A Terrible Country

A Terrible Country

A literary triumph about Russia, family, love, and loyalty--the first novel in ten years from a founding editor of n+1 and author of All the Sad Young Literary Men When Andrei Kaplan's older brother Dima insists that Andrei return to Moscow to care for their ailing grandmother, Andrei must take stock of his life in New York. His girlfriend has stopped returning his text mes A literary triumph about Russia, family, love, and loyalty--the first novel in ten years from a founding editor of n+...

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Title:A Terrible Country
Author:Keith Gessen
Rating:
Genres:Fiction
ISBN:A Terrible Country
ISBN
Edition Language:English
Format Type:Hardcover
Number of Pages:338 pages pages

A Terrible Country Reviews

  • Zach
    Jul 24, 2018

    Andrei emigrated with his parents from Russia at the age of six. Now, he's 33 and returning to Moscow to take care of his 89 year old grandmother, who?s suffering from some dementia. And who?s lonely because all her friends are dead. The book takes you to 2008 Moscow. You feel li...

    While I was reading this memoir-like novel about a Russian emigré's return to Moscow to spend time with his grandmother, I kept thinking about Andreď Makine's Dreams of My Russian Summers, another memoir-like novel in which the narrator returns to spend time with his grandmother. I h...

    At a time when Russia, Putin, conspiracy, and collusion dominate the news cycle it is wonderful to escape into a work of fiction that is absorbing, appealing to human emotion on many levels, and sadly, a comment on the reality of Russia today. As useful and engrossing as Keith Gessen?...

    This is a terrible country. My Yolka took to America. Why did you come back?? She seemed angry. A Terrible Country by Keith Gessen is published in the UK by perhaps my favourite of all publishers, Fitzcarraldo Editions, but is an odd fit for the "ambitious, imaginative and innova...

    To justify another 5-star rating for my beloved blue publisher, especially because this title seems to receive more criticism than some others (and I can see where it?s coming from), here are some of my subjective reasons for the grade: - It?s written in refreshingly short, easy...

    Andrei?s life in New York is not what you would call successful. His girlfriend has just dumped him, he barely earns enough to survive from his online teaching job and his dissertation adviser seems to have no confidence in his future job prospects at all. So when his brother Dima ca...

    Keith Gessen was born in Russia of Jewish parents, who emigrated to the US when he was still a child ? and is now an author, journalist (specialising in Russia), book-critic, translator and journal editor. This is his second novel ? and comes with by George Saunders and Elif Ba...

    . . . I felt the terrible freedom of this place. It was a fortress set down in a hostile environment. On one side the Mongols; on the other the Germans, Balts, and Vikings. So the Russians built this fortress here on a bend in the Yauza River, and hoped for the best. They built it big ...

    As a young immigrant from the Soviet Union, i related to the book a lot. Russia may have capitalism but it doesnt mean the corruption went away. Only the people who have connections and money survive Russia. Anyone interested in how Russia continues to operate should read this book. I ...

    Review soon. ...

    3.5 stars Tournament of Books Play-in Round Comments forthcoming. ...

    This is a book about what it means to return to a place that is no longer home. Reading it brought back memories of Tommy Orange?s ?There there?, or, more specifically, of Gertrude Stein?s quote about Oakland, ?there is no there there? from which Orange?s book drew its ti...

    I may be rounding up a bit here, but I really enjoyed this engaging and often funny book backed by a deep knowledge of Russian literature, history and culture. It was interesting to read about Putin's Russia from the oddly endearing voice of a struggling academic with roots in both Rus...

    This is one of the better books on the TOB shortlist. Not only does the writing flow with great characterization (the grandmother is a standout) but we learn some things about modern day Russia and our current political climate. In some ways Gessen's love letter to his grandmother (and...

    Andrei is one lost puppy floundering around in New York in 2008 after his girlfriend dumps him. When his brother Dima calls him to come take care of their 89-year-old grandmother in Moscow for just a little while, he says what the hell and jumps on a plane to Moscow where he lived as a...

    3.5 rounded down ...

    A man returns to Moscow to take care of his grandmother and discovers Putin's Russia, its new prosperity and its old problems. I have not read Gessen's previous novel, but it seems that the author began this one where he finished the previous one, in 2008, and that the main characte...

    When I stumbled on this book, reading the description and summary, I made the purchase with trepidation, (it just seemed to much of a high praise for a name I?ve never even heard). Now that I?ve completed it I just might have found myself a new favorite author in Keith Gessen. ...

    I have mixed feelings about this book. What I enjoyed: learning a bit about Russian culture and physical environments, and the political history and social ramifications of those changing theologies and practices. I eventually enjoyed the growing attachment between Andrei and his grand...

    A Terrible Narrator ...

    I loved this book! It?s been nearly a week since I finished and I miss it still and wish there was more. It is a novel but it reads like a memoir. It starts off with Andrei coming back to Moscow to take care of his grandmother while his older brother is out of the country. Andrei was...

    Rounding up from 3.5. The protagonist, a 30-something academic caring for his gransmother in Moscow for a year, is a bit of a naive jerk, but he seemed to catch himself fairly quickly and not become insufferable. I enjoyed the chance to read a novel set in more-or-less contemporary Rus...

    I enjoyed this book about Russia from someone who was born there, lived there for a time, and speaks the language. Reading about the author's Russian grandmother, and his relationship with her, was the highlight of the book for me. His writing was honest, true-to-life, and at times, ve...

    Smart, funny, page-turning--a deeply enjoyable read. ...

    3.5 stars. In A Terrible Country, the main character, Andrei Kaplan, like the author is Russian born and from a young age was raised in America. The year is 2008 and 33 year old Andrei is called back to Russia by his older brother, Dima, to look after their 88 year old grandmother who ...

    Magnificent. A truly moving and funny and beautiful novel about that time in America where it was possible to connect to Wi-fi but also possible to not have a cell phone. Except this book is about an American living in Putin's Russia just as the American economy explodes in 2008. I fin...

  • Janet
    May 26, 2018

    Andrei emigrated with his parents from Russia at the age of six. Now, he's 33 and returning to Moscow to take care of his 89 year old grandmother, who?s suffering from some dementia. And who?s lonely because all her friends are dead. The book takes you to 2008 Moscow. You feel li...

    While I was reading this memoir-like novel about a Russian emigré's return to Moscow to spend time with his grandmother, I kept thinking about Andreď Makine's Dreams of My Russian Summers, another memoir-like novel in which the narrator returns to spend time with his grandmother. I h...

    At a time when Russia, Putin, conspiracy, and collusion dominate the news cycle it is wonderful to escape into a work of fiction that is absorbing, appealing to human emotion on many levels, and sadly, a comment on the reality of Russia today. As useful and engrossing as Keith Gessen?...

    This is a terrible country. My Yolka took to America. Why did you come back?? She seemed angry. A Terrible Country by Keith Gessen is published in the UK by perhaps my favourite of all publishers, Fitzcarraldo Editions, but is an odd fit for the "ambitious, imaginative and innova...

    To justify another 5-star rating for my beloved blue publisher, especially because this title seems to receive more criticism than some others (and I can see where it?s coming from), here are some of my subjective reasons for the grade: - It?s written in refreshingly short, easy...

    Andrei?s life in New York is not what you would call successful. His girlfriend has just dumped him, he barely earns enough to survive from his online teaching job and his dissertation adviser seems to have no confidence in his future job prospects at all. So when his brother Dima ca...

    Keith Gessen was born in Russia of Jewish parents, who emigrated to the US when he was still a child ? and is now an author, journalist (specialising in Russia), book-critic, translator and journal editor. This is his second novel ? and comes with by George Saunders and Elif Ba...

    . . . I felt the terrible freedom of this place. It was a fortress set down in a hostile environment. On one side the Mongols; on the other the Germans, Balts, and Vikings. So the Russians built this fortress here on a bend in the Yauza River, and hoped for the best. They built it big ...

    As a young immigrant from the Soviet Union, i related to the book a lot. Russia may have capitalism but it doesnt mean the corruption went away. Only the people who have connections and money survive Russia. Anyone interested in how Russia continues to operate should read this book. I ...

    Review soon. ...

    3.5 stars Tournament of Books Play-in Round Comments forthcoming. ...

    This is a book about what it means to return to a place that is no longer home. Reading it brought back memories of Tommy Orange?s ?There there?, or, more specifically, of Gertrude Stein?s quote about Oakland, ?there is no there there? from which Orange?s book drew its ti...

    I may be rounding up a bit here, but I really enjoyed this engaging and often funny book backed by a deep knowledge of Russian literature, history and culture. It was interesting to read about Putin's Russia from the oddly endearing voice of a struggling academic with roots in both Rus...

    This is one of the better books on the TOB shortlist. Not only does the writing flow with great characterization (the grandmother is a standout) but we learn some things about modern day Russia and our current political climate. In some ways Gessen's love letter to his grandmother (and...

  • Jennifer
    Jul 17, 2018

    Andrei emigrated with his parents from Russia at the age of six. Now, he's 33 and returning to Moscow to take care of his 89 year old grandmother, who?s suffering from some dementia. And who?s lonely because all her friends are dead. The book takes you to 2008 Moscow. You feel li...

    While I was reading this memoir-like novel about a Russian emigré's return to Moscow to spend time with his grandmother, I kept thinking about Andreď Makine's Dreams of My Russian Summers, another memoir-like novel in which the narrator returns to spend time with his grandmother. I h...

    At a time when Russia, Putin, conspiracy, and collusion dominate the news cycle it is wonderful to escape into a work of fiction that is absorbing, appealing to human emotion on many levels, and sadly, a comment on the reality of Russia today. As useful and engrossing as Keith Gessen?...

    This is a terrible country. My Yolka took to America. Why did you come back?? She seemed angry. A Terrible Country by Keith Gessen is published in the UK by perhaps my favourite of all publishers, Fitzcarraldo Editions, but is an odd fit for the "ambitious, imaginative and innova...

    To justify another 5-star rating for my beloved blue publisher, especially because this title seems to receive more criticism than some others (and I can see where it?s coming from), here are some of my subjective reasons for the grade: - It?s written in refreshingly short, easy...

    Andrei?s life in New York is not what you would call successful. His girlfriend has just dumped him, he barely earns enough to survive from his online teaching job and his dissertation adviser seems to have no confidence in his future job prospects at all. So when his brother Dima ca...

    Keith Gessen was born in Russia of Jewish parents, who emigrated to the US when he was still a child ? and is now an author, journalist (specialising in Russia), book-critic, translator and journal editor. This is his second novel ? and comes with by George Saunders and Elif Ba...

    . . . I felt the terrible freedom of this place. It was a fortress set down in a hostile environment. On one side the Mongols; on the other the Germans, Balts, and Vikings. So the Russians built this fortress here on a bend in the Yauza River, and hoped for the best. They built it big ...

    As a young immigrant from the Soviet Union, i related to the book a lot. Russia may have capitalism but it doesnt mean the corruption went away. Only the people who have connections and money survive Russia. Anyone interested in how Russia continues to operate should read this book. I ...

    Review soon. ...

    3.5 stars Tournament of Books Play-in Round Comments forthcoming. ...

    This is a book about what it means to return to a place that is no longer home. Reading it brought back memories of Tommy Orange?s ?There there?, or, more specifically, of Gertrude Stein?s quote about Oakland, ?there is no there there? from which Orange?s book drew its ti...

    I may be rounding up a bit here, but I really enjoyed this engaging and often funny book backed by a deep knowledge of Russian literature, history and culture. It was interesting to read about Putin's Russia from the oddly endearing voice of a struggling academic with roots in both Rus...

    This is one of the better books on the TOB shortlist. Not only does the writing flow with great characterization (the grandmother is a standout) but we learn some things about modern day Russia and our current political climate. In some ways Gessen's love letter to his grandmother (and...

    Andrei is one lost puppy floundering around in New York in 2008 after his girlfriend dumps him. When his brother Dima calls him to come take care of their 89-year-old grandmother in Moscow for just a little while, he says what the hell and jumps on a plane to Moscow where he lived as a...

    3.5 rounded down ...

    A man returns to Moscow to take care of his grandmother and discovers Putin's Russia, its new prosperity and its old problems. I have not read Gessen's previous novel, but it seems that the author began this one where he finished the previous one, in 2008, and that the main characte...

