Winners Take All: The Elite Charade of Changing the World

Winners Take All: The Elite Charade of Changing the World

An insider's groundbreaking investigation of how the global elite's efforts to "change the world" preserve the status quo and obscure their role in causing the problems they later seek to solve. Former New York Times columnist Anand Giridharadas takes us into the inner sanctums of a new gilded age, where the rich and powerful fight for equality and justice any way they can- An insider's groundbreaking investigation of how the global elite's efforts to "change the world" preserve the status...

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Title:Winners Take All: The Elite Charade of Changing the World
Author:Anand Giridharadas
Rating:
Genres:Nonfiction
ISBN:0451493249
Edition Language:English
Format Type:Hardcover
Number of Pages:288 pages pages

Winners Take All: The Elite Charade of Changing the World Reviews

  • Bill  Kerwin
    Oct 20, 2018

    What Trump and Idealists Have in Common ?Making a difference? could be the idealistic theme of my generation?s collective ethos - at least among those of us who survived the drug-culture of the 60?s and 70?s with intact minds. The world had been opened to us by cheap acces...

    Did you watch Zuckerberg testify before the Senate committees about Facebook and the 2018 election? Were you struck by how blithely unrepentant he seemed, how convinced that his titanic, poorly monitored data base?which he habitually describes as ?a community??is an unalloyed...

  • Suzanne
    Oct 14, 2018

    What Trump and Idealists Have in Common ?Making a difference? could be the idealistic theme of my generation?s collective ethos - at least among those of us who survived the drug-culture of the 60?s and 70?s with intact minds. The world had been opened to us by cheap acces...

    Did you watch Zuckerberg testify before the Senate committees about Facebook and the 2018 election? Were you struck by how blithely unrepentant he seemed, how convinced that his titanic, poorly monitored data base?which he habitually describes as ?a community??is an unalloyed...

    This is another book recommended to me by Richard. In many ways this is a similar and perhaps an even better book than ?Small Change: Why business won?t save the world? by Michael Edwards. Under my review of that book Jan-Maat mentions Andrew Carnegie ? and he gets quite a run ...

    This is an excellent book and a must-read! It's also totally readable and even quite funny at times. And it's the kind of book that you keep bringing up in conversation and then trailing off and saying---you just really have to read this book. The oversimplified thesis is that you can'...

    As someone who has dithered on the edges of "elites changing the world", much of this rings true and I believe (and grapple) with the tension between the sometimes necessary power/influence/fortune needed, as we strive for justice and equity. An article that I always refer back to is N...

    Winners Take All is the hardest book I have ever read. Not because it was inaccessible or esoteric, but because it forced a long overdue look in the mirror. Being in the tech industry I?ve been swept up in thought leadership, heroic philanthropy, and the promise of innovation to ...

    Philanthropy exists mainly to enable the super-rich and super-powerful to defer any serious discussion of a serious reordering of power and wealth, argues Giridharadas. Through a series of vignettes both of the super-rich and super-powerful themselves, who prove themselves unable to co...

    Very much in the tradition of Thomas Frank and the Baffler Magazine. This lampoons the TED talking Thought leaders and Elon Musks hanging around Davos and Martha's Vineyard. You know the plutocrats on a mission to save us all. I don't know if they do it the avoid scrutiny or salve thei...

    I ADORED this book. It was not without its flaws, including being super biased, one sided and judgmental, but I LOVED it. I?ve been a total MarketWorlder, assuming business was the best vehicle for making change and business school was the most effective way to learn now. And this bo...

    This book was definitely an eye-opener for me. As one who deals with charities and non-profits some, it saddened me to see how much that world is being abused by those with the most money to spare. The richest 1% have managed to grow in power and influence over the past decades so t...

    "Winners Take All" is an important and timely book. Giridharadas examines the fundamental limitations and contradictions of those who work for social change from a position of wealth and prestige. His central theme is "the master's tools will never dismantle the master's house," that i...

    It's hard to argue with any of the blatantly obvious points Giridharadas makes, but in chapter after chapter his targets prove themselves immune to the criticism. The whole book is a collective portrait of a class well-described by Tolstoy in one of the book's epigraphs: ?I sit on...

    The author crystallizes a good critique and rebuke of the intellectual elite classes, though he waits until the acknowledgements to, well, acknowledge a fuller extent of how much he was part of the problem and to an extent still is. It?s evident elsewhere anyway, as he only menti...

    UPDATE: meet the Elizabeth Holmes of Charity Fraud.... https://www.propublica.org/article/ho... =========================== "I sit on a man?s back choking him and making him carry me, and yet assure myself and others that I am sorry for him and wish to lighten his load by al...

    Very mixed feelings about this book. I liked some parts too much to give a low rating, disliked other parts too much to give a high rating, and don't feel those should average out. While I was reading, I was considering a criticism that this book is ultimately not engaged in critica...

    I found this a very enjoying read that really helped me coalesce some recent thoughts I've had recently on the subject. I first heard about the book on the Ezra Klein podcast (I would recommend listening to it as well to get Ezra's questions) and decided it was worth a try. It was. ...

    A phenomenally thought-provoking book examining the myths and fallacies of change and problem solving via market-driven solutions advocated by global elites seeking win-win solutions that fail to address the root causes of problems for which those elites may be the very causes or enabl...

    Before you read this book, read the author?s bio. For someone who is so critical of elites hiding in their hobbit holes, he waits until the acknowledgments section at the end of the book to let you know that he is one of them. I found this incredibly bizarre. He says the reason is be...

    "Inspire the rich to do more good, but never, ever tell them to do less harm; inspire them to give back, but never, ever tell them to take less; inspire them to join the solution, but never, ever accuse them of being part of the problem." I say, sometimes, "How do those people sleep...

    Extremely thought provoking. Nodded my head and said "Yeah!" on virtually every page. "If anyone truly believes that the same ski-town conferences and fellowship programs, the same politicians and policies, the same entrepreneurs and social businesses, the same campaign donors, the ...

    In this book, Giridharadas points to the limits of market or philanthropic solutions for social problems and argues that such innovation may even weaken our existing social system by diverting pent-up demand for change. He critiques the changemaker industrial complex (of Davos, TED tal...

    Winners Take All is about the elite?s ?charade of changing the world.? Specifically, it?s about how wealthy people do a modest bit of good (through philanthropy) while doing nothing about larger systems of injustice (that they may or may not benefit from). The author?s lin...

    We live in a world where every SV exec and company, even ones laughably so (Coca-Cola? Facebook?) claim to be changing the world for the better, doing good and are involved in charitable donations. With so much charity and well-meaning, why hasn't the average American seen an income ch...

    I disagree with soooo much in this book, but it is thought-provoking. The mot aggravating part is, I think, the lack of a clear counter-proposal to the problems he sees. It?s clearly implied, of course, but he doesn?t elaborate. ...

    I squirreled away time to read this book, ignoring most other obligations and taking the opportunity to engage in an anti-social act I haven't partaken in since middle school: to hunch over a book in the midst of a crowd of people. As a result, I often found myself in the situation of ...

    ?Winners take All? (Knopf, 2018) by former New York Times columnist Anand Giridharadas. Ugh. This was painful read, psychologically speaking. Maybe a bit like psychotherapy, a bit too close to the truth, I kind of knew all this anyway but getting it presented in such a condensed ma...

    It took me a bit to get into this one -- Giridharadas has some *very* strong, negative opinions about some beliefs that I consider -- or at least, have considered -- core to my professional trajectory over the past decade or so. A colleague of mine, in my same line of work, is even hig...

    All good points. Rich people are making money and inventing things for fun rather than doing the work to fix government. We can't take Pepsi out of school because Pepsi has a right to make money. Meanwhile kids are dying and the rich get richer. In short, we're f'ed. Next book I read ...

  • Trevor
    Sep 23, 2018

    What Trump and Idealists Have in Common ?Making a difference? could be the idealistic theme of my generation?s collective ethos - at least among those of us who survived the drug-culture of the 60?s and 70?s with intact minds. The world had been opened to us by cheap acces...

    Did you watch Zuckerberg testify before the Senate committees about Facebook and the 2018 election? Were you struck by how blithely unrepentant he seemed, how convinced that his titanic, poorly monitored data base?which he habitually describes as ?a community??is an unalloyed...

    This is another book recommended to me by Richard. In many ways this is a similar and perhaps an even better book than ?Small Change: Why business won?t save the world? by Michael Edwards. Under my review of that book Jan-Maat mentions Andrew Carnegie ? and he gets quite a run ...

  • Abby
    Oct 10, 2018

    What Trump and Idealists Have in Common ?Making a difference? could be the idealistic theme of my generation?s collective ethos - at least among those of us who survived the drug-culture of the 60?s and 70?s with intact minds. The world had been opened to us by cheap acces...

    Did you watch Zuckerberg testify before the Senate committees about Facebook and the 2018 election? Were you struck by how blithely unrepentant he seemed, how convinced that his titanic, poorly monitored data base?which he habitually describes as ?a community??is an unalloyed...

    This is another book recommended to me by Richard. In many ways this is a similar and perhaps an even better book than ?Small Change: Why business won?t save the world? by Michael Edwards. Under my review of that book Jan-Maat mentions Andrew Carnegie ? and he gets quite a run ...

    This is an excellent book and a must-read! It's also totally readable and even quite funny at times. And it's the kind of book that you keep bringing up in conversation and then trailing off and saying---you just really have to read this book. The oversimplified thesis is that you can'...

    As someone who has dithered on the edges of "elites changing the world", much of this rings true and I believe (and grapple) with the tension between the sometimes necessary power/influence/fortune needed, as we strive for justice and equity. An article that I always refer back to is N...

    Winners Take All is the hardest book I have ever read. Not because it was inaccessible or esoteric, but because it forced a long overdue look in the mirror. Being in the tech industry I?ve been swept up in thought leadership, heroic philanthropy, and the promise of innovation to ...

    Philanthropy exists mainly to enable the super-rich and super-powerful to defer any serious discussion of a serious reordering of power and wealth, argues Giridharadas. Through a series of vignettes both of the super-rich and super-powerful themselves, who prove themselves unable to co...

    Very much in the tradition of Thomas Frank and the Baffler Magazine. This lampoons the TED talking Thought leaders and Elon Musks hanging around Davos and Martha's Vineyard. You know the plutocrats on a mission to save us all. I don't know if they do it the avoid scrutiny or salve thei...

    I ADORED this book. It was not without its flaws, including being super biased, one sided and judgmental, but I LOVED it. I?ve been a total MarketWorlder, assuming business was the best vehicle for making change and business school was the most effective way to learn now. And this bo...

    This book was definitely an eye-opener for me. As one who deals with charities and non-profits some, it saddened me to see how much that world is being abused by those with the most money to spare. The richest 1% have managed to grow in power and influence over the past decades so t...

    "Winners Take All" is an important and timely book. Giridharadas examines the fundamental limitations and contradictions of those who work for social change from a position of wealth and prestige. His central theme is "the master's tools will never dismantle the master's house," that i...

    It's hard to argue with any of the blatantly obvious points Giridharadas makes, but in chapter after chapter his targets prove themselves immune to the criticism. The whole book is a collective portrait of a class well-described by Tolstoy in one of the book's epigraphs: ?I sit on...

    The author crystallizes a good critique and rebuke of the intellectual elite classes, though he waits until the acknowledgements to, well, acknowledge a fuller extent of how much he was part of the problem and to an extent still is. It?s evident elsewhere anyway, as he only menti...

    UPDATE: meet the Elizabeth Holmes of Charity Fraud.... https://www.propublica.org/article/ho... =========================== "I sit on a man?s back choking him and making him carry me, and yet assure myself and others that I am sorry for him and wish to lighten his load by al...

    Very mixed feelings about this book. I liked some parts too much to give a low rating, disliked other parts too much to give a high rating, and don't feel those should average out. While I was reading, I was considering a criticism that this book is ultimately not engaged in critica...

    I found this a very enjoying read that really helped me coalesce some recent thoughts I've had recently on the subject. I first heard about the book on the Ezra Klein podcast (I would recommend listening to it as well to get Ezra's questions) and decided it was worth a try. It was. ...

    A phenomenally thought-provoking book examining the myths and fallacies of change and problem solving via market-driven solutions advocated by global elites seeking win-win solutions that fail to address the root causes of problems for which those elites may be the very causes or enabl...

    Before you read this book, read the author?s bio. For someone who is so critical of elites hiding in their hobbit holes, he waits until the acknowledgments section at the end of the book to let you know that he is one of them. I found this incredibly bizarre. He says the reason is be...

    "Inspire the rich to do more good, but never, ever tell them to do less harm; inspire them to give back, but never, ever tell them to take less; inspire them to join the solution, but never, ever accuse them of being part of the problem." I say, sometimes, "How do those people sleep...

    Extremely thought provoking. Nodded my head and said "Yeah!" on virtually every page. "If anyone truly believes that the same ski-town conferences and fellowship programs, the same politicians and policies, the same entrepreneurs and social businesses, the same campaign donors, the ...

    In this book, Giridharadas points to the limits of market or philanthropic solutions for social problems and argues that such innovation may even weaken our existing social system by diverting pent-up demand for change. He critiques the changemaker industrial complex (of Davos, TED tal...

  • Mehrsa
    Aug 31, 2018

    What Trump and Idealists Have in Common ?Making a difference? could be the idealistic theme of my generation?s collective ethos - at least among those of us who survived the drug-culture of the 60?s and 70?s with intact minds. The world had been opened to us by cheap acces...

