first chapter provides an analysis of where it all seems to have gone wrong and I...

    Paul Collier takes a step back from his usual battleground of third-world countries and looks at how modern-day western countries have moved in a disconcerting direction, towards increased alienation, reduced social mobility and ever widening inequalities, on a geographical as well as ...

    This book does a great job of explaining and examining the new anxieties brought about by modern day capitalist societies. How did we go from a largely united nation with common goals to one that is heavily divided along social, political, and economic lines? Collier raises interesting...

    ?We are social beings, neither economic man, nor altruistic saints. ?Ethical capitalism, built on our shared values, and pragmatic reasoning is the thesis of the book!? ?Shared Identity becomes the foundation for far-sighted reciprocity.? ?We must restore the va...

    My impression is that Paul Collier is trying to do with the left-right debate what he did with the Sachs-Easterly debates on aid for developing nations: be the respected voice in the middle that can be relied upon to evaluate the evidence rather than interpreting everything through the...

    It was an entertaining book to listen to (I have the audiobook version), but at times I felt like it was very dragged out and wished I could speed it up. I think it could have been shorter. I would still recommend it to someone interested in the topic for a one time read. Not the type ...

    It's hilarious how the author consistently uses Marxist as a pejorative and completely misunderstands Marx (as do most economists), but the book is basically advocating for socialism with extra steps. What a joke. ...

    A good perspective about some bad situations directly or indirectly associated with capitalism. Some chapters go too deep in subjects and sometimes it gets a little hard to follow but overall a good book with nice dissection of problems and good proposition of solutions. ...

  • James Meiers
    Feb 13, 2019

    https://www.economist.com/books-and-a... ...

    I found this to be a pretty terrible book. It has the kernel of some good -- or at least interesting -- ideas but it does such a poor job of putting forward arguments in favor of its suggestions that I end up feeling like I wasted my time reading this. It doesn't help that few of his s...

    This is a wonderful book, even better than I expected. The author is a respected and well published Oxford economist. The intent of the book is to provide a thoughtful overview of the problems facing global capitalism and even offer some possible fixes, perhaps in conjunction with his ...

    What Oxford professor Paul Collier has written here is not only a very involved work of economics but also a deeply felt expression of ethics surrounding the current socio-political climate and how that has tainted and marginalized rational discussion of purely economic issues. He fram...

    Collier is an Economics Professor at Oxford. He pointed out that the current problems of capitalism stem from assuming the existence of the unreal Economic Man and promotes Utilitarianism. As a result, profits are maximised, manufacturing and back end jobs are moved overseas, machines ...

    Collier makes some excellent books in here, but the idea needed some time to mature and become clear. The book offers a hodgepodge of problems and a few hodgepodge solutions. Problems go from feminism and the decline of marriage to offshore tax havens. Basically, lack of morality infus...

    h?zl? okunan, kolay anla??l?r, ekonomi d???nda her konuya de?inen, içeri?in büyük bir k?sm? Noah Harari'den derlenmi? hissi veren, sonuç itibariyle kapitalizmden ba?ka bir gelecek görmeyen, solcularla nazileri ele?tiren, ama kapitalizmin de böyle gitmeyece?ini sö...

    This is an interesting and thoughtful book. Paul's comments about belonging resonate with me. But I remain uncertain about the duty of rescue, especially in the context of his other comments. He essentially attacks victimhood, the notion that victims somehow deserve certain treatment a...

    Solid 3.5. The ideas are very interesting; the preamble and diagnosis are well covered and the book spends a lot of time rehashing. ...

    Paul Collier?s The Future of Capitalism ? Facing the New Anxieties An economist?s prescription to challenge the charlatan extremes ruling broken societies This is Paul Collier?s best book to date. It follows his other very good ones, notably The Bottom Billion, a watershed ...

    I approached the book with much interest having listened to an LSE podcast lecture delivered by Sir Paul Collier. The introduction to the book suggested it will tackle some important issues of the day such as the increasing economic divergence of major cities and the countryside. Indee...

    This is the age for a book like this. The economy no longer seems to be working. Society no longer seems to be working. Politics no longer seems to be working. This book looks at why this might be so. The first chapter provides an analysis of where it all seems to have gone wrong and I...