    When I stumbled on this book, reading the description and summary, I made the purchase with trepidation, (it just seemed to much of a high praise for a name I?ve never even heard). Now that I?ve completed it I just might have found myself a new favorite author in Keith Gessen. ...

    I have mixed feelings about this book. What I enjoyed: learning a bit about Russian culture and physical environments, and the political history and social ramifications of those changing theologies and practices. I eventually enjoyed the growing attachment between Andrei and his grand...

    A Terrible Narrator ...

    I loved this book! It?s been nearly a week since I finished and I miss it still and wish there was more. It is a novel but it reads like a memoir. It starts off with Andrei coming back to Moscow to take care of his grandmother while his older brother is out of the country. Andrei was...

    Rounding up from 3.5. The protagonist, a 30-something academic caring for his gransmother in Moscow for a year, is a bit of a naive jerk, but he seemed to catch himself fairly quickly and not become insufferable. I enjoyed the chance to read a novel set in more-or-less contemporary Rus...

    I enjoyed this book about Russia from someone who was born there, lived there for a time, and speaks the language. Reading about the author's Russian grandmother, and his relationship with her, was the highlight of the book for me. His writing was honest, true-to-life, and at times, ve...

    Smart, funny, page-turning--a deeply enjoyable read. ...

    3.5 stars. In A Terrible Country, the main character, Andrei Kaplan, like the author is Russian born and from a young age was raised in America. The year is 2008 and 33 year old Andrei is called back to Russia by his older brother, Dima, to look after their 88 year old grandmother who ...

  • Tommi
    Sep 04, 2018

    Andrei emigrated with his parents from Russia at the age of six. Now, he's 33 and returning to Moscow to take care of his 89 year old grandmother, who?s suffering from some dementia. And who?s lonely because all her friends are dead. The book takes you to 2008 Moscow. You feel li...

    While I was reading this memoir-like novel about a Russian emigré's return to Moscow to spend time with his grandmother, I kept thinking about Andreď Makine's Dreams of My Russian Summers, another memoir-like novel in which the narrator returns to spend time with his grandmother. I h...

    At a time when Russia, Putin, conspiracy, and collusion dominate the news cycle it is wonderful to escape into a work of fiction that is absorbing, appealing to human emotion on many levels, and sadly, a comment on the reality of Russia today. As useful and engrossing as Keith Gessen?...

    This is a terrible country. My Yolka took to America. Why did you come back?? She seemed angry. A Terrible Country by Keith Gessen is published in the UK by perhaps my favourite of all publishers, Fitzcarraldo Editions, but is an odd fit for the "ambitious, imaginative and innova...

    To justify another 5-star rating for my beloved blue publisher, especially because this title seems to receive more criticism than some others (and I can see where it?s coming from), here are some of my subjective reasons for the grade: - It?s written in refreshingly short, easy...

  • Paul Fulcher
    Jul 03, 2018

    Andrei emigrated with his parents from Russia at the age of six. Now, he's 33 and returning to Moscow to take care of his 89 year old grandmother, who?s suffering from some dementia. And who?s lonely because all her friends are dead. The book takes you to 2008 Moscow. You feel li...

    While I was reading this memoir-like novel about a Russian emigré's return to Moscow to spend time with his grandmother, I kept thinking about Andreď Makine's Dreams of My Russian Summers, another memoir-like novel in which the narrator returns to spend time with his grandmother. I h...

    At a time when Russia, Putin, conspiracy, and collusion dominate the news cycle it is wonderful to escape into a work of fiction that is absorbing, appealing to human emotion on many levels, and sadly, a comment on the reality of Russia today. As useful and engrossing as Keith Gessen?...

    This is a terrible country. My Yolka took to America. Why did you come back?? She seemed angry. A Terrible Country by Keith Gessen is published in the UK by perhaps my favourite of all publishers, Fitzcarraldo Editions, but is an odd fit for the "ambitious, imaginative and innova...

  • Sarah
    Dec 19, 2018

    Andrei emigrated with his parents from Russia at the age of six. Now, he's 33 and returning to Moscow to take care of his 89 year old grandmother, who?s suffering from some dementia. And who?s lonely because all her friends are dead. The book takes you to 2008 Moscow. You feel li...

    While I was reading this memoir-like novel about a Russian emigré's return to Moscow to spend time with his grandmother, I kept thinking about Andreď Makine's Dreams of My Russian Summers, another memoir-like novel in which the narrator returns to spend time with his grandmother. I h...

    At a time when Russia, Putin, conspiracy, and collusion dominate the news cycle it is wonderful to escape into a work of fiction that is absorbing, appealing to human emotion on many levels, and sadly, a comment on the reality of Russia today. As useful and engrossing as Keith Gessen?...

    This is a terrible country. My Yolka took to America. Why did you come back?? She seemed angry. A Terrible Country by Keith Gessen is published in the UK by perhaps my favourite of all publishers, Fitzcarraldo Editions, but is an odd fit for the "ambitious, imaginative and innova...

    To justify another 5-star rating for my beloved blue publisher, especially because this title seems to receive more criticism than some others (and I can see where it?s coming from), here are some of my subjective reasons for the grade: - It?s written in refreshingly short, easy...

    Andrei?s life in New York is not what you would call successful. His girlfriend has just dumped him, he barely earns enough to survive from his online teaching job and his dissertation adviser seems to have no confidence in his future job prospects at all. So when his brother Dima ca...

    Keith Gessen was born in Russia of Jewish parents, who emigrated to the US when he was still a child ? and is now an author, journalist (specialising in Russia), book-critic, translator and journal editor. This is his second novel ? and comes with by George Saunders and Elif Ba...

    . . . I felt the terrible freedom of this place. It was a fortress set down in a hostile environment. On one side the Mongols; on the other the Germans, Balts, and Vikings. So the Russians built this fortress here on a bend in the Yauza River, and hoped for the best. They built it big ...

    As a young immigrant from the Soviet Union, i related to the book a lot. Russia may have capitalism but it doesnt mean the corruption went away. Only the people who have connections and money survive Russia. Anyone interested in how Russia continues to operate should read this book. I ...

    Review soon. ...

    3.5 stars Tournament of Books Play-in Round Comments forthcoming. ...

    This is a book about what it means to return to a place that is no longer home. Reading it brought back memories of Tommy Orange?s ?There there?, or, more specifically, of Gertrude Stein?s quote about Oakland, ?there is no there there? from which Orange?s book drew its ti...

    I may be rounding up a bit here, but I really enjoyed this engaging and often funny book backed by a deep knowledge of Russian literature, history and culture. It was interesting to read about Putin's Russia from the oddly endearing voice of a struggling academic with roots in both Rus...

    This is one of the better books on the TOB shortlist. Not only does the writing flow with great characterization (the grandmother is a standout) but we learn some things about modern day Russia and our current political climate. In some ways Gessen's love letter to his grandmother (and...

    Andrei is one lost puppy floundering around in New York in 2008 after his girlfriend dumps him. When his brother Dima calls him to come take care of their 89-year-old grandmother in Moscow for just a little while, he says what the hell and jumps on a plane to Moscow where he lived as a...

    3.5 rounded down ...

  • Gwendolyn
    Jan 17, 2019

    Andrei emigrated with his parents from Russia at the age of six. Now, he's 33 and returning to Moscow to take care of his 89 year old grandmother, who?s suffering from some dementia. And who?s lonely because all her friends are dead. The book takes you to 2008 Moscow. You feel li...

    While I was reading this memoir-like novel about a Russian emigré's return to Moscow to spend time with his grandmother, I kept thinking about Andreď Makine's Dreams of My Russian Summers, another memoir-like novel in which the narrator returns to spend time with his grandmother. I h...

    At a time when Russia, Putin, conspiracy, and collusion dominate the news cycle it is wonderful to escape into a work of fiction that is absorbing, appealing to human emotion on many levels, and sadly, a comment on the reality of Russia today. As useful and engrossing as Keith Gessen?...

    This is a terrible country. My Yolka took to America. Why did you come back?? She seemed angry. A Terrible Country by Keith Gessen is published in the UK by perhaps my favourite of all publishers, Fitzcarraldo Editions, but is an odd fit for the "ambitious, imaginative and innova...

    To justify another 5-star rating for my beloved blue publisher, especially because this title seems to receive more criticism than some others (and I can see where it?s coming from), here are some of my subjective reasons for the grade: - It?s written in refreshingly short, easy...

    Andrei?s life in New York is not what you would call successful. His girlfriend has just dumped him, he barely earns enough to survive from his online teaching job and his dissertation adviser seems to have no confidence in his future job prospects at all. So when his brother Dima ca...

    Keith Gessen was born in Russia of Jewish parents, who emigrated to the US when he was still a child ? and is now an author, journalist (specialising in Russia), book-critic, translator and journal editor. This is his second novel ? and comes with by George Saunders and Elif Ba...

    . . . I felt the terrible freedom of this place. It was a fortress set down in a hostile environment. On one side the Mongols; on the other the Germans, Balts, and Vikings. So the Russians built this fortress here on a bend in the Yauza River, and hoped for the best. They built it big ...

    As a young immigrant from the Soviet Union, i related to the book a lot. Russia may have capitalism but it doesnt mean the corruption went away. Only the people who have connections and money survive Russia. Anyone interested in how Russia continues to operate should read this book. I ...

    Review soon. ...

    3.5 stars Tournament of Books Play-in Round Comments forthcoming. ...

    This is a book about what it means to return to a place that is no longer home. Reading it brought back memories of Tommy Orange?s ?There there?, or, more specifically, of Gertrude Stein?s quote about Oakland, ?there is no there there? from which Orange?s book drew its ti...

    I may be rounding up a bit here, but I really enjoyed this engaging and often funny book backed by a deep knowledge of Russian literature, history and culture. It was interesting to read about Putin's Russia from the oddly endearing voice of a struggling academic with roots in both Rus...

    This is one of the better books on the TOB shortlist. Not only does the writing flow with great characterization (the grandmother is a standout) but we learn some things about modern day Russia and our current political climate. In some ways Gessen's love letter to his grandmother (and...

    Andrei is one lost puppy floundering around in New York in 2008 after his girlfriend dumps him. When his brother Dima calls him to come take care of their 89-year-old grandmother in Moscow for just a little while, he says what the hell and jumps on a plane to Moscow where he lived as a...

    3.5 rounded down ...

    A man returns to Moscow to take care of his grandmother and discovers Putin's Russia, its new prosperity and its old problems. I have not read Gessen's previous novel, but it seems that the author began this one where he finished the previous one, in 2008, and that the main characte...

    When I stumbled on this book, reading the description and summary, I made the purchase with trepidation, (it just seemed to much of a high praise for a name I?ve never even heard). Now that I?ve completed it I just might have found myself a new favorite author in Keith Gessen. ...

    I have mixed feelings about this book. What I enjoyed: learning a bit about Russian culture and physical environments, and the political history and social ramifications of those changing theologies and practices. I eventually enjoyed the growing attachment between Andrei and his grand...

    A Terrible Narrator ...

    I loved this book! It?s been nearly a week since I finished and I miss it still and wish there was more. It is a novel but it reads like a memoir. It starts off with Andrei coming back to Moscow to take care of his grandmother while his older brother is out of the country. Andrei was...

    Rounding up from 3.5. The protagonist, a 30-something academic caring for his gransmother in Moscow for a year, is a bit of a naive jerk, but he seemed to catch himself fairly quickly and not become insufferable. I enjoyed the chance to read a novel set in more-or-less contemporary Rus...

    I enjoyed this book about Russia from someone who was born there, lived there for a time, and speaks the language. Reading about the author's Russian grandmother, and his relationship with her, was the highlight of the book for me. His writing was honest, true-to-life, and at times, ve...

    Smart, funny, page-turning--a deeply enjoyable read. ...

    3.5 stars. In A Terrible Country, the main character, Andrei Kaplan, like the author is Russian born and from a young age was raised in America. The year is 2008 and 33 year old Andrei is called back to Russia by his older brother, Dima, to look after their 88 year old grandmother who ...