    Did you watch Zuckerberg testify before the Senate committees about Facebook and the 2018 election? Were you struck by how blithely unrepentant he seemed, how convinced that his titanic, poorly monitored data base?which he habitually describes as ?a community??is an unalloyed...

    This is another book recommended to me by Richard. In many ways this is a similar and perhaps an even better book than ?Small Change: Why business won?t save the world? by Michael Edwards. Under my review of that book Jan-Maat mentions Andrew Carnegie ? and he gets quite a run ...

    This is an excellent book and a must-read! It's also totally readable and even quite funny at times. And it's the kind of book that you keep bringing up in conversation and then trailing off and saying---you just really have to read this book. The oversimplified thesis is that you can'...

  • Meredith
    Sep 15, 2018

    What Trump and Idealists Have in Common ?Making a difference? could be the idealistic theme of my generation?s collective ethos - at least among those of us who survived the drug-culture of the 60?s and 70?s with intact minds. The world had been opened to us by cheap acces...

    Did you watch Zuckerberg testify before the Senate committees about Facebook and the 2018 election? Were you struck by how blithely unrepentant he seemed, how convinced that his titanic, poorly monitored data base?which he habitually describes as ?a community??is an unalloyed...

    This is another book recommended to me by Richard. In many ways this is a similar and perhaps an even better book than ?Small Change: Why business won?t save the world? by Michael Edwards. Under my review of that book Jan-Maat mentions Andrew Carnegie ? and he gets quite a run ...

    This is an excellent book and a must-read! It's also totally readable and even quite funny at times. And it's the kind of book that you keep bringing up in conversation and then trailing off and saying---you just really have to read this book. The oversimplified thesis is that you can'...

    As someone who has dithered on the edges of "elites changing the world", much of this rings true and I believe (and grapple) with the tension between the sometimes necessary power/influence/fortune needed, as we strive for justice and equity. An article that I always refer back to is N...

    Winners Take All is the hardest book I have ever read. Not because it was inaccessible or esoteric, but because it forced a long overdue look in the mirror. Being in the tech industry I?ve been swept up in thought leadership, heroic philanthropy, and the promise of innovation to ...

    Philanthropy exists mainly to enable the super-rich and super-powerful to defer any serious discussion of a serious reordering of power and wealth, argues Giridharadas. Through a series of vignettes both of the super-rich and super-powerful themselves, who prove themselves unable to co...

    Very much in the tradition of Thomas Frank and the Baffler Magazine. This lampoons the TED talking Thought leaders and Elon Musks hanging around Davos and Martha's Vineyard. You know the plutocrats on a mission to save us all. I don't know if they do it the avoid scrutiny or salve thei...

    I ADORED this book. It was not without its flaws, including being super biased, one sided and judgmental, but I LOVED it. I?ve been a total MarketWorlder, assuming business was the best vehicle for making change and business school was the most effective way to learn now. And this bo...

  • Ted
    Oct 09, 2018

    What Trump and Idealists Have in Common ?Making a difference? could be the idealistic theme of my generation?s collective ethos - at least among those of us who survived the drug-culture of the 60?s and 70?s with intact minds. The world had been opened to us by cheap acces...

    Did you watch Zuckerberg testify before the Senate committees about Facebook and the 2018 election? Were you struck by how blithely unrepentant he seemed, how convinced that his titanic, poorly monitored data base?which he habitually describes as ?a community??is an unalloyed...

    This is another book recommended to me by Richard. In many ways this is a similar and perhaps an even better book than ?Small Change: Why business won?t save the world? by Michael Edwards. Under my review of that book Jan-Maat mentions Andrew Carnegie ? and he gets quite a run ...

    This is an excellent book and a must-read! It's also totally readable and even quite funny at times. And it's the kind of book that you keep bringing up in conversation and then trailing off and saying---you just really have to read this book. The oversimplified thesis is that you can'...

    As someone who has dithered on the edges of "elites changing the world", much of this rings true and I believe (and grapple) with the tension between the sometimes necessary power/influence/fortune needed, as we strive for justice and equity. An article that I always refer back to is N...

    Winners Take All is the hardest book I have ever read. Not because it was inaccessible or esoteric, but because it forced a long overdue look in the mirror. Being in the tech industry I?ve been swept up in thought leadership, heroic philanthropy, and the promise of innovation to ...

    Philanthropy exists mainly to enable the super-rich and super-powerful to defer any serious discussion of a serious reordering of power and wealth, argues Giridharadas. Through a series of vignettes both of the super-rich and super-powerful themselves, who prove themselves unable to co...

    Very much in the tradition of Thomas Frank and the Baffler Magazine. This lampoons the TED talking Thought leaders and Elon Musks hanging around Davos and Martha's Vineyard. You know the plutocrats on a mission to save us all. I don't know if they do it the avoid scrutiny or salve thei...

    I ADORED this book. It was not without its flaws, including being super biased, one sided and judgmental, but I LOVED it. I?ve been a total MarketWorlder, assuming business was the best vehicle for making change and business school was the most effective way to learn now. And this bo...

    This book was definitely an eye-opener for me. As one who deals with charities and non-profits some, it saddened me to see how much that world is being abused by those with the most money to spare. The richest 1% have managed to grow in power and influence over the past decades so t...

    "Winners Take All" is an important and timely book. Giridharadas examines the fundamental limitations and contradictions of those who work for social change from a position of wealth and prestige. His central theme is "the master's tools will never dismantle the master's house," that i...

    It's hard to argue with any of the blatantly obvious points Giridharadas makes, but in chapter after chapter his targets prove themselves immune to the criticism. The whole book is a collective portrait of a class well-described by Tolstoy in one of the book's epigraphs: ?I sit on...

    The author crystallizes a good critique and rebuke of the intellectual elite classes, though he waits until the acknowledgements to, well, acknowledge a fuller extent of how much he was part of the problem and to an extent still is. It?s evident elsewhere anyway, as he only menti...

    UPDATE: meet the Elizabeth Holmes of Charity Fraud.... https://www.propublica.org/article/ho... =========================== "I sit on a man?s back choking him and making him carry me, and yet assure myself and others that I am sorry for him and wish to lighten his load by al...

    Very mixed feelings about this book. I liked some parts too much to give a low rating, disliked other parts too much to give a high rating, and don't feel those should average out. While I was reading, I was considering a criticism that this book is ultimately not engaged in critica...

    I found this a very enjoying read that really helped me coalesce some recent thoughts I've had recently on the subject. I first heard about the book on the Ezra Klein podcast (I would recommend listening to it as well to get Ezra's questions) and decided it was worth a try. It was. ...

    A phenomenally thought-provoking book examining the myths and fallacies of change and problem solving via market-driven solutions advocated by global elites seeking win-win solutions that fail to address the root causes of problems for which those elites may be the very causes or enabl...

    Before you read this book, read the author?s bio. For someone who is so critical of elites hiding in their hobbit holes, he waits until the acknowledgments section at the end of the book to let you know that he is one of them. I found this incredibly bizarre. He says the reason is be...

    "Inspire the rich to do more good, but never, ever tell them to do less harm; inspire them to give back, but never, ever tell them to take less; inspire them to join the solution, but never, ever accuse them of being part of the problem." I say, sometimes, "How do those people sleep...

    Extremely thought provoking. Nodded my head and said "Yeah!" on virtually every page. "If anyone truly believes that the same ski-town conferences and fellowship programs, the same politicians and policies, the same entrepreneurs and social businesses, the same campaign donors, the ...

    In this book, Giridharadas points to the limits of market or philanthropic solutions for social problems and argues that such innovation may even weaken our existing social system by diverting pent-up demand for change. He critiques the changemaker industrial complex (of Davos, TED tal...

    Winners Take All is about the elite?s ?charade of changing the world.? Specifically, it?s about how wealthy people do a modest bit of good (through philanthropy) while doing nothing about larger systems of injustice (that they may or may not benefit from). The author?s lin...

    We live in a world where every SV exec and company, even ones laughably so (Coca-Cola? Facebook?) claim to be changing the world for the better, doing good and are involved in charitable donations. With so much charity and well-meaning, why hasn't the average American seen an income ch...

    I disagree with soooo much in this book, but it is thought-provoking. The mot aggravating part is, I think, the lack of a clear counter-proposal to the problems he sees. It?s clearly implied, of course, but he doesn?t elaborate. ...

    I squirreled away time to read this book, ignoring most other obligations and taking the opportunity to engage in an anti-social act I haven't partaken in since middle school: to hunch over a book in the midst of a crowd of people. As a result, I often found myself in the situation of ...

    ?Winners take All? (Knopf, 2018) by former New York Times columnist Anand Giridharadas. Ugh. This was painful read, psychologically speaking. Maybe a bit like psychotherapy, a bit too close to the truth, I kind of knew all this anyway but getting it presented in such a condensed ma...

    It took me a bit to get into this one -- Giridharadas has some *very* strong, negative opinions about some beliefs that I consider -- or at least, have considered -- core to my professional trajectory over the past decade or so. A colleague of mine, in my same line of work, is even hig...

  • Steve Turtell
    Sep 06, 2018

    What Trump and Idealists Have in Common ?Making a difference? could be the idealistic theme of my generation?s collective ethos - at least among those of us who survived the drug-culture of the 60?s and 70?s with intact minds. The world had been opened to us by cheap acces...

    Did you watch Zuckerberg testify before the Senate committees about Facebook and the 2018 election? Were you struck by how blithely unrepentant he seemed, how convinced that his titanic, poorly monitored data base?which he habitually describes as ?a community??is an unalloyed...

    This is another book recommended to me by Richard. In many ways this is a similar and perhaps an even better book than ?Small Change: Why business won?t save the world? by Michael Edwards. Under my review of that book Jan-Maat mentions Andrew Carnegie ? and he gets quite a run ...

    This is an excellent book and a must-read! It's also totally readable and even quite funny at times. And it's the kind of book that you keep bringing up in conversation and then trailing off and saying---you just really have to read this book. The oversimplified thesis is that you can'...

    As someone who has dithered on the edges of "elites changing the world", much of this rings true and I believe (and grapple) with the tension between the sometimes necessary power/influence/fortune needed, as we strive for justice and equity. An article that I always refer back to is N...

    Winners Take All is the hardest book I have ever read. Not because it was inaccessible or esoteric, but because it forced a long overdue look in the mirror. Being in the tech industry I?ve been swept up in thought leadership, heroic philanthropy, and the promise of innovation to ...

    Philanthropy exists mainly to enable the super-rich and super-powerful to defer any serious discussion of a serious reordering of power and wealth, argues Giridharadas. Through a series of vignettes both of the super-rich and super-powerful themselves, who prove themselves unable to co...

    Very much in the tradition of Thomas Frank and the Baffler Magazine. This lampoons the TED talking Thought leaders and Elon Musks hanging around Davos and Martha's Vineyard. You know the plutocrats on a mission to save us all. I don't know if they do it the avoid scrutiny or salve thei...

    I ADORED this book. It was not without its flaws, including being super biased, one sided and judgmental, but I LOVED it. I?ve been a total MarketWorlder, assuming business was the best vehicle for making change and business school was the most effective way to learn now. And this bo...

    This book was definitely an eye-opener for me. As one who deals with charities and non-profits some, it saddened me to see how much that world is being abused by those with the most money to spare. The richest 1% have managed to grow in power and influence over the past decades so t...

    "Winners Take All" is an important and timely book. Giridharadas examines the fundamental limitations and contradictions of those who work for social change from a position of wealth and prestige. His central theme is "the master's tools will never dismantle the master's house," that i...

    It's hard to argue with any of the blatantly obvious points Giridharadas makes, but in chapter after chapter his targets prove themselves immune to the criticism. The whole book is a collective portrait of a class well-described by Tolstoy in one of the book's epigraphs: ?I sit on...

  • Nils
    May 12, 2018

    What Trump and Idealists Have in Common ?Making a difference? could be the idealistic theme of my generation?s collective ethos - at least among those of us who survived the drug-culture of the 60?s and 70?s with intact minds. The world had been opened to us by cheap acces...

    Did you watch Zuckerberg testify before the Senate committees about Facebook and the 2018 election? Were you struck by how blithely unrepentant he seemed, how convinced that his titanic, poorly monitored data base?which he habitually describes as ?a community??is an unalloyed...

    This is another book recommended to me by Richard. In many ways this is a similar and perhaps an even better book than ?Small Change: Why business won?t save the world? by Michael Edwards. Under my review of that book Jan-Maat mentions Andrew Carnegie ? and he gets quite a run ...

    This is an excellent book and a must-read! It's also totally readable and even quite funny at times. And it's the kind of book that you keep bringing up in conversation and then trailing off and saying---you just really have to read this book. The oversimplified thesis is that you can'...

    As someone who has dithered on the edges of "elites changing the world", much of this rings true and I believe (and grapple) with the tension between the sometimes necessary power/influence/fortune needed, as we strive for justice and equity. An article that I always refer back to is N...

    Winners Take All is the hardest book I have ever read. Not because it was inaccessible or esoteric, but because it forced a long overdue look in the mirror. Being in the tech industry I?ve been swept up in thought leadership, heroic philanthropy, and the promise of innovation to ...

    Philanthropy exists mainly to enable the super-rich and super-powerful to defer any serious discussion of a serious reordering of power and wealth, argues Giridharadas. Through a series of vignettes both of the super-rich and super-powerful themselves, who prove themselves unable to co...

