The Assassination of Brangwain Spurge

The Assassination of Brangwain Spurge

Subverting convention, award-winning creators M. T. Anderson and Eugene Yelchin pair up for an anarchic, outlandish, and deeply political saga of warring elf and goblin kingdoms. Uptight elfin historian Brangwain Spurge is on a mission: survive being catapulted across the mountains into goblin territory, deliver a priceless peace offering to their mysterious dark lord, and Subverting convention, award-winning creators M. T. Anderson and Eugene Yelchin pair up for an anarchic, outlandish, a...

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Title:The Assassination of Brangwain Spurge
Author:M.T. Anderson
Rating:
Genres:Fantasy
ISBN:0763698229
Edition Language:English
Format Type:Hardcover
Number of Pages:544 pages pages

The Assassination of Brangwain Spurge Reviews

  • Dan
    Oct 20, 2018

    If history is written by the winners then what happens when everyone loses? In my job I read a lot of books written for kids and middle schoolers. To guide this reading I take into account a lot of professional reviews from sources like Kirkus and Publishers Weekly and School Librar...

    This book was a delight. There?s weight to it as you hold it in your hands. The cover gives a hint of the humor to come. The illustrations are a wonder. Spurge and Werfel are my kind of heroes. Highly recommend! ...

    There is no doubt this is brilliant, but often I found myself as confused as an Elf in a Goblin world. ...

    M. T. Anderson is one of my all-time favorite writers, and this latest, a collaboration with illustrator Eugene Yelchin, is a witty wonder. This quirky novel, a collection of letters and dispatches concerning the ongoing strife between the Elves and the Goblins, is a brilliant reflecti...

    The Assassination of Brangwain Spurge takes me back to the whimsy and invention of classics like The Phantom Tollbooth, Willy Wonky, and The Yellow Submarine. A comedy of etiquette errors, of historical hilarities? it?s been a long time since I genuinely laughed out loud while read...

    This is a *really* fun take on the unreliable narrator. As an adult reader, it didn't take me long to figure out why the illustrations and text weren't matching up, but this is such a great way to introduce this concept to younger readers (not to mention all the commentary on revisioni...

    An elf ambassador, Brangwain Spurge, is sent to the city of goblins to offer a gift of goodwill, a recently-found ancient artifact, after centuries of war and hostility. His goblin host, Werfel, is looking forward to the experience. He understands they both share a career and passion f...

    All of M.T. Anderson's books are so weird and I love them so much. He's such a funny, incisive author no matter what he's talking about. This book was a real trip. I also loved Eugene Yelchin's illustrations, and the whole conceit is so clever and so well-excecuted. I feel like thi...

    Having read enough of Anderson's books, I should realize by now that whatever I expect is not what is going to happen. I was also a bit dubious about the fact the book was listed as a finalist for the National Book Award in Young People's Literature. At first it was kind of ho-hum, meh...

    Want another illustrated story recommendation? How about this one? It's dark, it's humorous, and it is a lot of fun to read as you see one person's POV as illustrations and the other's POV written out. Two view points from two sides of an old, ongoing war (elves vs. goblins). Poor ...

    This is a silly book about serious topics. Who can you trust when you can't trust the leaders of a country? An interesting question at this particular time. My biggest quibble was that the super secret transmissions were not adequately explained early on and I was not viewing them with...

    My favorite part of this book is that a goblin's love language is insults. Honestly, I admired this, but it was not my favorite book of the year. Maybe I guessed the ending/twist too early, but it felt too long. I hope there aren't too many kids who fail to finish the story, becaus...

    To all of my friends on Goodreads, "you clammy sweaty pedants" (how Goblins talk to their friends), put aside all your other books and read this immediately! Brilliant and very very funny, this collaboration between Anderson and Yelchin is a joyful challenge to readers everywhere. C...

    I?m just going to let everyone else gush over this one. I?m not the right person for the job. ...

    I voluntarily read and reviewed an advanced copy of this book. All thoughts and opinions are my own. Historian elf Brangwain Spurge has a very clear mission: travel to the land of goblins and present their King, a dark and mysterious alien, with a mighty present. Goblin archivis...

    This is a three star book for me, but I?m giving a bonus star for the experimentation behind it. In short, two historically warring races, elves and goblins, meet by way of a historian from each. Their perceptions are colored by prejudice. Hijinks ensue. The problem for me was that i...

    The elf was a guest. It was Werfel's duty to protect him. Okay, this is more like 3.5 stars. My feelings on this one are hard to explain. It's not the best book I've read, not ridiculously funny, suspenseful or outlandish. But it is nostalgic. Very reminiscent of the Lord of...

    This illustrated novel is really great. I love novels that are difficult to put into one box. The elf, Brangwain Spurge, is sent as an emissary to the goblin king with a gift of an old goblin artifact. He is also tasked with sending back visual images of his time with the goblins to...

    And they all lived happily ever after...? What a strange and interesting book. Werfel the Archivist is a goblin. Brangwain Spurge, also a historian, is an elf. When Spurge gets sent to the goblin's city by his former childhood bully, he assumes that he is there to spy. He doesn't kn...

    What utter joy: wish I was 10 or 8 and could fully feel the fun of a book about gnarly, gross out govlin culture and a fish-out-of-water comedy. This book tells its story through text w shifting points of view, and wordless first person narration through illustration. A shrunken elfin ...

    I have read enough M. T. Anderson to know I usually like his style. It's weird, off the wall, and you never know where he is going until it gets there. Feed is a book I read 10 years ago and still think about and Landscape with Invisible Hand was a wild ride. This one, however, gets ...

    I am going to break one of my personal writing rules and start this review with a question: (view spoiler)[What if a book had two stories at war with each other? In The Assassination of Brangwain Spurge by M.T. Anderson and illustrated by Eugene Yelchin, that is exactly what happe...

  • Renata
    Nov 27, 2018

    If history is written by the winners then what happens when everyone loses? In my job I read a lot of books written for kids and middle schoolers. To guide this reading I take into account a lot of professional reviews from sources like Kirkus and Publishers Weekly and School Librar...

    This book was a delight. There?s weight to it as you hold it in your hands. The cover gives a hint of the humor to come. The illustrations are a wonder. Spurge and Werfel are my kind of heroes. Highly recommend! ...

    There is no doubt this is brilliant, but often I found myself as confused as an Elf in a Goblin world. ...

    M. T. Anderson is one of my all-time favorite writers, and this latest, a collaboration with illustrator Eugene Yelchin, is a witty wonder. This quirky novel, a collection of letters and dispatches concerning the ongoing strife between the Elves and the Goblins, is a brilliant reflecti...

    The Assassination of Brangwain Spurge takes me back to the whimsy and invention of classics like The Phantom Tollbooth, Willy Wonky, and The Yellow Submarine. A comedy of etiquette errors, of historical hilarities? it?s been a long time since I genuinely laughed out loud while read...

    This is a *really* fun take on the unreliable narrator. As an adult reader, it didn't take me long to figure out why the illustrations and text weren't matching up, but this is such a great way to introduce this concept to younger readers (not to mention all the commentary on revisioni...

    An elf ambassador, Brangwain Spurge, is sent to the city of goblins to offer a gift of goodwill, a recently-found ancient artifact, after centuries of war and hostility. His goblin host, Werfel, is looking forward to the experience. He understands they both share a career and passion f...

    All of M.T. Anderson's books are so weird and I love them so much. He's such a funny, incisive author no matter what he's talking about. This book was a real trip. I also loved Eugene Yelchin's illustrations, and the whole conceit is so clever and so well-excecuted. I feel like thi...

  • Cat
    Oct 11, 2018

    If history is written by the winners then what happens when everyone loses? In my job I read a lot of books written for kids and middle schoolers. To guide this reading I take into account a lot of professional reviews from sources like Kirkus and Publishers Weekly and School Librar...

    This book was a delight. There?s weight to it as you hold it in your hands. The cover gives a hint of the humor to come. The illustrations are a wonder. Spurge and Werfel are my kind of heroes. Highly recommend! ...

    There is no doubt this is brilliant, but often I found myself as confused as an Elf in a Goblin world. ...

    M. T. Anderson is one of my all-time favorite writers, and this latest, a collaboration with illustrator Eugene Yelchin, is a witty wonder. This quirky novel, a collection of letters and dispatches concerning the ongoing strife between the Elves and the Goblins, is a brilliant reflecti...

  • Destinee Sutton
    Nov 09, 2018

    If history is written by the winners then what happens when everyone loses? In my job I read a lot of books written for kids and middle schoolers. To guide this reading I take into account a lot of professional reviews from sources like Kirkus and Publishers Weekly and School Librar...

    This book was a delight. There?s weight to it as you hold it in your hands. The cover gives a hint of the humor to come. The illustrations are a wonder. Spurge and Werfel are my kind of heroes. Highly recommend! ...

    There is no doubt this is brilliant, but often I found myself as confused as an Elf in a Goblin world. ...

    M. T. Anderson is one of my all-time favorite writers, and this latest, a collaboration with illustrator Eugene Yelchin, is a witty wonder. This quirky novel, a collection of letters and dispatches concerning the ongoing strife between the Elves and the Goblins, is a brilliant reflecti...

    The Assassination of Brangwain Spurge takes me back to the whimsy and invention of classics like The Phantom Tollbooth, Willy Wonky, and The Yellow Submarine. A comedy of etiquette errors, of historical hilarities? it?s been a long time since I genuinely laughed out loud while read...

    This is a *really* fun take on the unreliable narrator. As an adult reader, it didn't take me long to figure out why the illustrations and text weren't matching up, but this is such a great way to introduce this concept to younger readers (not to mention all the commentary on revisioni...

    An elf ambassador, Brangwain Spurge, is sent to the city of goblins to offer a gift of goodwill, a recently-found ancient artifact, after centuries of war and hostility. His goblin host, Werfel, is looking forward to the experience. He understands they both share a career and passion f...

    All of M.T. Anderson's books are so weird and I love them so much. He's such a funny, incisive author no matter what he's talking about. This book was a real trip. I also loved Eugene Yelchin's illustrations, and the whole conceit is so clever and so well-excecuted. I feel like thi...

    Having read enough of Anderson's books, I should realize by now that whatever I expect is not what is going to happen. I was also a bit dubious about the fact the book was listed as a finalist for the National Book Award in Young People's Literature. At first it was kind of ho-hum, meh...

    Want another illustrated story recommendation? How about this one? It's dark, it's humorous, and it is a lot of fun to read as you see one person's POV as illustrations and the other's POV written out. Two view points from two sides of an old, ongoing war (elves vs. goblins). Poor ...

    This is a silly book about serious topics. Who can you trust when you can't trust the leaders of a country? An interesting question at this particular time. My biggest quibble was that the super secret transmissions were not adequately explained early on and I was not viewing them with...

    My favorite part of this book is that a goblin's love language is insults. Honestly, I admired this, but it was not my favorite book of the year. Maybe I guessed the ending/twist too early, but it felt too long. I hope there aren't too many kids who fail to finish the story, becaus...

  • Travis
    Dec 12, 2018

    If history is written by the winners then what happens when everyone loses? In my job I read a lot of books written for kids and middle schoolers. To guide this reading I take into account a lot of professional reviews from sources like Kirkus and Publishers Weekly and School Librar...

    This book was a delight. There?s weight to it as you hold it in your hands. The cover gives a hint of the humor to come. The illustrations are a wonder. Spurge and Werfel are my kind of heroes. Highly recommend! ...

    There is no doubt this is brilliant, but often I found myself as confused as an Elf in a Goblin world. ...

    M. T. Anderson is one of my all-time favorite writers, and this latest, a collaboration with illustrator Eugene Yelchin, is a witty wonder. This quirky novel, a collection of letters and dispatches concerning the ongoing strife between the Elves and the Goblins, is a brilliant reflecti...

    The Assassination of Brangwain Spurge takes me back to the whimsy and invention of classics like The Phantom Tollbooth, Willy Wonky, and The Yellow Submarine. A comedy of etiquette errors, of historical hilarities? it?s been a long time since I genuinely laughed out loud while read...

    This is a *really* fun take on the unreliable narrator. As an adult reader, it didn't take me long to figure out why the illustrations and text weren't matching up, but this is such a great way to introduce this concept to younger readers (not to mention all the commentary on revisioni...

    An elf ambassador, Brangwain Spurge, is sent to the city of goblins to offer a gift of goodwill, a recently-found ancient artifact, after centuries of war and hostility. His goblin host, Werfel, is looking forward to the experience. He understands they both share a career and passion f...

    All of M.T. Anderson's books are so weird and I love them so much. He's such a funny, incisive author no matter what he's talking about. This book was a real trip. I also loved Eugene Yelchin's illustrations, and the whole conceit is so clever and so well-excecuted. I feel like thi...

    Having read enough of Anderson's books, I should realize by now that whatever I expect is not what is going to happen. I was also a bit dubious about the fact the book was listed as a finalist for the National Book Award in Young People's Literature. At first it was kind of ho-hum, meh...