    Paul Collier takes a step back from his usual battleground of third-world countries and looks at how modern-day western countries have moved in a disconcerting direction, towards increased alienation, reduced social mobility and ever widening inequalities, on a geographical as well as ...

    This book does a great job of explaining and examining the new anxieties brought about by modern day capitalist societies. How did we go from a largely united nation with common goals to one that is heavily divided along social, political, and economic lines? Collier raises interesting...

    ?We are social beings, neither economic man, nor altruistic saints. ?Ethical capitalism, built on our shared values, and pragmatic reasoning is the thesis of the book!? ?Shared Identity becomes the foundation for far-sighted reciprocity.? ?We must restore the va...

    My impression is that Paul Collier is trying to do with the left-right debate what he did with the Sachs-Easterly debates on aid for developing nations: be the respected voice in the middle that can be relied upon to evaluate the evidence rather than interpreting everything through the...

    It was an entertaining book to listen to (I have the audiobook version), but at times I felt like it was very dragged out and wished I could speed it up. I think it could have been shorter. I would still recommend it to someone interested in the topic for a one time read. Not the type ...

    It's hilarious how the author consistently uses Marxist as a pejorative and completely misunderstands Marx (as do most economists), but the book is basically advocating for socialism with extra steps. What a joke. ...

  • Rosemary Catt
    Jan 31, 2019

    https://www.economist.com/books-and-a... ...

    I found this to be a pretty terrible book. It has the kernel of some good -- or at least interesting -- ideas but it does such a poor job of putting forward arguments in favor of its suggestions that I end up feeling like I wasted my time reading this. It doesn't help that few of his s...

    This is a wonderful book, even better than I expected. The author is a respected and well published Oxford economist. The intent of the book is to provide a thoughtful overview of the problems facing global capitalism and even offer some possible fixes, perhaps in conjunction with his ...

    What Oxford professor Paul Collier has written here is not only a very involved work of economics but also a deeply felt expression of ethics surrounding the current socio-political climate and how that has tainted and marginalized rational discussion of purely economic issues. He fram...

    Collier is an Economics Professor at Oxford. He pointed out that the current problems of capitalism stem from assuming the existence of the unreal Economic Man and promotes Utilitarianism. As a result, profits are maximised, manufacturing and back end jobs are moved overseas, machines ...

    Collier makes some excellent books in here, but the idea needed some time to mature and become clear. The book offers a hodgepodge of problems and a few hodgepodge solutions. Problems go from feminism and the decline of marriage to offshore tax havens. Basically, lack of morality infus...

    h?zl? okunan, kolay anla??l?r, ekonomi d???nda her konuya de?inen, içeri?in büyük bir k?sm? Noah Harari'den derlenmi? hissi veren, sonuç itibariyle kapitalizmden ba?ka bir gelecek görmeyen, solcularla nazileri ele?tiren, ama kapitalizmin de böyle gitmeyece?ini sö...

    This is an interesting and thoughtful book. Paul's comments about belonging resonate with me. But I remain uncertain about the duty of rescue, especially in the context of his other comments. He essentially attacks victimhood, the notion that victims somehow deserve certain treatment a...

    Solid 3.5. The ideas are very interesting; the preamble and diagnosis are well covered and the book spends a lot of time rehashing. ...

    Paul Collier?s The Future of Capitalism ? Facing the New Anxieties An economist?s prescription to challenge the charlatan extremes ruling broken societies This is Paul Collier?s best book to date. It follows his other very good ones, notably The Bottom Billion, a watershed ...

    I approached the book with much interest having listened to an LSE podcast lecture delivered by Sir Paul Collier. The introduction to the book suggested it will tackle some important issues of the day such as the increasing economic divergence of major cities and the countryside. Indee...

    This is the age for a book like this. The economy no longer seems to be working. Society no longer seems to be working. Politics no longer seems to be working. This book looks at why this might be so. The first chapter provides an analysis of where it all seems to have gone wrong and I...

    Paul Collier takes a step back from his usual battleground of third-world countries and looks at how modern-day western countries have moved in a disconcerting direction, towards increased alienation, reduced social mobility and ever widening inequalities, on a geographical as well as ...

    This book does a great job of explaining and examining the new anxieties brought about by modern day capitalist societies. How did we go from a largely united nation with common goals to one that is heavily divided along social, political, and economic lines? Collier raises interesting...