  • Dolly
    Nov 17, 2018

    What Trump and Idealists Have in Common ?Making a difference? could be the idealistic theme of my generation?s collective ethos - at least among those of us who survived the drug-culture of the 60?s and 70?s with intact minds. The world had been opened to us by cheap acces...

    Did you watch Zuckerberg testify before the Senate committees about Facebook and the 2018 election? Were you struck by how blithely unrepentant he seemed, how convinced that his titanic, poorly monitored data base?which he habitually describes as ?a community??is an unalloyed...

    This is another book recommended to me by Richard. In many ways this is a similar and perhaps an even better book than ?Small Change: Why business won?t save the world? by Michael Edwards. Under my review of that book Jan-Maat mentions Andrew Carnegie ? and he gets quite a run ...

    This is an excellent book and a must-read! It's also totally readable and even quite funny at times. And it's the kind of book that you keep bringing up in conversation and then trailing off and saying---you just really have to read this book. The oversimplified thesis is that you can'...

    As someone who has dithered on the edges of "elites changing the world", much of this rings true and I believe (and grapple) with the tension between the sometimes necessary power/influence/fortune needed, as we strive for justice and equity. An article that I always refer back to is N...

    Winners Take All is the hardest book I have ever read. Not because it was inaccessible or esoteric, but because it forced a long overdue look in the mirror. Being in the tech industry I?ve been swept up in thought leadership, heroic philanthropy, and the promise of innovation to ...

    Philanthropy exists mainly to enable the super-rich and super-powerful to defer any serious discussion of a serious reordering of power and wealth, argues Giridharadas. Through a series of vignettes both of the super-rich and super-powerful themselves, who prove themselves unable to co...

    Very much in the tradition of Thomas Frank and the Baffler Magazine. This lampoons the TED talking Thought leaders and Elon Musks hanging around Davos and Martha's Vineyard. You know the plutocrats on a mission to save us all. I don't know if they do it the avoid scrutiny or salve thei...

    I ADORED this book. It was not without its flaws, including being super biased, one sided and judgmental, but I LOVED it. I?ve been a total MarketWorlder, assuming business was the best vehicle for making change and business school was the most effective way to learn now. And this bo...

    This book was definitely an eye-opener for me. As one who deals with charities and non-profits some, it saddened me to see how much that world is being abused by those with the most money to spare. The richest 1% have managed to grow in power and influence over the past decades so t...

    "Winners Take All" is an important and timely book. Giridharadas examines the fundamental limitations and contradictions of those who work for social change from a position of wealth and prestige. His central theme is "the master's tools will never dismantle the master's house," that i...

    It's hard to argue with any of the blatantly obvious points Giridharadas makes, but in chapter after chapter his targets prove themselves immune to the criticism. The whole book is a collective portrait of a class well-described by Tolstoy in one of the book's epigraphs: ?I sit on...

    The author crystallizes a good critique and rebuke of the intellectual elite classes, though he waits until the acknowledgements to, well, acknowledge a fuller extent of how much he was part of the problem and to an extent still is. It?s evident elsewhere anyway, as he only menti...

    UPDATE: meet the Elizabeth Holmes of Charity Fraud.... https://www.propublica.org/article/ho... =========================== "I sit on a man?s back choking him and making him carry me, and yet assure myself and others that I am sorry for him and wish to lighten his load by al...

    Very mixed feelings about this book. I liked some parts too much to give a low rating, disliked other parts too much to give a high rating, and don't feel those should average out. While I was reading, I was considering a criticism that this book is ultimately not engaged in critica...

    I found this a very enjoying read that really helped me coalesce some recent thoughts I've had recently on the subject. I first heard about the book on the Ezra Klein podcast (I would recommend listening to it as well to get Ezra's questions) and decided it was worth a try. It was. ...

    A phenomenally thought-provoking book examining the myths and fallacies of change and problem solving via market-driven solutions advocated by global elites seeking win-win solutions that fail to address the root causes of problems for which those elites may be the very causes or enabl...

    Before you read this book, read the author?s bio. For someone who is so critical of elites hiding in their hobbit holes, he waits until the acknowledgments section at the end of the book to let you know that he is one of them. I found this incredibly bizarre. He says the reason is be...

  • Paula Lyle
    Sep 10, 2018

    What Trump and Idealists Have in Common ?Making a difference? could be the idealistic theme of my generation?s collective ethos - at least among those of us who survived the drug-culture of the 60?s and 70?s with intact minds. The world had been opened to us by cheap acces...

    Did you watch Zuckerberg testify before the Senate committees about Facebook and the 2018 election? Were you struck by how blithely unrepentant he seemed, how convinced that his titanic, poorly monitored data base?which he habitually describes as ?a community??is an unalloyed...

    This is another book recommended to me by Richard. In many ways this is a similar and perhaps an even better book than ?Small Change: Why business won?t save the world? by Michael Edwards. Under my review of that book Jan-Maat mentions Andrew Carnegie ? and he gets quite a run ...

    This is an excellent book and a must-read! It's also totally readable and even quite funny at times. And it's the kind of book that you keep bringing up in conversation and then trailing off and saying---you just really have to read this book. The oversimplified thesis is that you can'...

    As someone who has dithered on the edges of "elites changing the world", much of this rings true and I believe (and grapple) with the tension between the sometimes necessary power/influence/fortune needed, as we strive for justice and equity. An article that I always refer back to is N...

    Winners Take All is the hardest book I have ever read. Not because it was inaccessible or esoteric, but because it forced a long overdue look in the mirror. Being in the tech industry I?ve been swept up in thought leadership, heroic philanthropy, and the promise of innovation to ...

    Philanthropy exists mainly to enable the super-rich and super-powerful to defer any serious discussion of a serious reordering of power and wealth, argues Giridharadas. Through a series of vignettes both of the super-rich and super-powerful themselves, who prove themselves unable to co...

    Very much in the tradition of Thomas Frank and the Baffler Magazine. This lampoons the TED talking Thought leaders and Elon Musks hanging around Davos and Martha's Vineyard. You know the plutocrats on a mission to save us all. I don't know if they do it the avoid scrutiny or salve thei...

    I ADORED this book. It was not without its flaws, including being super biased, one sided and judgmental, but I LOVED it. I?ve been a total MarketWorlder, assuming business was the best vehicle for making change and business school was the most effective way to learn now. And this bo...

    This book was definitely an eye-opener for me. As one who deals with charities and non-profits some, it saddened me to see how much that world is being abused by those with the most money to spare. The richest 1% have managed to grow in power and influence over the past decades so t...

    "Winners Take All" is an important and timely book. Giridharadas examines the fundamental limitations and contradictions of those who work for social change from a position of wealth and prestige. His central theme is "the master's tools will never dismantle the master's house," that i...

    It's hard to argue with any of the blatantly obvious points Giridharadas makes, but in chapter after chapter his targets prove themselves immune to the criticism. The whole book is a collective portrait of a class well-described by Tolstoy in one of the book's epigraphs: ?I sit on...

    The author crystallizes a good critique and rebuke of the intellectual elite classes, though he waits until the acknowledgements to, well, acknowledge a fuller extent of how much he was part of the problem and to an extent still is. It?s evident elsewhere anyway, as he only menti...

    UPDATE: meet the Elizabeth Holmes of Charity Fraud.... https://www.propublica.org/article/ho... =========================== "I sit on a man?s back choking him and making him carry me, and yet assure myself and others that I am sorry for him and wish to lighten his load by al...

    Very mixed feelings about this book. I liked some parts too much to give a low rating, disliked other parts too much to give a high rating, and don't feel those should average out. While I was reading, I was considering a criticism that this book is ultimately not engaged in critica...

    I found this a very enjoying read that really helped me coalesce some recent thoughts I've had recently on the subject. I first heard about the book on the Ezra Klein podcast (I would recommend listening to it as well to get Ezra's questions) and decided it was worth a try. It was. ...

    A phenomenally thought-provoking book examining the myths and fallacies of change and problem solving via market-driven solutions advocated by global elites seeking win-win solutions that fail to address the root causes of problems for which those elites may be the very causes or enabl...

    Before you read this book, read the author?s bio. For someone who is so critical of elites hiding in their hobbit holes, he waits until the acknowledgments section at the end of the book to let you know that he is one of them. I found this incredibly bizarre. He says the reason is be...

    "Inspire the rich to do more good, but never, ever tell them to do less harm; inspire them to give back, but never, ever tell them to take less; inspire them to join the solution, but never, ever accuse them of being part of the problem." I say, sometimes, "How do those people sleep...

  • Patrick Bair
    Oct 10, 2018

    What Trump and Idealists Have in Common ?Making a difference? could be the idealistic theme of my generation?s collective ethos - at least among those of us who survived the drug-culture of the 60?s and 70?s with intact minds. The world had been opened to us by cheap acces...

    Did you watch Zuckerberg testify before the Senate committees about Facebook and the 2018 election? Were you struck by how blithely unrepentant he seemed, how convinced that his titanic, poorly monitored data base?which he habitually describes as ?a community??is an unalloyed...

    This is another book recommended to me by Richard. In many ways this is a similar and perhaps an even better book than ?Small Change: Why business won?t save the world? by Michael Edwards. Under my review of that book Jan-Maat mentions Andrew Carnegie ? and he gets quite a run ...

    This is an excellent book and a must-read! It's also totally readable and even quite funny at times. And it's the kind of book that you keep bringing up in conversation and then trailing off and saying---you just really have to read this book. The oversimplified thesis is that you can'...

    As someone who has dithered on the edges of "elites changing the world", much of this rings true and I believe (and grapple) with the tension between the sometimes necessary power/influence/fortune needed, as we strive for justice and equity. An article that I always refer back to is N...

    Winners Take All is the hardest book I have ever read. Not because it was inaccessible or esoteric, but because it forced a long overdue look in the mirror. Being in the tech industry I?ve been swept up in thought leadership, heroic philanthropy, and the promise of innovation to ...

    Philanthropy exists mainly to enable the super-rich and super-powerful to defer any serious discussion of a serious reordering of power and wealth, argues Giridharadas. Through a series of vignettes both of the super-rich and super-powerful themselves, who prove themselves unable to co...

    Very much in the tradition of Thomas Frank and the Baffler Magazine. This lampoons the TED talking Thought leaders and Elon Musks hanging around Davos and Martha's Vineyard. You know the plutocrats on a mission to save us all. I don't know if they do it the avoid scrutiny or salve thei...

    I ADORED this book. It was not without its flaws, including being super biased, one sided and judgmental, but I LOVED it. I?ve been a total MarketWorlder, assuming business was the best vehicle for making change and business school was the most effective way to learn now. And this bo...

    This book was definitely an eye-opener for me. As one who deals with charities and non-profits some, it saddened me to see how much that world is being abused by those with the most money to spare. The richest 1% have managed to grow in power and influence over the past decades so t...

    "Winners Take All" is an important and timely book. Giridharadas examines the fundamental limitations and contradictions of those who work for social change from a position of wealth and prestige. His central theme is "the master's tools will never dismantle the master's house," that i...

    It's hard to argue with any of the blatantly obvious points Giridharadas makes, but in chapter after chapter his targets prove themselves immune to the criticism. The whole book is a collective portrait of a class well-described by Tolstoy in one of the book's epigraphs: ?I sit on...

    The author crystallizes a good critique and rebuke of the intellectual elite classes, though he waits until the acknowledgements to, well, acknowledge a fuller extent of how much he was part of the problem and to an extent still is. It?s evident elsewhere anyway, as he only menti...

    UPDATE: meet the Elizabeth Holmes of Charity Fraud.... https://www.propublica.org/article/ho... =========================== "I sit on a man?s back choking him and making him carry me, and yet assure myself and others that I am sorry for him and wish to lighten his load by al...

    Very mixed feelings about this book. I liked some parts too much to give a low rating, disliked other parts too much to give a high rating, and don't feel those should average out. While I was reading, I was considering a criticism that this book is ultimately not engaged in critica...

    I found this a very enjoying read that really helped me coalesce some recent thoughts I've had recently on the subject. I first heard about the book on the Ezra Klein podcast (I would recommend listening to it as well to get Ezra's questions) and decided it was worth a try. It was. ...

    A phenomenally thought-provoking book examining the myths and fallacies of change and problem solving via market-driven solutions advocated by global elites seeking win-win solutions that fail to address the root causes of problems for which those elites may be the very causes or enabl...

    Before you read this book, read the author?s bio. For someone who is so critical of elites hiding in their hobbit holes, he waits until the acknowledgments section at the end of the book to let you know that he is one of them. I found this incredibly bizarre. He says the reason is be...

    "Inspire the rich to do more good, but never, ever tell them to do less harm; inspire them to give back, but never, ever tell them to take less; inspire them to join the solution, but never, ever accuse them of being part of the problem." I say, sometimes, "How do those people sleep...

    Extremely thought provoking. Nodded my head and said "Yeah!" on virtually every page. "If anyone truly believes that the same ski-town conferences and fellowship programs, the same politicians and policies, the same entrepreneurs and social businesses, the same campaign donors, the ...

  • Linh
    Sep 14, 2018

    What Trump and Idealists Have in Common ?Making a difference? could be the idealistic theme of my generation?s collective ethos - at least among those of us who survived the drug-culture of the 60?s and 70?s with intact minds. The world had been opened to us by cheap acces...