    Want another illustrated story recommendation? How about this one? It's dark, it's humorous, and it is a lot of fun to read as you see one person's POV as illustrations and the other's POV written out. Two view points from two sides of an old, ongoing war (elves vs. goblins). Poor ...

    This is a silly book about serious topics. Who can you trust when you can't trust the leaders of a country? An interesting question at this particular time. My biggest quibble was that the super secret transmissions were not adequately explained early on and I was not viewing them with...

    My favorite part of this book is that a goblin's love language is insults. Honestly, I admired this, but it was not my favorite book of the year. Maybe I guessed the ending/twist too early, but it felt too long. I hope there aren't too many kids who fail to finish the story, becaus...

    To all of my friends on Goodreads, "you clammy sweaty pedants" (how Goblins talk to their friends), put aside all your other books and read this immediately! Brilliant and very very funny, this collaboration between Anderson and Yelchin is a joyful challenge to readers everywhere. C...

    I?m just going to let everyone else gush over this one. I?m not the right person for the job. ...

    I voluntarily read and reviewed an advanced copy of this book. All thoughts and opinions are my own. Historian elf Brangwain Spurge has a very clear mission: travel to the land of goblins and present their King, a dark and mysterious alien, with a mighty present. Goblin archivis...

    This is a three star book for me, but I?m giving a bonus star for the experimentation behind it. In short, two historically warring races, elves and goblins, meet by way of a historian from each. Their perceptions are colored by prejudice. Hijinks ensue. The problem for me was that i...

    The elf was a guest. It was Werfel's duty to protect him. Okay, this is more like 3.5 stars. My feelings on this one are hard to explain. It's not the best book I've read, not ridiculously funny, suspenseful or outlandish. But it is nostalgic. Very reminiscent of the Lord of...

    This illustrated novel is really great. I love novels that are difficult to put into one box. The elf, Brangwain Spurge, is sent as an emissary to the goblin king with a gift of an old goblin artifact. He is also tasked with sending back visual images of his time with the goblins to...

    And they all lived happily ever after...? What a strange and interesting book. Werfel the Archivist is a goblin. Brangwain Spurge, also a historian, is an elf. When Spurge gets sent to the goblin's city by his former childhood bully, he assumes that he is there to spy. He doesn't kn...

    What utter joy: wish I was 10 or 8 and could fully feel the fun of a book about gnarly, gross out govlin culture and a fish-out-of-water comedy. This book tells its story through text w shifting points of view, and wordless first person narration through illustration. A shrunken elfin ...

    I have read enough M. T. Anderson to know I usually like his style. It's weird, off the wall, and you never know where he is going until it gets there. Feed is a book I read 10 years ago and still think about and Landscape with Invisible Hand was a wild ride. This one, however, gets ...

    I am going to break one of my personal writing rules and start this review with a question: (view spoiler)[What if a book had two stories at war with each other? In The Assassination of Brangwain Spurge by M.T. Anderson and illustrated by Eugene Yelchin, that is exactly what happe...

    Really enjoyed this one. This is a trend with me - I usually enjoy children's literature much more than YA. YA is mostly whiney, smarmy, and very annoying, or at least this is what I feel when I read modern YA. With children's literature, it it different. It is sincere, hilarious, ho...

    What a unique collaboration! Anderson and Yelchin have told a fascinating story about an elf/goblin conflict through the use of alternating text and illustrations. Brangwain Spurge and Werfel are both historians who each have their own biases about what has gone on between the two race...

    (4.5 stars) M.T. Anderson is one of my kids? favorite authors, so when I saw this book at the bookstore, I had to have it. A glance at the insides looked like the book would be a lot of fun, and it was. The story, which, very briefly, tells of the adventures of an elf and a goblin, ...

    Two history nerds from warring cultures find themselves at the heart of international politics and intrigue in a story told from alternating points of view (the main narrative, independent viewpoints told by beautiful black and white illustrations, and increasingly more desperate and h...

  • Betsy
    Apr 27, 2018

    If history is written by the winners then what happens when everyone loses? In my job I read a lot of books written for kids and middle schoolers. To guide this reading I take into account a lot of professional reviews from sources like Kirkus and Publishers Weekly and School Librar...

  • Tamsyn
    Oct 18, 2018

    If history is written by the winners then what happens when everyone loses? In my job I read a lot of books written for kids and middle schoolers. To guide this reading I take into account a lot of professional reviews from sources like Kirkus and Publishers Weekly and School Librar...

    This book was a delight. There?s weight to it as you hold it in your hands. The cover gives a hint of the humor to come. The illustrations are a wonder. Spurge and Werfel are my kind of heroes. Highly recommend! ...

    There is no doubt this is brilliant, but often I found myself as confused as an Elf in a Goblin world. ...

    M. T. Anderson is one of my all-time favorite writers, and this latest, a collaboration with illustrator Eugene Yelchin, is a witty wonder. This quirky novel, a collection of letters and dispatches concerning the ongoing strife between the Elves and the Goblins, is a brilliant reflecti...

    The Assassination of Brangwain Spurge takes me back to the whimsy and invention of classics like The Phantom Tollbooth, Willy Wonky, and The Yellow Submarine. A comedy of etiquette errors, of historical hilarities? it?s been a long time since I genuinely laughed out loud while read...

    This is a *really* fun take on the unreliable narrator. As an adult reader, it didn't take me long to figure out why the illustrations and text weren't matching up, but this is such a great way to introduce this concept to younger readers (not to mention all the commentary on revisioni...

    An elf ambassador, Brangwain Spurge, is sent to the city of goblins to offer a gift of goodwill, a recently-found ancient artifact, after centuries of war and hostility. His goblin host, Werfel, is looking forward to the experience. He understands they both share a career and passion f...

    All of M.T. Anderson's books are so weird and I love them so much. He's such a funny, incisive author no matter what he's talking about. This book was a real trip. I also loved Eugene Yelchin's illustrations, and the whole conceit is so clever and so well-excecuted. I feel like thi...

    Having read enough of Anderson's books, I should realize by now that whatever I expect is not what is going to happen. I was also a bit dubious about the fact the book was listed as a finalist for the National Book Award in Young People's Literature. At first it was kind of ho-hum, meh...

    Want another illustrated story recommendation? How about this one? It's dark, it's humorous, and it is a lot of fun to read as you see one person's POV as illustrations and the other's POV written out. Two view points from two sides of an old, ongoing war (elves vs. goblins). Poor ...

    This is a silly book about serious topics. Who can you trust when you can't trust the leaders of a country? An interesting question at this particular time. My biggest quibble was that the super secret transmissions were not adequately explained early on and I was not viewing them with...

    My favorite part of this book is that a goblin's love language is insults. Honestly, I admired this, but it was not my favorite book of the year. Maybe I guessed the ending/twist too early, but it felt too long. I hope there aren't too many kids who fail to finish the story, becaus...

    To all of my friends on Goodreads, "you clammy sweaty pedants" (how Goblins talk to their friends), put aside all your other books and read this immediately! Brilliant and very very funny, this collaboration between Anderson and Yelchin is a joyful challenge to readers everywhere. C...

    I?m just going to let everyone else gush over this one. I?m not the right person for the job. ...

    I voluntarily read and reviewed an advanced copy of this book. All thoughts and opinions are my own. Historian elf Brangwain Spurge has a very clear mission: travel to the land of goblins and present their King, a dark and mysterious alien, with a mighty present. Goblin archivis...

    This is a three star book for me, but I?m giving a bonus star for the experimentation behind it. In short, two historically warring races, elves and goblins, meet by way of a historian from each. Their perceptions are colored by prejudice. Hijinks ensue. The problem for me was that i...

    The elf was a guest. It was Werfel's duty to protect him. Okay, this is more like 3.5 stars. My feelings on this one are hard to explain. It's not the best book I've read, not ridiculously funny, suspenseful or outlandish. But it is nostalgic. Very reminiscent of the Lord of...

    This illustrated novel is really great. I love novels that are difficult to put into one box. The elf, Brangwain Spurge, is sent as an emissary to the goblin king with a gift of an old goblin artifact. He is also tasked with sending back visual images of his time with the goblins to...

    And they all lived happily ever after...? What a strange and interesting book. Werfel the Archivist is a goblin. Brangwain Spurge, also a historian, is an elf. When Spurge gets sent to the goblin's city by his former childhood bully, he assumes that he is there to spy. He doesn't kn...

    What utter joy: wish I was 10 or 8 and could fully feel the fun of a book about gnarly, gross out govlin culture and a fish-out-of-water comedy. This book tells its story through text w shifting points of view, and wordless first person narration through illustration. A shrunken elfin ...

    I have read enough M. T. Anderson to know I usually like his style. It's weird, off the wall, and you never know where he is going until it gets there. Feed is a book I read 10 years ago and still think about and Landscape with Invisible Hand was a wild ride. This one, however, gets ...

    I am going to break one of my personal writing rules and start this review with a question: (view spoiler)[What if a book had two stories at war with each other? In The Assassination of Brangwain Spurge by M.T. Anderson and illustrated by Eugene Yelchin, that is exactly what happe...

    Really enjoyed this one. This is a trend with me - I usually enjoy children's literature much more than YA. YA is mostly whiney, smarmy, and very annoying, or at least this is what I feel when I read modern YA. With children's literature, it it different. It is sincere, hilarious, ho...

    What a unique collaboration! Anderson and Yelchin have told a fascinating story about an elf/goblin conflict through the use of alternating text and illustrations. Brangwain Spurge and Werfel are both historians who each have their own biases about what has gone on between the two race...

    (4.5 stars) M.T. Anderson is one of my kids? favorite authors, so when I saw this book at the bookstore, I had to have it. A glance at the insides looked like the book would be a lot of fun, and it was. The story, which, very briefly, tells of the adventures of an elf and a goblin, ...

    Two history nerds from warring cultures find themselves at the heart of international politics and intrigue in a story told from alternating points of view (the main narrative, independent viewpoints told by beautiful black and white illustrations, and increasingly more desperate and h...

    gripping to the point of almost unputdownable. It's a long book, but with many interspersed sequences of illustrations that carry the story forwards, which make it a faster read. I might have given it a fifth star, except that my heart was too sad for the Goblin Historian, who was the ...

    Loved it. So hilarious, so different. One of my favorites this year. AMAZING on audio. This is one of those books I never would have read in a million years and only read on obligation, but I LOVED it. A true reading delight. This book is made to be read a loud. I see quick-witted uppe...

    This is a delightful, hilarious and altogether entertaining story about an elf on a diplomatic mission to the enemy goblin?s kingdom to deliver an ancient and valuable artifact. He is a historian and is hosted by his goblin counterpart. Things do not go as planned. This is the first ...

  • Lynn
    Jul 05, 2018

    If history is written by the winners then what happens when everyone loses? In my job I read a lot of books written for kids and middle schoolers. To guide this reading I take into account a lot of professional reviews from sources like Kirkus and Publishers Weekly and School Librar...

    This book was a delight. There?s weight to it as you hold it in your hands. The cover gives a hint of the humor to come. The illustrations are a wonder. Spurge and Werfel are my kind of heroes. Highly recommend! ...

    There is no doubt this is brilliant, but often I found myself as confused as an Elf in a Goblin world. ...

    M. T. Anderson is one of my all-time favorite writers, and this latest, a collaboration with illustrator Eugene Yelchin, is a witty wonder. This quirky novel, a collection of letters and dispatches concerning the ongoing strife between the Elves and the Goblins, is a brilliant reflecti...

    The Assassination of Brangwain Spurge takes me back to the whimsy and invention of classics like The Phantom Tollbooth, Willy Wonky, and The Yellow Submarine. A comedy of etiquette errors, of historical hilarities? it?s been a long time since I genuinely laughed out loud while read...

    This is a *really* fun take on the unreliable narrator. As an adult reader, it didn't take me long to figure out why the illustrations and text weren't matching up, but this is such a great way to introduce this concept to younger readers (not to mention all the commentary on revisioni...

    An elf ambassador, Brangwain Spurge, is sent to the city of goblins to offer a gift of goodwill, a recently-found ancient artifact, after centuries of war and hostility. His goblin host, Werfel, is looking forward to the experience. He understands they both share a career and passion f...

    All of M.T. Anderson's books are so weird and I love them so much. He's such a funny, incisive author no matter what he's talking about. This book was a real trip. I also loved Eugene Yelchin's illustrations, and the whole conceit is so clever and so well-excecuted. I feel like thi...

    Having read enough of Anderson's books, I should realize by now that whatever I expect is not what is going to happen. I was also a bit dubious about the fact the book was listed as a finalist for the National Book Award in Young People's Literature. At first it was kind of ho-hum, meh...

    Want another illustrated story recommendation? How about this one? It's dark, it's humorous, and it is a lot of fun to read as you see one person's POV as illustrations and the other's POV written out. Two view points from two sides of an old, ongoing war (elves vs. goblins). Poor ...

    This is a silly book about serious topics. Who can you trust when you can't trust the leaders of a country? An interesting question at this particular time. My biggest quibble was that the super secret transmissions were not adequately explained early on and I was not viewing them with...