    ?We are social beings, neither economic man, nor altruistic saints. ?Ethical capitalism, built on our shared values, and pragmatic reasoning is the thesis of the book!? ?Shared Identity becomes the foundation for far-sighted reciprocity.? ?We must restore the va...

    My impression is that Paul Collier is trying to do with the left-right debate what he did with the Sachs-Easterly debates on aid for developing nations: be the respected voice in the middle that can be relied upon to evaluate the evidence rather than interpreting everything through the...

    It was an entertaining book to listen to (I have the audiobook version), but at times I felt like it was very dragged out and wished I could speed it up. I think it could have been shorter. I would still recommend it to someone interested in the topic for a one time read. Not the type ...

    It's hilarious how the author consistently uses Marxist as a pejorative and completely misunderstands Marx (as do most economists), but the book is basically advocating for socialism with extra steps. What a joke. ...

    A good perspective about some bad situations directly or indirectly associated with capitalism. Some chapters go too deep in subjects and sometimes it gets a little hard to follow but overall a good book with nice dissection of problems and good proposition of solutions. ...

    This book is a good read. Relevant and explains the ups/down sides to capitalism as well as offers constructive criticism on how to do things better. Uses real world examples and policies. ...

    The best parts pulls this all the way up; others are a bit light on substance. A very nuanced discussion from the hard (political) centre. ...

    not enough details in the part about how to change his perceived problems with capitalism ...

    The first coherent explanation for our world today, that I've read. ...

    Heavy going but worth persevering for a sustainable and equitable future. ...

  • Hendri Setiawan
    Nov 14, 2018

    https://www.economist.com/books-and-a... ...

    I found this to be a pretty terrible book. It has the kernel of some good -- or at least interesting -- ideas but it does such a poor job of putting forward arguments in favor of its suggestions that I end up feeling like I wasted my time reading this. It doesn't help that few of his s...

    This is a wonderful book, even better than I expected. The author is a respected and well published Oxford economist. The intent of the book is to provide a thoughtful overview of the problems facing global capitalism and even offer some possible fixes, perhaps in conjunction with his ...

    What Oxford professor Paul Collier has written here is not only a very involved work of economics but also a deeply felt expression of ethics surrounding the current socio-political climate and how that has tainted and marginalized rational discussion of purely economic issues. He fram...

    Collier is an Economics Professor at Oxford. He pointed out that the current problems of capitalism stem from assuming the existence of the unreal Economic Man and promotes Utilitarianism. As a result, profits are maximised, manufacturing and back end jobs are moved overseas, machines ...

    Collier makes some excellent books in here, but the idea needed some time to mature and become clear. The book offers a hodgepodge of problems and a few hodgepodge solutions. Problems go from feminism and the decline of marriage to offshore tax havens. Basically, lack of morality infus...

    h?zl? okunan, kolay anla??l?r, ekonomi d???nda her konuya de?inen, içeri?in büyük bir k?sm? Noah Harari'den derlenmi? hissi veren, sonuç itibariyle kapitalizmden ba?ka bir gelecek görmeyen, solcularla nazileri ele?tiren, ama kapitalizmin de böyle gitmeyece?ini sö...

    This is an interesting and thoughtful book. Paul's comments about belonging resonate with me. But I remain uncertain about the duty of rescue, especially in the context of his other comments. He essentially attacks victimhood, the notion that victims somehow deserve certain treatment a...

    Solid 3.5. The ideas are very interesting; the preamble and diagnosis are well covered and the book spends a lot of time rehashing. ...

    Paul Collier?s The Future of Capitalism ? Facing the New Anxieties An economist?s prescription to challenge the charlatan extremes ruling broken societies This is Paul Collier?s best book to date. It follows his other very good ones, notably The Bottom Billion, a watershed ...

    I approached the book with much interest having listened to an LSE podcast lecture delivered by Sir Paul Collier. The introduction to the book suggested it will tackle some important issues of the day such as the increasing economic divergence of major cities and the countryside. Indee...

    This is the age for a book like this. The economy no longer seems to be working. Society no longer seems to be working. Politics no longer seems to be working. This book looks at why this might be so. The first chapter provides an analysis of where it all seems to have gone wrong and I...

    Paul Collier takes a step back from his usual battleground of third-world countries and looks at how modern-day western countries have moved in a disconcerting direction, towards increased alienation, reduced social mobility and ever widening inequalities, on a geographical as well as ...