    Did you watch Zuckerberg testify before the Senate committees about Facebook and the 2018 election? Were you struck by how blithely unrepentant he seemed, how convinced that his titanic, poorly monitored data base?which he habitually describes as ?a community??is an unalloyed...

    This is another book recommended to me by Richard. In many ways this is a similar and perhaps an even better book than ?Small Change: Why business won?t save the world? by Michael Edwards. Under my review of that book Jan-Maat mentions Andrew Carnegie ? and he gets quite a run ...

    This is an excellent book and a must-read! It's also totally readable and even quite funny at times. And it's the kind of book that you keep bringing up in conversation and then trailing off and saying---you just really have to read this book. The oversimplified thesis is that you can'...

    As someone who has dithered on the edges of "elites changing the world", much of this rings true and I believe (and grapple) with the tension between the sometimes necessary power/influence/fortune needed, as we strive for justice and equity. An article that I always refer back to is N...

  • Darnell
    Oct 19, 2018

    What Trump and Idealists Have in Common ?Making a difference? could be the idealistic theme of my generation?s collective ethos - at least among those of us who survived the drug-culture of the 60?s and 70?s with intact minds. The world had been opened to us by cheap acces...

    Did you watch Zuckerberg testify before the Senate committees about Facebook and the 2018 election? Were you struck by how blithely unrepentant he seemed, how convinced that his titanic, poorly monitored data base?which he habitually describes as ?a community??is an unalloyed...

    This is another book recommended to me by Richard. In many ways this is a similar and perhaps an even better book than ?Small Change: Why business won?t save the world? by Michael Edwards. Under my review of that book Jan-Maat mentions Andrew Carnegie ? and he gets quite a run ...

    This is an excellent book and a must-read! It's also totally readable and even quite funny at times. And it's the kind of book that you keep bringing up in conversation and then trailing off and saying---you just really have to read this book. The oversimplified thesis is that you can'...

    As someone who has dithered on the edges of "elites changing the world", much of this rings true and I believe (and grapple) with the tension between the sometimes necessary power/influence/fortune needed, as we strive for justice and equity. An article that I always refer back to is N...

    Winners Take All is the hardest book I have ever read. Not because it was inaccessible or esoteric, but because it forced a long overdue look in the mirror. Being in the tech industry I?ve been swept up in thought leadership, heroic philanthropy, and the promise of innovation to ...

    Philanthropy exists mainly to enable the super-rich and super-powerful to defer any serious discussion of a serious reordering of power and wealth, argues Giridharadas. Through a series of vignettes both of the super-rich and super-powerful themselves, who prove themselves unable to co...

    Very much in the tradition of Thomas Frank and the Baffler Magazine. This lampoons the TED talking Thought leaders and Elon Musks hanging around Davos and Martha's Vineyard. You know the plutocrats on a mission to save us all. I don't know if they do it the avoid scrutiny or salve thei...

    I ADORED this book. It was not without its flaws, including being super biased, one sided and judgmental, but I LOVED it. I?ve been a total MarketWorlder, assuming business was the best vehicle for making change and business school was the most effective way to learn now. And this bo...

    This book was definitely an eye-opener for me. As one who deals with charities and non-profits some, it saddened me to see how much that world is being abused by those with the most money to spare. The richest 1% have managed to grow in power and influence over the past decades so t...

    "Winners Take All" is an important and timely book. Giridharadas examines the fundamental limitations and contradictions of those who work for social change from a position of wealth and prestige. His central theme is "the master's tools will never dismantle the master's house," that i...

    It's hard to argue with any of the blatantly obvious points Giridharadas makes, but in chapter after chapter his targets prove themselves immune to the criticism. The whole book is a collective portrait of a class well-described by Tolstoy in one of the book's epigraphs: ?I sit on...

    The author crystallizes a good critique and rebuke of the intellectual elite classes, though he waits until the acknowledgements to, well, acknowledge a fuller extent of how much he was part of the problem and to an extent still is. It?s evident elsewhere anyway, as he only menti...

    UPDATE: meet the Elizabeth Holmes of Charity Fraud.... https://www.propublica.org/article/ho... =========================== "I sit on a man?s back choking him and making him carry me, and yet assure myself and others that I am sorry for him and wish to lighten his load by al...

    Very mixed feelings about this book. I liked some parts too much to give a low rating, disliked other parts too much to give a high rating, and don't feel those should average out. While I was reading, I was considering a criticism that this book is ultimately not engaged in critica...

  • Greg
    Sep 04, 2018

    What Trump and Idealists Have in Common ?Making a difference? could be the idealistic theme of my generation?s collective ethos - at least among those of us who survived the drug-culture of the 60?s and 70?s with intact minds. The world had been opened to us by cheap acces...

    Did you watch Zuckerberg testify before the Senate committees about Facebook and the 2018 election? Were you struck by how blithely unrepentant he seemed, how convinced that his titanic, poorly monitored data base?which he habitually describes as ?a community??is an unalloyed...

    This is another book recommended to me by Richard. In many ways this is a similar and perhaps an even better book than ?Small Change: Why business won?t save the world? by Michael Edwards. Under my review of that book Jan-Maat mentions Andrew Carnegie ? and he gets quite a run ...

    This is an excellent book and a must-read! It's also totally readable and even quite funny at times. And it's the kind of book that you keep bringing up in conversation and then trailing off and saying---you just really have to read this book. The oversimplified thesis is that you can'...

    As someone who has dithered on the edges of "elites changing the world", much of this rings true and I believe (and grapple) with the tension between the sometimes necessary power/influence/fortune needed, as we strive for justice and equity. An article that I always refer back to is N...

    Winners Take All is the hardest book I have ever read. Not because it was inaccessible or esoteric, but because it forced a long overdue look in the mirror. Being in the tech industry I?ve been swept up in thought leadership, heroic philanthropy, and the promise of innovation to ...

    Philanthropy exists mainly to enable the super-rich and super-powerful to defer any serious discussion of a serious reordering of power and wealth, argues Giridharadas. Through a series of vignettes both of the super-rich and super-powerful themselves, who prove themselves unable to co...

    Very much in the tradition of Thomas Frank and the Baffler Magazine. This lampoons the TED talking Thought leaders and Elon Musks hanging around Davos and Martha's Vineyard. You know the plutocrats on a mission to save us all. I don't know if they do it the avoid scrutiny or salve thei...

    I ADORED this book. It was not without its flaws, including being super biased, one sided and judgmental, but I LOVED it. I?ve been a total MarketWorlder, assuming business was the best vehicle for making change and business school was the most effective way to learn now. And this bo...

    This book was definitely an eye-opener for me. As one who deals with charities and non-profits some, it saddened me to see how much that world is being abused by those with the most money to spare. The richest 1% have managed to grow in power and influence over the past decades so t...

    "Winners Take All" is an important and timely book. Giridharadas examines the fundamental limitations and contradictions of those who work for social change from a position of wealth and prestige. His central theme is "the master's tools will never dismantle the master's house," that i...

    It's hard to argue with any of the blatantly obvious points Giridharadas makes, but in chapter after chapter his targets prove themselves immune to the criticism. The whole book is a collective portrait of a class well-described by Tolstoy in one of the book's epigraphs: ?I sit on...

    The author crystallizes a good critique and rebuke of the intellectual elite classes, though he waits until the acknowledgements to, well, acknowledge a fuller extent of how much he was part of the problem and to an extent still is. It?s evident elsewhere anyway, as he only menti...

    UPDATE: meet the Elizabeth Holmes of Charity Fraud.... https://www.propublica.org/article/ho... =========================== "I sit on a man?s back choking him and making him carry me, and yet assure myself and others that I am sorry for him and wish to lighten his load by al...

    Very mixed feelings about this book. I liked some parts too much to give a low rating, disliked other parts too much to give a high rating, and don't feel those should average out. While I was reading, I was considering a criticism that this book is ultimately not engaged in critica...

    I found this a very enjoying read that really helped me coalesce some recent thoughts I've had recently on the subject. I first heard about the book on the Ezra Klein podcast (I would recommend listening to it as well to get Ezra's questions) and decided it was worth a try. It was. ...

    A phenomenally thought-provoking book examining the myths and fallacies of change and problem solving via market-driven solutions advocated by global elites seeking win-win solutions that fail to address the root causes of problems for which those elites may be the very causes or enabl...

    Before you read this book, read the author?s bio. For someone who is so critical of elites hiding in their hobbit holes, he waits until the acknowledgments section at the end of the book to let you know that he is one of them. I found this incredibly bizarre. He says the reason is be...

    "Inspire the rich to do more good, but never, ever tell them to do less harm; inspire them to give back, but never, ever tell them to take less; inspire them to join the solution, but never, ever accuse them of being part of the problem." I say, sometimes, "How do those people sleep...

    Extremely thought provoking. Nodded my head and said "Yeah!" on virtually every page. "If anyone truly believes that the same ski-town conferences and fellowship programs, the same politicians and policies, the same entrepreneurs and social businesses, the same campaign donors, the ...

    In this book, Giridharadas points to the limits of market or philanthropic solutions for social problems and argues that such innovation may even weaken our existing social system by diverting pent-up demand for change. He critiques the changemaker industrial complex (of Davos, TED tal...

    Winners Take All is about the elite?s ?charade of changing the world.? Specifically, it?s about how wealthy people do a modest bit of good (through philanthropy) while doing nothing about larger systems of injustice (that they may or may not benefit from). The author?s lin...

    We live in a world where every SV exec and company, even ones laughably so (Coca-Cola? Facebook?) claim to be changing the world for the better, doing good and are involved in charitable donations. With so much charity and well-meaning, why hasn't the average American seen an income ch...

  • Michael Perkins
    Nov 01, 2018

    What Trump and Idealists Have in Common ?Making a difference? could be the idealistic theme of my generation?s collective ethos - at least among those of us who survived the drug-culture of the 60?s and 70?s with intact minds. The world had been opened to us by cheap acces...

    Did you watch Zuckerberg testify before the Senate committees about Facebook and the 2018 election? Were you struck by how blithely unrepentant he seemed, how convinced that his titanic, poorly monitored data base?which he habitually describes as ?a community??is an unalloyed...

    This is another book recommended to me by Richard. In many ways this is a similar and perhaps an even better book than ?Small Change: Why business won?t save the world? by Michael Edwards. Under my review of that book Jan-Maat mentions Andrew Carnegie ? and he gets quite a run ...

    This is an excellent book and a must-read! It's also totally readable and even quite funny at times. And it's the kind of book that you keep bringing up in conversation and then trailing off and saying---you just really have to read this book. The oversimplified thesis is that you can'...

    As someone who has dithered on the edges of "elites changing the world", much of this rings true and I believe (and grapple) with the tension between the sometimes necessary power/influence/fortune needed, as we strive for justice and equity. An article that I always refer back to is N...

    Winners Take All is the hardest book I have ever read. Not because it was inaccessible or esoteric, but because it forced a long overdue look in the mirror. Being in the tech industry I?ve been swept up in thought leadership, heroic philanthropy, and the promise of innovation to ...

    Philanthropy exists mainly to enable the super-rich and super-powerful to defer any serious discussion of a serious reordering of power and wealth, argues Giridharadas. Through a series of vignettes both of the super-rich and super-powerful themselves, who prove themselves unable to co...

    Very much in the tradition of Thomas Frank and the Baffler Magazine. This lampoons the TED talking Thought leaders and Elon Musks hanging around Davos and Martha's Vineyard. You know the plutocrats on a mission to save us all. I don't know if they do it the avoid scrutiny or salve thei...

    I ADORED this book. It was not without its flaws, including being super biased, one sided and judgmental, but I LOVED it. I?ve been a total MarketWorlder, assuming business was the best vehicle for making change and business school was the most effective way to learn now. And this bo...

    This book was definitely an eye-opener for me. As one who deals with charities and non-profits some, it saddened me to see how much that world is being abused by those with the most money to spare. The richest 1% have managed to grow in power and influence over the past decades so t...

    "Winners Take All" is an important and timely book. Giridharadas examines the fundamental limitations and contradictions of those who work for social change from a position of wealth and prestige. His central theme is "the master's tools will never dismantle the master's house," that i...

    It's hard to argue with any of the blatantly obvious points Giridharadas makes, but in chapter after chapter his targets prove themselves immune to the criticism. The whole book is a collective portrait of a class well-described by Tolstoy in one of the book's epigraphs: ?I sit on...

    The author crystallizes a good critique and rebuke of the intellectual elite classes, though he waits until the acknowledgements to, well, acknowledge a fuller extent of how much he was part of the problem and to an extent still is. It?s evident elsewhere anyway, as he only menti...

    UPDATE: meet the Elizabeth Holmes of Charity Fraud.... https://www.propublica.org/article/ho... =========================== "I sit on a man?s back choking him and making him carry me, and yet assure myself and others that I am sorry for him and wish to lighten his load by al...

  • Dan Connors
    Sep 24, 2018

    What Trump and Idealists Have in Common ?Making a difference? could be the idealistic theme of my generation?s collective ethos - at least among those of us who survived the drug-culture of the 60?s and 70?s with intact minds. The world had been opened to us by cheap acces...

    Did you watch Zuckerberg testify before the Senate committees about Facebook and the 2018 election? Were you struck by how blithely unrepentant he seemed, how convinced that his titanic, poorly monitored data base?which he habitually describes as ?a community??is an unalloyed...