    Magnificent. A truly moving and funny and beautiful novel about that time in America where it was possible to connect to Wi-fi but also possible to not have a cell phone. Except this book is about an American living in Putin's Russia just as the American economy explodes in 2008. I fin...

    When a young American man returns to Russia to care for his elderly grandmother you can only imagine what he encounters. Keith Gessen is a talented writer who knows how to engage and keep the reader moving through the story. There are some terrific lines in this novel. ...

    Andrei Kaplan is a struggling academic specializing in Russian Literature and looking for work in a crowded market that?s downsizing or eliminating Slavic literature and language departments. He?s at loose ends when his brother calls from Russia to say Andrei is needed in Moscow to...

  • Liz
    Jun 12, 2018

    Andrei emigrated with his parents from Russia at the age of six. Now, he's 33 and returning to Moscow to take care of his 89 year old grandmother, who?s suffering from some dementia. And who?s lonely because all her friends are dead. The book takes you to 2008 Moscow. You feel li...

  • Diane S ☔
    Jul 28, 2018

    Andrei emigrated with his parents from Russia at the age of six. Now, he's 33 and returning to Moscow to take care of his 89 year old grandmother, who?s suffering from some dementia. And who?s lonely because all her friends are dead. The book takes you to 2008 Moscow. You feel li...

    While I was reading this memoir-like novel about a Russian emigré's return to Moscow to spend time with his grandmother, I kept thinking about Andreď Makine's Dreams of My Russian Summers, another memoir-like novel in which the narrator returns to spend time with his grandmother. I h...

    At a time when Russia, Putin, conspiracy, and collusion dominate the news cycle it is wonderful to escape into a work of fiction that is absorbing, appealing to human emotion on many levels, and sadly, a comment on the reality of Russia today. As useful and engrossing as Keith Gessen?...

    This is a terrible country. My Yolka took to America. Why did you come back?? She seemed angry. A Terrible Country by Keith Gessen is published in the UK by perhaps my favourite of all publishers, Fitzcarraldo Editions, but is an odd fit for the "ambitious, imaginative and innova...

    To justify another 5-star rating for my beloved blue publisher, especially because this title seems to receive more criticism than some others (and I can see where it?s coming from), here are some of my subjective reasons for the grade: - It?s written in refreshingly short, easy...

    Andrei?s life in New York is not what you would call successful. His girlfriend has just dumped him, he barely earns enough to survive from his online teaching job and his dissertation adviser seems to have no confidence in his future job prospects at all. So when his brother Dima ca...

    Keith Gessen was born in Russia of Jewish parents, who emigrated to the US when he was still a child ? and is now an author, journalist (specialising in Russia), book-critic, translator and journal editor. This is his second novel ? and comes with by George Saunders and Elif Ba...

    . . . I felt the terrible freedom of this place. It was a fortress set down in a hostile environment. On one side the Mongols; on the other the Germans, Balts, and Vikings. So the Russians built this fortress here on a bend in the Yauza River, and hoped for the best. They built it big ...

    As a young immigrant from the Soviet Union, i related to the book a lot. Russia may have capitalism but it doesnt mean the corruption went away. Only the people who have connections and money survive Russia. Anyone interested in how Russia continues to operate should read this book. I ...

    Review soon. ...

  • RoseMary Achey
    Aug 23, 2018

    Andrei emigrated with his parents from Russia at the age of six. Now, he's 33 and returning to Moscow to take care of his 89 year old grandmother, who?s suffering from some dementia. And who?s lonely because all her friends are dead. The book takes you to 2008 Moscow. You feel li...

    While I was reading this memoir-like novel about a Russian emigré's return to Moscow to spend time with his grandmother, I kept thinking about Andreď Makine's Dreams of My Russian Summers, another memoir-like novel in which the narrator returns to spend time with his grandmother. I h...

    At a time when Russia, Putin, conspiracy, and collusion dominate the news cycle it is wonderful to escape into a work of fiction that is absorbing, appealing to human emotion on many levels, and sadly, a comment on the reality of Russia today. As useful and engrossing as Keith Gessen?...

    This is a terrible country. My Yolka took to America. Why did you come back?? She seemed angry. A Terrible Country by Keith Gessen is published in the UK by perhaps my favourite of all publishers, Fitzcarraldo Editions, but is an odd fit for the "ambitious, imaginative and innova...

    To justify another 5-star rating for my beloved blue publisher, especially because this title seems to receive more criticism than some others (and I can see where it?s coming from), here are some of my subjective reasons for the grade: - It?s written in refreshingly short, easy...

    Andrei?s life in New York is not what you would call successful. His girlfriend has just dumped him, he barely earns enough to survive from his online teaching job and his dissertation adviser seems to have no confidence in his future job prospects at all. So when his brother Dima ca...

    Keith Gessen was born in Russia of Jewish parents, who emigrated to the US when he was still a child ? and is now an author, journalist (specialising in Russia), book-critic, translator and journal editor. This is his second novel ? and comes with by George Saunders and Elif Ba...

    . . . I felt the terrible freedom of this place. It was a fortress set down in a hostile environment. On one side the Mongols; on the other the Germans, Balts, and Vikings. So the Russians built this fortress here on a bend in the Yauza River, and hoped for the best. They built it big ...

    As a young immigrant from the Soviet Union, i related to the book a lot. Russia may have capitalism but it doesnt mean the corruption went away. Only the people who have connections and money survive Russia. Anyone interested in how Russia continues to operate should read this book. I ...

    Review soon. ...

    3.5 stars Tournament of Books Play-in Round Comments forthcoming. ...

    This is a book about what it means to return to a place that is no longer home. Reading it brought back memories of Tommy Orange?s ?There there?, or, more specifically, of Gertrude Stein?s quote about Oakland, ?there is no there there? from which Orange?s book drew its ti...

    I may be rounding up a bit here, but I really enjoyed this engaging and often funny book backed by a deep knowledge of Russian literature, history and culture. It was interesting to read about Putin's Russia from the oddly endearing voice of a struggling academic with roots in both Rus...

    This is one of the better books on the TOB shortlist. Not only does the writing flow with great characterization (the grandmother is a standout) but we learn some things about modern day Russia and our current political climate. In some ways Gessen's love letter to his grandmother (and...

    Andrei is one lost puppy floundering around in New York in 2008 after his girlfriend dumps him. When his brother Dima calls him to come take care of their 89-year-old grandmother in Moscow for just a little while, he says what the hell and jumps on a plane to Moscow where he lived as a...

    3.5 rounded down ...

    A man returns to Moscow to take care of his grandmother and discovers Putin's Russia, its new prosperity and its old problems. I have not read Gessen's previous novel, but it seems that the author began this one where he finished the previous one, in 2008, and that the main characte...

    When I stumbled on this book, reading the description and summary, I made the purchase with trepidation, (it just seemed to much of a high praise for a name I?ve never even heard). Now that I?ve completed it I just might have found myself a new favorite author in Keith Gessen. ...

    I have mixed feelings about this book. What I enjoyed: learning a bit about Russian culture and physical environments, and the political history and social ramifications of those changing theologies and practices. I eventually enjoyed the growing attachment between Andrei and his grand...

    A Terrible Narrator ...

    I loved this book! It?s been nearly a week since I finished and I miss it still and wish there was more. It is a novel but it reads like a memoir. It starts off with Andrei coming back to Moscow to take care of his grandmother while his older brother is out of the country. Andrei was...

    Rounding up from 3.5. The protagonist, a 30-something academic caring for his gransmother in Moscow for a year, is a bit of a naive jerk, but he seemed to catch himself fairly quickly and not become insufferable. I enjoyed the chance to read a novel set in more-or-less contemporary Rus...

    I enjoyed this book about Russia from someone who was born there, lived there for a time, and speaks the language. Reading about the author's Russian grandmother, and his relationship with her, was the highlight of the book for me. His writing was honest, true-to-life, and at times, ve...

    Smart, funny, page-turning--a deeply enjoyable read. ...

    3.5 stars. In A Terrible Country, the main character, Andrei Kaplan, like the author is Russian born and from a young age was raised in America. The year is 2008 and 33 year old Andrei is called back to Russia by his older brother, Dima, to look after their 88 year old grandmother who ...

    Magnificent. A truly moving and funny and beautiful novel about that time in America where it was possible to connect to Wi-fi but also possible to not have a cell phone. Except this book is about an American living in Putin's Russia just as the American economy explodes in 2008. I fin...

    When a young American man returns to Russia to care for his elderly grandmother you can only imagine what he encounters. Keith Gessen is a talented writer who knows how to engage and keep the reader moving through the story. There are some terrific lines in this novel. ...

  • Fionnuala
    Jan 27, 2019

    Andrei emigrated with his parents from Russia at the age of six. Now, he's 33 and returning to Moscow to take care of his 89 year old grandmother, who?s suffering from some dementia. And who?s lonely because all her friends are dead. The book takes you to 2008 Moscow. You feel li...

    While I was reading this memoir-like novel about a Russian emigré's return to Moscow to spend time with his grandmother, I kept thinking about Andreď Makine's Dreams of My Russian Summers, another memoir-like novel in which the narrator returns to spend time with his grandmother. I h...

  • Johannes
    Sep 26, 2018

    Andrei emigrated with his parents from Russia at the age of six. Now, he's 33 and returning to Moscow to take care of his 89 year old grandmother, who?s suffering from some dementia. And who?s lonely because all her friends are dead. The book takes you to 2008 Moscow. You feel li...

    While I was reading this memoir-like novel about a Russian emigré's return to Moscow to spend time with his grandmother, I kept thinking about Andreď Makine's Dreams of My Russian Summers, another memoir-like novel in which the narrator returns to spend time with his grandmother. I h...

    At a time when Russia, Putin, conspiracy, and collusion dominate the news cycle it is wonderful to escape into a work of fiction that is absorbing, appealing to human emotion on many levels, and sadly, a comment on the reality of Russia today. As useful and engrossing as Keith Gessen?...

    This is a terrible country. My Yolka took to America. Why did you come back?? She seemed angry. A Terrible Country by Keith Gessen is published in the UK by perhaps my favourite of all publishers, Fitzcarraldo Editions, but is an odd fit for the "ambitious, imaginative and innova...

    To justify another 5-star rating for my beloved blue publisher, especially because this title seems to receive more criticism than some others (and I can see where it?s coming from), here are some of my subjective reasons for the grade: - It?s written in refreshingly short, easy...

    Andrei?s life in New York is not what you would call successful. His girlfriend has just dumped him, he barely earns enough to survive from his online teaching job and his dissertation adviser seems to have no confidence in his future job prospects at all. So when his brother Dima ca...

    Keith Gessen was born in Russia of Jewish parents, who emigrated to the US when he was still a child ? and is now an author, journalist (specialising in Russia), book-critic, translator and journal editor. This is his second novel ? and comes with by George Saunders and Elif Ba...

    . . . I felt the terrible freedom of this place. It was a fortress set down in a hostile environment. On one side the Mongols; on the other the Germans, Balts, and Vikings. So the Russians built this fortress here on a bend in the Yauza River, and hoped for the best. They built it big ...

    As a young immigrant from the Soviet Union, i related to the book a lot. Russia may have capitalism but it doesnt mean the corruption went away. Only the people who have connections and money survive Russia. Anyone interested in how Russia continues to operate should read this book. I ...

    Review soon. ...

    3.5 stars Tournament of Books Play-in Round Comments forthcoming. ...

    This is a book about what it means to return to a place that is no longer home. Reading it brought back memories of Tommy Orange?s ?There there?, or, more specifically, of Gertrude Stein?s quote about Oakland, ?there is no there there? from which Orange?s book drew its ti...

    I may be rounding up a bit here, but I really enjoyed this engaging and often funny book backed by a deep knowledge of Russian literature, history and culture. It was interesting to read about Putin's Russia from the oddly endearing voice of a struggling academic with roots in both Rus...

    This is one of the better books on the TOB shortlist. Not only does the writing flow with great characterization (the grandmother is a standout) but we learn some things about modern day Russia and our current political climate. In some ways Gessen's love letter to his grandmother (and...

    Andrei is one lost puppy floundering around in New York in 2008 after his girlfriend dumps him. When his brother Dima calls him to come take care of their 89-year-old grandmother in Moscow for just a little while, he says what the hell and jumps on a plane to Moscow where he lived as a...