    This book does a great job of explaining and examining the new anxieties brought about by modern day capitalist societies. How did we go from a largely united nation with common goals to one that is heavily divided along social, political, and economic lines? Collier raises interesting...

    ?We are social beings, neither economic man, nor altruistic saints. ?Ethical capitalism, built on our shared values, and pragmatic reasoning is the thesis of the book!? ?Shared Identity becomes the foundation for far-sighted reciprocity.? ?We must restore the va...

    My impression is that Paul Collier is trying to do with the left-right debate what he did with the Sachs-Easterly debates on aid for developing nations: be the respected voice in the middle that can be relied upon to evaluate the evidence rather than interpreting everything through the...

    It was an entertaining book to listen to (I have the audiobook version), but at times I felt like it was very dragged out and wished I could speed it up. I think it could have been shorter. I would still recommend it to someone interested in the topic for a one time read. Not the type ...

    It's hilarious how the author consistently uses Marxist as a pejorative and completely misunderstands Marx (as do most economists), but the book is basically advocating for socialism with extra steps. What a joke. ...

    A good perspective about some bad situations directly or indirectly associated with capitalism. Some chapters go too deep in subjects and sometimes it gets a little hard to follow but overall a good book with nice dissection of problems and good proposition of solutions. ...

    This book is a good read. Relevant and explains the ups/down sides to capitalism as well as offers constructive criticism on how to do things better. Uses real world examples and policies. ...

    The best parts pulls this all the way up; others are a bit light on substance. A very nuanced discussion from the hard (political) centre. ...

    not enough details in the part about how to change his perceived problems with capitalism ...

    The first coherent explanation for our world today, that I've read. ...

    Heavy going but worth persevering for a sustainable and equitable future. ...

    One of the best books I read all year. Enormously relevant and so full of provocative ideas that I will be thinking them over for years to come. ...

    Enlightened view on where Capitalism has led us. Some ideas on how to improve things but light on specifics. ...

    There are some very good points in the book, such as being pragmatic, the roles of family, ethnic and efficient taxation, and excessive trading in the financial markets, and I like the last one especially. However, my overall impression is not that good, mainly because it seems that th...

    ...

  • Randy
    Jan 05, 2019

    https://www.economist.com/books-and-a... ...

    I found this to be a pretty terrible book. It has the kernel of some good -- or at least interesting -- ideas but it does such a poor job of putting forward arguments in favor of its suggestions that I end up feeling like I wasted my time reading this. It doesn't help that few of his s...

    This is a wonderful book, even better than I expected. The author is a respected and well published Oxford economist. The intent of the book is to provide a thoughtful overview of the problems facing global capitalism and even offer some possible fixes, perhaps in conjunction with his ...

    What Oxford professor Paul Collier has written here is not only a very involved work of economics but also a deeply felt expression of ethics surrounding the current socio-political climate and how that has tainted and marginalized rational discussion of purely economic issues. He fram...

    Collier is an Economics Professor at Oxford. He pointed out that the current problems of capitalism stem from assuming the existence of the unreal Economic Man and promotes Utilitarianism. As a result, profits are maximised, manufacturing and back end jobs are moved overseas, machines ...

    Collier makes some excellent books in here, but the idea needed some time to mature and become clear. The book offers a hodgepodge of problems and a few hodgepodge solutions. Problems go from feminism and the decline of marriage to offshore tax havens. Basically, lack of morality infus...

    h?zl? okunan, kolay anla??l?r, ekonomi d???nda her konuya de?inen, içeri?in büyük bir k?sm? Noah Harari'den derlenmi? hissi veren, sonuç itibariyle kapitalizmden ba?ka bir gelecek görmeyen, solcularla nazileri ele?tiren, ama kapitalizmin de böyle gitmeyece?ini sö...

    This is an interesting and thoughtful book. Paul's comments about belonging resonate with me. But I remain uncertain about the duty of rescue, especially in the context of his other comments. He essentially attacks victimhood, the notion that victims somehow deserve certain treatment a...

    Solid 3.5. The ideas are very interesting; the preamble and diagnosis are well covered and the book spends a lot of time rehashing. ...

    Paul Collier?s The Future of Capitalism ? Facing the New Anxieties An economist?s prescription to challenge the charlatan extremes ruling broken societies This is Paul Collier?s best book to date. It follows his other very good ones, notably The Bottom Billion, a watershed ...