    This is another book recommended to me by Richard. In many ways this is a similar and perhaps an even better book than ?Small Change: Why business won?t save the world? by Michael Edwards. Under my review of that book Jan-Maat mentions Andrew Carnegie ? and he gets quite a run ...

    This is an excellent book and a must-read! It's also totally readable and even quite funny at times. And it's the kind of book that you keep bringing up in conversation and then trailing off and saying---you just really have to read this book. The oversimplified thesis is that you can'...

    As someone who has dithered on the edges of "elites changing the world", much of this rings true and I believe (and grapple) with the tension between the sometimes necessary power/influence/fortune needed, as we strive for justice and equity. An article that I always refer back to is N...

    Winners Take All is the hardest book I have ever read. Not because it was inaccessible or esoteric, but because it forced a long overdue look in the mirror. Being in the tech industry I?ve been swept up in thought leadership, heroic philanthropy, and the promise of innovation to ...

    Philanthropy exists mainly to enable the super-rich and super-powerful to defer any serious discussion of a serious reordering of power and wealth, argues Giridharadas. Through a series of vignettes both of the super-rich and super-powerful themselves, who prove themselves unable to co...

    Very much in the tradition of Thomas Frank and the Baffler Magazine. This lampoons the TED talking Thought leaders and Elon Musks hanging around Davos and Martha's Vineyard. You know the plutocrats on a mission to save us all. I don't know if they do it the avoid scrutiny or salve thei...

    I ADORED this book. It was not without its flaws, including being super biased, one sided and judgmental, but I LOVED it. I?ve been a total MarketWorlder, assuming business was the best vehicle for making change and business school was the most effective way to learn now. And this bo...

    This book was definitely an eye-opener for me. As one who deals with charities and non-profits some, it saddened me to see how much that world is being abused by those with the most money to spare. The richest 1% have managed to grow in power and influence over the past decades so t...

  • Peter Mcloughlin
    Nov 21, 2018

    What Trump and Idealists Have in Common ?Making a difference? could be the idealistic theme of my generation?s collective ethos - at least among those of us who survived the drug-culture of the 60?s and 70?s with intact minds. The world had been opened to us by cheap acces...

    Did you watch Zuckerberg testify before the Senate committees about Facebook and the 2018 election? Were you struck by how blithely unrepentant he seemed, how convinced that his titanic, poorly monitored data base?which he habitually describes as ?a community??is an unalloyed...

    This is another book recommended to me by Richard. In many ways this is a similar and perhaps an even better book than ?Small Change: Why business won?t save the world? by Michael Edwards. Under my review of that book Jan-Maat mentions Andrew Carnegie ? and he gets quite a run ...

    This is an excellent book and a must-read! It's also totally readable and even quite funny at times. And it's the kind of book that you keep bringing up in conversation and then trailing off and saying---you just really have to read this book. The oversimplified thesis is that you can'...

    As someone who has dithered on the edges of "elites changing the world", much of this rings true and I believe (and grapple) with the tension between the sometimes necessary power/influence/fortune needed, as we strive for justice and equity. An article that I always refer back to is N...

    Winners Take All is the hardest book I have ever read. Not because it was inaccessible or esoteric, but because it forced a long overdue look in the mirror. Being in the tech industry I?ve been swept up in thought leadership, heroic philanthropy, and the promise of innovation to ...

    Philanthropy exists mainly to enable the super-rich and super-powerful to defer any serious discussion of a serious reordering of power and wealth, argues Giridharadas. Through a series of vignettes both of the super-rich and super-powerful themselves, who prove themselves unable to co...

    Very much in the tradition of Thomas Frank and the Baffler Magazine. This lampoons the TED talking Thought leaders and Elon Musks hanging around Davos and Martha's Vineyard. You know the plutocrats on a mission to save us all. I don't know if they do it the avoid scrutiny or salve thei...

  • BlackOxford
    Nov 05, 2018

    What Trump and Idealists Have in Common ?Making a difference? could be the idealistic theme of my generation?s collective ethos - at least among those of us who survived the drug-culture of the 60?s and 70?s with intact minds. The world had been opened to us by cheap acces...

  • Adam McNamara
    Nov 30, 2018

    What Trump and Idealists Have in Common ?Making a difference? could be the idealistic theme of my generation?s collective ethos - at least among those of us who survived the drug-culture of the 60?s and 70?s with intact minds. The world had been opened to us by cheap acces...

    Did you watch Zuckerberg testify before the Senate committees about Facebook and the 2018 election? Were you struck by how blithely unrepentant he seemed, how convinced that his titanic, poorly monitored data base?which he habitually describes as ?a community??is an unalloyed...

    This is another book recommended to me by Richard. In many ways this is a similar and perhaps an even better book than ?Small Change: Why business won?t save the world? by Michael Edwards. Under my review of that book Jan-Maat mentions Andrew Carnegie ? and he gets quite a run ...

    This is an excellent book and a must-read! It's also totally readable and even quite funny at times. And it's the kind of book that you keep bringing up in conversation and then trailing off and saying---you just really have to read this book. The oversimplified thesis is that you can'...

    As someone who has dithered on the edges of "elites changing the world", much of this rings true and I believe (and grapple) with the tension between the sometimes necessary power/influence/fortune needed, as we strive for justice and equity. An article that I always refer back to is N...

    Winners Take All is the hardest book I have ever read. Not because it was inaccessible or esoteric, but because it forced a long overdue look in the mirror. Being in the tech industry I?ve been swept up in thought leadership, heroic philanthropy, and the promise of innovation to ...

    Philanthropy exists mainly to enable the super-rich and super-powerful to defer any serious discussion of a serious reordering of power and wealth, argues Giridharadas. Through a series of vignettes both of the super-rich and super-powerful themselves, who prove themselves unable to co...

    Very much in the tradition of Thomas Frank and the Baffler Magazine. This lampoons the TED talking Thought leaders and Elon Musks hanging around Davos and Martha's Vineyard. You know the plutocrats on a mission to save us all. I don't know if they do it the avoid scrutiny or salve thei...

    I ADORED this book. It was not without its flaws, including being super biased, one sided and judgmental, but I LOVED it. I?ve been a total MarketWorlder, assuming business was the best vehicle for making change and business school was the most effective way to learn now. And this bo...

    This book was definitely an eye-opener for me. As one who deals with charities and non-profits some, it saddened me to see how much that world is being abused by those with the most money to spare. The richest 1% have managed to grow in power and influence over the past decades so t...

    "Winners Take All" is an important and timely book. Giridharadas examines the fundamental limitations and contradictions of those who work for social change from a position of wealth and prestige. His central theme is "the master's tools will never dismantle the master's house," that i...

    It's hard to argue with any of the blatantly obvious points Giridharadas makes, but in chapter after chapter his targets prove themselves immune to the criticism. The whole book is a collective portrait of a class well-described by Tolstoy in one of the book's epigraphs: ?I sit on...

    The author crystallizes a good critique and rebuke of the intellectual elite classes, though he waits until the acknowledgements to, well, acknowledge a fuller extent of how much he was part of the problem and to an extent still is. It?s evident elsewhere anyway, as he only menti...

    UPDATE: meet the Elizabeth Holmes of Charity Fraud.... https://www.propublica.org/article/ho... =========================== "I sit on a man?s back choking him and making him carry me, and yet assure myself and others that I am sorry for him and wish to lighten his load by al...

    Very mixed feelings about this book. I liked some parts too much to give a low rating, disliked other parts too much to give a high rating, and don't feel those should average out. While I was reading, I was considering a criticism that this book is ultimately not engaged in critica...

    I found this a very enjoying read that really helped me coalesce some recent thoughts I've had recently on the subject. I first heard about the book on the Ezra Klein podcast (I would recommend listening to it as well to get Ezra's questions) and decided it was worth a try. It was. ...

    A phenomenally thought-provoking book examining the myths and fallacies of change and problem solving via market-driven solutions advocated by global elites seeking win-win solutions that fail to address the root causes of problems for which those elites may be the very causes or enabl...

    Before you read this book, read the author?s bio. For someone who is so critical of elites hiding in their hobbit holes, he waits until the acknowledgments section at the end of the book to let you know that he is one of them. I found this incredibly bizarre. He says the reason is be...

    "Inspire the rich to do more good, but never, ever tell them to do less harm; inspire them to give back, but never, ever tell them to take less; inspire them to join the solution, but never, ever accuse them of being part of the problem." I say, sometimes, "How do those people sleep...

    Extremely thought provoking. Nodded my head and said "Yeah!" on virtually every page. "If anyone truly believes that the same ski-town conferences and fellowship programs, the same politicians and policies, the same entrepreneurs and social businesses, the same campaign donors, the ...

    In this book, Giridharadas points to the limits of market or philanthropic solutions for social problems and argues that such innovation may even weaken our existing social system by diverting pent-up demand for change. He critiques the changemaker industrial complex (of Davos, TED tal...

    Winners Take All is about the elite?s ?charade of changing the world.? Specifically, it?s about how wealthy people do a modest bit of good (through philanthropy) while doing nothing about larger systems of injustice (that they may or may not benefit from). The author?s lin...

  • Paul Ark
    Sep 27, 2018

    What Trump and Idealists Have in Common ?Making a difference? could be the idealistic theme of my generation?s collective ethos - at least among those of us who survived the drug-culture of the 60?s and 70?s with intact minds. The world had been opened to us by cheap acces...

    Did you watch Zuckerberg testify before the Senate committees about Facebook and the 2018 election? Were you struck by how blithely unrepentant he seemed, how convinced that his titanic, poorly monitored data base?which he habitually describes as ?a community??is an unalloyed...

    This is another book recommended to me by Richard. In many ways this is a similar and perhaps an even better book than ?Small Change: Why business won?t save the world? by Michael Edwards. Under my review of that book Jan-Maat mentions Andrew Carnegie ? and he gets quite a run ...

    This is an excellent book and a must-read! It's also totally readable and even quite funny at times. And it's the kind of book that you keep bringing up in conversation and then trailing off and saying---you just really have to read this book. The oversimplified thesis is that you can'...

    As someone who has dithered on the edges of "elites changing the world", much of this rings true and I believe (and grapple) with the tension between the sometimes necessary power/influence/fortune needed, as we strive for justice and equity. An article that I always refer back to is N...

    Winners Take All is the hardest book I have ever read. Not because it was inaccessible or esoteric, but because it forced a long overdue look in the mirror. Being in the tech industry I?ve been swept up in thought leadership, heroic philanthropy, and the promise of innovation to ...

    Philanthropy exists mainly to enable the super-rich and super-powerful to defer any serious discussion of a serious reordering of power and wealth, argues Giridharadas. Through a series of vignettes both of the super-rich and super-powerful themselves, who prove themselves unable to co...

    Very much in the tradition of Thomas Frank and the Baffler Magazine. This lampoons the TED talking Thought leaders and Elon Musks hanging around Davos and Martha's Vineyard. You know the plutocrats on a mission to save us all. I don't know if they do it the avoid scrutiny or salve thei...

    I ADORED this book. It was not without its flaws, including being super biased, one sided and judgmental, but I LOVED it. I?ve been a total MarketWorlder, assuming business was the best vehicle for making change and business school was the most effective way to learn now. And this bo...

    This book was definitely an eye-opener for me. As one who deals with charities and non-profits some, it saddened me to see how much that world is being abused by those with the most money to spare. The richest 1% have managed to grow in power and influence over the past decades so t...

    "Winners Take All" is an important and timely book. Giridharadas examines the fundamental limitations and contradictions of those who work for social change from a position of wealth and prestige. His central theme is "the master's tools will never dismantle the master's house," that i...

    It's hard to argue with any of the blatantly obvious points Giridharadas makes, but in chapter after chapter his targets prove themselves immune to the criticism. The whole book is a collective portrait of a class well-described by Tolstoy in one of the book's epigraphs: ?I sit on...

    The author crystallizes a good critique and rebuke of the intellectual elite classes, though he waits until the acknowledgements to, well, acknowledge a fuller extent of how much he was part of the problem and to an extent still is. It?s evident elsewhere anyway, as he only menti...

    UPDATE: meet the Elizabeth Holmes of Charity Fraud.... https://www.propublica.org/article/ho... =========================== "I sit on a man?s back choking him and making him carry me, and yet assure myself and others that I am sorry for him and wish to lighten his load by al...

    Very mixed feelings about this book. I liked some parts too much to give a low rating, disliked other parts too much to give a high rating, and don't feel those should average out. While I was reading, I was considering a criticism that this book is ultimately not engaged in critica...

    I found this a very enjoying read that really helped me coalesce some recent thoughts I've had recently on the subject. I first heard about the book on the Ezra Klein podcast (I would recommend listening to it as well to get Ezra's questions) and decided it was worth a try. It was. ...

    A phenomenally thought-provoking book examining the myths and fallacies of change and problem solving via market-driven solutions advocated by global elites seeking win-win solutions that fail to address the root causes of problems for which those elites may be the very causes or enabl...

  • Steffi
    Nov 09, 2018

    What Trump and Idealists Have in Common ?Making a difference? could be the idealistic theme of my generation?s collective ethos - at least among those of us who survived the drug-culture of the 60?s and 70?s with intact minds. The world had been opened to us by cheap acces...

    Did you watch Zuckerberg testify before the Senate committees about Facebook and the 2018 election? Were you struck by how blithely unrepentant he seemed, how convinced that his titanic, poorly monitored data base?which he habitually describes as ?a community??is an unalloyed...