    3.5 rounded down ...

    A man returns to Moscow to take care of his grandmother and discovers Putin's Russia, its new prosperity and its old problems. I have not read Gessen's previous novel, but it seems that the author began this one where he finished the previous one, in 2008, and that the main characte...

    When I stumbled on this book, reading the description and summary, I made the purchase with trepidation, (it just seemed to much of a high praise for a name I?ve never even heard). Now that I?ve completed it I just might have found myself a new favorite author in Keith Gessen. ...

    I have mixed feelings about this book. What I enjoyed: learning a bit about Russian culture and physical environments, and the political history and social ramifications of those changing theologies and practices. I eventually enjoyed the growing attachment between Andrei and his grand...

    A Terrible Narrator ...

    I loved this book! It?s been nearly a week since I finished and I miss it still and wish there was more. It is a novel but it reads like a memoir. It starts off with Andrei coming back to Moscow to take care of his grandmother while his older brother is out of the country. Andrei was...

    Rounding up from 3.5. The protagonist, a 30-something academic caring for his gransmother in Moscow for a year, is a bit of a naive jerk, but he seemed to catch himself fairly quickly and not become insufferable. I enjoyed the chance to read a novel set in more-or-less contemporary Rus...

    I enjoyed this book about Russia from someone who was born there, lived there for a time, and speaks the language. Reading about the author's Russian grandmother, and his relationship with her, was the highlight of the book for me. His writing was honest, true-to-life, and at times, ve...

    Smart, funny, page-turning--a deeply enjoyable read. ...

  • Erin Glover
    Feb 11, 2019

    Andrei emigrated with his parents from Russia at the age of six. Now, he's 33 and returning to Moscow to take care of his 89 year old grandmother, who?s suffering from some dementia. And who?s lonely because all her friends are dead. The book takes you to 2008 Moscow. You feel li...

    While I was reading this memoir-like novel about a Russian emigré's return to Moscow to spend time with his grandmother, I kept thinking about Andreď Makine's Dreams of My Russian Summers, another memoir-like novel in which the narrator returns to spend time with his grandmother. I h...

    At a time when Russia, Putin, conspiracy, and collusion dominate the news cycle it is wonderful to escape into a work of fiction that is absorbing, appealing to human emotion on many levels, and sadly, a comment on the reality of Russia today. As useful and engrossing as Keith Gessen?...

    This is a terrible country. My Yolka took to America. Why did you come back?? She seemed angry. A Terrible Country by Keith Gessen is published in the UK by perhaps my favourite of all publishers, Fitzcarraldo Editions, but is an odd fit for the "ambitious, imaginative and innova...

    To justify another 5-star rating for my beloved blue publisher, especially because this title seems to receive more criticism than some others (and I can see where it?s coming from), here are some of my subjective reasons for the grade: - It?s written in refreshingly short, easy...

    Andrei?s life in New York is not what you would call successful. His girlfriend has just dumped him, he barely earns enough to survive from his online teaching job and his dissertation adviser seems to have no confidence in his future job prospects at all. So when his brother Dima ca...

    Keith Gessen was born in Russia of Jewish parents, who emigrated to the US when he was still a child ? and is now an author, journalist (specialising in Russia), book-critic, translator and journal editor. This is his second novel ? and comes with by George Saunders and Elif Ba...

    . . . I felt the terrible freedom of this place. It was a fortress set down in a hostile environment. On one side the Mongols; on the other the Germans, Balts, and Vikings. So the Russians built this fortress here on a bend in the Yauza River, and hoped for the best. They built it big ...

    As a young immigrant from the Soviet Union, i related to the book a lot. Russia may have capitalism but it doesnt mean the corruption went away. Only the people who have connections and money survive Russia. Anyone interested in how Russia continues to operate should read this book. I ...

    Review soon. ...

    3.5 stars Tournament of Books Play-in Round Comments forthcoming. ...

    This is a book about what it means to return to a place that is no longer home. Reading it brought back memories of Tommy Orange?s ?There there?, or, more specifically, of Gertrude Stein?s quote about Oakland, ?there is no there there? from which Orange?s book drew its ti...

    I may be rounding up a bit here, but I really enjoyed this engaging and often funny book backed by a deep knowledge of Russian literature, history and culture. It was interesting to read about Putin's Russia from the oddly endearing voice of a struggling academic with roots in both Rus...

    This is one of the better books on the TOB shortlist. Not only does the writing flow with great characterization (the grandmother is a standout) but we learn some things about modern day Russia and our current political climate. In some ways Gessen's love letter to his grandmother (and...

    Andrei is one lost puppy floundering around in New York in 2008 after his girlfriend dumps him. When his brother Dima calls him to come take care of their 89-year-old grandmother in Moscow for just a little while, he says what the hell and jumps on a plane to Moscow where he lived as a...

  • Jan
    Oct 01, 2018

    Andrei emigrated with his parents from Russia at the age of six. Now, he's 33 and returning to Moscow to take care of his 89 year old grandmother, who?s suffering from some dementia. And who?s lonely because all her friends are dead. The book takes you to 2008 Moscow. You feel li...

    While I was reading this memoir-like novel about a Russian emigré's return to Moscow to spend time with his grandmother, I kept thinking about Andreď Makine's Dreams of My Russian Summers, another memoir-like novel in which the narrator returns to spend time with his grandmother. I h...

    At a time when Russia, Putin, conspiracy, and collusion dominate the news cycle it is wonderful to escape into a work of fiction that is absorbing, appealing to human emotion on many levels, and sadly, a comment on the reality of Russia today. As useful and engrossing as Keith Gessen?...

    This is a terrible country. My Yolka took to America. Why did you come back?? She seemed angry. A Terrible Country by Keith Gessen is published in the UK by perhaps my favourite of all publishers, Fitzcarraldo Editions, but is an odd fit for the "ambitious, imaginative and innova...

    To justify another 5-star rating for my beloved blue publisher, especially because this title seems to receive more criticism than some others (and I can see where it?s coming from), here are some of my subjective reasons for the grade: - It?s written in refreshingly short, easy...

    Andrei?s life in New York is not what you would call successful. His girlfriend has just dumped him, he barely earns enough to survive from his online teaching job and his dissertation adviser seems to have no confidence in his future job prospects at all. So when his brother Dima ca...

    Keith Gessen was born in Russia of Jewish parents, who emigrated to the US when he was still a child ? and is now an author, journalist (specialising in Russia), book-critic, translator and journal editor. This is his second novel ? and comes with by George Saunders and Elif Ba...

    . . . I felt the terrible freedom of this place. It was a fortress set down in a hostile environment. On one side the Mongols; on the other the Germans, Balts, and Vikings. So the Russians built this fortress here on a bend in the Yauza River, and hoped for the best. They built it big ...

    As a young immigrant from the Soviet Union, i related to the book a lot. Russia may have capitalism but it doesnt mean the corruption went away. Only the people who have connections and money survive Russia. Anyone interested in how Russia continues to operate should read this book. I ...

    Review soon. ...

    3.5 stars Tournament of Books Play-in Round Comments forthcoming. ...

    This is a book about what it means to return to a place that is no longer home. Reading it brought back memories of Tommy Orange?s ?There there?, or, more specifically, of Gertrude Stein?s quote about Oakland, ?there is no there there? from which Orange?s book drew its ti...

    I may be rounding up a bit here, but I really enjoyed this engaging and often funny book backed by a deep knowledge of Russian literature, history and culture. It was interesting to read about Putin's Russia from the oddly endearing voice of a struggling academic with roots in both Rus...

    This is one of the better books on the TOB shortlist. Not only does the writing flow with great characterization (the grandmother is a standout) but we learn some things about modern day Russia and our current political climate. In some ways Gessen's love letter to his grandmother (and...

    Andrei is one lost puppy floundering around in New York in 2008 after his girlfriend dumps him. When his brother Dima calls him to come take care of their 89-year-old grandmother in Moscow for just a little while, he says what the hell and jumps on a plane to Moscow where he lived as a...

    3.5 rounded down ...

    A man returns to Moscow to take care of his grandmother and discovers Putin's Russia, its new prosperity and its old problems. I have not read Gessen's previous novel, but it seems that the author began this one where he finished the previous one, in 2008, and that the main characte...

    When I stumbled on this book, reading the description and summary, I made the purchase with trepidation, (it just seemed to much of a high praise for a name I?ve never even heard). Now that I?ve completed it I just might have found myself a new favorite author in Keith Gessen. ...

    I have mixed feelings about this book. What I enjoyed: learning a bit about Russian culture and physical environments, and the political history and social ramifications of those changing theologies and practices. I eventually enjoyed the growing attachment between Andrei and his grand...

    A Terrible Narrator ...

    I loved this book! It?s been nearly a week since I finished and I miss it still and wish there was more. It is a novel but it reads like a memoir. It starts off with Andrei coming back to Moscow to take care of his grandmother while his older brother is out of the country. Andrei was...

    Rounding up from 3.5. The protagonist, a 30-something academic caring for his gransmother in Moscow for a year, is a bit of a naive jerk, but he seemed to catch himself fairly quickly and not become insufferable. I enjoyed the chance to read a novel set in more-or-less contemporary Rus...

  • ❤Marie Gentilcore
    Jul 18, 2018

    Andrei emigrated with his parents from Russia at the age of six. Now, he's 33 and returning to Moscow to take care of his 89 year old grandmother, who?s suffering from some dementia. And who?s lonely because all her friends are dead. The book takes you to 2008 Moscow. You feel li...

    While I was reading this memoir-like novel about a Russian emigré's return to Moscow to spend time with his grandmother, I kept thinking about Andreď Makine's Dreams of My Russian Summers, another memoir-like novel in which the narrator returns to spend time with his grandmother. I h...

    At a time when Russia, Putin, conspiracy, and collusion dominate the news cycle it is wonderful to escape into a work of fiction that is absorbing, appealing to human emotion on many levels, and sadly, a comment on the reality of Russia today. As useful and engrossing as Keith Gessen?...

    This is a terrible country. My Yolka took to America. Why did you come back?? She seemed angry. A Terrible Country by Keith Gessen is published in the UK by perhaps my favourite of all publishers, Fitzcarraldo Editions, but is an odd fit for the "ambitious, imaginative and innova...

    To justify another 5-star rating for my beloved blue publisher, especially because this title seems to receive more criticism than some others (and I can see where it?s coming from), here are some of my subjective reasons for the grade: - It?s written in refreshingly short, easy...

    Andrei?s life in New York is not what you would call successful. His girlfriend has just dumped him, he barely earns enough to survive from his online teaching job and his dissertation adviser seems to have no confidence in his future job prospects at all. So when his brother Dima ca...

    Keith Gessen was born in Russia of Jewish parents, who emigrated to the US when he was still a child ? and is now an author, journalist (specialising in Russia), book-critic, translator and journal editor. This is his second novel ? and comes with by George Saunders and Elif Ba...

    . . . I felt the terrible freedom of this place. It was a fortress set down in a hostile environment. On one side the Mongols; on the other the Germans, Balts, and Vikings. So the Russians built this fortress here on a bend in the Yauza River, and hoped for the best. They built it big ...

    As a young immigrant from the Soviet Union, i related to the book a lot. Russia may have capitalism but it doesnt mean the corruption went away. Only the people who have connections and money survive Russia. Anyone interested in how Russia continues to operate should read this book. I ...

    Review soon. ...

    3.5 stars Tournament of Books Play-in Round Comments forthcoming. ...

    This is a book about what it means to return to a place that is no longer home. Reading it brought back memories of Tommy Orange?s ?There there?, or, more specifically, of Gertrude Stein?s quote about Oakland, ?there is no there there? from which Orange?s book drew its ti...

    I may be rounding up a bit here, but I really enjoyed this engaging and often funny book backed by a deep knowledge of Russian literature, history and culture. It was interesting to read about Putin's Russia from the oddly endearing voice of a struggling academic with roots in both Rus...

    This is one of the better books on the TOB shortlist. Not only does the writing flow with great characterization (the grandmother is a standout) but we learn some things about modern day Russia and our current political climate. In some ways Gessen's love letter to his grandmother (and...