    I approached the book with much interest having listened to an LSE podcast lecture delivered by Sir Paul Collier. The introduction to the book suggested it will tackle some important issues of the day such as the increasing economic divergence of major cities and the countryside. Indee...

    This is the age for a book like this. The economy no longer seems to be working. Society no longer seems to be working. Politics no longer seems to be working. This book looks at why this might be so. The first chapter provides an analysis of where it all seems to have gone wrong and I...

    Paul Collier takes a step back from his usual battleground of third-world countries and looks at how modern-day western countries have moved in a disconcerting direction, towards increased alienation, reduced social mobility and ever widening inequalities, on a geographical as well as ...

    This book does a great job of explaining and examining the new anxieties brought about by modern day capitalist societies. How did we go from a largely united nation with common goals to one that is heavily divided along social, political, and economic lines? Collier raises interesting...

    ?We are social beings, neither economic man, nor altruistic saints. ?Ethical capitalism, built on our shared values, and pragmatic reasoning is the thesis of the book!? ?Shared Identity becomes the foundation for far-sighted reciprocity.? ?We must restore the va...

    My impression is that Paul Collier is trying to do with the left-right debate what he did with the Sachs-Easterly debates on aid for developing nations: be the respected voice in the middle that can be relied upon to evaluate the evidence rather than interpreting everything through the...

    It was an entertaining book to listen to (I have the audiobook version), but at times I felt like it was very dragged out and wished I could speed it up. I think it could have been shorter. I would still recommend it to someone interested in the topic for a one time read. Not the type ...

    It's hilarious how the author consistently uses Marxist as a pejorative and completely misunderstands Marx (as do most economists), but the book is basically advocating for socialism with extra steps. What a joke. ...

    A good perspective about some bad situations directly or indirectly associated with capitalism. Some chapters go too deep in subjects and sometimes it gets a little hard to follow but overall a good book with nice dissection of problems and good proposition of solutions. ...

    This book is a good read. Relevant and explains the ups/down sides to capitalism as well as offers constructive criticism on how to do things better. Uses real world examples and policies. ...

    The best parts pulls this all the way up; others are a bit light on substance. A very nuanced discussion from the hard (political) centre. ...

    not enough details in the part about how to change his perceived problems with capitalism ...

    The first coherent explanation for our world today, that I've read. ...

    Heavy going but worth persevering for a sustainable and equitable future. ...

    One of the best books I read all year. Enormously relevant and so full of provocative ideas that I will be thinking them over for years to come. ...

    Enlightened view on where Capitalism has led us. Some ideas on how to improve things but light on specifics. ...

    There are some very good points in the book, such as being pragmatic, the roles of family, ethnic and efficient taxation, and excessive trading in the financial markets, and I like the last one especially. However, my overall impression is not that good, mainly because it seems that th...

  • Precious
    Nov 27, 2018

    https://www.economist.com/books-and-a... ...

    I found this to be a pretty terrible book. It has the kernel of some good -- or at least interesting -- ideas but it does such a poor job of putting forward arguments in favor of its suggestions that I end up feeling like I wasted my time reading this. It doesn't help that few of his s...

    This is a wonderful book, even better than I expected. The author is a respected and well published Oxford economist. The intent of the book is to provide a thoughtful overview of the problems facing global capitalism and even offer some possible fixes, perhaps in conjunction with his ...

    What Oxford professor Paul Collier has written here is not only a very involved work of economics but also a deeply felt expression of ethics surrounding the current socio-political climate and how that has tainted and marginalized rational discussion of purely economic issues. He fram...

    Collier is an Economics Professor at Oxford. He pointed out that the current problems of capitalism stem from assuming the existence of the unreal Economic Man and promotes Utilitarianism. As a result, profits are maximised, manufacturing and back end jobs are moved overseas, machines ...

    Collier makes some excellent books in here, but the idea needed some time to mature and become clear. The book offers a hodgepodge of problems and a few hodgepodge solutions. Problems go from feminism and the decline of marriage to offshore tax havens. Basically, lack of morality infus...

    h?zl? okunan, kolay anla??l?r, ekonomi d???nda her konuya de?inen, içeri?in büyük bir k?sm? Noah Harari'den derlenmi? hissi veren, sonuç itibariyle kapitalizmden ba?ka bir gelecek görmeyen, solcularla nazileri ele?tiren, ama kapitalizmin de böyle gitmeyece?ini sö...