    My favorite part of this book is that a goblin's love language is insults. Honestly, I admired this, but it was not my favorite book of the year. Maybe I guessed the ending/twist too early, but it felt too long. I hope there aren't too many kids who fail to finish the story, becaus...

    To all of my friends on Goodreads, "you clammy sweaty pedants" (how Goblins talk to their friends), put aside all your other books and read this immediately! Brilliant and very very funny, this collaboration between Anderson and Yelchin is a joyful challenge to readers everywhere. C...

  • DaNae
    Oct 26, 2018

    If history is written by the winners then what happens when everyone loses? In my job I read a lot of books written for kids and middle schoolers. To guide this reading I take into account a lot of professional reviews from sources like Kirkus and Publishers Weekly and School Librar...

    This book was a delight. There?s weight to it as you hold it in your hands. The cover gives a hint of the humor to come. The illustrations are a wonder. Spurge and Werfel are my kind of heroes. Highly recommend! ...

    There is no doubt this is brilliant, but often I found myself as confused as an Elf in a Goblin world. ...

  • KWinks
    Oct 03, 2018

    If history is written by the winners then what happens when everyone loses? In my job I read a lot of books written for kids and middle schoolers. To guide this reading I take into account a lot of professional reviews from sources like Kirkus and Publishers Weekly and School Librar...

    This book was a delight. There?s weight to it as you hold it in your hands. The cover gives a hint of the humor to come. The illustrations are a wonder. Spurge and Werfel are my kind of heroes. Highly recommend! ...

    There is no doubt this is brilliant, but often I found myself as confused as an Elf in a Goblin world. ...

    M. T. Anderson is one of my all-time favorite writers, and this latest, a collaboration with illustrator Eugene Yelchin, is a witty wonder. This quirky novel, a collection of letters and dispatches concerning the ongoing strife between the Elves and the Goblins, is a brilliant reflecti...

    The Assassination of Brangwain Spurge takes me back to the whimsy and invention of classics like The Phantom Tollbooth, Willy Wonky, and The Yellow Submarine. A comedy of etiquette errors, of historical hilarities? it?s been a long time since I genuinely laughed out loud while read...

    This is a *really* fun take on the unreliable narrator. As an adult reader, it didn't take me long to figure out why the illustrations and text weren't matching up, but this is such a great way to introduce this concept to younger readers (not to mention all the commentary on revisioni...

    An elf ambassador, Brangwain Spurge, is sent to the city of goblins to offer a gift of goodwill, a recently-found ancient artifact, after centuries of war and hostility. His goblin host, Werfel, is looking forward to the experience. He understands they both share a career and passion f...

    All of M.T. Anderson's books are so weird and I love them so much. He's such a funny, incisive author no matter what he's talking about. This book was a real trip. I also loved Eugene Yelchin's illustrations, and the whole conceit is so clever and so well-excecuted. I feel like thi...

    Having read enough of Anderson's books, I should realize by now that whatever I expect is not what is going to happen. I was also a bit dubious about the fact the book was listed as a finalist for the National Book Award in Young People's Literature. At first it was kind of ho-hum, meh...

    Want another illustrated story recommendation? How about this one? It's dark, it's humorous, and it is a lot of fun to read as you see one person's POV as illustrations and the other's POV written out. Two view points from two sides of an old, ongoing war (elves vs. goblins). Poor ...

    This is a silly book about serious topics. Who can you trust when you can't trust the leaders of a country? An interesting question at this particular time. My biggest quibble was that the super secret transmissions were not adequately explained early on and I was not viewing them with...

    My favorite part of this book is that a goblin's love language is insults. Honestly, I admired this, but it was not my favorite book of the year. Maybe I guessed the ending/twist too early, but it felt too long. I hope there aren't too many kids who fail to finish the story, becaus...

    To all of my friends on Goodreads, "you clammy sweaty pedants" (how Goblins talk to their friends), put aside all your other books and read this immediately! Brilliant and very very funny, this collaboration between Anderson and Yelchin is a joyful challenge to readers everywhere. C...

    I?m just going to let everyone else gush over this one. I?m not the right person for the job. ...

    I voluntarily read and reviewed an advanced copy of this book. All thoughts and opinions are my own. Historian elf Brangwain Spurge has a very clear mission: travel to the land of goblins and present their King, a dark and mysterious alien, with a mighty present. Goblin archivis...

    This is a three star book for me, but I?m giving a bonus star for the experimentation behind it. In short, two historically warring races, elves and goblins, meet by way of a historian from each. Their perceptions are colored by prejudice. Hijinks ensue. The problem for me was that i...

    The elf was a guest. It was Werfel's duty to protect him. Okay, this is more like 3.5 stars. My feelings on this one are hard to explain. It's not the best book I've read, not ridiculously funny, suspenseful or outlandish. But it is nostalgic. Very reminiscent of the Lord of...

    This illustrated novel is really great. I love novels that are difficult to put into one box. The elf, Brangwain Spurge, is sent as an emissary to the goblin king with a gift of an old goblin artifact. He is also tasked with sending back visual images of his time with the goblins to...

    And they all lived happily ever after...? What a strange and interesting book. Werfel the Archivist is a goblin. Brangwain Spurge, also a historian, is an elf. When Spurge gets sent to the goblin's city by his former childhood bully, he assumes that he is there to spy. He doesn't kn...

    What utter joy: wish I was 10 or 8 and could fully feel the fun of a book about gnarly, gross out govlin culture and a fish-out-of-water comedy. This book tells its story through text w shifting points of view, and wordless first person narration through illustration. A shrunken elfin ...

    I have read enough M. T. Anderson to know I usually like his style. It's weird, off the wall, and you never know where he is going until it gets there. Feed is a book I read 10 years ago and still think about and Landscape with Invisible Hand was a wild ride. This one, however, gets ...

  • Shauna Yusko
    Sep 12, 2018

    If history is written by the winners then what happens when everyone loses? In my job I read a lot of books written for kids and middle schoolers. To guide this reading I take into account a lot of professional reviews from sources like Kirkus and Publishers Weekly and School Librar...

    This book was a delight. There?s weight to it as you hold it in your hands. The cover gives a hint of the humor to come. The illustrations are a wonder. Spurge and Werfel are my kind of heroes. Highly recommend! ...

    There is no doubt this is brilliant, but often I found myself as confused as an Elf in a Goblin world. ...

    M. T. Anderson is one of my all-time favorite writers, and this latest, a collaboration with illustrator Eugene Yelchin, is a witty wonder. This quirky novel, a collection of letters and dispatches concerning the ongoing strife between the Elves and the Goblins, is a brilliant reflecti...

    The Assassination of Brangwain Spurge takes me back to the whimsy and invention of classics like The Phantom Tollbooth, Willy Wonky, and The Yellow Submarine. A comedy of etiquette errors, of historical hilarities? it?s been a long time since I genuinely laughed out loud while read...

    This is a *really* fun take on the unreliable narrator. As an adult reader, it didn't take me long to figure out why the illustrations and text weren't matching up, but this is such a great way to introduce this concept to younger readers (not to mention all the commentary on revisioni...

    An elf ambassador, Brangwain Spurge, is sent to the city of goblins to offer a gift of goodwill, a recently-found ancient artifact, after centuries of war and hostility. His goblin host, Werfel, is looking forward to the experience. He understands they both share a career and passion f...

    All of M.T. Anderson's books are so weird and I love them so much. He's such a funny, incisive author no matter what he's talking about. This book was a real trip. I also loved Eugene Yelchin's illustrations, and the whole conceit is so clever and so well-excecuted. I feel like thi...

    Having read enough of Anderson's books, I should realize by now that whatever I expect is not what is going to happen. I was also a bit dubious about the fact the book was listed as a finalist for the National Book Award in Young People's Literature. At first it was kind of ho-hum, meh...

    Want another illustrated story recommendation? How about this one? It's dark, it's humorous, and it is a lot of fun to read as you see one person's POV as illustrations and the other's POV written out. Two view points from two sides of an old, ongoing war (elves vs. goblins). Poor ...

    This is a silly book about serious topics. Who can you trust when you can't trust the leaders of a country? An interesting question at this particular time. My biggest quibble was that the super secret transmissions were not adequately explained early on and I was not viewing them with...

    My favorite part of this book is that a goblin's love language is insults. Honestly, I admired this, but it was not my favorite book of the year. Maybe I guessed the ending/twist too early, but it felt too long. I hope there aren't too many kids who fail to finish the story, becaus...

    To all of my friends on Goodreads, "you clammy sweaty pedants" (how Goblins talk to their friends), put aside all your other books and read this immediately! Brilliant and very very funny, this collaboration between Anderson and Yelchin is a joyful challenge to readers everywhere. C...

    I?m just going to let everyone else gush over this one. I?m not the right person for the job. ...

  • Charlotte
    Sep 16, 2018

    If history is written by the winners then what happens when everyone loses? In my job I read a lot of books written for kids and middle schoolers. To guide this reading I take into account a lot of professional reviews from sources like Kirkus and Publishers Weekly and School Librar...

    This book was a delight. There?s weight to it as you hold it in your hands. The cover gives a hint of the humor to come. The illustrations are a wonder. Spurge and Werfel are my kind of heroes. Highly recommend! ...

    There is no doubt this is brilliant, but often I found myself as confused as an Elf in a Goblin world. ...

    M. T. Anderson is one of my all-time favorite writers, and this latest, a collaboration with illustrator Eugene Yelchin, is a witty wonder. This quirky novel, a collection of letters and dispatches concerning the ongoing strife between the Elves and the Goblins, is a brilliant reflecti...

    The Assassination of Brangwain Spurge takes me back to the whimsy and invention of classics like The Phantom Tollbooth, Willy Wonky, and The Yellow Submarine. A comedy of etiquette errors, of historical hilarities? it?s been a long time since I genuinely laughed out loud while read...

    This is a *really* fun take on the unreliable narrator. As an adult reader, it didn't take me long to figure out why the illustrations and text weren't matching up, but this is such a great way to introduce this concept to younger readers (not to mention all the commentary on revisioni...

    An elf ambassador, Brangwain Spurge, is sent to the city of goblins to offer a gift of goodwill, a recently-found ancient artifact, after centuries of war and hostility. His goblin host, Werfel, is looking forward to the experience. He understands they both share a career and passion f...

    All of M.T. Anderson's books are so weird and I love them so much. He's such a funny, incisive author no matter what he's talking about. This book was a real trip. I also loved Eugene Yelchin's illustrations, and the whole conceit is so clever and so well-excecuted. I feel like thi...

    Having read enough of Anderson's books, I should realize by now that whatever I expect is not what is going to happen. I was also a bit dubious about the fact the book was listed as a finalist for the National Book Award in Young People's Literature. At first it was kind of ho-hum, meh...

    Want another illustrated story recommendation? How about this one? It's dark, it's humorous, and it is a lot of fun to read as you see one person's POV as illustrations and the other's POV written out. Two view points from two sides of an old, ongoing war (elves vs. goblins). Poor ...

    This is a silly book about serious topics. Who can you trust when you can't trust the leaders of a country? An interesting question at this particular time. My biggest quibble was that the super secret transmissions were not adequately explained early on and I was not viewing them with...

    My favorite part of this book is that a goblin's love language is insults. Honestly, I admired this, but it was not my favorite book of the year. Maybe I guessed the ending/twist too early, but it felt too long. I hope there aren't too many kids who fail to finish the story, becaus...

    To all of my friends on Goodreads, "you clammy sweaty pedants" (how Goblins talk to their friends), put aside all your other books and read this immediately! Brilliant and very very funny, this collaboration between Anderson and Yelchin is a joyful challenge to readers everywhere. C...

    I?m just going to let everyone else gush over this one. I?m not the right person for the job. ...

    I voluntarily read and reviewed an advanced copy of this book. All thoughts and opinions are my own. Historian elf Brangwain Spurge has a very clear mission: travel to the land of goblins and present their King, a dark and mysterious alien, with a mighty present. Goblin archivis...

    This is a three star book for me, but I?m giving a bonus star for the experimentation behind it. In short, two historically warring races, elves and goblins, meet by way of a historian from each. Their perceptions are colored by prejudice. Hijinks ensue. The problem for me was that i...

    The elf was a guest. It was Werfel's duty to protect him. Okay, this is more like 3.5 stars. My feelings on this one are hard to explain. It's not the best book I've read, not ridiculously funny, suspenseful or outlandish. But it is nostalgic. Very reminiscent of the Lord of...

    This illustrated novel is really great. I love novels that are difficult to put into one box. The elf, Brangwain Spurge, is sent as an emissary to the goblin king with a gift of an old goblin artifact. He is also tasked with sending back visual images of his time with the goblins to...

    And they all lived happily ever after...? What a strange and interesting book. Werfel the Archivist is a goblin. Brangwain Spurge, also a historian, is an elf. When Spurge gets sent to the goblin's city by his former childhood bully, he assumes that he is there to spy. He doesn't kn...