    Andrei is one lost puppy floundering around in New York in 2008 after his girlfriend dumps him. When his brother Dima calls him to come take care of their 89-year-old grandmother in Moscow for just a little while, he says what the hell and jumps on a plane to Moscow where he lived as a...

    3.5 rounded down ...

    A man returns to Moscow to take care of his grandmother and discovers Putin's Russia, its new prosperity and its old problems. I have not read Gessen's previous novel, but it seems that the author began this one where he finished the previous one, in 2008, and that the main characte...

    When I stumbled on this book, reading the description and summary, I made the purchase with trepidation, (it just seemed to much of a high praise for a name I?ve never even heard). Now that I?ve completed it I just might have found myself a new favorite author in Keith Gessen. ...

    I have mixed feelings about this book. What I enjoyed: learning a bit about Russian culture and physical environments, and the political history and social ramifications of those changing theologies and practices. I eventually enjoyed the growing attachment between Andrei and his grand...

    A Terrible Narrator ...

    I loved this book! It?s been nearly a week since I finished and I miss it still and wish there was more. It is a novel but it reads like a memoir. It starts off with Andrei coming back to Moscow to take care of his grandmother while his older brother is out of the country. Andrei was...

  • Jill Dobbe
    May 04, 2018

    Andrei emigrated with his parents from Russia at the age of six. Now, he's 33 and returning to Moscow to take care of his 89 year old grandmother, who?s suffering from some dementia. And who?s lonely because all her friends are dead. The book takes you to 2008 Moscow. You feel li...

    While I was reading this memoir-like novel about a Russian emigré's return to Moscow to spend time with his grandmother, I kept thinking about Andreď Makine's Dreams of My Russian Summers, another memoir-like novel in which the narrator returns to spend time with his grandmother. I h...

    At a time when Russia, Putin, conspiracy, and collusion dominate the news cycle it is wonderful to escape into a work of fiction that is absorbing, appealing to human emotion on many levels, and sadly, a comment on the reality of Russia today. As useful and engrossing as Keith Gessen?...

    This is a terrible country. My Yolka took to America. Why did you come back?? She seemed angry. A Terrible Country by Keith Gessen is published in the UK by perhaps my favourite of all publishers, Fitzcarraldo Editions, but is an odd fit for the "ambitious, imaginative and innova...

    To justify another 5-star rating for my beloved blue publisher, especially because this title seems to receive more criticism than some others (and I can see where it?s coming from), here are some of my subjective reasons for the grade: - It?s written in refreshingly short, easy...

    Andrei?s life in New York is not what you would call successful. His girlfriend has just dumped him, he barely earns enough to survive from his online teaching job and his dissertation adviser seems to have no confidence in his future job prospects at all. So when his brother Dima ca...

    Keith Gessen was born in Russia of Jewish parents, who emigrated to the US when he was still a child ? and is now an author, journalist (specialising in Russia), book-critic, translator and journal editor. This is his second novel ? and comes with by George Saunders and Elif Ba...

    . . . I felt the terrible freedom of this place. It was a fortress set down in a hostile environment. On one side the Mongols; on the other the Germans, Balts, and Vikings. So the Russians built this fortress here on a bend in the Yauza River, and hoped for the best. They built it big ...

    As a young immigrant from the Soviet Union, i related to the book a lot. Russia may have capitalism but it doesnt mean the corruption went away. Only the people who have connections and money survive Russia. Anyone interested in how Russia continues to operate should read this book. I ...

    Review soon. ...

    3.5 stars Tournament of Books Play-in Round Comments forthcoming. ...

    This is a book about what it means to return to a place that is no longer home. Reading it brought back memories of Tommy Orange?s ?There there?, or, more specifically, of Gertrude Stein?s quote about Oakland, ?there is no there there? from which Orange?s book drew its ti...

    I may be rounding up a bit here, but I really enjoyed this engaging and often funny book backed by a deep knowledge of Russian literature, history and culture. It was interesting to read about Putin's Russia from the oddly endearing voice of a struggling academic with roots in both Rus...

    This is one of the better books on the TOB shortlist. Not only does the writing flow with great characterization (the grandmother is a standout) but we learn some things about modern day Russia and our current political climate. In some ways Gessen's love letter to his grandmother (and...

    Andrei is one lost puppy floundering around in New York in 2008 after his girlfriend dumps him. When his brother Dima calls him to come take care of their 89-year-old grandmother in Moscow for just a little while, he says what the hell and jumps on a plane to Moscow where he lived as a...

    3.5 rounded down ...

    A man returns to Moscow to take care of his grandmother and discovers Putin's Russia, its new prosperity and its old problems. I have not read Gessen's previous novel, but it seems that the author began this one where he finished the previous one, in 2008, and that the main characte...

    When I stumbled on this book, reading the description and summary, I made the purchase with trepidation, (it just seemed to much of a high praise for a name I?ve never even heard). Now that I?ve completed it I just might have found myself a new favorite author in Keith Gessen. ...

    I have mixed feelings about this book. What I enjoyed: learning a bit about Russian culture and physical environments, and the political history and social ramifications of those changing theologies and practices. I eventually enjoyed the growing attachment between Andrei and his grand...

    A Terrible Narrator ...

    I loved this book! It?s been nearly a week since I finished and I miss it still and wish there was more. It is a novel but it reads like a memoir. It starts off with Andrei coming back to Moscow to take care of his grandmother while his older brother is out of the country. Andrei was...

    Rounding up from 3.5. The protagonist, a 30-something academic caring for his gransmother in Moscow for a year, is a bit of a naive jerk, but he seemed to catch himself fairly quickly and not become insufferable. I enjoyed the chance to read a novel set in more-or-less contemporary Rus...

    I enjoyed this book about Russia from someone who was born there, lived there for a time, and speaks the language. Reading about the author's Russian grandmother, and his relationship with her, was the highlight of the book for me. His writing was honest, true-to-life, and at times, ve...

  • Big Al
    Jan 11, 2019

    Andrei emigrated with his parents from Russia at the age of six. Now, he's 33 and returning to Moscow to take care of his 89 year old grandmother, who?s suffering from some dementia. And who?s lonely because all her friends are dead. The book takes you to 2008 Moscow. You feel li...

    While I was reading this memoir-like novel about a Russian emigré's return to Moscow to spend time with his grandmother, I kept thinking about Andreď Makine's Dreams of My Russian Summers, another memoir-like novel in which the narrator returns to spend time with his grandmother. I h...

    At a time when Russia, Putin, conspiracy, and collusion dominate the news cycle it is wonderful to escape into a work of fiction that is absorbing, appealing to human emotion on many levels, and sadly, a comment on the reality of Russia today. As useful and engrossing as Keith Gessen?...

    This is a terrible country. My Yolka took to America. Why did you come back?? She seemed angry. A Terrible Country by Keith Gessen is published in the UK by perhaps my favourite of all publishers, Fitzcarraldo Editions, but is an odd fit for the "ambitious, imaginative and innova...

    To justify another 5-star rating for my beloved blue publisher, especially because this title seems to receive more criticism than some others (and I can see where it?s coming from), here are some of my subjective reasons for the grade: - It?s written in refreshingly short, easy...

    Andrei?s life in New York is not what you would call successful. His girlfriend has just dumped him, he barely earns enough to survive from his online teaching job and his dissertation adviser seems to have no confidence in his future job prospects at all. So when his brother Dima ca...

    Keith Gessen was born in Russia of Jewish parents, who emigrated to the US when he was still a child ? and is now an author, journalist (specialising in Russia), book-critic, translator and journal editor. This is his second novel ? and comes with by George Saunders and Elif Ba...

    . . . I felt the terrible freedom of this place. It was a fortress set down in a hostile environment. On one side the Mongols; on the other the Germans, Balts, and Vikings. So the Russians built this fortress here on a bend in the Yauza River, and hoped for the best. They built it big ...

    As a young immigrant from the Soviet Union, i related to the book a lot. Russia may have capitalism but it doesnt mean the corruption went away. Only the people who have connections and money survive Russia. Anyone interested in how Russia continues to operate should read this book. I ...

    Review soon. ...

    3.5 stars Tournament of Books Play-in Round Comments forthcoming. ...

    This is a book about what it means to return to a place that is no longer home. Reading it brought back memories of Tommy Orange?s ?There there?, or, more specifically, of Gertrude Stein?s quote about Oakland, ?there is no there there? from which Orange?s book drew its ti...

    I may be rounding up a bit here, but I really enjoyed this engaging and often funny book backed by a deep knowledge of Russian literature, history and culture. It was interesting to read about Putin's Russia from the oddly endearing voice of a struggling academic with roots in both Rus...

    This is one of the better books on the TOB shortlist. Not only does the writing flow with great characterization (the grandmother is a standout) but we learn some things about modern day Russia and our current political climate. In some ways Gessen's love letter to his grandmother (and...

    Andrei is one lost puppy floundering around in New York in 2008 after his girlfriend dumps him. When his brother Dima calls him to come take care of their 89-year-old grandmother in Moscow for just a little while, he says what the hell and jumps on a plane to Moscow where he lived as a...

    3.5 rounded down ...

    A man returns to Moscow to take care of his grandmother and discovers Putin's Russia, its new prosperity and its old problems. I have not read Gessen's previous novel, but it seems that the author began this one where he finished the previous one, in 2008, and that the main characte...

    When I stumbled on this book, reading the description and summary, I made the purchase with trepidation, (it just seemed to much of a high praise for a name I?ve never even heard). Now that I?ve completed it I just might have found myself a new favorite author in Keith Gessen. ...

    I have mixed feelings about this book. What I enjoyed: learning a bit about Russian culture and physical environments, and the political history and social ramifications of those changing theologies and practices. I eventually enjoyed the growing attachment between Andrei and his grand...

    A Terrible Narrator ...

  • Danielle Tremblay
    Jun 06, 2018

    Andrei emigrated with his parents from Russia at the age of six. Now, he's 33 and returning to Moscow to take care of his 89 year old grandmother, who?s suffering from some dementia. And who?s lonely because all her friends are dead. The book takes you to 2008 Moscow. You feel li...

    While I was reading this memoir-like novel about a Russian emigré's return to Moscow to spend time with his grandmother, I kept thinking about Andreď Makine's Dreams of My Russian Summers, another memoir-like novel in which the narrator returns to spend time with his grandmother. I h...

    At a time when Russia, Putin, conspiracy, and collusion dominate the news cycle it is wonderful to escape into a work of fiction that is absorbing, appealing to human emotion on many levels, and sadly, a comment on the reality of Russia today. As useful and engrossing as Keith Gessen?...

    This is a terrible country. My Yolka took to America. Why did you come back?? She seemed angry. A Terrible Country by Keith Gessen is published in the UK by perhaps my favourite of all publishers, Fitzcarraldo Editions, but is an odd fit for the "ambitious, imaginative and innova...

    To justify another 5-star rating for my beloved blue publisher, especially because this title seems to receive more criticism than some others (and I can see where it?s coming from), here are some of my subjective reasons for the grade: - It?s written in refreshingly short, easy...

    Andrei?s life in New York is not what you would call successful. His girlfriend has just dumped him, he barely earns enough to survive from his online teaching job and his dissertation adviser seems to have no confidence in his future job prospects at all. So when his brother Dima ca...

    Keith Gessen was born in Russia of Jewish parents, who emigrated to the US when he was still a child ? and is now an author, journalist (specialising in Russia), book-critic, translator and journal editor. This is his second novel ? and comes with by George Saunders and Elif Ba...

    . . . I felt the terrible freedom of this place. It was a fortress set down in a hostile environment. On one side the Mongols; on the other the Germans, Balts, and Vikings. So the Russians built this fortress here on a bend in the Yauza River, and hoped for the best. They built it big ...

    As a young immigrant from the Soviet Union, i related to the book a lot. Russia may have capitalism but it doesnt mean the corruption went away. Only the people who have connections and money survive Russia. Anyone interested in how Russia continues to operate should read this book. I ...

    Review soon. ...

    3.5 stars Tournament of Books Play-in Round Comments forthcoming. ...

    This is a book about what it means to return to a place that is no longer home. Reading it brought back memories of Tommy Orange?s ?There there?, or, more specifically, of Gertrude Stein?s quote about Oakland, ?there is no there there? from which Orange?s book drew its ti...