    This is an interesting and thoughtful book. Paul's comments about belonging resonate with me. But I remain uncertain about the duty of rescue, especially in the context of his other comments. He essentially attacks victimhood, the notion that victims somehow deserve certain treatment a...

    Solid 3.5. The ideas are very interesting; the preamble and diagnosis are well covered and the book spends a lot of time rehashing. ...

    Paul Collier?s The Future of Capitalism ? Facing the New Anxieties An economist?s prescription to challenge the charlatan extremes ruling broken societies This is Paul Collier?s best book to date. It follows his other very good ones, notably The Bottom Billion, a watershed ...

    I approached the book with much interest having listened to an LSE podcast lecture delivered by Sir Paul Collier. The introduction to the book suggested it will tackle some important issues of the day such as the increasing economic divergence of major cities and the countryside. Indee...

    This is the age for a book like this. The economy no longer seems to be working. Society no longer seems to be working. Politics no longer seems to be working. This book looks at why this might be so. The first chapter provides an analysis of where it all seems to have gone wrong and I...

    Paul Collier takes a step back from his usual battleground of third-world countries and looks at how modern-day western countries have moved in a disconcerting direction, towards increased alienation, reduced social mobility and ever widening inequalities, on a geographical as well as ...

    This book does a great job of explaining and examining the new anxieties brought about by modern day capitalist societies. How did we go from a largely united nation with common goals to one that is heavily divided along social, political, and economic lines? Collier raises interesting...

    ?We are social beings, neither economic man, nor altruistic saints. ?Ethical capitalism, built on our shared values, and pragmatic reasoning is the thesis of the book!? ?Shared Identity becomes the foundation for far-sighted reciprocity.? ?We must restore the va...

    My impression is that Paul Collier is trying to do with the left-right debate what he did with the Sachs-Easterly debates on aid for developing nations: be the respected voice in the middle that can be relied upon to evaluate the evidence rather than interpreting everything through the...

    It was an entertaining book to listen to (I have the audiobook version), but at times I felt like it was very dragged out and wished I could speed it up. I think it could have been shorter. I would still recommend it to someone interested in the topic for a one time read. Not the type ...

    It's hilarious how the author consistently uses Marxist as a pejorative and completely misunderstands Marx (as do most economists), but the book is basically advocating for socialism with extra steps. What a joke. ...

    A good perspective about some bad situations directly or indirectly associated with capitalism. Some chapters go too deep in subjects and sometimes it gets a little hard to follow but overall a good book with nice dissection of problems and good proposition of solutions. ...

    This book is a good read. Relevant and explains the ups/down sides to capitalism as well as offers constructive criticism on how to do things better. Uses real world examples and policies. ...

    The best parts pulls this all the way up; others are a bit light on substance. A very nuanced discussion from the hard (political) centre. ...

    not enough details in the part about how to change his perceived problems with capitalism ...

    The first coherent explanation for our world today, that I've read. ...

    Heavy going but worth persevering for a sustainable and equitable future. ...

    One of the best books I read all year. Enormously relevant and so full of provocative ideas that I will be thinking them over for years to come. ...

    Enlightened view on where Capitalism has led us. Some ideas on how to improve things but light on specifics. ...

    There are some very good points in the book, such as being pragmatic, the roles of family, ethnic and efficient taxation, and excessive trading in the financial markets, and I like the last one especially. However, my overall impression is not that good, mainly because it seems that th...

    ...

    ...

    ...

  • Maria Paula
    Jan 05, 2019

    https://www.economist.com/books-and-a... ...

    I found this to be a pretty terrible book. It has the kernel of some good -- or at least interesting -- ideas but it does such a poor job of putting forward arguments in favor of its suggestions that I end up feeling like I wasted my time reading this. It doesn't help that few of his s...

    This is a wonderful book, even better than I expected. The author is a respected and well published Oxford economist. The intent of the book is to provide a thoughtful overview of the problems facing global capitalism and even offer some possible fixes, perhaps in conjunction with his ...

    What Oxford professor Paul Collier has written here is not only a very involved work of economics but also a deeply felt expression of ethics surrounding the current socio-political climate and how that has tainted and marginalized rational discussion of purely economic issues. He fram...