    What utter joy: wish I was 10 or 8 and could fully feel the fun of a book about gnarly, gross out govlin culture and a fish-out-of-water comedy. This book tells its story through text w shifting points of view, and wordless first person narration through illustration. A shrunken elfin ...

    I have read enough M. T. Anderson to know I usually like his style. It's weird, off the wall, and you never know where he is going until it gets there. Feed is a book I read 10 years ago and still think about and Landscape with Invisible Hand was a wild ride. This one, however, gets ...

    I am going to break one of my personal writing rules and start this review with a question: (view spoiler)[What if a book had two stories at war with each other? In The Assassination of Brangwain Spurge by M.T. Anderson and illustrated by Eugene Yelchin, that is exactly what happe...

    Really enjoyed this one. This is a trend with me - I usually enjoy children's literature much more than YA. YA is mostly whiney, smarmy, and very annoying, or at least this is what I feel when I read modern YA. With children's literature, it it different. It is sincere, hilarious, ho...

    What a unique collaboration! Anderson and Yelchin have told a fascinating story about an elf/goblin conflict through the use of alternating text and illustrations. Brangwain Spurge and Werfel are both historians who each have their own biases about what has gone on between the two race...

    (4.5 stars) M.T. Anderson is one of my kids? favorite authors, so when I saw this book at the bookstore, I had to have it. A glance at the insides looked like the book would be a lot of fun, and it was. The story, which, very briefly, tells of the adventures of an elf and a goblin, ...

    Two history nerds from warring cultures find themselves at the heart of international politics and intrigue in a story told from alternating points of view (the main narrative, independent viewpoints told by beautiful black and white illustrations, and increasingly more desperate and h...

    gripping to the point of almost unputdownable. It's a long book, but with many interspersed sequences of illustrations that carry the story forwards, which make it a faster read. I might have given it a fifth star, except that my heart was too sad for the Goblin Historian, who was the ...

  • Padraig
    Dec 04, 2018

    If history is written by the winners then what happens when everyone loses? In my job I read a lot of books written for kids and middle schoolers. To guide this reading I take into account a lot of professional reviews from sources like Kirkus and Publishers Weekly and School Librar...

    This book was a delight. There?s weight to it as you hold it in your hands. The cover gives a hint of the humor to come. The illustrations are a wonder. Spurge and Werfel are my kind of heroes. Highly recommend! ...

    There is no doubt this is brilliant, but often I found myself as confused as an Elf in a Goblin world. ...

    M. T. Anderson is one of my all-time favorite writers, and this latest, a collaboration with illustrator Eugene Yelchin, is a witty wonder. This quirky novel, a collection of letters and dispatches concerning the ongoing strife between the Elves and the Goblins, is a brilliant reflecti...

    The Assassination of Brangwain Spurge takes me back to the whimsy and invention of classics like The Phantom Tollbooth, Willy Wonky, and The Yellow Submarine. A comedy of etiquette errors, of historical hilarities? it?s been a long time since I genuinely laughed out loud while read...

    This is a *really* fun take on the unreliable narrator. As an adult reader, it didn't take me long to figure out why the illustrations and text weren't matching up, but this is such a great way to introduce this concept to younger readers (not to mention all the commentary on revisioni...

    An elf ambassador, Brangwain Spurge, is sent to the city of goblins to offer a gift of goodwill, a recently-found ancient artifact, after centuries of war and hostility. His goblin host, Werfel, is looking forward to the experience. He understands they both share a career and passion f...

    All of M.T. Anderson's books are so weird and I love them so much. He's such a funny, incisive author no matter what he's talking about. This book was a real trip. I also loved Eugene Yelchin's illustrations, and the whole conceit is so clever and so well-excecuted. I feel like thi...

    Having read enough of Anderson's books, I should realize by now that whatever I expect is not what is going to happen. I was also a bit dubious about the fact the book was listed as a finalist for the National Book Award in Young People's Literature. At first it was kind of ho-hum, meh...

    Want another illustrated story recommendation? How about this one? It's dark, it's humorous, and it is a lot of fun to read as you see one person's POV as illustrations and the other's POV written out. Two view points from two sides of an old, ongoing war (elves vs. goblins). Poor ...

    This is a silly book about serious topics. Who can you trust when you can't trust the leaders of a country? An interesting question at this particular time. My biggest quibble was that the super secret transmissions were not adequately explained early on and I was not viewing them with...

    My favorite part of this book is that a goblin's love language is insults. Honestly, I admired this, but it was not my favorite book of the year. Maybe I guessed the ending/twist too early, but it felt too long. I hope there aren't too many kids who fail to finish the story, becaus...

    To all of my friends on Goodreads, "you clammy sweaty pedants" (how Goblins talk to their friends), put aside all your other books and read this immediately! Brilliant and very very funny, this collaboration between Anderson and Yelchin is a joyful challenge to readers everywhere. C...

    I?m just going to let everyone else gush over this one. I?m not the right person for the job. ...

    I voluntarily read and reviewed an advanced copy of this book. All thoughts and opinions are my own. Historian elf Brangwain Spurge has a very clear mission: travel to the land of goblins and present their King, a dark and mysterious alien, with a mighty present. Goblin archivis...

    This is a three star book for me, but I?m giving a bonus star for the experimentation behind it. In short, two historically warring races, elves and goblins, meet by way of a historian from each. Their perceptions are colored by prejudice. Hijinks ensue. The problem for me was that i...

    The elf was a guest. It was Werfel's duty to protect him. Okay, this is more like 3.5 stars. My feelings on this one are hard to explain. It's not the best book I've read, not ridiculously funny, suspenseful or outlandish. But it is nostalgic. Very reminiscent of the Lord of...

    This illustrated novel is really great. I love novels that are difficult to put into one box. The elf, Brangwain Spurge, is sent as an emissary to the goblin king with a gift of an old goblin artifact. He is also tasked with sending back visual images of his time with the goblins to...

    And they all lived happily ever after...? What a strange and interesting book. Werfel the Archivist is a goblin. Brangwain Spurge, also a historian, is an elf. When Spurge gets sent to the goblin's city by his former childhood bully, he assumes that he is there to spy. He doesn't kn...

    What utter joy: wish I was 10 or 8 and could fully feel the fun of a book about gnarly, gross out govlin culture and a fish-out-of-water comedy. This book tells its story through text w shifting points of view, and wordless first person narration through illustration. A shrunken elfin ...

  • Allison Parker
    Dec 10, 2018

    If history is written by the winners then what happens when everyone loses? In my job I read a lot of books written for kids and middle schoolers. To guide this reading I take into account a lot of professional reviews from sources like Kirkus and Publishers Weekly and School Librar...

    This book was a delight. There?s weight to it as you hold it in your hands. The cover gives a hint of the humor to come. The illustrations are a wonder. Spurge and Werfel are my kind of heroes. Highly recommend! ...

    There is no doubt this is brilliant, but often I found myself as confused as an Elf in a Goblin world. ...

    M. T. Anderson is one of my all-time favorite writers, and this latest, a collaboration with illustrator Eugene Yelchin, is a witty wonder. This quirky novel, a collection of letters and dispatches concerning the ongoing strife between the Elves and the Goblins, is a brilliant reflecti...

    The Assassination of Brangwain Spurge takes me back to the whimsy and invention of classics like The Phantom Tollbooth, Willy Wonky, and The Yellow Submarine. A comedy of etiquette errors, of historical hilarities? it?s been a long time since I genuinely laughed out loud while read...

    This is a *really* fun take on the unreliable narrator. As an adult reader, it didn't take me long to figure out why the illustrations and text weren't matching up, but this is such a great way to introduce this concept to younger readers (not to mention all the commentary on revisioni...

    An elf ambassador, Brangwain Spurge, is sent to the city of goblins to offer a gift of goodwill, a recently-found ancient artifact, after centuries of war and hostility. His goblin host, Werfel, is looking forward to the experience. He understands they both share a career and passion f...

  • Kifflie
    Dec 07, 2018

    If history is written by the winners then what happens when everyone loses? In my job I read a lot of books written for kids and middle schoolers. To guide this reading I take into account a lot of professional reviews from sources like Kirkus and Publishers Weekly and School Librar...

    This book was a delight. There?s weight to it as you hold it in your hands. The cover gives a hint of the humor to come. The illustrations are a wonder. Spurge and Werfel are my kind of heroes. Highly recommend! ...

    There is no doubt this is brilliant, but often I found myself as confused as an Elf in a Goblin world. ...

    M. T. Anderson is one of my all-time favorite writers, and this latest, a collaboration with illustrator Eugene Yelchin, is a witty wonder. This quirky novel, a collection of letters and dispatches concerning the ongoing strife between the Elves and the Goblins, is a brilliant reflecti...

    The Assassination of Brangwain Spurge takes me back to the whimsy and invention of classics like The Phantom Tollbooth, Willy Wonky, and The Yellow Submarine. A comedy of etiquette errors, of historical hilarities? it?s been a long time since I genuinely laughed out loud while read...

    This is a *really* fun take on the unreliable narrator. As an adult reader, it didn't take me long to figure out why the illustrations and text weren't matching up, but this is such a great way to introduce this concept to younger readers (not to mention all the commentary on revisioni...

    An elf ambassador, Brangwain Spurge, is sent to the city of goblins to offer a gift of goodwill, a recently-found ancient artifact, after centuries of war and hostility. His goblin host, Werfel, is looking forward to the experience. He understands they both share a career and passion f...

    All of M.T. Anderson's books are so weird and I love them so much. He's such a funny, incisive author no matter what he's talking about. This book was a real trip. I also loved Eugene Yelchin's illustrations, and the whole conceit is so clever and so well-excecuted. I feel like thi...

    Having read enough of Anderson's books, I should realize by now that whatever I expect is not what is going to happen. I was also a bit dubious about the fact the book was listed as a finalist for the National Book Award in Young People's Literature. At first it was kind of ho-hum, meh...

    Want another illustrated story recommendation? How about this one? It's dark, it's humorous, and it is a lot of fun to read as you see one person's POV as illustrations and the other's POV written out. Two view points from two sides of an old, ongoing war (elves vs. goblins). Poor ...

    This is a silly book about serious topics. Who can you trust when you can't trust the leaders of a country? An interesting question at this particular time. My biggest quibble was that the super secret transmissions were not adequately explained early on and I was not viewing them with...

    My favorite part of this book is that a goblin's love language is insults. Honestly, I admired this, but it was not my favorite book of the year. Maybe I guessed the ending/twist too early, but it felt too long. I hope there aren't too many kids who fail to finish the story, becaus...

    To all of my friends on Goodreads, "you clammy sweaty pedants" (how Goblins talk to their friends), put aside all your other books and read this immediately! Brilliant and very very funny, this collaboration between Anderson and Yelchin is a joyful challenge to readers everywhere. C...

    I?m just going to let everyone else gush over this one. I?m not the right person for the job. ...

    I voluntarily read and reviewed an advanced copy of this book. All thoughts and opinions are my own. Historian elf Brangwain Spurge has a very clear mission: travel to the land of goblins and present their King, a dark and mysterious alien, with a mighty present. Goblin archivis...

    This is a three star book for me, but I?m giving a bonus star for the experimentation behind it. In short, two historically warring races, elves and goblins, meet by way of a historian from each. Their perceptions are colored by prejudice. Hijinks ensue. The problem for me was that i...

    The elf was a guest. It was Werfel's duty to protect him. Okay, this is more like 3.5 stars. My feelings on this one are hard to explain. It's not the best book I've read, not ridiculously funny, suspenseful or outlandish. But it is nostalgic. Very reminiscent of the Lord of...

    This illustrated novel is really great. I love novels that are difficult to put into one box. The elf, Brangwain Spurge, is sent as an emissary to the goblin king with a gift of an old goblin artifact. He is also tasked with sending back visual images of his time with the goblins to...

    And they all lived happily ever after...? What a strange and interesting book. Werfel the Archivist is a goblin. Brangwain Spurge, also a historian, is an elf. When Spurge gets sent to the goblin's city by his former childhood bully, he assumes that he is there to spy. He doesn't kn...

    What utter joy: wish I was 10 or 8 and could fully feel the fun of a book about gnarly, gross out govlin culture and a fish-out-of-water comedy. This book tells its story through text w shifting points of view, and wordless first person narration through illustration. A shrunken elfin ...

    I have read enough M. T. Anderson to know I usually like his style. It's weird, off the wall, and you never know where he is going until it gets there. Feed is a book I read 10 years ago and still think about and Landscape with Invisible Hand was a wild ride. This one, however, gets ...

    I am going to break one of my personal writing rules and start this review with a question: (view spoiler)[What if a book had two stories at war with each other? In The Assassination of Brangwain Spurge by M.T. Anderson and illustrated by Eugene Yelchin, that is exactly what happe...

    Really enjoyed this one. This is a trend with me - I usually enjoy children's literature much more than YA. YA is mostly whiney, smarmy, and very annoying, or at least this is what I feel when I read modern YA. With children's literature, it it different. It is sincere, hilarious, ho...