    I may be rounding up a bit here, but I really enjoyed this engaging and often funny book backed by a deep knowledge of Russian literature, history and culture. It was interesting to read about Putin's Russia from the oddly endearing voice of a struggling academic with roots in both Rus...

    This is one of the better books on the TOB shortlist. Not only does the writing flow with great characterization (the grandmother is a standout) but we learn some things about modern day Russia and our current political climate. In some ways Gessen's love letter to his grandmother (and...

    Andrei is one lost puppy floundering around in New York in 2008 after his girlfriend dumps him. When his brother Dima calls him to come take care of their 89-year-old grandmother in Moscow for just a little while, he says what the hell and jumps on a plane to Moscow where he lived as a...

    3.5 rounded down ...

    A man returns to Moscow to take care of his grandmother and discovers Putin's Russia, its new prosperity and its old problems. I have not read Gessen's previous novel, but it seems that the author began this one where he finished the previous one, in 2008, and that the main characte...

  • Steven Z.
    Aug 06, 2018

    Andrei emigrated with his parents from Russia at the age of six. Now, he's 33 and returning to Moscow to take care of his 89 year old grandmother, who?s suffering from some dementia. And who?s lonely because all her friends are dead. The book takes you to 2008 Moscow. You feel li...

    While I was reading this memoir-like novel about a Russian emigré's return to Moscow to spend time with his grandmother, I kept thinking about Andreď Makine's Dreams of My Russian Summers, another memoir-like novel in which the narrator returns to spend time with his grandmother. I h...

    At a time when Russia, Putin, conspiracy, and collusion dominate the news cycle it is wonderful to escape into a work of fiction that is absorbing, appealing to human emotion on many levels, and sadly, a comment on the reality of Russia today. As useful and engrossing as Keith Gessen?...

  • Eren BuğlalÄąlar
    Oct 29, 2018

    Andrei emigrated with his parents from Russia at the age of six. Now, he's 33 and returning to Moscow to take care of his 89 year old grandmother, who?s suffering from some dementia. And who?s lonely because all her friends are dead. The book takes you to 2008 Moscow. You feel li...

    While I was reading this memoir-like novel about a Russian emigré's return to Moscow to spend time with his grandmother, I kept thinking about Andreď Makine's Dreams of My Russian Summers, another memoir-like novel in which the narrator returns to spend time with his grandmother. I h...

    At a time when Russia, Putin, conspiracy, and collusion dominate the news cycle it is wonderful to escape into a work of fiction that is absorbing, appealing to human emotion on many levels, and sadly, a comment on the reality of Russia today. As useful and engrossing as Keith Gessen?...

    This is a terrible country. My Yolka took to America. Why did you come back?? She seemed angry. A Terrible Country by Keith Gessen is published in the UK by perhaps my favourite of all publishers, Fitzcarraldo Editions, but is an odd fit for the "ambitious, imaginative and innova...

    To justify another 5-star rating for my beloved blue publisher, especially because this title seems to receive more criticism than some others (and I can see where it?s coming from), here are some of my subjective reasons for the grade: - It?s written in refreshingly short, easy...

    Andrei?s life in New York is not what you would call successful. His girlfriend has just dumped him, he barely earns enough to survive from his online teaching job and his dissertation adviser seems to have no confidence in his future job prospects at all. So when his brother Dima ca...

    Keith Gessen was born in Russia of Jewish parents, who emigrated to the US when he was still a child ? and is now an author, journalist (specialising in Russia), book-critic, translator and journal editor. This is his second novel ? and comes with by George Saunders and Elif Ba...

    . . . I felt the terrible freedom of this place. It was a fortress set down in a hostile environment. On one side the Mongols; on the other the Germans, Balts, and Vikings. So the Russians built this fortress here on a bend in the Yauza River, and hoped for the best. They built it big ...

    As a young immigrant from the Soviet Union, i related to the book a lot. Russia may have capitalism but it doesnt mean the corruption went away. Only the people who have connections and money survive Russia. Anyone interested in how Russia continues to operate should read this book. I ...

    Review soon. ...

    3.5 stars Tournament of Books Play-in Round Comments forthcoming. ...

    This is a book about what it means to return to a place that is no longer home. Reading it brought back memories of Tommy Orange?s ?There there?, or, more specifically, of Gertrude Stein?s quote about Oakland, ?there is no there there? from which Orange?s book drew its ti...

    I may be rounding up a bit here, but I really enjoyed this engaging and often funny book backed by a deep knowledge of Russian literature, history and culture. It was interesting to read about Putin's Russia from the oddly endearing voice of a struggling academic with roots in both Rus...

    This is one of the better books on the TOB shortlist. Not only does the writing flow with great characterization (the grandmother is a standout) but we learn some things about modern day Russia and our current political climate. In some ways Gessen's love letter to his grandmother (and...

    Andrei is one lost puppy floundering around in New York in 2008 after his girlfriend dumps him. When his brother Dima calls him to come take care of their 89-year-old grandmother in Moscow for just a little while, he says what the hell and jumps on a plane to Moscow where he lived as a...

    3.5 rounded down ...

    A man returns to Moscow to take care of his grandmother and discovers Putin's Russia, its new prosperity and its old problems. I have not read Gessen's previous novel, but it seems that the author began this one where he finished the previous one, in 2008, and that the main characte...

    When I stumbled on this book, reading the description and summary, I made the purchase with trepidation, (it just seemed to much of a high praise for a name I?ve never even heard). Now that I?ve completed it I just might have found myself a new favorite author in Keith Gessen. ...

    I have mixed feelings about this book. What I enjoyed: learning a bit about Russian culture and physical environments, and the political history and social ramifications of those changing theologies and practices. I eventually enjoyed the growing attachment between Andrei and his grand...

    A Terrible Narrator ...

    I loved this book! It?s been nearly a week since I finished and I miss it still and wish there was more. It is a novel but it reads like a memoir. It starts off with Andrei coming back to Moscow to take care of his grandmother while his older brother is out of the country. Andrei was...

    Rounding up from 3.5. The protagonist, a 30-something academic caring for his gransmother in Moscow for a year, is a bit of a naive jerk, but he seemed to catch himself fairly quickly and not become insufferable. I enjoyed the chance to read a novel set in more-or-less contemporary Rus...

    I enjoyed this book about Russia from someone who was born there, lived there for a time, and speaks the language. Reading about the author's Russian grandmother, and his relationship with her, was the highlight of the book for me. His writing was honest, true-to-life, and at times, ve...

    Smart, funny, page-turning--a deeply enjoyable read. ...

    3.5 stars. In A Terrible Country, the main character, Andrei Kaplan, like the author is Russian born and from a young age was raised in America. The year is 2008 and 33 year old Andrei is called back to Russia by his older brother, Dima, to look after their 88 year old grandmother who ...

    Magnificent. A truly moving and funny and beautiful novel about that time in America where it was possible to connect to Wi-fi but also possible to not have a cell phone. Except this book is about an American living in Putin's Russia just as the American economy explodes in 2008. I fin...

    When a young American man returns to Russia to care for his elderly grandmother you can only imagine what he encounters. Keith Gessen is a talented writer who knows how to engage and keep the reader moving through the story. There are some terrific lines in this novel. ...

    Andrei Kaplan is a struggling academic specializing in Russian Literature and looking for work in a crowded market that?s downsizing or eliminating Slavic literature and language departments. He?s at loose ends when his brother calls from Russia to say Andrei is needed in Moscow to...

    A Terrible Country is the story of Andrew/Andrei, who was born in Moscow and immigrated to the United States as a child. Now an adult , he leaves New York to return to Russia to care for his 80-something-year-old grandmother. The book follows Andrei and his struggles to acclimate, but,...

    Elif Batuman'dan da biliyoruz: ABD ç?k??l? Rus Dili ve Edebiyat? mezunlar? kurgu yapmaya isteksiz ve eski günlüklerle an?lar?na tadilat yap?p roman demeyi seviyorlar. Emperyalist merkezlerin ayd?nlar?, onlar?n sahip olduklar? ayr?cal?klar ve vatanda?lar? olduklar...

  • Alison Hardtmann
    Jan 10, 2019

    Andrei emigrated with his parents from Russia at the age of six. Now, he's 33 and returning to Moscow to take care of his 89 year old grandmother, who?s suffering from some dementia. And who?s lonely because all her friends are dead. The book takes you to 2008 Moscow. You feel li...

    While I was reading this memoir-like novel about a Russian emigré's return to Moscow to spend time with his grandmother, I kept thinking about Andreď Makine's Dreams of My Russian Summers, another memoir-like novel in which the narrator returns to spend time with his grandmother. I h...

    At a time when Russia, Putin, conspiracy, and collusion dominate the news cycle it is wonderful to escape into a work of fiction that is absorbing, appealing to human emotion on many levels, and sadly, a comment on the reality of Russia today. As useful and engrossing as Keith Gessen?...

    This is a terrible country. My Yolka took to America. Why did you come back?? She seemed angry. A Terrible Country by Keith Gessen is published in the UK by perhaps my favourite of all publishers, Fitzcarraldo Editions, but is an odd fit for the "ambitious, imaginative and innova...

    To justify another 5-star rating for my beloved blue publisher, especially because this title seems to receive more criticism than some others (and I can see where it?s coming from), here are some of my subjective reasons for the grade: - It?s written in refreshingly short, easy...

    Andrei?s life in New York is not what you would call successful. His girlfriend has just dumped him, he barely earns enough to survive from his online teaching job and his dissertation adviser seems to have no confidence in his future job prospects at all. So when his brother Dima ca...

    Keith Gessen was born in Russia of Jewish parents, who emigrated to the US when he was still a child ? and is now an author, journalist (specialising in Russia), book-critic, translator and journal editor. This is his second novel ? and comes with by George Saunders and Elif Ba...

    . . . I felt the terrible freedom of this place. It was a fortress set down in a hostile environment. On one side the Mongols; on the other the Germans, Balts, and Vikings. So the Russians built this fortress here on a bend in the Yauza River, and hoped for the best. They built it big ...

  • Michelle
    Jan 25, 2019

    Andrei emigrated with his parents from Russia at the age of six. Now, he's 33 and returning to Moscow to take care of his 89 year old grandmother, who?s suffering from some dementia. And who?s lonely because all her friends are dead. The book takes you to 2008 Moscow. You feel li...

    While I was reading this memoir-like novel about a Russian emigré's return to Moscow to spend time with his grandmother, I kept thinking about Andreď Makine's Dreams of My Russian Summers, another memoir-like novel in which the narrator returns to spend time with his grandmother. I h...

    At a time when Russia, Putin, conspiracy, and collusion dominate the news cycle it is wonderful to escape into a work of fiction that is absorbing, appealing to human emotion on many levels, and sadly, a comment on the reality of Russia today. As useful and engrossing as Keith Gessen?...

    This is a terrible country. My Yolka took to America. Why did you come back?? She seemed angry. A Terrible Country by Keith Gessen is published in the UK by perhaps my favourite of all publishers, Fitzcarraldo Editions, but is an odd fit for the "ambitious, imaginative and innova...

    To justify another 5-star rating for my beloved blue publisher, especially because this title seems to receive more criticism than some others (and I can see where it?s coming from), here are some of my subjective reasons for the grade: - It?s written in refreshingly short, easy...

    Andrei?s life in New York is not what you would call successful. His girlfriend has just dumped him, he barely earns enough to survive from his online teaching job and his dissertation adviser seems to have no confidence in his future job prospects at all. So when his brother Dima ca...

    Keith Gessen was born in Russia of Jewish parents, who emigrated to the US when he was still a child ? and is now an author, journalist (specialising in Russia), book-critic, translator and journal editor. This is his second novel ? and comes with by George Saunders and Elif Ba...

    . . . I felt the terrible freedom of this place. It was a fortress set down in a hostile environment. On one side the Mongols; on the other the Germans, Balts, and Vikings. So the Russians built this fortress here on a bend in the Yauza River, and hoped for the best. They built it big ...