    Collier is an Economics Professor at Oxford. He pointed out that the current problems of capitalism stem from assuming the existence of the unreal Economic Man and promotes Utilitarianism. As a result, profits are maximised, manufacturing and back end jobs are moved overseas, machines ...

    Collier makes some excellent books in here, but the idea needed some time to mature and become clear. The book offers a hodgepodge of problems and a few hodgepodge solutions. Problems go from feminism and the decline of marriage to offshore tax havens. Basically, lack of morality infus...

    h?zl? okunan, kolay anla??l?r, ekonomi d???nda her konuya de?inen, içeri?in büyük bir k?sm? Noah Harari'den derlenmi? hissi veren, sonuç itibariyle kapitalizmden ba?ka bir gelecek görmeyen, solcularla nazileri ele?tiren, ama kapitalizmin de böyle gitmeyece?ini sö...

    This is an interesting and thoughtful book. Paul's comments about belonging resonate with me. But I remain uncertain about the duty of rescue, especially in the context of his other comments. He essentially attacks victimhood, the notion that victims somehow deserve certain treatment a...

    Solid 3.5. The ideas are very interesting; the preamble and diagnosis are well covered and the book spends a lot of time rehashing. ...

    Paul Collier?s The Future of Capitalism ? Facing the New Anxieties An economist?s prescription to challenge the charlatan extremes ruling broken societies This is Paul Collier?s best book to date. It follows his other very good ones, notably The Bottom Billion, a watershed ...

    I approached the book with much interest having listened to an LSE podcast lecture delivered by Sir Paul Collier. The introduction to the book suggested it will tackle some important issues of the day such as the increasing economic divergence of major cities and the countryside. Indee...

    This is the age for a book like this. The economy no longer seems to be working. Society no longer seems to be working. Politics no longer seems to be working. This book looks at why this might be so. The first chapter provides an analysis of where it all seems to have gone wrong and I...

    Paul Collier takes a step back from his usual battleground of third-world countries and looks at how modern-day western countries have moved in a disconcerting direction, towards increased alienation, reduced social mobility and ever widening inequalities, on a geographical as well as ...

    This book does a great job of explaining and examining the new anxieties brought about by modern day capitalist societies. How did we go from a largely united nation with common goals to one that is heavily divided along social, political, and economic lines? Collier raises interesting...

    ?We are social beings, neither economic man, nor altruistic saints. ?Ethical capitalism, built on our shared values, and pragmatic reasoning is the thesis of the book!? ?Shared Identity becomes the foundation for far-sighted reciprocity.? ?We must restore the va...

    My impression is that Paul Collier is trying to do with the left-right debate what he did with the Sachs-Easterly debates on aid for developing nations: be the respected voice in the middle that can be relied upon to evaluate the evidence rather than interpreting everything through the...

    It was an entertaining book to listen to (I have the audiobook version), but at times I felt like it was very dragged out and wished I could speed it up. I think it could have been shorter. I would still recommend it to someone interested in the topic for a one time read. Not the type ...

  • Robert Duff
    Feb 18, 2019

    https://www.economist.com/books-and-a... ...

    I found this to be a pretty terrible book. It has the kernel of some good -- or at least interesting -- ideas but it does such a poor job of putting forward arguments in favor of its suggestions that I end up feeling like I wasted my time reading this. It doesn't help that few of his s...

    This is a wonderful book, even better than I expected. The author is a respected and well published Oxford economist. The intent of the book is to provide a thoughtful overview of the problems facing global capitalism and even offer some possible fixes, perhaps in conjunction with his ...

    What Oxford professor Paul Collier has written here is not only a very involved work of economics but also a deeply felt expression of ethics surrounding the current socio-political climate and how that has tainted and marginalized rational discussion of purely economic issues. He fram...

    Collier is an Economics Professor at Oxford. He pointed out that the current problems of capitalism stem from assuming the existence of the unreal Economic Man and promotes Utilitarianism. As a result, profits are maximised, manufacturing and back end jobs are moved overseas, machines ...