    This is another book recommended to me by Richard. In many ways this is a similar and perhaps an even better book than ?Small Change: Why business won?t save the world? by Michael Edwards. Under my review of that book Jan-Maat mentions Andrew Carnegie ? and he gets quite a run ...

    This is an excellent book and a must-read! It's also totally readable and even quite funny at times. And it's the kind of book that you keep bringing up in conversation and then trailing off and saying---you just really have to read this book. The oversimplified thesis is that you can'...

    As someone who has dithered on the edges of "elites changing the world", much of this rings true and I believe (and grapple) with the tension between the sometimes necessary power/influence/fortune needed, as we strive for justice and equity. An article that I always refer back to is N...

    Winners Take All is the hardest book I have ever read. Not because it was inaccessible or esoteric, but because it forced a long overdue look in the mirror. Being in the tech industry I?ve been swept up in thought leadership, heroic philanthropy, and the promise of innovation to ...

    Philanthropy exists mainly to enable the super-rich and super-powerful to defer any serious discussion of a serious reordering of power and wealth, argues Giridharadas. Through a series of vignettes both of the super-rich and super-powerful themselves, who prove themselves unable to co...

    Very much in the tradition of Thomas Frank and the Baffler Magazine. This lampoons the TED talking Thought leaders and Elon Musks hanging around Davos and Martha's Vineyard. You know the plutocrats on a mission to save us all. I don't know if they do it the avoid scrutiny or salve thei...

    I ADORED this book. It was not without its flaws, including being super biased, one sided and judgmental, but I LOVED it. I?ve been a total MarketWorlder, assuming business was the best vehicle for making change and business school was the most effective way to learn now. And this bo...

    This book was definitely an eye-opener for me. As one who deals with charities and non-profits some, it saddened me to see how much that world is being abused by those with the most money to spare. The richest 1% have managed to grow in power and influence over the past decades so t...

    "Winners Take All" is an important and timely book. Giridharadas examines the fundamental limitations and contradictions of those who work for social change from a position of wealth and prestige. His central theme is "the master's tools will never dismantle the master's house," that i...

    It's hard to argue with any of the blatantly obvious points Giridharadas makes, but in chapter after chapter his targets prove themselves immune to the criticism. The whole book is a collective portrait of a class well-described by Tolstoy in one of the book's epigraphs: ?I sit on...

    The author crystallizes a good critique and rebuke of the intellectual elite classes, though he waits until the acknowledgements to, well, acknowledge a fuller extent of how much he was part of the problem and to an extent still is. It?s evident elsewhere anyway, as he only menti...

    UPDATE: meet the Elizabeth Holmes of Charity Fraud.... https://www.propublica.org/article/ho... =========================== "I sit on a man?s back choking him and making him carry me, and yet assure myself and others that I am sorry for him and wish to lighten his load by al...

    Very mixed feelings about this book. I liked some parts too much to give a low rating, disliked other parts too much to give a high rating, and don't feel those should average out. While I was reading, I was considering a criticism that this book is ultimately not engaged in critica...

    I found this a very enjoying read that really helped me coalesce some recent thoughts I've had recently on the subject. I first heard about the book on the Ezra Klein podcast (I would recommend listening to it as well to get Ezra's questions) and decided it was worth a try. It was. ...

    A phenomenally thought-provoking book examining the myths and fallacies of change and problem solving via market-driven solutions advocated by global elites seeking win-win solutions that fail to address the root causes of problems for which those elites may be the very causes or enabl...

    Before you read this book, read the author?s bio. For someone who is so critical of elites hiding in their hobbit holes, he waits until the acknowledgments section at the end of the book to let you know that he is one of them. I found this incredibly bizarre. He says the reason is be...

    "Inspire the rich to do more good, but never, ever tell them to do less harm; inspire them to give back, but never, ever tell them to take less; inspire them to join the solution, but never, ever accuse them of being part of the problem." I say, sometimes, "How do those people sleep...

    Extremely thought provoking. Nodded my head and said "Yeah!" on virtually every page. "If anyone truly believes that the same ski-town conferences and fellowship programs, the same politicians and policies, the same entrepreneurs and social businesses, the same campaign donors, the ...

    In this book, Giridharadas points to the limits of market or philanthropic solutions for social problems and argues that such innovation may even weaken our existing social system by diverting pent-up demand for change. He critiques the changemaker industrial complex (of Davos, TED tal...

    Winners Take All is about the elite?s ?charade of changing the world.? Specifically, it?s about how wealthy people do a modest bit of good (through philanthropy) while doing nothing about larger systems of injustice (that they may or may not benefit from). The author?s lin...

    We live in a world where every SV exec and company, even ones laughably so (Coca-Cola? Facebook?) claim to be changing the world for the better, doing good and are involved in charitable donations. With so much charity and well-meaning, why hasn't the average American seen an income ch...

    I disagree with soooo much in this book, but it is thought-provoking. The mot aggravating part is, I think, the lack of a clear counter-proposal to the problems he sees. It?s clearly implied, of course, but he doesn?t elaborate. ...

    I squirreled away time to read this book, ignoring most other obligations and taking the opportunity to engage in an anti-social act I haven't partaken in since middle school: to hunch over a book in the midst of a crowd of people. As a result, I often found myself in the situation of ...

    ?Winners take All? (Knopf, 2018) by former New York Times columnist Anand Giridharadas. Ugh. This was painful read, psychologically speaking. Maybe a bit like psychotherapy, a bit too close to the truth, I kind of knew all this anyway but getting it presented in such a condensed ma...

  • Theresa
    Oct 09, 2018

    What Trump and Idealists Have in Common ?Making a difference? could be the idealistic theme of my generation?s collective ethos - at least among those of us who survived the drug-culture of the 60?s and 70?s with intact minds. The world had been opened to us by cheap acces...

    Did you watch Zuckerberg testify before the Senate committees about Facebook and the 2018 election? Were you struck by how blithely unrepentant he seemed, how convinced that his titanic, poorly monitored data base?which he habitually describes as ?a community??is an unalloyed...

    This is another book recommended to me by Richard. In many ways this is a similar and perhaps an even better book than ?Small Change: Why business won?t save the world? by Michael Edwards. Under my review of that book Jan-Maat mentions Andrew Carnegie ? and he gets quite a run ...

    This is an excellent book and a must-read! It's also totally readable and even quite funny at times. And it's the kind of book that you keep bringing up in conversation and then trailing off and saying---you just really have to read this book. The oversimplified thesis is that you can'...

    As someone who has dithered on the edges of "elites changing the world", much of this rings true and I believe (and grapple) with the tension between the sometimes necessary power/influence/fortune needed, as we strive for justice and equity. An article that I always refer back to is N...

    Winners Take All is the hardest book I have ever read. Not because it was inaccessible or esoteric, but because it forced a long overdue look in the mirror. Being in the tech industry I?ve been swept up in thought leadership, heroic philanthropy, and the promise of innovation to ...

    Philanthropy exists mainly to enable the super-rich and super-powerful to defer any serious discussion of a serious reordering of power and wealth, argues Giridharadas. Through a series of vignettes both of the super-rich and super-powerful themselves, who prove themselves unable to co...

    Very much in the tradition of Thomas Frank and the Baffler Magazine. This lampoons the TED talking Thought leaders and Elon Musks hanging around Davos and Martha's Vineyard. You know the plutocrats on a mission to save us all. I don't know if they do it the avoid scrutiny or salve thei...

    I ADORED this book. It was not without its flaws, including being super biased, one sided and judgmental, but I LOVED it. I?ve been a total MarketWorlder, assuming business was the best vehicle for making change and business school was the most effective way to learn now. And this bo...

    This book was definitely an eye-opener for me. As one who deals with charities and non-profits some, it saddened me to see how much that world is being abused by those with the most money to spare. The richest 1% have managed to grow in power and influence over the past decades so t...

    "Winners Take All" is an important and timely book. Giridharadas examines the fundamental limitations and contradictions of those who work for social change from a position of wealth and prestige. His central theme is "the master's tools will never dismantle the master's house," that i...

    It's hard to argue with any of the blatantly obvious points Giridharadas makes, but in chapter after chapter his targets prove themselves immune to the criticism. The whole book is a collective portrait of a class well-described by Tolstoy in one of the book's epigraphs: ?I sit on...

    The author crystallizes a good critique and rebuke of the intellectual elite classes, though he waits until the acknowledgements to, well, acknowledge a fuller extent of how much he was part of the problem and to an extent still is. It?s evident elsewhere anyway, as he only menti...

    UPDATE: meet the Elizabeth Holmes of Charity Fraud.... https://www.propublica.org/article/ho... =========================== "I sit on a man?s back choking him and making him carry me, and yet assure myself and others that I am sorry for him and wish to lighten his load by al...

    Very mixed feelings about this book. I liked some parts too much to give a low rating, disliked other parts too much to give a high rating, and don't feel those should average out. While I was reading, I was considering a criticism that this book is ultimately not engaged in critica...

    I found this a very enjoying read that really helped me coalesce some recent thoughts I've had recently on the subject. I first heard about the book on the Ezra Klein podcast (I would recommend listening to it as well to get Ezra's questions) and decided it was worth a try. It was. ...

    A phenomenally thought-provoking book examining the myths and fallacies of change and problem solving via market-driven solutions advocated by global elites seeking win-win solutions that fail to address the root causes of problems for which those elites may be the very causes or enabl...

    Before you read this book, read the author?s bio. For someone who is so critical of elites hiding in their hobbit holes, he waits until the acknowledgments section at the end of the book to let you know that he is one of them. I found this incredibly bizarre. He says the reason is be...

    "Inspire the rich to do more good, but never, ever tell them to do less harm; inspire them to give back, but never, ever tell them to take less; inspire them to join the solution, but never, ever accuse them of being part of the problem." I say, sometimes, "How do those people sleep...

    Extremely thought provoking. Nodded my head and said "Yeah!" on virtually every page. "If anyone truly believes that the same ski-town conferences and fellowship programs, the same politicians and policies, the same entrepreneurs and social businesses, the same campaign donors, the ...

    In this book, Giridharadas points to the limits of market or philanthropic solutions for social problems and argues that such innovation may even weaken our existing social system by diverting pent-up demand for change. He critiques the changemaker industrial complex (of Davos, TED tal...

    Winners Take All is about the elite?s ?charade of changing the world.? Specifically, it?s about how wealthy people do a modest bit of good (through philanthropy) while doing nothing about larger systems of injustice (that they may or may not benefit from). The author?s lin...

    We live in a world where every SV exec and company, even ones laughably so (Coca-Cola? Facebook?) claim to be changing the world for the better, doing good and are involved in charitable donations. With so much charity and well-meaning, why hasn't the average American seen an income ch...

    I disagree with soooo much in this book, but it is thought-provoking. The mot aggravating part is, I think, the lack of a clear counter-proposal to the problems he sees. It?s clearly implied, of course, but he doesn?t elaborate. ...

    I squirreled away time to read this book, ignoring most other obligations and taking the opportunity to engage in an anti-social act I haven't partaken in since middle school: to hunch over a book in the midst of a crowd of people. As a result, I often found myself in the situation of ...

    ?Winners take All? (Knopf, 2018) by former New York Times columnist Anand Giridharadas. Ugh. This was painful read, psychologically speaking. Maybe a bit like psychotherapy, a bit too close to the truth, I kind of knew all this anyway but getting it presented in such a condensed ma...

    It took me a bit to get into this one -- Giridharadas has some *very* strong, negative opinions about some beliefs that I consider -- or at least, have considered -- core to my professional trajectory over the past decade or so. A colleague of mine, in my same line of work, is even hig...

    All good points. Rich people are making money and inventing things for fun rather than doing the work to fix government. We can't take Pepsi out of school because Pepsi has a right to make money. Meanwhile kids are dying and the rich get richer. In short, we're f'ed. Next book I read ...

    Anand is a cynic's cynic. Enjoyable. ...

    Giridharadas, a former Aspen Institute fellow, uses his experience behind the scenes with the world's global elite to question their motives and philanthropy. His thesis revolves around the idea that business models can solve the world's problems with poverty, economics, and social jus...

  • John Spiller
    Sep 06, 2018

    What Trump and Idealists Have in Common ?Making a difference? could be the idealistic theme of my generation?s collective ethos - at least among those of us who survived the drug-culture of the 60?s and 70?s with intact minds. The world had been opened to us by cheap acces...

    Did you watch Zuckerberg testify before the Senate committees about Facebook and the 2018 election? Were you struck by how blithely unrepentant he seemed, how convinced that his titanic, poorly monitored data base?which he habitually describes as ?a community??is an unalloyed...

    This is another book recommended to me by Richard. In many ways this is a similar and perhaps an even better book than ?Small Change: Why business won?t save the world? by Michael Edwards. Under my review of that book Jan-Maat mentions Andrew Carnegie ? and he gets quite a run ...

    This is an excellent book and a must-read! It's also totally readable and even quite funny at times. And it's the kind of book that you keep bringing up in conversation and then trailing off and saying---you just really have to read this book. The oversimplified thesis is that you can'...

    As someone who has dithered on the edges of "elites changing the world", much of this rings true and I believe (and grapple) with the tension between the sometimes necessary power/influence/fortune needed, as we strive for justice and equity. An article that I always refer back to is N...

    Winners Take All is the hardest book I have ever read. Not because it was inaccessible or esoteric, but because it forced a long overdue look in the mirror. Being in the tech industry I?ve been swept up in thought leadership, heroic philanthropy, and the promise of innovation to ...