    What a unique collaboration! Anderson and Yelchin have told a fascinating story about an elf/goblin conflict through the use of alternating text and illustrations. Brangwain Spurge and Werfel are both historians who each have their own biases about what has gone on between the two race...

  • J
    Oct 16, 2018

    If history is written by the winners then what happens when everyone loses? In my job I read a lot of books written for kids and middle schoolers. To guide this reading I take into account a lot of professional reviews from sources like Kirkus and Publishers Weekly and School Librar...

    This book was a delight. There?s weight to it as you hold it in your hands. The cover gives a hint of the humor to come. The illustrations are a wonder. Spurge and Werfel are my kind of heroes. Highly recommend! ...

    There is no doubt this is brilliant, but often I found myself as confused as an Elf in a Goblin world. ...

    M. T. Anderson is one of my all-time favorite writers, and this latest, a collaboration with illustrator Eugene Yelchin, is a witty wonder. This quirky novel, a collection of letters and dispatches concerning the ongoing strife between the Elves and the Goblins, is a brilliant reflecti...

    The Assassination of Brangwain Spurge takes me back to the whimsy and invention of classics like The Phantom Tollbooth, Willy Wonky, and The Yellow Submarine. A comedy of etiquette errors, of historical hilarities? it?s been a long time since I genuinely laughed out loud while read...

    This is a *really* fun take on the unreliable narrator. As an adult reader, it didn't take me long to figure out why the illustrations and text weren't matching up, but this is such a great way to introduce this concept to younger readers (not to mention all the commentary on revisioni...

    An elf ambassador, Brangwain Spurge, is sent to the city of goblins to offer a gift of goodwill, a recently-found ancient artifact, after centuries of war and hostility. His goblin host, Werfel, is looking forward to the experience. He understands they both share a career and passion f...

    All of M.T. Anderson's books are so weird and I love them so much. He's such a funny, incisive author no matter what he's talking about. This book was a real trip. I also loved Eugene Yelchin's illustrations, and the whole conceit is so clever and so well-excecuted. I feel like thi...

    Having read enough of Anderson's books, I should realize by now that whatever I expect is not what is going to happen. I was also a bit dubious about the fact the book was listed as a finalist for the National Book Award in Young People's Literature. At first it was kind of ho-hum, meh...

  • Amy
    Dec 08, 2018

    If history is written by the winners then what happens when everyone loses? In my job I read a lot of books written for kids and middle schoolers. To guide this reading I take into account a lot of professional reviews from sources like Kirkus and Publishers Weekly and School Librar...

    This book was a delight. There?s weight to it as you hold it in your hands. The cover gives a hint of the humor to come. The illustrations are a wonder. Spurge and Werfel are my kind of heroes. Highly recommend! ...

    There is no doubt this is brilliant, but often I found myself as confused as an Elf in a Goblin world. ...

    M. T. Anderson is one of my all-time favorite writers, and this latest, a collaboration with illustrator Eugene Yelchin, is a witty wonder. This quirky novel, a collection of letters and dispatches concerning the ongoing strife between the Elves and the Goblins, is a brilliant reflecti...

    The Assassination of Brangwain Spurge takes me back to the whimsy and invention of classics like The Phantom Tollbooth, Willy Wonky, and The Yellow Submarine. A comedy of etiquette errors, of historical hilarities? it?s been a long time since I genuinely laughed out loud while read...

    This is a *really* fun take on the unreliable narrator. As an adult reader, it didn't take me long to figure out why the illustrations and text weren't matching up, but this is such a great way to introduce this concept to younger readers (not to mention all the commentary on revisioni...

    An elf ambassador, Brangwain Spurge, is sent to the city of goblins to offer a gift of goodwill, a recently-found ancient artifact, after centuries of war and hostility. His goblin host, Werfel, is looking forward to the experience. He understands they both share a career and passion f...

    All of M.T. Anderson's books are so weird and I love them so much. He's such a funny, incisive author no matter what he's talking about. This book was a real trip. I also loved Eugene Yelchin's illustrations, and the whole conceit is so clever and so well-excecuted. I feel like thi...

    Having read enough of Anderson's books, I should realize by now that whatever I expect is not what is going to happen. I was also a bit dubious about the fact the book was listed as a finalist for the National Book Award in Young People's Literature. At first it was kind of ho-hum, meh...

    Want another illustrated story recommendation? How about this one? It's dark, it's humorous, and it is a lot of fun to read as you see one person's POV as illustrations and the other's POV written out. Two view points from two sides of an old, ongoing war (elves vs. goblins). Poor ...

    This is a silly book about serious topics. Who can you trust when you can't trust the leaders of a country? An interesting question at this particular time. My biggest quibble was that the super secret transmissions were not adequately explained early on and I was not viewing them with...

    My favorite part of this book is that a goblin's love language is insults. Honestly, I admired this, but it was not my favorite book of the year. Maybe I guessed the ending/twist too early, but it felt too long. I hope there aren't too many kids who fail to finish the story, becaus...

    To all of my friends on Goodreads, "you clammy sweaty pedants" (how Goblins talk to their friends), put aside all your other books and read this immediately! Brilliant and very very funny, this collaboration between Anderson and Yelchin is a joyful challenge to readers everywhere. C...

    I?m just going to let everyone else gush over this one. I?m not the right person for the job. ...

    I voluntarily read and reviewed an advanced copy of this book. All thoughts and opinions are my own. Historian elf Brangwain Spurge has a very clear mission: travel to the land of goblins and present their King, a dark and mysterious alien, with a mighty present. Goblin archivis...

    This is a three star book for me, but I?m giving a bonus star for the experimentation behind it. In short, two historically warring races, elves and goblins, meet by way of a historian from each. Their perceptions are colored by prejudice. Hijinks ensue. The problem for me was that i...

    The elf was a guest. It was Werfel's duty to protect him. Okay, this is more like 3.5 stars. My feelings on this one are hard to explain. It's not the best book I've read, not ridiculously funny, suspenseful or outlandish. But it is nostalgic. Very reminiscent of the Lord of...

    This illustrated novel is really great. I love novels that are difficult to put into one box. The elf, Brangwain Spurge, is sent as an emissary to the goblin king with a gift of an old goblin artifact. He is also tasked with sending back visual images of his time with the goblins to...

    And they all lived happily ever after...? What a strange and interesting book. Werfel the Archivist is a goblin. Brangwain Spurge, also a historian, is an elf. When Spurge gets sent to the goblin's city by his former childhood bully, he assumes that he is there to spy. He doesn't kn...

    What utter joy: wish I was 10 or 8 and could fully feel the fun of a book about gnarly, gross out govlin culture and a fish-out-of-water comedy. This book tells its story through text w shifting points of view, and wordless first person narration through illustration. A shrunken elfin ...

    I have read enough M. T. Anderson to know I usually like his style. It's weird, off the wall, and you never know where he is going until it gets there. Feed is a book I read 10 years ago and still think about and Landscape with Invisible Hand was a wild ride. This one, however, gets ...

    I am going to break one of my personal writing rules and start this review with a question: (view spoiler)[What if a book had two stories at war with each other? In The Assassination of Brangwain Spurge by M.T. Anderson and illustrated by Eugene Yelchin, that is exactly what happe...

    Really enjoyed this one. This is a trend with me - I usually enjoy children's literature much more than YA. YA is mostly whiney, smarmy, and very annoying, or at least this is what I feel when I read modern YA. With children's literature, it it different. It is sincere, hilarious, ho...

    What a unique collaboration! Anderson and Yelchin have told a fascinating story about an elf/goblin conflict through the use of alternating text and illustrations. Brangwain Spurge and Werfel are both historians who each have their own biases about what has gone on between the two race...

    (4.5 stars) M.T. Anderson is one of my kids? favorite authors, so when I saw this book at the bookstore, I had to have it. A glance at the insides looked like the book would be a lot of fun, and it was. The story, which, very briefly, tells of the adventures of an elf and a goblin, ...

    Two history nerds from warring cultures find themselves at the heart of international politics and intrigue in a story told from alternating points of view (the main narrative, independent viewpoints told by beautiful black and white illustrations, and increasingly more desperate and h...

    gripping to the point of almost unputdownable. It's a long book, but with many interspersed sequences of illustrations that carry the story forwards, which make it a faster read. I might have given it a fifth star, except that my heart was too sad for the Goblin Historian, who was the ...

    Loved it. So hilarious, so different. One of my favorites this year. AMAZING on audio. This is one of those books I never would have read in a million years and only read on obligation, but I LOVED it. A true reading delight. This book is made to be read a loud. I see quick-witted uppe...

  • Zulfiya
    Nov 12, 2018

    If history is written by the winners then what happens when everyone loses? In my job I read a lot of books written for kids and middle schoolers. To guide this reading I take into account a lot of professional reviews from sources like Kirkus and Publishers Weekly and School Librar...

    This book was a delight. There?s weight to it as you hold it in your hands. The cover gives a hint of the humor to come. The illustrations are a wonder. Spurge and Werfel are my kind of heroes. Highly recommend! ...

    There is no doubt this is brilliant, but often I found myself as confused as an Elf in a Goblin world. ...

    M. T. Anderson is one of my all-time favorite writers, and this latest, a collaboration with illustrator Eugene Yelchin, is a witty wonder. This quirky novel, a collection of letters and dispatches concerning the ongoing strife between the Elves and the Goblins, is a brilliant reflecti...

    The Assassination of Brangwain Spurge takes me back to the whimsy and invention of classics like The Phantom Tollbooth, Willy Wonky, and The Yellow Submarine. A comedy of etiquette errors, of historical hilarities? it?s been a long time since I genuinely laughed out loud while read...

    This is a *really* fun take on the unreliable narrator. As an adult reader, it didn't take me long to figure out why the illustrations and text weren't matching up, but this is such a great way to introduce this concept to younger readers (not to mention all the commentary on revisioni...

    An elf ambassador, Brangwain Spurge, is sent to the city of goblins to offer a gift of goodwill, a recently-found ancient artifact, after centuries of war and hostility. His goblin host, Werfel, is looking forward to the experience. He understands they both share a career and passion f...

    All of M.T. Anderson's books are so weird and I love them so much. He's such a funny, incisive author no matter what he's talking about. This book was a real trip. I also loved Eugene Yelchin's illustrations, and the whole conceit is so clever and so well-excecuted. I feel like thi...

    Having read enough of Anderson's books, I should realize by now that whatever I expect is not what is going to happen. I was also a bit dubious about the fact the book was listed as a finalist for the National Book Award in Young People's Literature. At first it was kind of ho-hum, meh...

    Want another illustrated story recommendation? How about this one? It's dark, it's humorous, and it is a lot of fun to read as you see one person's POV as illustrations and the other's POV written out. Two view points from two sides of an old, ongoing war (elves vs. goblins). Poor ...

    This is a silly book about serious topics. Who can you trust when you can't trust the leaders of a country? An interesting question at this particular time. My biggest quibble was that the super secret transmissions were not adequately explained early on and I was not viewing them with...

    My favorite part of this book is that a goblin's love language is insults. Honestly, I admired this, but it was not my favorite book of the year. Maybe I guessed the ending/twist too early, but it felt too long. I hope there aren't too many kids who fail to finish the story, becaus...

    To all of my friends on Goodreads, "you clammy sweaty pedants" (how Goblins talk to their friends), put aside all your other books and read this immediately! Brilliant and very very funny, this collaboration between Anderson and Yelchin is a joyful challenge to readers everywhere. C...

    I?m just going to let everyone else gush over this one. I?m not the right person for the job. ...

    I voluntarily read and reviewed an advanced copy of this book. All thoughts and opinions are my own. Historian elf Brangwain Spurge has a very clear mission: travel to the land of goblins and present their King, a dark and mysterious alien, with a mighty present. Goblin archivis...

    This is a three star book for me, but I?m giving a bonus star for the experimentation behind it. In short, two historically warring races, elves and goblins, meet by way of a historian from each. Their perceptions are colored by prejudice. Hijinks ensue. The problem for me was that i...

    The elf was a guest. It was Werfel's duty to protect him. Okay, this is more like 3.5 stars. My feelings on this one are hard to explain. It's not the best book I've read, not ridiculously funny, suspenseful or outlandish. But it is nostalgic. Very reminiscent of the Lord of...

    This illustrated novel is really great. I love novels that are difficult to put into one box. The elf, Brangwain Spurge, is sent as an emissary to the goblin king with a gift of an old goblin artifact. He is also tasked with sending back visual images of his time with the goblins to...

    And they all lived happily ever after...? What a strange and interesting book. Werfel the Archivist is a goblin. Brangwain Spurge, also a historian, is an elf. When Spurge gets sent to the goblin's city by his former childhood bully, he assumes that he is there to spy. He doesn't kn...

    What utter joy: wish I was 10 or 8 and could fully feel the fun of a book about gnarly, gross out govlin culture and a fish-out-of-water comedy. This book tells its story through text w shifting points of view, and wordless first person narration through illustration. A shrunken elfin ...