    As a young immigrant from the Soviet Union, i related to the book a lot. Russia may have capitalism but it doesnt mean the corruption went away. Only the people who have connections and money survive Russia. Anyone interested in how Russia continues to operate should read this book. I ...

    Review soon. ...

    3.5 stars Tournament of Books Play-in Round Comments forthcoming. ...

  • Neil
    Aug 27, 2018

    Andrei emigrated with his parents from Russia at the age of six. Now, he's 33 and returning to Moscow to take care of his 89 year old grandmother, who?s suffering from some dementia. And who?s lonely because all her friends are dead. The book takes you to 2008 Moscow. You feel li...

    While I was reading this memoir-like novel about a Russian emigré's return to Moscow to spend time with his grandmother, I kept thinking about Andreď Makine's Dreams of My Russian Summers, another memoir-like novel in which the narrator returns to spend time with his grandmother. I h...

    At a time when Russia, Putin, conspiracy, and collusion dominate the news cycle it is wonderful to escape into a work of fiction that is absorbing, appealing to human emotion on many levels, and sadly, a comment on the reality of Russia today. As useful and engrossing as Keith Gessen?...

    This is a terrible country. My Yolka took to America. Why did you come back?? She seemed angry. A Terrible Country by Keith Gessen is published in the UK by perhaps my favourite of all publishers, Fitzcarraldo Editions, but is an odd fit for the "ambitious, imaginative and innova...

    To justify another 5-star rating for my beloved blue publisher, especially because this title seems to receive more criticism than some others (and I can see where it?s coming from), here are some of my subjective reasons for the grade: - It?s written in refreshingly short, easy...

    Andrei?s life in New York is not what you would call successful. His girlfriend has just dumped him, he barely earns enough to survive from his online teaching job and his dissertation adviser seems to have no confidence in his future job prospects at all. So when his brother Dima ca...

    Keith Gessen was born in Russia of Jewish parents, who emigrated to the US when he was still a child ? and is now an author, journalist (specialising in Russia), book-critic, translator and journal editor. This is his second novel ? and comes with by George Saunders and Elif Ba...

    . . . I felt the terrible freedom of this place. It was a fortress set down in a hostile environment. On one side the Mongols; on the other the Germans, Balts, and Vikings. So the Russians built this fortress here on a bend in the Yauza River, and hoped for the best. They built it big ...

    As a young immigrant from the Soviet Union, i related to the book a lot. Russia may have capitalism but it doesnt mean the corruption went away. Only the people who have connections and money survive Russia. Anyone interested in how Russia continues to operate should read this book. I ...

    Review soon. ...

    3.5 stars Tournament of Books Play-in Round Comments forthcoming. ...

    This is a book about what it means to return to a place that is no longer home. Reading it brought back memories of Tommy Orange?s ?There there?, or, more specifically, of Gertrude Stein?s quote about Oakland, ?there is no there there? from which Orange?s book drew its ti...

  • Gumble's Yard
    Jun 17, 2018

    Andrei emigrated with his parents from Russia at the age of six. Now, he's 33 and returning to Moscow to take care of his 89 year old grandmother, who?s suffering from some dementia. And who?s lonely because all her friends are dead. The book takes you to 2008 Moscow. You feel li...

    While I was reading this memoir-like novel about a Russian emigré's return to Moscow to spend time with his grandmother, I kept thinking about Andreď Makine's Dreams of My Russian Summers, another memoir-like novel in which the narrator returns to spend time with his grandmother. I h...

    At a time when Russia, Putin, conspiracy, and collusion dominate the news cycle it is wonderful to escape into a work of fiction that is absorbing, appealing to human emotion on many levels, and sadly, a comment on the reality of Russia today. As useful and engrossing as Keith Gessen?...

    This is a terrible country. My Yolka took to America. Why did you come back?? She seemed angry. A Terrible Country by Keith Gessen is published in the UK by perhaps my favourite of all publishers, Fitzcarraldo Editions, but is an odd fit for the "ambitious, imaginative and innova...

    To justify another 5-star rating for my beloved blue publisher, especially because this title seems to receive more criticism than some others (and I can see where it?s coming from), here are some of my subjective reasons for the grade: - It?s written in refreshingly short, easy...

    Andrei?s life in New York is not what you would call successful. His girlfriend has just dumped him, he barely earns enough to survive from his online teaching job and his dissertation adviser seems to have no confidence in his future job prospects at all. So when his brother Dima ca...

    Keith Gessen was born in Russia of Jewish parents, who emigrated to the US when he was still a child ? and is now an author, journalist (specialising in Russia), book-critic, translator and journal editor. This is his second novel ? and comes with by George Saunders and Elif Ba...

  • Carmel Hanes
    Jan 05, 2019

    Andrei emigrated with his parents from Russia at the age of six. Now, he's 33 and returning to Moscow to take care of his 89 year old grandmother, who?s suffering from some dementia. And who?s lonely because all her friends are dead. The book takes you to 2008 Moscow. You feel li...

    While I was reading this memoir-like novel about a Russian emigré's return to Moscow to spend time with his grandmother, I kept thinking about Andreď Makine's Dreams of My Russian Summers, another memoir-like novel in which the narrator returns to spend time with his grandmother. I h...

    At a time when Russia, Putin, conspiracy, and collusion dominate the news cycle it is wonderful to escape into a work of fiction that is absorbing, appealing to human emotion on many levels, and sadly, a comment on the reality of Russia today. As useful and engrossing as Keith Gessen?...

    This is a terrible country. My Yolka took to America. Why did you come back?? She seemed angry. A Terrible Country by Keith Gessen is published in the UK by perhaps my favourite of all publishers, Fitzcarraldo Editions, but is an odd fit for the "ambitious, imaginative and innova...

    To justify another 5-star rating for my beloved blue publisher, especially because this title seems to receive more criticism than some others (and I can see where it?s coming from), here are some of my subjective reasons for the grade: - It?s written in refreshingly short, easy...

    Andrei?s life in New York is not what you would call successful. His girlfriend has just dumped him, he barely earns enough to survive from his online teaching job and his dissertation adviser seems to have no confidence in his future job prospects at all. So when his brother Dima ca...

    Keith Gessen was born in Russia of Jewish parents, who emigrated to the US when he was still a child ? and is now an author, journalist (specialising in Russia), book-critic, translator and journal editor. This is his second novel ? and comes with by George Saunders and Elif Ba...

    . . . I felt the terrible freedom of this place. It was a fortress set down in a hostile environment. On one side the Mongols; on the other the Germans, Balts, and Vikings. So the Russians built this fortress here on a bend in the Yauza River, and hoped for the best. They built it big ...

    As a young immigrant from the Soviet Union, i related to the book a lot. Russia may have capitalism but it doesnt mean the corruption went away. Only the people who have connections and money survive Russia. Anyone interested in how Russia continues to operate should read this book. I ...

    Review soon. ...

    3.5 stars Tournament of Books Play-in Round Comments forthcoming. ...

    This is a book about what it means to return to a place that is no longer home. Reading it brought back memories of Tommy Orange?s ?There there?, or, more specifically, of Gertrude Stein?s quote about Oakland, ?there is no there there? from which Orange?s book drew its ti...

    I may be rounding up a bit here, but I really enjoyed this engaging and often funny book backed by a deep knowledge of Russian literature, history and culture. It was interesting to read about Putin's Russia from the oddly endearing voice of a struggling academic with roots in both Rus...

    This is one of the better books on the TOB shortlist. Not only does the writing flow with great characterization (the grandmother is a standout) but we learn some things about modern day Russia and our current political climate. In some ways Gessen's love letter to his grandmother (and...

    Andrei is one lost puppy floundering around in New York in 2008 after his girlfriend dumps him. When his brother Dima calls him to come take care of their 89-year-old grandmother in Moscow for just a little while, he says what the hell and jumps on a plane to Moscow where he lived as a...

    3.5 rounded down ...

    A man returns to Moscow to take care of his grandmother and discovers Putin's Russia, its new prosperity and its old problems. I have not read Gessen's previous novel, but it seems that the author began this one where he finished the previous one, in 2008, and that the main characte...

    When I stumbled on this book, reading the description and summary, I made the purchase with trepidation, (it just seemed to much of a high praise for a name I?ve never even heard). Now that I?ve completed it I just might have found myself a new favorite author in Keith Gessen. ...

    I have mixed feelings about this book. What I enjoyed: learning a bit about Russian culture and physical environments, and the political history and social ramifications of those changing theologies and practices. I eventually enjoyed the growing attachment between Andrei and his grand...

  • Sonya
    Mar 31, 2018

    Andrei emigrated with his parents from Russia at the age of six. Now, he's 33 and returning to Moscow to take care of his 89 year old grandmother, who?s suffering from some dementia. And who?s lonely because all her friends are dead. The book takes you to 2008 Moscow. You feel li...

    While I was reading this memoir-like novel about a Russian emigré's return to Moscow to spend time with his grandmother, I kept thinking about Andreď Makine's Dreams of My Russian Summers, another memoir-like novel in which the narrator returns to spend time with his grandmother. I h...

    At a time when Russia, Putin, conspiracy, and collusion dominate the news cycle it is wonderful to escape into a work of fiction that is absorbing, appealing to human emotion on many levels, and sadly, a comment on the reality of Russia today. As useful and engrossing as Keith Gessen?...

    This is a terrible country. My Yolka took to America. Why did you come back?? She seemed angry. A Terrible Country by Keith Gessen is published in the UK by perhaps my favourite of all publishers, Fitzcarraldo Editions, but is an odd fit for the "ambitious, imaginative and innova...

    To justify another 5-star rating for my beloved blue publisher, especially because this title seems to receive more criticism than some others (and I can see where it?s coming from), here are some of my subjective reasons for the grade: - It?s written in refreshingly short, easy...

    Andrei?s life in New York is not what you would call successful. His girlfriend has just dumped him, he barely earns enough to survive from his online teaching job and his dissertation adviser seems to have no confidence in his future job prospects at all. So when his brother Dima ca...

    Keith Gessen was born in Russia of Jewish parents, who emigrated to the US when he was still a child ? and is now an author, journalist (specialising in Russia), book-critic, translator and journal editor. This is his second novel ? and comes with by George Saunders and Elif Ba...

    . . . I felt the terrible freedom of this place. It was a fortress set down in a hostile environment. On one side the Mongols; on the other the Germans, Balts, and Vikings. So the Russians built this fortress here on a bend in the Yauza River, and hoped for the best. They built it big ...

    As a young immigrant from the Soviet Union, i related to the book a lot. Russia may have capitalism but it doesnt mean the corruption went away. Only the people who have connections and money survive Russia. Anyone interested in how Russia continues to operate should read this book. I ...

  • Matthew
    Jan 31, 2019

    Andrei emigrated with his parents from Russia at the age of six. Now, he's 33 and returning to Moscow to take care of his 89 year old grandmother, who?s suffering from some dementia. And who?s lonely because all her friends are dead. The book takes you to 2008 Moscow. You feel li...

    While I was reading this memoir-like novel about a Russian emigré's return to Moscow to spend time with his grandmother, I kept thinking about Andreď Makine's Dreams of My Russian Summers, another memoir-like novel in which the narrator returns to spend time with his grandmother. I h...

    At a time when Russia, Putin, conspiracy, and collusion dominate the news cycle it is wonderful to escape into a work of fiction that is absorbing, appealing to human emotion on many levels, and sadly, a comment on the reality of Russia today. As useful and engrossing as Keith Gessen?...

    This is a terrible country. My Yolka took to America. Why did you come back?? She seemed angry. A Terrible Country by Keith Gessen is published in the UK by perhaps my favourite of all publishers, Fitzcarraldo Editions, but is an odd fit for the "ambitious, imaginative and innova...

    To justify another 5-star rating for my beloved blue publisher, especially because this title seems to receive more criticism than some others (and I can see where it?s coming from), here are some of my subjective reasons for the grade: - It?s written in refreshingly short, easy...

    Andrei?s life in New York is not what you would call successful. His girlfriend has just dumped him, he barely earns enough to survive from his online teaching job and his dissertation adviser seems to have no confidence in his future job prospects at all. So when his brother Dima ca...

    Keith Gessen was born in Russia of Jewish parents, who emigrated to the US when he was still a child ? and is now an author, journalist (specialising in Russia), book-critic, translator and journal editor. This is his second novel ? and comes with by George Saunders and Elif Ba...