    Philanthropy exists mainly to enable the super-rich and super-powerful to defer any serious discussion of a serious reordering of power and wealth, argues Giridharadas. Through a series of vignettes both of the super-rich and super-powerful themselves, who prove themselves unable to co...

    Very much in the tradition of Thomas Frank and the Baffler Magazine. This lampoons the TED talking Thought leaders and Elon Musks hanging around Davos and Martha's Vineyard. You know the plutocrats on a mission to save us all. I don't know if they do it the avoid scrutiny or salve thei...

    I ADORED this book. It was not without its flaws, including being super biased, one sided and judgmental, but I LOVED it. I?ve been a total MarketWorlder, assuming business was the best vehicle for making change and business school was the most effective way to learn now. And this bo...

    This book was definitely an eye-opener for me. As one who deals with charities and non-profits some, it saddened me to see how much that world is being abused by those with the most money to spare. The richest 1% have managed to grow in power and influence over the past decades so t...

    "Winners Take All" is an important and timely book. Giridharadas examines the fundamental limitations and contradictions of those who work for social change from a position of wealth and prestige. His central theme is "the master's tools will never dismantle the master's house," that i...

  • Trey McIntyre
    Sep 28, 2018

    What Trump and Idealists Have in Common ?Making a difference? could be the idealistic theme of my generation?s collective ethos - at least among those of us who survived the drug-culture of the 60?s and 70?s with intact minds. The world had been opened to us by cheap acces...

    Did you watch Zuckerberg testify before the Senate committees about Facebook and the 2018 election? Were you struck by how blithely unrepentant he seemed, how convinced that his titanic, poorly monitored data base?which he habitually describes as ?a community??is an unalloyed...

    This is another book recommended to me by Richard. In many ways this is a similar and perhaps an even better book than ?Small Change: Why business won?t save the world? by Michael Edwards. Under my review of that book Jan-Maat mentions Andrew Carnegie ? and he gets quite a run ...

    This is an excellent book and a must-read! It's also totally readable and even quite funny at times. And it's the kind of book that you keep bringing up in conversation and then trailing off and saying---you just really have to read this book. The oversimplified thesis is that you can'...

    As someone who has dithered on the edges of "elites changing the world", much of this rings true and I believe (and grapple) with the tension between the sometimes necessary power/influence/fortune needed, as we strive for justice and equity. An article that I always refer back to is N...

    Winners Take All is the hardest book I have ever read. Not because it was inaccessible or esoteric, but because it forced a long overdue look in the mirror. Being in the tech industry I?ve been swept up in thought leadership, heroic philanthropy, and the promise of innovation to ...

    Philanthropy exists mainly to enable the super-rich and super-powerful to defer any serious discussion of a serious reordering of power and wealth, argues Giridharadas. Through a series of vignettes both of the super-rich and super-powerful themselves, who prove themselves unable to co...

    Very much in the tradition of Thomas Frank and the Baffler Magazine. This lampoons the TED talking Thought leaders and Elon Musks hanging around Davos and Martha's Vineyard. You know the plutocrats on a mission to save us all. I don't know if they do it the avoid scrutiny or salve thei...

    I ADORED this book. It was not without its flaws, including being super biased, one sided and judgmental, but I LOVED it. I?ve been a total MarketWorlder, assuming business was the best vehicle for making change and business school was the most effective way to learn now. And this bo...

    This book was definitely an eye-opener for me. As one who deals with charities and non-profits some, it saddened me to see how much that world is being abused by those with the most money to spare. The richest 1% have managed to grow in power and influence over the past decades so t...

    "Winners Take All" is an important and timely book. Giridharadas examines the fundamental limitations and contradictions of those who work for social change from a position of wealth and prestige. His central theme is "the master's tools will never dismantle the master's house," that i...

    It's hard to argue with any of the blatantly obvious points Giridharadas makes, but in chapter after chapter his targets prove themselves immune to the criticism. The whole book is a collective portrait of a class well-described by Tolstoy in one of the book's epigraphs: ?I sit on...

    The author crystallizes a good critique and rebuke of the intellectual elite classes, though he waits until the acknowledgements to, well, acknowledge a fuller extent of how much he was part of the problem and to an extent still is. It?s evident elsewhere anyway, as he only menti...

    UPDATE: meet the Elizabeth Holmes of Charity Fraud.... https://www.propublica.org/article/ho... =========================== "I sit on a man?s back choking him and making him carry me, and yet assure myself and others that I am sorry for him and wish to lighten his load by al...

    Very mixed feelings about this book. I liked some parts too much to give a low rating, disliked other parts too much to give a high rating, and don't feel those should average out. While I was reading, I was considering a criticism that this book is ultimately not engaged in critica...

    I found this a very enjoying read that really helped me coalesce some recent thoughts I've had recently on the subject. I first heard about the book on the Ezra Klein podcast (I would recommend listening to it as well to get Ezra's questions) and decided it was worth a try. It was. ...

    A phenomenally thought-provoking book examining the myths and fallacies of change and problem solving via market-driven solutions advocated by global elites seeking win-win solutions that fail to address the root causes of problems for which those elites may be the very causes or enabl...

    Before you read this book, read the author?s bio. For someone who is so critical of elites hiding in their hobbit holes, he waits until the acknowledgments section at the end of the book to let you know that he is one of them. I found this incredibly bizarre. He says the reason is be...

    "Inspire the rich to do more good, but never, ever tell them to do less harm; inspire them to give back, but never, ever tell them to take less; inspire them to join the solution, but never, ever accuse them of being part of the problem." I say, sometimes, "How do those people sleep...

    Extremely thought provoking. Nodded my head and said "Yeah!" on virtually every page. "If anyone truly believes that the same ski-town conferences and fellowship programs, the same politicians and policies, the same entrepreneurs and social businesses, the same campaign donors, the ...

    In this book, Giridharadas points to the limits of market or philanthropic solutions for social problems and argues that such innovation may even weaken our existing social system by diverting pent-up demand for change. He critiques the changemaker industrial complex (of Davos, TED tal...

    Winners Take All is about the elite?s ?charade of changing the world.? Specifically, it?s about how wealthy people do a modest bit of good (through philanthropy) while doing nothing about larger systems of injustice (that they may or may not benefit from). The author?s lin...

    We live in a world where every SV exec and company, even ones laughably so (Coca-Cola? Facebook?) claim to be changing the world for the better, doing good and are involved in charitable donations. With so much charity and well-meaning, why hasn't the average American seen an income ch...

    I disagree with soooo much in this book, but it is thought-provoking. The mot aggravating part is, I think, the lack of a clear counter-proposal to the problems he sees. It?s clearly implied, of course, but he doesn?t elaborate. ...

  • Michael Tackett
    Sep 14, 2018

    What Trump and Idealists Have in Common ?Making a difference? could be the idealistic theme of my generation?s collective ethos - at least among those of us who survived the drug-culture of the 60?s and 70?s with intact minds. The world had been opened to us by cheap acces...

    Did you watch Zuckerberg testify before the Senate committees about Facebook and the 2018 election? Were you struck by how blithely unrepentant he seemed, how convinced that his titanic, poorly monitored data base?which he habitually describes as ?a community??is an unalloyed...

    This is another book recommended to me by Richard. In many ways this is a similar and perhaps an even better book than ?Small Change: Why business won?t save the world? by Michael Edwards. Under my review of that book Jan-Maat mentions Andrew Carnegie ? and he gets quite a run ...

    This is an excellent book and a must-read! It's also totally readable and even quite funny at times. And it's the kind of book that you keep bringing up in conversation and then trailing off and saying---you just really have to read this book. The oversimplified thesis is that you can'...

    As someone who has dithered on the edges of "elites changing the world", much of this rings true and I believe (and grapple) with the tension between the sometimes necessary power/influence/fortune needed, as we strive for justice and equity. An article that I always refer back to is N...

    Winners Take All is the hardest book I have ever read. Not because it was inaccessible or esoteric, but because it forced a long overdue look in the mirror. Being in the tech industry I?ve been swept up in thought leadership, heroic philanthropy, and the promise of innovation to ...

    Philanthropy exists mainly to enable the super-rich and super-powerful to defer any serious discussion of a serious reordering of power and wealth, argues Giridharadas. Through a series of vignettes both of the super-rich and super-powerful themselves, who prove themselves unable to co...

    Very much in the tradition of Thomas Frank and the Baffler Magazine. This lampoons the TED talking Thought leaders and Elon Musks hanging around Davos and Martha's Vineyard. You know the plutocrats on a mission to save us all. I don't know if they do it the avoid scrutiny or salve thei...

    I ADORED this book. It was not without its flaws, including being super biased, one sided and judgmental, but I LOVED it. I?ve been a total MarketWorlder, assuming business was the best vehicle for making change and business school was the most effective way to learn now. And this bo...

    This book was definitely an eye-opener for me. As one who deals with charities and non-profits some, it saddened me to see how much that world is being abused by those with the most money to spare. The richest 1% have managed to grow in power and influence over the past decades so t...

    "Winners Take All" is an important and timely book. Giridharadas examines the fundamental limitations and contradictions of those who work for social change from a position of wealth and prestige. His central theme is "the master's tools will never dismantle the master's house," that i...

    It's hard to argue with any of the blatantly obvious points Giridharadas makes, but in chapter after chapter his targets prove themselves immune to the criticism. The whole book is a collective portrait of a class well-described by Tolstoy in one of the book's epigraphs: ?I sit on...

    The author crystallizes a good critique and rebuke of the intellectual elite classes, though he waits until the acknowledgements to, well, acknowledge a fuller extent of how much he was part of the problem and to an extent still is. It?s evident elsewhere anyway, as he only menti...

    UPDATE: meet the Elizabeth Holmes of Charity Fraud.... https://www.propublica.org/article/ho... =========================== "I sit on a man?s back choking him and making him carry me, and yet assure myself and others that I am sorry for him and wish to lighten his load by al...

    Very mixed feelings about this book. I liked some parts too much to give a low rating, disliked other parts too much to give a high rating, and don't feel those should average out. While I was reading, I was considering a criticism that this book is ultimately not engaged in critica...

    I found this a very enjoying read that really helped me coalesce some recent thoughts I've had recently on the subject. I first heard about the book on the Ezra Klein podcast (I would recommend listening to it as well to get Ezra's questions) and decided it was worth a try. It was. ...

  • Raja Ramesh
    Nov 11, 2018

    What Trump and Idealists Have in Common ?Making a difference? could be the idealistic theme of my generation?s collective ethos - at least among those of us who survived the drug-culture of the 60?s and 70?s with intact minds. The world had been opened to us by cheap acces...

    Did you watch Zuckerberg testify before the Senate committees about Facebook and the 2018 election? Were you struck by how blithely unrepentant he seemed, how convinced that his titanic, poorly monitored data base?which he habitually describes as ?a community??is an unalloyed...

    This is another book recommended to me by Richard. In many ways this is a similar and perhaps an even better book than ?Small Change: Why business won?t save the world? by Michael Edwards. Under my review of that book Jan-Maat mentions Andrew Carnegie ? and he gets quite a run ...

    This is an excellent book and a must-read! It's also totally readable and even quite funny at times. And it's the kind of book that you keep bringing up in conversation and then trailing off and saying---you just really have to read this book. The oversimplified thesis is that you can'...

    As someone who has dithered on the edges of "elites changing the world", much of this rings true and I believe (and grapple) with the tension between the sometimes necessary power/influence/fortune needed, as we strive for justice and equity. An article that I always refer back to is N...

    Winners Take All is the hardest book I have ever read. Not because it was inaccessible or esoteric, but because it forced a long overdue look in the mirror. Being in the tech industry I?ve been swept up in thought leadership, heroic philanthropy, and the promise of innovation to ...

    Philanthropy exists mainly to enable the super-rich and super-powerful to defer any serious discussion of a serious reordering of power and wealth, argues Giridharadas. Through a series of vignettes both of the super-rich and super-powerful themselves, who prove themselves unable to co...

    Very much in the tradition of Thomas Frank and the Baffler Magazine. This lampoons the TED talking Thought leaders and Elon Musks hanging around Davos and Martha's Vineyard. You know the plutocrats on a mission to save us all. I don't know if they do it the avoid scrutiny or salve thei...

    I ADORED this book. It was not without its flaws, including being super biased, one sided and judgmental, but I LOVED it. I?ve been a total MarketWorlder, assuming business was the best vehicle for making change and business school was the most effective way to learn now. And this bo...

    This book was definitely an eye-opener for me. As one who deals with charities and non-profits some, it saddened me to see how much that world is being abused by those with the most money to spare. The richest 1% have managed to grow in power and influence over the past decades so t...

    "Winners Take All" is an important and timely book. Giridharadas examines the fundamental limitations and contradictions of those who work for social change from a position of wealth and prestige. His central theme is "the master's tools will never dismantle the master's house," that i...

    It's hard to argue with any of the blatantly obvious points Giridharadas makes, but in chapter after chapter his targets prove themselves immune to the criticism. The whole book is a collective portrait of a class well-described by Tolstoy in one of the book's epigraphs: ?I sit on...

    The author crystallizes a good critique and rebuke of the intellectual elite classes, though he waits until the acknowledgements to, well, acknowledge a fuller extent of how much he was part of the problem and to an extent still is. It?s evident elsewhere anyway, as he only menti...