    I have read enough M. T. Anderson to know I usually like his style. It's weird, off the wall, and you never know where he is going until it gets there. Feed is a book I read 10 years ago and still think about and Landscape with Invisible Hand was a wild ride. This one, however, gets ...

    I am going to break one of my personal writing rules and start this review with a question: (view spoiler)[What if a book had two stories at war with each other? In The Assassination of Brangwain Spurge by M.T. Anderson and illustrated by Eugene Yelchin, that is exactly what happe...

    Really enjoyed this one. This is a trend with me - I usually enjoy children's literature much more than YA. YA is mostly whiney, smarmy, and very annoying, or at least this is what I feel when I read modern YA. With children's literature, it it different. It is sincere, hilarious, ho...

  • Angie
    Nov 17, 2018

    If history is written by the winners then what happens when everyone loses? In my job I read a lot of books written for kids and middle schoolers. To guide this reading I take into account a lot of professional reviews from sources like Kirkus and Publishers Weekly and School Librar...

    This book was a delight. There?s weight to it as you hold it in your hands. The cover gives a hint of the humor to come. The illustrations are a wonder. Spurge and Werfel are my kind of heroes. Highly recommend! ...

    There is no doubt this is brilliant, but often I found myself as confused as an Elf in a Goblin world. ...

    M. T. Anderson is one of my all-time favorite writers, and this latest, a collaboration with illustrator Eugene Yelchin, is a witty wonder. This quirky novel, a collection of letters and dispatches concerning the ongoing strife between the Elves and the Goblins, is a brilliant reflecti...

    The Assassination of Brangwain Spurge takes me back to the whimsy and invention of classics like The Phantom Tollbooth, Willy Wonky, and The Yellow Submarine. A comedy of etiquette errors, of historical hilarities? it?s been a long time since I genuinely laughed out loud while read...

    This is a *really* fun take on the unreliable narrator. As an adult reader, it didn't take me long to figure out why the illustrations and text weren't matching up, but this is such a great way to introduce this concept to younger readers (not to mention all the commentary on revisioni...

    An elf ambassador, Brangwain Spurge, is sent to the city of goblins to offer a gift of goodwill, a recently-found ancient artifact, after centuries of war and hostility. His goblin host, Werfel, is looking forward to the experience. He understands they both share a career and passion f...

    All of M.T. Anderson's books are so weird and I love them so much. He's such a funny, incisive author no matter what he's talking about. This book was a real trip. I also loved Eugene Yelchin's illustrations, and the whole conceit is so clever and so well-excecuted. I feel like thi...

    Having read enough of Anderson's books, I should realize by now that whatever I expect is not what is going to happen. I was also a bit dubious about the fact the book was listed as a finalist for the National Book Award in Young People's Literature. At first it was kind of ho-hum, meh...

    Want another illustrated story recommendation? How about this one? It's dark, it's humorous, and it is a lot of fun to read as you see one person's POV as illustrations and the other's POV written out. Two view points from two sides of an old, ongoing war (elves vs. goblins). Poor ...

  • Paula Lyle
    Oct 20, 2018

    If history is written by the winners then what happens when everyone loses? In my job I read a lot of books written for kids and middle schoolers. To guide this reading I take into account a lot of professional reviews from sources like Kirkus and Publishers Weekly and School Librar...

    This book was a delight. There?s weight to it as you hold it in your hands. The cover gives a hint of the humor to come. The illustrations are a wonder. Spurge and Werfel are my kind of heroes. Highly recommend! ...

    There is no doubt this is brilliant, but often I found myself as confused as an Elf in a Goblin world. ...

    M. T. Anderson is one of my all-time favorite writers, and this latest, a collaboration with illustrator Eugene Yelchin, is a witty wonder. This quirky novel, a collection of letters and dispatches concerning the ongoing strife between the Elves and the Goblins, is a brilliant reflecti...

    The Assassination of Brangwain Spurge takes me back to the whimsy and invention of classics like The Phantom Tollbooth, Willy Wonky, and The Yellow Submarine. A comedy of etiquette errors, of historical hilarities? it?s been a long time since I genuinely laughed out loud while read...

    This is a *really* fun take on the unreliable narrator. As an adult reader, it didn't take me long to figure out why the illustrations and text weren't matching up, but this is such a great way to introduce this concept to younger readers (not to mention all the commentary on revisioni...

    An elf ambassador, Brangwain Spurge, is sent to the city of goblins to offer a gift of goodwill, a recently-found ancient artifact, after centuries of war and hostility. His goblin host, Werfel, is looking forward to the experience. He understands they both share a career and passion f...

    All of M.T. Anderson's books are so weird and I love them so much. He's such a funny, incisive author no matter what he's talking about. This book was a real trip. I also loved Eugene Yelchin's illustrations, and the whole conceit is so clever and so well-excecuted. I feel like thi...

    Having read enough of Anderson's books, I should realize by now that whatever I expect is not what is going to happen. I was also a bit dubious about the fact the book was listed as a finalist for the National Book Award in Young People's Literature. At first it was kind of ho-hum, meh...

    Want another illustrated story recommendation? How about this one? It's dark, it's humorous, and it is a lot of fun to read as you see one person's POV as illustrations and the other's POV written out. Two view points from two sides of an old, ongoing war (elves vs. goblins). Poor ...

    This is a silly book about serious topics. Who can you trust when you can't trust the leaders of a country? An interesting question at this particular time. My biggest quibble was that the super secret transmissions were not adequately explained early on and I was not viewing them with...

  • Michelle
    Nov 04, 2018

    If history is written by the winners then what happens when everyone loses? In my job I read a lot of books written for kids and middle schoolers. To guide this reading I take into account a lot of professional reviews from sources like Kirkus and Publishers Weekly and School Librar...

    This book was a delight. There?s weight to it as you hold it in your hands. The cover gives a hint of the humor to come. The illustrations are a wonder. Spurge and Werfel are my kind of heroes. Highly recommend! ...

    There is no doubt this is brilliant, but often I found myself as confused as an Elf in a Goblin world. ...

    M. T. Anderson is one of my all-time favorite writers, and this latest, a collaboration with illustrator Eugene Yelchin, is a witty wonder. This quirky novel, a collection of letters and dispatches concerning the ongoing strife between the Elves and the Goblins, is a brilliant reflecti...

    The Assassination of Brangwain Spurge takes me back to the whimsy and invention of classics like The Phantom Tollbooth, Willy Wonky, and The Yellow Submarine. A comedy of etiquette errors, of historical hilarities? it?s been a long time since I genuinely laughed out loud while read...

    This is a *really* fun take on the unreliable narrator. As an adult reader, it didn't take me long to figure out why the illustrations and text weren't matching up, but this is such a great way to introduce this concept to younger readers (not to mention all the commentary on revisioni...

  • Paul
    Sep 03, 2018

    If history is written by the winners then what happens when everyone loses? In my job I read a lot of books written for kids and middle schoolers. To guide this reading I take into account a lot of professional reviews from sources like Kirkus and Publishers Weekly and School Librar...

    This book was a delight. There?s weight to it as you hold it in your hands. The cover gives a hint of the humor to come. The illustrations are a wonder. Spurge and Werfel are my kind of heroes. Highly recommend! ...

    There is no doubt this is brilliant, but often I found myself as confused as an Elf in a Goblin world. ...

    M. T. Anderson is one of my all-time favorite writers, and this latest, a collaboration with illustrator Eugene Yelchin, is a witty wonder. This quirky novel, a collection of letters and dispatches concerning the ongoing strife between the Elves and the Goblins, is a brilliant reflecti...

    The Assassination of Brangwain Spurge takes me back to the whimsy and invention of classics like The Phantom Tollbooth, Willy Wonky, and The Yellow Submarine. A comedy of etiquette errors, of historical hilarities? it?s been a long time since I genuinely laughed out loud while read...

  • Gianna
    Sep 03, 2018

    If history is written by the winners then what happens when everyone loses? In my job I read a lot of books written for kids and middle schoolers. To guide this reading I take into account a lot of professional reviews from sources like Kirkus and Publishers Weekly and School Librar...

    This book was a delight. There?s weight to it as you hold it in your hands. The cover gives a hint of the humor to come. The illustrations are a wonder. Spurge and Werfel are my kind of heroes. Highly recommend! ...

    There is no doubt this is brilliant, but often I found myself as confused as an Elf in a Goblin world. ...

    M. T. Anderson is one of my all-time favorite writers, and this latest, a collaboration with illustrator Eugene Yelchin, is a witty wonder. This quirky novel, a collection of letters and dispatches concerning the ongoing strife between the Elves and the Goblins, is a brilliant reflecti...

    The Assassination of Brangwain Spurge takes me back to the whimsy and invention of classics like The Phantom Tollbooth, Willy Wonky, and The Yellow Submarine. A comedy of etiquette errors, of historical hilarities? it?s been a long time since I genuinely laughed out loud while read...

    This is a *really* fun take on the unreliable narrator. As an adult reader, it didn't take me long to figure out why the illustrations and text weren't matching up, but this is such a great way to introduce this concept to younger readers (not to mention all the commentary on revisioni...

    An elf ambassador, Brangwain Spurge, is sent to the city of goblins to offer a gift of goodwill, a recently-found ancient artifact, after centuries of war and hostility. His goblin host, Werfel, is looking forward to the experience. He understands they both share a career and passion f...

    All of M.T. Anderson's books are so weird and I love them so much. He's such a funny, incisive author no matter what he's talking about. This book was a real trip. I also loved Eugene Yelchin's illustrations, and the whole conceit is so clever and so well-excecuted. I feel like thi...

    Having read enough of Anderson's books, I should realize by now that whatever I expect is not what is going to happen. I was also a bit dubious about the fact the book was listed as a finalist for the National Book Award in Young People's Literature. At first it was kind of ho-hum, meh...

    Want another illustrated story recommendation? How about this one? It's dark, it's humorous, and it is a lot of fun to read as you see one person's POV as illustrations and the other's POV written out. Two view points from two sides of an old, ongoing war (elves vs. goblins). Poor ...

    This is a silly book about serious topics. Who can you trust when you can't trust the leaders of a country? An interesting question at this particular time. My biggest quibble was that the super secret transmissions were not adequately explained early on and I was not viewing them with...

    My favorite part of this book is that a goblin's love language is insults. Honestly, I admired this, but it was not my favorite book of the year. Maybe I guessed the ending/twist too early, but it felt too long. I hope there aren't too many kids who fail to finish the story, becaus...

    To all of my friends on Goodreads, "you clammy sweaty pedants" (how Goblins talk to their friends), put aside all your other books and read this immediately! Brilliant and very very funny, this collaboration between Anderson and Yelchin is a joyful challenge to readers everywhere. C...

    I?m just going to let everyone else gush over this one. I?m not the right person for the job. ...

    I voluntarily read and reviewed an advanced copy of this book. All thoughts and opinions are my own. Historian elf Brangwain Spurge has a very clear mission: travel to the land of goblins and present their King, a dark and mysterious alien, with a mighty present. Goblin archivis...

  • Denny
    Oct 12, 2018

    If history is written by the winners then what happens when everyone loses? In my job I read a lot of books written for kids and middle schoolers. To guide this reading I take into account a lot of professional reviews from sources like Kirkus and Publishers Weekly and School Librar...

    This book was a delight. There?s weight to it as you hold it in your hands. The cover gives a hint of the humor to come. The illustrations are a wonder. Spurge and Werfel are my kind of heroes. Highly recommend! ...

  • Lara
    Oct 25, 2018

    If history is written by the winners then what happens when everyone loses? In my job I read a lot of books written for kids and middle schoolers. To guide this reading I take into account a lot of professional reviews from sources like Kirkus and Publishers Weekly and School Librar...

    This book was a delight. There?s weight to it as you hold it in your hands. The cover gives a hint of the humor to come. The illustrations are a wonder. Spurge and Werfel are my kind of heroes. Highly recommend! ...

    There is no doubt this is brilliant, but often I found myself as confused as an Elf in a Goblin world. ...

    M. T. Anderson is one of my all-time favorite writers, and this latest, a collaboration with illustrator Eugene Yelchin, is a witty wonder. This quirky novel, a collection of letters and dispatches concerning the ongoing strife between the Elves and the Goblins, is a brilliant reflecti...

    The Assassination of Brangwain Spurge takes me back to the whimsy and invention of classics like The Phantom Tollbooth, Willy Wonky, and The Yellow Submarine. A comedy of etiquette errors, of historical hilarities? it?s been a long time since I genuinely laughed out loud while read...

    This is a *really* fun take on the unreliable narrator. As an adult reader, it didn't take me long to figure out why the illustrations and text weren't matching up, but this is such a great way to introduce this concept to younger readers (not to mention all the commentary on revisioni...

    An elf ambassador, Brangwain Spurge, is sent to the city of goblins to offer a gift of goodwill, a recently-found ancient artifact, after centuries of war and hostility. His goblin host, Werfel, is looking forward to the experience. He understands they both share a career and passion f...

    All of M.T. Anderson's books are so weird and I love them so much. He's such a funny, incisive author no matter what he's talking about. This book was a real trip. I also loved Eugene Yelchin's illustrations, and the whole conceit is so clever and so well-excecuted. I feel like thi...