    . . . I felt the terrible freedom of this place. It was a fortress set down in a hostile environment. On one side the Mongols; on the other the Germans, Balts, and Vikings. So the Russians built this fortress here on a bend in the Yauza River, and hoped for the best. They built it big ...

    As a young immigrant from the Soviet Union, i related to the book a lot. Russia may have capitalism but it doesnt mean the corruption went away. Only the people who have connections and money survive Russia. Anyone interested in how Russia continues to operate should read this book. I ...

    Review soon. ...

    3.5 stars Tournament of Books Play-in Round Comments forthcoming. ...

    This is a book about what it means to return to a place that is no longer home. Reading it brought back memories of Tommy Orange?s ?There there?, or, more specifically, of Gertrude Stein?s quote about Oakland, ?there is no there there? from which Orange?s book drew its ti...

    I may be rounding up a bit here, but I really enjoyed this engaging and often funny book backed by a deep knowledge of Russian literature, history and culture. It was interesting to read about Putin's Russia from the oddly endearing voice of a struggling academic with roots in both Rus...

  • Patricia Doyle
    May 27, 2018

    Andrei emigrated with his parents from Russia at the age of six. Now, he's 33 and returning to Moscow to take care of his 89 year old grandmother, who?s suffering from some dementia. And who?s lonely because all her friends are dead. The book takes you to 2008 Moscow. You feel li...

    While I was reading this memoir-like novel about a Russian emigré's return to Moscow to spend time with his grandmother, I kept thinking about Andreď Makine's Dreams of My Russian Summers, another memoir-like novel in which the narrator returns to spend time with his grandmother. I h...

    At a time when Russia, Putin, conspiracy, and collusion dominate the news cycle it is wonderful to escape into a work of fiction that is absorbing, appealing to human emotion on many levels, and sadly, a comment on the reality of Russia today. As useful and engrossing as Keith Gessen?...

    This is a terrible country. My Yolka took to America. Why did you come back?? She seemed angry. A Terrible Country by Keith Gessen is published in the UK by perhaps my favourite of all publishers, Fitzcarraldo Editions, but is an odd fit for the "ambitious, imaginative and innova...

    To justify another 5-star rating for my beloved blue publisher, especially because this title seems to receive more criticism than some others (and I can see where it?s coming from), here are some of my subjective reasons for the grade: - It?s written in refreshingly short, easy...

    Andrei?s life in New York is not what you would call successful. His girlfriend has just dumped him, he barely earns enough to survive from his online teaching job and his dissertation adviser seems to have no confidence in his future job prospects at all. So when his brother Dima ca...

    Keith Gessen was born in Russia of Jewish parents, who emigrated to the US when he was still a child ? and is now an author, journalist (specialising in Russia), book-critic, translator and journal editor. This is his second novel ? and comes with by George Saunders and Elif Ba...

    . . . I felt the terrible freedom of this place. It was a fortress set down in a hostile environment. On one side the Mongols; on the other the Germans, Balts, and Vikings. So the Russians built this fortress here on a bend in the Yauza River, and hoped for the best. They built it big ...

    As a young immigrant from the Soviet Union, i related to the book a lot. Russia may have capitalism but it doesnt mean the corruption went away. Only the people who have connections and money survive Russia. Anyone interested in how Russia continues to operate should read this book. I ...

    Review soon. ...

    3.5 stars Tournament of Books Play-in Round Comments forthcoming. ...

    This is a book about what it means to return to a place that is no longer home. Reading it brought back memories of Tommy Orange?s ?There there?, or, more specifically, of Gertrude Stein?s quote about Oakland, ?there is no there there? from which Orange?s book drew its ti...

    I may be rounding up a bit here, but I really enjoyed this engaging and often funny book backed by a deep knowledge of Russian literature, history and culture. It was interesting to read about Putin's Russia from the oddly endearing voice of a struggling academic with roots in both Rus...

    This is one of the better books on the TOB shortlist. Not only does the writing flow with great characterization (the grandmother is a standout) but we learn some things about modern day Russia and our current political climate. In some ways Gessen's love letter to his grandmother (and...

    Andrei is one lost puppy floundering around in New York in 2008 after his girlfriend dumps him. When his brother Dima calls him to come take care of their 89-year-old grandmother in Moscow for just a little while, he says what the hell and jumps on a plane to Moscow where he lived as a...

    3.5 rounded down ...

    A man returns to Moscow to take care of his grandmother and discovers Putin's Russia, its new prosperity and its old problems. I have not read Gessen's previous novel, but it seems that the author began this one where he finished the previous one, in 2008, and that the main characte...

    When I stumbled on this book, reading the description and summary, I made the purchase with trepidation, (it just seemed to much of a high praise for a name I?ve never even heard). Now that I?ve completed it I just might have found myself a new favorite author in Keith Gessen. ...

    I have mixed feelings about this book. What I enjoyed: learning a bit about Russian culture and physical environments, and the political history and social ramifications of those changing theologies and practices. I eventually enjoyed the growing attachment between Andrei and his grand...

    A Terrible Narrator ...

    I loved this book! It?s been nearly a week since I finished and I miss it still and wish there was more. It is a novel but it reads like a memoir. It starts off with Andrei coming back to Moscow to take care of his grandmother while his older brother is out of the country. Andrei was...

    Rounding up from 3.5. The protagonist, a 30-something academic caring for his gransmother in Moscow for a year, is a bit of a naive jerk, but he seemed to catch himself fairly quickly and not become insufferable. I enjoyed the chance to read a novel set in more-or-less contemporary Rus...

    I enjoyed this book about Russia from someone who was born there, lived there for a time, and speaks the language. Reading about the author's Russian grandmother, and his relationship with her, was the highlight of the book for me. His writing was honest, true-to-life, and at times, ve...

    Smart, funny, page-turning--a deeply enjoyable read. ...

    3.5 stars. In A Terrible Country, the main character, Andrei Kaplan, like the author is Russian born and from a young age was raised in America. The year is 2008 and 33 year old Andrei is called back to Russia by his older brother, Dima, to look after their 88 year old grandmother who ...

    Magnificent. A truly moving and funny and beautiful novel about that time in America where it was possible to connect to Wi-fi but also possible to not have a cell phone. Except this book is about an American living in Putin's Russia just as the American economy explodes in 2008. I fin...

    When a young American man returns to Russia to care for his elderly grandmother you can only imagine what he encounters. Keith Gessen is a talented writer who knows how to engage and keep the reader moving through the story. There are some terrific lines in this novel. ...

    Andrei Kaplan is a struggling academic specializing in Russian Literature and looking for work in a crowded market that?s downsizing or eliminating Slavic literature and language departments. He?s at loose ends when his brother calls from Russia to say Andrei is needed in Moscow to...

    A Terrible Country is the story of Andrew/Andrei, who was born in Moscow and immigrated to the United States as a child. Now an adult , he leaves New York to return to Russia to care for his 80-something-year-old grandmother. The book follows Andrei and his struggles to acclimate, but,...

  • Fikayo Adebolajo
    Aug 21, 2018

    Andrei emigrated with his parents from Russia at the age of six. Now, he's 33 and returning to Moscow to take care of his 89 year old grandmother, who?s suffering from some dementia. And who?s lonely because all her friends are dead. The book takes you to 2008 Moscow. You feel li...

    While I was reading this memoir-like novel about a Russian emigré's return to Moscow to spend time with his grandmother, I kept thinking about Andreď Makine's Dreams of My Russian Summers, another memoir-like novel in which the narrator returns to spend time with his grandmother. I h...

    At a time when Russia, Putin, conspiracy, and collusion dominate the news cycle it is wonderful to escape into a work of fiction that is absorbing, appealing to human emotion on many levels, and sadly, a comment on the reality of Russia today. As useful and engrossing as Keith Gessen?...

    This is a terrible country. My Yolka took to America. Why did you come back?? She seemed angry. A Terrible Country by Keith Gessen is published in the UK by perhaps my favourite of all publishers, Fitzcarraldo Editions, but is an odd fit for the "ambitious, imaginative and innova...

    To justify another 5-star rating for my beloved blue publisher, especially because this title seems to receive more criticism than some others (and I can see where it?s coming from), here are some of my subjective reasons for the grade: - It?s written in refreshingly short, easy...

    Andrei?s life in New York is not what you would call successful. His girlfriend has just dumped him, he barely earns enough to survive from his online teaching job and his dissertation adviser seems to have no confidence in his future job prospects at all. So when his brother Dima ca...

    Keith Gessen was born in Russia of Jewish parents, who emigrated to the US when he was still a child ? and is now an author, journalist (specialising in Russia), book-critic, translator and journal editor. This is his second novel ? and comes with by George Saunders and Elif Ba...

    . . . I felt the terrible freedom of this place. It was a fortress set down in a hostile environment. On one side the Mongols; on the other the Germans, Balts, and Vikings. So the Russians built this fortress here on a bend in the Yauza River, and hoped for the best. They built it big ...

    As a young immigrant from the Soviet Union, i related to the book a lot. Russia may have capitalism but it doesnt mean the corruption went away. Only the people who have connections and money survive Russia. Anyone interested in how Russia continues to operate should read this book. I ...

    Review soon. ...

    3.5 stars Tournament of Books Play-in Round Comments forthcoming. ...

    This is a book about what it means to return to a place that is no longer home. Reading it brought back memories of Tommy Orange?s ?There there?, or, more specifically, of Gertrude Stein?s quote about Oakland, ?there is no there there? from which Orange?s book drew its ti...

    I may be rounding up a bit here, but I really enjoyed this engaging and often funny book backed by a deep knowledge of Russian literature, history and culture. It was interesting to read about Putin's Russia from the oddly endearing voice of a struggling academic with roots in both Rus...

    This is one of the better books on the TOB shortlist. Not only does the writing flow with great characterization (the grandmother is a standout) but we learn some things about modern day Russia and our current political climate. In some ways Gessen's love letter to his grandmother (and...

    Andrei is one lost puppy floundering around in New York in 2008 after his girlfriend dumps him. When his brother Dima calls him to come take care of their 89-year-old grandmother in Moscow for just a little while, he says what the hell and jumps on a plane to Moscow where he lived as a...

    3.5 rounded down ...

    A man returns to Moscow to take care of his grandmother and discovers Putin's Russia, its new prosperity and its old problems. I have not read Gessen's previous novel, but it seems that the author began this one where he finished the previous one, in 2008, and that the main characte...

    When I stumbled on this book, reading the description and summary, I made the purchase with trepidation, (it just seemed to much of a high praise for a name I?ve never even heard). Now that I?ve completed it I just might have found myself a new favorite author in Keith Gessen. ...

  • Collin
    Dec 30, 2018

    Andrei emigrated with his parents from Russia at the age of six. Now, he's 33 and returning to Moscow to take care of his 89 year old grandmother, who?s suffering from some dementia. And who?s lonely because all her friends are dead. The book takes you to 2008 Moscow. You feel li...

    While I was reading this memoir-like novel about a Russian emigré's return to Moscow to spend time with his grandmother, I kept thinking about Andreď Makine's Dreams of My Russian Summers, another memoir-like novel in which the narrator returns to spend time with his grandmother. I h...

    At a time when Russia, Putin, conspiracy, and collusion dominate the news cycle it is wonderful to escape into a work of fiction that is absorbing, appealing to human emotion on many levels, and sadly, a comment on the reality of Russia today. As useful and engrossing as Keith Gessen?...

    This is a terrible country. My Yolka took to America. Why did you come back?? She seemed angry. A Terrible Country by Keith Gessen is published in the UK by perhaps my favourite of all publishers, Fitzcarraldo Editions, but is an odd fit for the "ambitious, imaginative and innova...

    To justify another 5-star rating for my beloved blue publisher, especially because this title seems to receive more criticism than some others (and I can see where it?s coming from), here are some of my subjective reasons for the grade: - It?s written in refreshingly short, easy...

    Andrei?s life in New York is not what you would call successful. His girlfriend has just dumped him, he barely earns enough to survive from his online teaching job and his dissertation adviser seems to have no confidence in his future job prospects at all. So when his brother Dima ca...