    UPDATE: meet the Elizabeth Holmes of Charity Fraud.... https://www.propublica.org/article/ho... =========================== "I sit on a man?s back choking him and making him carry me, and yet assure myself and others that I am sorry for him and wish to lighten his load by al...

    Very mixed feelings about this book. I liked some parts too much to give a low rating, disliked other parts too much to give a high rating, and don't feel those should average out. While I was reading, I was considering a criticism that this book is ultimately not engaged in critica...

    I found this a very enjoying read that really helped me coalesce some recent thoughts I've had recently on the subject. I first heard about the book on the Ezra Klein podcast (I would recommend listening to it as well to get Ezra's questions) and decided it was worth a try. It was. ...

    A phenomenally thought-provoking book examining the myths and fallacies of change and problem solving via market-driven solutions advocated by global elites seeking win-win solutions that fail to address the root causes of problems for which those elites may be the very causes or enabl...

    Before you read this book, read the author?s bio. For someone who is so critical of elites hiding in their hobbit holes, he waits until the acknowledgments section at the end of the book to let you know that he is one of them. I found this incredibly bizarre. He says the reason is be...

    "Inspire the rich to do more good, but never, ever tell them to do less harm; inspire them to give back, but never, ever tell them to take less; inspire them to join the solution, but never, ever accuse them of being part of the problem." I say, sometimes, "How do those people sleep...

    Extremely thought provoking. Nodded my head and said "Yeah!" on virtually every page. "If anyone truly believes that the same ski-town conferences and fellowship programs, the same politicians and policies, the same entrepreneurs and social businesses, the same campaign donors, the ...

    In this book, Giridharadas points to the limits of market or philanthropic solutions for social problems and argues that such innovation may even weaken our existing social system by diverting pent-up demand for change. He critiques the changemaker industrial complex (of Davos, TED tal...

    Winners Take All is about the elite?s ?charade of changing the world.? Specifically, it?s about how wealthy people do a modest bit of good (through philanthropy) while doing nothing about larger systems of injustice (that they may or may not benefit from). The author?s lin...

    We live in a world where every SV exec and company, even ones laughably so (Coca-Cola? Facebook?) claim to be changing the world for the better, doing good and are involved in charitable donations. With so much charity and well-meaning, why hasn't the average American seen an income ch...

    I disagree with soooo much in this book, but it is thought-provoking. The mot aggravating part is, I think, the lack of a clear counter-proposal to the problems he sees. It?s clearly implied, of course, but he doesn?t elaborate. ...

    I squirreled away time to read this book, ignoring most other obligations and taking the opportunity to engage in an anti-social act I haven't partaken in since middle school: to hunch over a book in the midst of a crowd of people. As a result, I often found myself in the situation of ...

  • David Wunderlich
    Oct 23, 2018

    What Trump and Idealists Have in Common ?Making a difference? could be the idealistic theme of my generation?s collective ethos - at least among those of us who survived the drug-culture of the 60?s and 70?s with intact minds. The world had been opened to us by cheap acces...

    Did you watch Zuckerberg testify before the Senate committees about Facebook and the 2018 election? Were you struck by how blithely unrepentant he seemed, how convinced that his titanic, poorly monitored data base?which he habitually describes as ?a community??is an unalloyed...

    This is another book recommended to me by Richard. In many ways this is a similar and perhaps an even better book than ?Small Change: Why business won?t save the world? by Michael Edwards. Under my review of that book Jan-Maat mentions Andrew Carnegie ? and he gets quite a run ...

    This is an excellent book and a must-read! It's also totally readable and even quite funny at times. And it's the kind of book that you keep bringing up in conversation and then trailing off and saying---you just really have to read this book. The oversimplified thesis is that you can'...

    As someone who has dithered on the edges of "elites changing the world", much of this rings true and I believe (and grapple) with the tension between the sometimes necessary power/influence/fortune needed, as we strive for justice and equity. An article that I always refer back to is N...

    Winners Take All is the hardest book I have ever read. Not because it was inaccessible or esoteric, but because it forced a long overdue look in the mirror. Being in the tech industry I?ve been swept up in thought leadership, heroic philanthropy, and the promise of innovation to ...

    Philanthropy exists mainly to enable the super-rich and super-powerful to defer any serious discussion of a serious reordering of power and wealth, argues Giridharadas. Through a series of vignettes both of the super-rich and super-powerful themselves, who prove themselves unable to co...

    Very much in the tradition of Thomas Frank and the Baffler Magazine. This lampoons the TED talking Thought leaders and Elon Musks hanging around Davos and Martha's Vineyard. You know the plutocrats on a mission to save us all. I don't know if they do it the avoid scrutiny or salve thei...

    I ADORED this book. It was not without its flaws, including being super biased, one sided and judgmental, but I LOVED it. I?ve been a total MarketWorlder, assuming business was the best vehicle for making change and business school was the most effective way to learn now. And this bo...

    This book was definitely an eye-opener for me. As one who deals with charities and non-profits some, it saddened me to see how much that world is being abused by those with the most money to spare. The richest 1% have managed to grow in power and influence over the past decades so t...

    "Winners Take All" is an important and timely book. Giridharadas examines the fundamental limitations and contradictions of those who work for social change from a position of wealth and prestige. His central theme is "the master's tools will never dismantle the master's house," that i...

    It's hard to argue with any of the blatantly obvious points Giridharadas makes, but in chapter after chapter his targets prove themselves immune to the criticism. The whole book is a collective portrait of a class well-described by Tolstoy in one of the book's epigraphs: ?I sit on...

    The author crystallizes a good critique and rebuke of the intellectual elite classes, though he waits until the acknowledgements to, well, acknowledge a fuller extent of how much he was part of the problem and to an extent still is. It?s evident elsewhere anyway, as he only menti...

  • Cesar
    Sep 30, 2018

    What Trump and Idealists Have in Common ?Making a difference? could be the idealistic theme of my generation?s collective ethos - at least among those of us who survived the drug-culture of the 60?s and 70?s with intact minds. The world had been opened to us by cheap acces...

    Did you watch Zuckerberg testify before the Senate committees about Facebook and the 2018 election? Were you struck by how blithely unrepentant he seemed, how convinced that his titanic, poorly monitored data base?which he habitually describes as ?a community??is an unalloyed...

    This is another book recommended to me by Richard. In many ways this is a similar and perhaps an even better book than ?Small Change: Why business won?t save the world? by Michael Edwards. Under my review of that book Jan-Maat mentions Andrew Carnegie ? and he gets quite a run ...

    This is an excellent book and a must-read! It's also totally readable and even quite funny at times. And it's the kind of book that you keep bringing up in conversation and then trailing off and saying---you just really have to read this book. The oversimplified thesis is that you can'...

    As someone who has dithered on the edges of "elites changing the world", much of this rings true and I believe (and grapple) with the tension between the sometimes necessary power/influence/fortune needed, as we strive for justice and equity. An article that I always refer back to is N...

    Winners Take All is the hardest book I have ever read. Not because it was inaccessible or esoteric, but because it forced a long overdue look in the mirror. Being in the tech industry I?ve been swept up in thought leadership, heroic philanthropy, and the promise of innovation to ...

  • Daniel Cunningham
    Nov 09, 2018

    What Trump and Idealists Have in Common ?Making a difference? could be the idealistic theme of my generation?s collective ethos - at least among those of us who survived the drug-culture of the 60?s and 70?s with intact minds. The world had been opened to us by cheap acces...

    Did you watch Zuckerberg testify before the Senate committees about Facebook and the 2018 election? Were you struck by how blithely unrepentant he seemed, how convinced that his titanic, poorly monitored data base?which he habitually describes as ?a community??is an unalloyed...

    This is another book recommended to me by Richard. In many ways this is a similar and perhaps an even better book than ?Small Change: Why business won?t save the world? by Michael Edwards. Under my review of that book Jan-Maat mentions Andrew Carnegie ? and he gets quite a run ...

    This is an excellent book and a must-read! It's also totally readable and even quite funny at times. And it's the kind of book that you keep bringing up in conversation and then trailing off and saying---you just really have to read this book. The oversimplified thesis is that you can'...

    As someone who has dithered on the edges of "elites changing the world", much of this rings true and I believe (and grapple) with the tension between the sometimes necessary power/influence/fortune needed, as we strive for justice and equity. An article that I always refer back to is N...

    Winners Take All is the hardest book I have ever read. Not because it was inaccessible or esoteric, but because it forced a long overdue look in the mirror. Being in the tech industry I?ve been swept up in thought leadership, heroic philanthropy, and the promise of innovation to ...

    Philanthropy exists mainly to enable the super-rich and super-powerful to defer any serious discussion of a serious reordering of power and wealth, argues Giridharadas. Through a series of vignettes both of the super-rich and super-powerful themselves, who prove themselves unable to co...

    Very much in the tradition of Thomas Frank and the Baffler Magazine. This lampoons the TED talking Thought leaders and Elon Musks hanging around Davos and Martha's Vineyard. You know the plutocrats on a mission to save us all. I don't know if they do it the avoid scrutiny or salve thei...

    I ADORED this book. It was not without its flaws, including being super biased, one sided and judgmental, but I LOVED it. I?ve been a total MarketWorlder, assuming business was the best vehicle for making change and business school was the most effective way to learn now. And this bo...

    This book was definitely an eye-opener for me. As one who deals with charities and non-profits some, it saddened me to see how much that world is being abused by those with the most money to spare. The richest 1% have managed to grow in power and influence over the past decades so t...

    "Winners Take All" is an important and timely book. Giridharadas examines the fundamental limitations and contradictions of those who work for social change from a position of wealth and prestige. His central theme is "the master's tools will never dismantle the master's house," that i...

    It's hard to argue with any of the blatantly obvious points Giridharadas makes, but in chapter after chapter his targets prove themselves immune to the criticism. The whole book is a collective portrait of a class well-described by Tolstoy in one of the book's epigraphs: ?I sit on...

    The author crystallizes a good critique and rebuke of the intellectual elite classes, though he waits until the acknowledgements to, well, acknowledge a fuller extent of how much he was part of the problem and to an extent still is. It?s evident elsewhere anyway, as he only menti...

    UPDATE: meet the Elizabeth Holmes of Charity Fraud.... https://www.propublica.org/article/ho... =========================== "I sit on a man?s back choking him and making him carry me, and yet assure myself and others that I am sorry for him and wish to lighten his load by al...

    Very mixed feelings about this book. I liked some parts too much to give a low rating, disliked other parts too much to give a high rating, and don't feel those should average out. While I was reading, I was considering a criticism that this book is ultimately not engaged in critica...

    I found this a very enjoying read that really helped me coalesce some recent thoughts I've had recently on the subject. I first heard about the book on the Ezra Klein podcast (I would recommend listening to it as well to get Ezra's questions) and decided it was worth a try. It was. ...

    A phenomenally thought-provoking book examining the myths and fallacies of change and problem solving via market-driven solutions advocated by global elites seeking win-win solutions that fail to address the root causes of problems for which those elites may be the very causes or enabl...

    Before you read this book, read the author?s bio. For someone who is so critical of elites hiding in their hobbit holes, he waits until the acknowledgments section at the end of the book to let you know that he is one of them. I found this incredibly bizarre. He says the reason is be...

    "Inspire the rich to do more good, but never, ever tell them to do less harm; inspire them to give back, but never, ever tell them to take less; inspire them to join the solution, but never, ever accuse them of being part of the problem." I say, sometimes, "How do those people sleep...

    Extremely thought provoking. Nodded my head and said "Yeah!" on virtually every page. "If anyone truly believes that the same ski-town conferences and fellowship programs, the same politicians and policies, the same entrepreneurs and social businesses, the same campaign donors, the ...

    In this book, Giridharadas points to the limits of market or philanthropic solutions for social problems and argues that such innovation may even weaken our existing social system by diverting pent-up demand for change. He critiques the changemaker industrial complex (of Davos, TED tal...

    Winners Take All is about the elite?s ?charade of changing the world.? Specifically, it?s about how wealthy people do a modest bit of good (through philanthropy) while doing nothing about larger systems of injustice (that they may or may not benefit from). The author?s lin...

    We live in a world where every SV exec and company, even ones laughably so (Coca-Cola? Facebook?) claim to be changing the world for the better, doing good and are involved in charitable donations. With so much charity and well-meaning, why hasn't the average American seen an income ch...

    I disagree with soooo much in this book, but it is thought-provoking. The mot aggravating part is, I think, the lack of a clear counter-proposal to the problems he sees. It?s clearly implied, of course, but he doesn?t elaborate. ...

    I squirreled away time to read this book, ignoring most other obligations and taking the opportunity to engage in an anti-social act I haven't partaken in since middle school: to hunch over a book in the midst of a crowd of people. As a result, I often found myself in the situation of ...

    ?Winners take All? (Knopf, 2018) by former New York Times columnist Anand Giridharadas. Ugh. This was painful read, psychologically speaking. Maybe a bit like psychotherapy, a bit too close to the truth, I kind of knew all this anyway but getting it presented in such a condensed ma...

    It took me a bit to get into this one -- Giridharadas has some *very* strong, negative opinions about some beliefs that I consider -- or at least, have considered -- core to my professional trajectory over the past decade or so. A colleague of mine, in my same line of work, is even hig...

    All good points. Rich people are making money and inventing things for fun rather than doing the work to fix government. We can't take Pepsi out of school because Pepsi has a right to make money. Meanwhile kids are dying and the rich get richer. In short, we're f'ed. Next book I read ...

    Anand is a cynic's cynic. Enjoyable. ...