    Having read enough of Anderson's books, I should realize by now that whatever I expect is not what is going to happen. I was also a bit dubious about the fact the book was listed as a finalist for the National Book Award in Young People's Literature. At first it was kind of ho-hum, meh...

    Want another illustrated story recommendation? How about this one? It's dark, it's humorous, and it is a lot of fun to read as you see one person's POV as illustrations and the other's POV written out. Two view points from two sides of an old, ongoing war (elves vs. goblins). Poor ...

    This is a silly book about serious topics. Who can you trust when you can't trust the leaders of a country? An interesting question at this particular time. My biggest quibble was that the super secret transmissions were not adequately explained early on and I was not viewing them with...

    My favorite part of this book is that a goblin's love language is insults. Honestly, I admired this, but it was not my favorite book of the year. Maybe I guessed the ending/twist too early, but it felt too long. I hope there aren't too many kids who fail to finish the story, becaus...

    To all of my friends on Goodreads, "you clammy sweaty pedants" (how Goblins talk to their friends), put aside all your other books and read this immediately! Brilliant and very very funny, this collaboration between Anderson and Yelchin is a joyful challenge to readers everywhere. C...

    I?m just going to let everyone else gush over this one. I?m not the right person for the job. ...

    I voluntarily read and reviewed an advanced copy of this book. All thoughts and opinions are my own. Historian elf Brangwain Spurge has a very clear mission: travel to the land of goblins and present their King, a dark and mysterious alien, with a mighty present. Goblin archivis...

    This is a three star book for me, but I?m giving a bonus star for the experimentation behind it. In short, two historically warring races, elves and goblins, meet by way of a historian from each. Their perceptions are colored by prejudice. Hijinks ensue. The problem for me was that i...

    The elf was a guest. It was Werfel's duty to protect him. Okay, this is more like 3.5 stars. My feelings on this one are hard to explain. It's not the best book I've read, not ridiculously funny, suspenseful or outlandish. But it is nostalgic. Very reminiscent of the Lord of...

    This illustrated novel is really great. I love novels that are difficult to put into one box. The elf, Brangwain Spurge, is sent as an emissary to the goblin king with a gift of an old goblin artifact. He is also tasked with sending back visual images of his time with the goblins to...

    And they all lived happily ever after...? What a strange and interesting book. Werfel the Archivist is a goblin. Brangwain Spurge, also a historian, is an elf. When Spurge gets sent to the goblin's city by his former childhood bully, he assumes that he is there to spy. He doesn't kn...

    What utter joy: wish I was 10 or 8 and could fully feel the fun of a book about gnarly, gross out govlin culture and a fish-out-of-water comedy. This book tells its story through text w shifting points of view, and wordless first person narration through illustration. A shrunken elfin ...

    I have read enough M. T. Anderson to know I usually like his style. It's weird, off the wall, and you never know where he is going until it gets there. Feed is a book I read 10 years ago and still think about and Landscape with Invisible Hand was a wild ride. This one, however, gets ...

    I am going to break one of my personal writing rules and start this review with a question: (view spoiler)[What if a book had two stories at war with each other? In The Assassination of Brangwain Spurge by M.T. Anderson and illustrated by Eugene Yelchin, that is exactly what happe...

    Really enjoyed this one. This is a trend with me - I usually enjoy children's literature much more than YA. YA is mostly whiney, smarmy, and very annoying, or at least this is what I feel when I read modern YA. With children's literature, it it different. It is sincere, hilarious, ho...

    What a unique collaboration! Anderson and Yelchin have told a fascinating story about an elf/goblin conflict through the use of alternating text and illustrations. Brangwain Spurge and Werfel are both historians who each have their own biases about what has gone on between the two race...

    (4.5 stars) M.T. Anderson is one of my kids? favorite authors, so when I saw this book at the bookstore, I had to have it. A glance at the insides looked like the book would be a lot of fun, and it was. The story, which, very briefly, tells of the adventures of an elf and a goblin, ...

    Two history nerds from warring cultures find themselves at the heart of international politics and intrigue in a story told from alternating points of view (the main narrative, independent viewpoints told by beautiful black and white illustrations, and increasingly more desperate and h...

    gripping to the point of almost unputdownable. It's a long book, but with many interspersed sequences of illustrations that carry the story forwards, which make it a faster read. I might have given it a fifth star, except that my heart was too sad for the Goblin Historian, who was the ...

    Loved it. So hilarious, so different. One of my favorites this year. AMAZING on audio. This is one of those books I never would have read in a million years and only read on obligation, but I LOVED it. A true reading delight. This book is made to be read a loud. I see quick-witted uppe...

    This is a delightful, hilarious and altogether entertaining story about an elf on a diplomatic mission to the enemy goblin?s kingdom to deliver an ancient and valuable artifact. He is a historian and is hosted by his goblin counterpart. Things do not go as planned. This is the first ...

    Funny and clever, and sharply pointed in spots regarding long-held prejudices and history being written by the victors. The illustrations are magnificent. ...

  • Jonine Bergen
    Nov 26, 2018

    If history is written by the winners then what happens when everyone loses? In my job I read a lot of books written for kids and middle schoolers. To guide this reading I take into account a lot of professional reviews from sources like Kirkus and Publishers Weekly and School Librar...

    This book was a delight. There?s weight to it as you hold it in your hands. The cover gives a hint of the humor to come. The illustrations are a wonder. Spurge and Werfel are my kind of heroes. Highly recommend! ...

    There is no doubt this is brilliant, but often I found myself as confused as an Elf in a Goblin world. ...

    M. T. Anderson is one of my all-time favorite writers, and this latest, a collaboration with illustrator Eugene Yelchin, is a witty wonder. This quirky novel, a collection of letters and dispatches concerning the ongoing strife between the Elves and the Goblins, is a brilliant reflecti...

    The Assassination of Brangwain Spurge takes me back to the whimsy and invention of classics like The Phantom Tollbooth, Willy Wonky, and The Yellow Submarine. A comedy of etiquette errors, of historical hilarities? it?s been a long time since I genuinely laughed out loud while read...

    This is a *really* fun take on the unreliable narrator. As an adult reader, it didn't take me long to figure out why the illustrations and text weren't matching up, but this is such a great way to introduce this concept to younger readers (not to mention all the commentary on revisioni...

    An elf ambassador, Brangwain Spurge, is sent to the city of goblins to offer a gift of goodwill, a recently-found ancient artifact, after centuries of war and hostility. His goblin host, Werfel, is looking forward to the experience. He understands they both share a career and passion f...

    All of M.T. Anderson's books are so weird and I love them so much. He's such a funny, incisive author no matter what he's talking about. This book was a real trip. I also loved Eugene Yelchin's illustrations, and the whole conceit is so clever and so well-excecuted. I feel like thi...

    Having read enough of Anderson's books, I should realize by now that whatever I expect is not what is going to happen. I was also a bit dubious about the fact the book was listed as a finalist for the National Book Award in Young People's Literature. At first it was kind of ho-hum, meh...

    Want another illustrated story recommendation? How about this one? It's dark, it's humorous, and it is a lot of fun to read as you see one person's POV as illustrations and the other's POV written out. Two view points from two sides of an old, ongoing war (elves vs. goblins). Poor ...

    This is a silly book about serious topics. Who can you trust when you can't trust the leaders of a country? An interesting question at this particular time. My biggest quibble was that the super secret transmissions were not adequately explained early on and I was not viewing them with...

    My favorite part of this book is that a goblin's love language is insults. Honestly, I admired this, but it was not my favorite book of the year. Maybe I guessed the ending/twist too early, but it felt too long. I hope there aren't too many kids who fail to finish the story, becaus...

    To all of my friends on Goodreads, "you clammy sweaty pedants" (how Goblins talk to their friends), put aside all your other books and read this immediately! Brilliant and very very funny, this collaboration between Anderson and Yelchin is a joyful challenge to readers everywhere. C...

    I?m just going to let everyone else gush over this one. I?m not the right person for the job. ...

    I voluntarily read and reviewed an advanced copy of this book. All thoughts and opinions are my own. Historian elf Brangwain Spurge has a very clear mission: travel to the land of goblins and present their King, a dark and mysterious alien, with a mighty present. Goblin archivis...

    This is a three star book for me, but I?m giving a bonus star for the experimentation behind it. In short, two historically warring races, elves and goblins, meet by way of a historian from each. Their perceptions are colored by prejudice. Hijinks ensue. The problem for me was that i...

    The elf was a guest. It was Werfel's duty to protect him. Okay, this is more like 3.5 stars. My feelings on this one are hard to explain. It's not the best book I've read, not ridiculously funny, suspenseful or outlandish. But it is nostalgic. Very reminiscent of the Lord of...

    This illustrated novel is really great. I love novels that are difficult to put into one box. The elf, Brangwain Spurge, is sent as an emissary to the goblin king with a gift of an old goblin artifact. He is also tasked with sending back visual images of his time with the goblins to...

  • Stephanie (aka WW)
    Nov 27, 2018

    If history is written by the winners then what happens when everyone loses? In my job I read a lot of books written for kids and middle schoolers. To guide this reading I take into account a lot of professional reviews from sources like Kirkus and Publishers Weekly and School Librar...

    This book was a delight. There?s weight to it as you hold it in your hands. The cover gives a hint of the humor to come. The illustrations are a wonder. Spurge and Werfel are my kind of heroes. Highly recommend! ...

    There is no doubt this is brilliant, but often I found myself as confused as an Elf in a Goblin world. ...

    M. T. Anderson is one of my all-time favorite writers, and this latest, a collaboration with illustrator Eugene Yelchin, is a witty wonder. This quirky novel, a collection of letters and dispatches concerning the ongoing strife between the Elves and the Goblins, is a brilliant reflecti...

    The Assassination of Brangwain Spurge takes me back to the whimsy and invention of classics like The Phantom Tollbooth, Willy Wonky, and The Yellow Submarine. A comedy of etiquette errors, of historical hilarities? it?s been a long time since I genuinely laughed out loud while read...

    This is a *really* fun take on the unreliable narrator. As an adult reader, it didn't take me long to figure out why the illustrations and text weren't matching up, but this is such a great way to introduce this concept to younger readers (not to mention all the commentary on revisioni...

    An elf ambassador, Brangwain Spurge, is sent to the city of goblins to offer a gift of goodwill, a recently-found ancient artifact, after centuries of war and hostility. His goblin host, Werfel, is looking forward to the experience. He understands they both share a career and passion f...

    All of M.T. Anderson's books are so weird and I love them so much. He's such a funny, incisive author no matter what he's talking about. This book was a real trip. I also loved Eugene Yelchin's illustrations, and the whole conceit is so clever and so well-excecuted. I feel like thi...

    Having read enough of Anderson's books, I should realize by now that whatever I expect is not what is going to happen. I was also a bit dubious about the fact the book was listed as a finalist for the National Book Award in Young People's Literature. At first it was kind of ho-hum, meh...

    Want another illustrated story recommendation? How about this one? It's dark, it's humorous, and it is a lot of fun to read as you see one person's POV as illustrations and the other's POV written out. Two view points from two sides of an old, ongoing war (elves vs. goblins). Poor ...

    This is a silly book about serious topics. Who can you trust when you can't trust the leaders of a country? An interesting question at this particular time. My biggest quibble was that the super secret transmissions were not adequately explained early on and I was not viewing them with...

    My favorite part of this book is that a goblin's love language is insults. Honestly, I admired this, but it was not my favorite book of the year. Maybe I guessed the ending/twist too early, but it felt too long. I hope there aren't too many kids who fail to finish the story, becaus...

    To all of my friends on Goodreads, "you clammy sweaty pedants" (how Goblins talk to their friends), put aside all your other books and read this immediately! Brilliant and very very funny, this collaboration between Anderson and Yelchin is a joyful challenge to readers everywhere. C...

    I?m just going to let everyone else gush over this one. I?m not the right person for the job. ...

    I voluntarily read and reviewed an advanced copy of this book. All thoughts and opinions are my own. Historian elf Brangwain Spurge has a very clear mission: travel to the land of goblins and present their King, a dark and mysterious alien, with a mighty present. Goblin archivis...

    This is a three star book for me, but I?m giving a bonus star for the experimentation behind it. In short, two historically warring races, elves and goblins, meet by way of a historian from each. Their perceptions are colored by prejudice. Hijinks ensue. The problem for me was that i...

    The elf was a guest. It was Werfel's duty to protect him. Okay, this is more like 3.5 stars. My feelings on this one are hard to explain. It's not the best book I've read, not ridiculously funny, suspenseful or outlandish. But it is nostalgic. Very reminiscent of the Lord of...

    This illustrated novel is really great. I love novels that are difficult to put into one box. The elf, Brangwain Spurge, is sent as an emissary to the goblin king with a gift of an old goblin artifact. He is also tasked with sending back visual images of his time with the goblins to...