    Collier makes some excellent books in here, but the idea needed some time to mature and become clear. The book offers a hodgepodge of problems and a few hodgepodge solutions. Problems go from feminism and the decline of marriage to offshore tax havens. Basically, lack of morality infus...

    h?zl? okunan, kolay anla??l?r, ekonomi d???nda her konuya de?inen, içeri?in büyük bir k?sm? Noah Harari'den derlenmi? hissi veren, sonuç itibariyle kapitalizmden ba?ka bir gelecek görmeyen, solcularla nazileri ele?tiren, ama kapitalizmin de böyle gitmeyece?ini sö...

    This is an interesting and thoughtful book. Paul's comments about belonging resonate with me. But I remain uncertain about the duty of rescue, especially in the context of his other comments. He essentially attacks victimhood, the notion that victims somehow deserve certain treatment a...

    Solid 3.5. The ideas are very interesting; the preamble and diagnosis are well covered and the book spends a lot of time rehashing. ...

    Paul Collier?s The Future of Capitalism ? Facing the New Anxieties An economist?s prescription to challenge the charlatan extremes ruling broken societies This is Paul Collier?s best book to date. It follows his other very good ones, notably The Bottom Billion, a watershed ...

    I approached the book with much interest having listened to an LSE podcast lecture delivered by Sir Paul Collier. The introduction to the book suggested it will tackle some important issues of the day such as the increasing economic divergence of major cities and the countryside. Indee...

    This is the age for a book like this. The economy no longer seems to be working. Society no longer seems to be working. Politics no longer seems to be working. This book looks at why this might be so. The first chapter provides an analysis of where it all seems to have gone wrong and I...

    Paul Collier takes a step back from his usual battleground of third-world countries and looks at how modern-day western countries have moved in a disconcerting direction, towards increased alienation, reduced social mobility and ever widening inequalities, on a geographical as well as ...

    This book does a great job of explaining and examining the new anxieties brought about by modern day capitalist societies. How did we go from a largely united nation with common goals to one that is heavily divided along social, political, and economic lines? Collier raises interesting...

    ?We are social beings, neither economic man, nor altruistic saints. ?Ethical capitalism, built on our shared values, and pragmatic reasoning is the thesis of the book!? ?Shared Identity becomes the foundation for far-sighted reciprocity.? ?We must restore the va...

    My impression is that Paul Collier is trying to do with the left-right debate what he did with the Sachs-Easterly debates on aid for developing nations: be the respected voice in the middle that can be relied upon to evaluate the evidence rather than interpreting everything through the...

    It was an entertaining book to listen to (I have the audiobook version), but at times I felt like it was very dragged out and wished I could speed it up. I think it could have been shorter. I would still recommend it to someone interested in the topic for a one time read. Not the type ...

    It's hilarious how the author consistently uses Marxist as a pejorative and completely misunderstands Marx (as do most economists), but the book is basically advocating for socialism with extra steps. What a joke. ...

    A good perspective about some bad situations directly or indirectly associated with capitalism. Some chapters go too deep in subjects and sometimes it gets a little hard to follow but overall a good book with nice dissection of problems and good proposition of solutions. ...

    This book is a good read. Relevant and explains the ups/down sides to capitalism as well as offers constructive criticism on how to do things better. Uses real world examples and policies. ...

    The best parts pulls this all the way up; others are a bit light on substance. A very nuanced discussion from the hard (political) centre. ...

    not enough details in the part about how to change his perceived problems with capitalism ...

    The first coherent explanation for our world today, that I've read. ...

    Heavy going but worth persevering for a sustainable and equitable future. ...

    One of the best books I read all year. Enormously relevant and so full of provocative ideas that I will be thinking them over for years to come. ...

    Enlightened view on where Capitalism has led us. Some ideas on how to improve things but light on specifics. ...

    There are some very good points in the book, such as being pragmatic, the roles of family, ethnic and efficient taxation, and excessive trading in the financial markets, and I like the last one especially. However, my overall impression is not that good, mainly because it seems that th...

    ...

    ...

  • Marks54
    Jan 25, 2019

    https://www.economist.com/books-and-a... ...

    I found this to be a pretty terrible book. It has the kernel of some good -- or at least interesting -- ideas but it does such a poor job of putting forward arguments in favor of its suggestions that I end up feeling like I wasted my time reading this. It doesn't help that few of his s...

    This is a wonderful book, even better than I expected. The author is a respected and well published Oxford economist. The intent of the book is to provide a thoughtful overview of the problems facing global capitalism and even offer some possible fixes, perhaps in conjunction with his ...