    And they all lived happily ever after...? What a strange and interesting book. Werfel the Archivist is a goblin. Brangwain Spurge, also a historian, is an elf. When Spurge gets sent to the goblin's city by his former childhood bully, he assumes that he is there to spy. He doesn't kn...

    What utter joy: wish I was 10 or 8 and could fully feel the fun of a book about gnarly, gross out govlin culture and a fish-out-of-water comedy. This book tells its story through text w shifting points of view, and wordless first person narration through illustration. A shrunken elfin ...

    I have read enough M. T. Anderson to know I usually like his style. It's weird, off the wall, and you never know where he is going until it gets there. Feed is a book I read 10 years ago and still think about and Landscape with Invisible Hand was a wild ride. This one, however, gets ...

    I am going to break one of my personal writing rules and start this review with a question: (view spoiler)[What if a book had two stories at war with each other? In The Assassination of Brangwain Spurge by M.T. Anderson and illustrated by Eugene Yelchin, that is exactly what happe...

    Really enjoyed this one. This is a trend with me - I usually enjoy children's literature much more than YA. YA is mostly whiney, smarmy, and very annoying, or at least this is what I feel when I read modern YA. With children's literature, it it different. It is sincere, hilarious, ho...

    What a unique collaboration! Anderson and Yelchin have told a fascinating story about an elf/goblin conflict through the use of alternating text and illustrations. Brangwain Spurge and Werfel are both historians who each have their own biases about what has gone on between the two race...

    (4.5 stars) M.T. Anderson is one of my kids? favorite authors, so when I saw this book at the bookstore, I had to have it. A glance at the insides looked like the book would be a lot of fun, and it was. The story, which, very briefly, tells of the adventures of an elf and a goblin, ...

  • M. Lauritano
    Nov 17, 2018

    If history is written by the winners then what happens when everyone loses? In my job I read a lot of books written for kids and middle schoolers. To guide this reading I take into account a lot of professional reviews from sources like Kirkus and Publishers Weekly and School Librar...

    This book was a delight. There?s weight to it as you hold it in your hands. The cover gives a hint of the humor to come. The illustrations are a wonder. Spurge and Werfel are my kind of heroes. Highly recommend! ...

    There is no doubt this is brilliant, but often I found myself as confused as an Elf in a Goblin world. ...

    M. T. Anderson is one of my all-time favorite writers, and this latest, a collaboration with illustrator Eugene Yelchin, is a witty wonder. This quirky novel, a collection of letters and dispatches concerning the ongoing strife between the Elves and the Goblins, is a brilliant reflecti...

    The Assassination of Brangwain Spurge takes me back to the whimsy and invention of classics like The Phantom Tollbooth, Willy Wonky, and The Yellow Submarine. A comedy of etiquette errors, of historical hilarities? it?s been a long time since I genuinely laughed out loud while read...

    This is a *really* fun take on the unreliable narrator. As an adult reader, it didn't take me long to figure out why the illustrations and text weren't matching up, but this is such a great way to introduce this concept to younger readers (not to mention all the commentary on revisioni...

    An elf ambassador, Brangwain Spurge, is sent to the city of goblins to offer a gift of goodwill, a recently-found ancient artifact, after centuries of war and hostility. His goblin host, Werfel, is looking forward to the experience. He understands they both share a career and passion f...

    All of M.T. Anderson's books are so weird and I love them so much. He's such a funny, incisive author no matter what he's talking about. This book was a real trip. I also loved Eugene Yelchin's illustrations, and the whole conceit is so clever and so well-excecuted. I feel like thi...

    Having read enough of Anderson's books, I should realize by now that whatever I expect is not what is going to happen. I was also a bit dubious about the fact the book was listed as a finalist for the National Book Award in Young People's Literature. At first it was kind of ho-hum, meh...

    Want another illustrated story recommendation? How about this one? It's dark, it's humorous, and it is a lot of fun to read as you see one person's POV as illustrations and the other's POV written out. Two view points from two sides of an old, ongoing war (elves vs. goblins). Poor ...

    This is a silly book about serious topics. Who can you trust when you can't trust the leaders of a country? An interesting question at this particular time. My biggest quibble was that the super secret transmissions were not adequately explained early on and I was not viewing them with...

    My favorite part of this book is that a goblin's love language is insults. Honestly, I admired this, but it was not my favorite book of the year. Maybe I guessed the ending/twist too early, but it felt too long. I hope there aren't too many kids who fail to finish the story, becaus...

    To all of my friends on Goodreads, "you clammy sweaty pedants" (how Goblins talk to their friends), put aside all your other books and read this immediately! Brilliant and very very funny, this collaboration between Anderson and Yelchin is a joyful challenge to readers everywhere. C...

    I?m just going to let everyone else gush over this one. I?m not the right person for the job. ...

    I voluntarily read and reviewed an advanced copy of this book. All thoughts and opinions are my own. Historian elf Brangwain Spurge has a very clear mission: travel to the land of goblins and present their King, a dark and mysterious alien, with a mighty present. Goblin archivis...

    This is a three star book for me, but I?m giving a bonus star for the experimentation behind it. In short, two historically warring races, elves and goblins, meet by way of a historian from each. Their perceptions are colored by prejudice. Hijinks ensue. The problem for me was that i...

  • Barb Dixon Palmieri
    Oct 11, 2018

    If history is written by the winners then what happens when everyone loses? In my job I read a lot of books written for kids and middle schoolers. To guide this reading I take into account a lot of professional reviews from sources like Kirkus and Publishers Weekly and School Librar...

    This book was a delight. There?s weight to it as you hold it in your hands. The cover gives a hint of the humor to come. The illustrations are a wonder. Spurge and Werfel are my kind of heroes. Highly recommend! ...

    There is no doubt this is brilliant, but often I found myself as confused as an Elf in a Goblin world. ...

    M. T. Anderson is one of my all-time favorite writers, and this latest, a collaboration with illustrator Eugene Yelchin, is a witty wonder. This quirky novel, a collection of letters and dispatches concerning the ongoing strife between the Elves and the Goblins, is a brilliant reflecti...

    The Assassination of Brangwain Spurge takes me back to the whimsy and invention of classics like The Phantom Tollbooth, Willy Wonky, and The Yellow Submarine. A comedy of etiquette errors, of historical hilarities? it?s been a long time since I genuinely laughed out loud while read...

    This is a *really* fun take on the unreliable narrator. As an adult reader, it didn't take me long to figure out why the illustrations and text weren't matching up, but this is such a great way to introduce this concept to younger readers (not to mention all the commentary on revisioni...

    An elf ambassador, Brangwain Spurge, is sent to the city of goblins to offer a gift of goodwill, a recently-found ancient artifact, after centuries of war and hostility. His goblin host, Werfel, is looking forward to the experience. He understands they both share a career and passion f...

    All of M.T. Anderson's books are so weird and I love them so much. He's such a funny, incisive author no matter what he's talking about. This book was a real trip. I also loved Eugene Yelchin's illustrations, and the whole conceit is so clever and so well-excecuted. I feel like thi...

    Having read enough of Anderson's books, I should realize by now that whatever I expect is not what is going to happen. I was also a bit dubious about the fact the book was listed as a finalist for the National Book Award in Young People's Literature. At first it was kind of ho-hum, meh...

    Want another illustrated story recommendation? How about this one? It's dark, it's humorous, and it is a lot of fun to read as you see one person's POV as illustrations and the other's POV written out. Two view points from two sides of an old, ongoing war (elves vs. goblins). Poor ...

    This is a silly book about serious topics. Who can you trust when you can't trust the leaders of a country? An interesting question at this particular time. My biggest quibble was that the super secret transmissions were not adequately explained early on and I was not viewing them with...

    My favorite part of this book is that a goblin's love language is insults. Honestly, I admired this, but it was not my favorite book of the year. Maybe I guessed the ending/twist too early, but it felt too long. I hope there aren't too many kids who fail to finish the story, becaus...

    To all of my friends on Goodreads, "you clammy sweaty pedants" (how Goblins talk to their friends), put aside all your other books and read this immediately! Brilliant and very very funny, this collaboration between Anderson and Yelchin is a joyful challenge to readers everywhere. C...

    I?m just going to let everyone else gush over this one. I?m not the right person for the job. ...

    I voluntarily read and reviewed an advanced copy of this book. All thoughts and opinions are my own. Historian elf Brangwain Spurge has a very clear mission: travel to the land of goblins and present their King, a dark and mysterious alien, with a mighty present. Goblin archivis...

    This is a three star book for me, but I?m giving a bonus star for the experimentation behind it. In short, two historically warring races, elves and goblins, meet by way of a historian from each. Their perceptions are colored by prejudice. Hijinks ensue. The problem for me was that i...

    The elf was a guest. It was Werfel's duty to protect him. Okay, this is more like 3.5 stars. My feelings on this one are hard to explain. It's not the best book I've read, not ridiculously funny, suspenseful or outlandish. But it is nostalgic. Very reminiscent of the Lord of...

    This illustrated novel is really great. I love novels that are difficult to put into one box. The elf, Brangwain Spurge, is sent as an emissary to the goblin king with a gift of an old goblin artifact. He is also tasked with sending back visual images of his time with the goblins to...

    And they all lived happily ever after...? What a strange and interesting book. Werfel the Archivist is a goblin. Brangwain Spurge, also a historian, is an elf. When Spurge gets sent to the goblin's city by his former childhood bully, he assumes that he is there to spy. He doesn't kn...

  • Jeweliana
    Nov 28, 2018

    If history is written by the winners then what happens when everyone loses? In my job I read a lot of books written for kids and middle schoolers. To guide this reading I take into account a lot of professional reviews from sources like Kirkus and Publishers Weekly and School Librar...

    This book was a delight. There?s weight to it as you hold it in your hands. The cover gives a hint of the humor to come. The illustrations are a wonder. Spurge and Werfel are my kind of heroes. Highly recommend! ...

    There is no doubt this is brilliant, but often I found myself as confused as an Elf in a Goblin world. ...

    M. T. Anderson is one of my all-time favorite writers, and this latest, a collaboration with illustrator Eugene Yelchin, is a witty wonder. This quirky novel, a collection of letters and dispatches concerning the ongoing strife between the Elves and the Goblins, is a brilliant reflecti...

    The Assassination of Brangwain Spurge takes me back to the whimsy and invention of classics like The Phantom Tollbooth, Willy Wonky, and The Yellow Submarine. A comedy of etiquette errors, of historical hilarities? it?s been a long time since I genuinely laughed out loud while read...

    This is a *really* fun take on the unreliable narrator. As an adult reader, it didn't take me long to figure out why the illustrations and text weren't matching up, but this is such a great way to introduce this concept to younger readers (not to mention all the commentary on revisioni...

    An elf ambassador, Brangwain Spurge, is sent to the city of goblins to offer a gift of goodwill, a recently-found ancient artifact, after centuries of war and hostility. His goblin host, Werfel, is looking forward to the experience. He understands they both share a career and passion f...

    All of M.T. Anderson's books are so weird and I love them so much. He's such a funny, incisive author no matter what he's talking about. This book was a real trip. I also loved Eugene Yelchin's illustrations, and the whole conceit is so clever and so well-excecuted. I feel like thi...

    Having read enough of Anderson's books, I should realize by now that whatever I expect is not what is going to happen. I was also a bit dubious about the fact the book was listed as a finalist for the National Book Award in Young People's Literature. At first it was kind of ho-hum, meh...

    Want another illustrated story recommendation? How about this one? It's dark, it's humorous, and it is a lot of fun to read as you see one person's POV as illustrations and the other's POV written out. Two view points from two sides of an old, ongoing war (elves vs. goblins). Poor ...

    This is a silly book about serious topics. Who can you trust when you can't trust the leaders of a country? An interesting question at this particular time. My biggest quibble was that the super secret transmissions were not adequately explained early on and I was not viewing them with...

    My favorite part of this book is that a goblin's love language is insults. Honestly, I admired this, but it was not my favorite book of the year. Maybe I guessed the ending/twist too early, but it felt too long. I hope there aren't too many kids who fail to finish the story, becaus...

    To all of my friends on Goodreads, "you clammy sweaty pedants" (how Goblins talk to their friends), put aside all your other books and read this immediately! Brilliant and very very funny, this collaboration between Anderson and Yelchin is a joyful challenge to readers everywhere. C...

    I?m just going to let everyone else gush over this one. I?m not the right person for the job. ...

    I voluntarily read and reviewed an advanced copy of this book. All thoughts and opinions are my own. Historian elf Brangwain Spurge has a very clear mission: travel to the land of goblins and present their King, a dark and mysterious alien, with a mighty present. Goblin archivis...

    This is a three star book for me, but I?m giving a bonus star for the experimentation behind it. In short, two historically warring races, elves and goblins, meet by way of a historian from each. Their perceptions are colored by prejudice. Hijinks ensue. The problem for me was that i...

    The elf was a guest. It was Werfel's duty to protect him. Okay, this is more like 3.5 stars. My feelings on this one are hard to explain. It's not the best book I've read, not ridiculously funny, suspenseful or outlandish. But it is nostalgic. Very reminiscent of the Lord of...