Accessory to War: The Unspoken Alliance Between Astrophysics and the Military

Accessory to War: The Unspoken Alliance Between Astrophysics and the Military

In this fascinating foray into the centuries-old relationship between science and military power, acclaimed astrophysicist Neil deGrasse Tyson and writer-researcher Avis Lang examine how the methods and tools of astrophysics have been enlisted in the service of war. "The overlap is strong, and the knowledge flows in both directions," say the authors, because astrophysicist In this fascinating foray into the centuries-old relationship between science and military power, acclaimed astrophysicis...

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Title:Accessory to War: The Unspoken Alliance Between Astrophysics and the Military
Author:Neil deGrasse Tyson
Rating:
Genres:Science
ISBN:0393064441
Edition Language:English
Format Type:Hardcover
Number of Pages:576 pages pages

Accessory to War: The Unspoken Alliance Between Astrophysics and the Military Reviews

  • Ginny
    Oct 04, 2018

    An alternate (and, arguably, better) title for this could be THE HISTORY OF ASTROPHYSICS FOR PEOPLE IN LESS OF A HURRY, and it's just as fascinating and richly observed as Mr. Degrasse Tyson's slimmer volume from last year. Unfortunately, there's also a very long section in the middle ...

    "Many significant advances in our understanding of the cosmos are by-products of government investment in the apparatus of warfare, and many innovative instruments of destruction are by-products of advances in astrophysics." Neil deGrasse Tyson expands on this statement by leaps an...

    I received an advanced copy of this book in exchange for an honest review from NetGalley. For anyone interested in the linkage between the missions of science and warfighting, this book is for you. I feel like I can tell the pages written by Dr. Tyson, and those written by Avis Lang. T...

    After wading through the pages of medieval history, old rudimentary inventions like longitude, and the CNN opinion-like pages of anger at the American military, you got like five pages on the actual weapons of space and some information about a space war. The advertising and naming ...

    Wow, text-book level amount of history about scientific innovations and military advancements. Space, data, and the new "High-ground." I liked how this book had global information and did NOT just focus on American history and American scientific research. It was a bit like learning ho...

    A detailed account of the impact of specific sciences on military advancement and the resulting outcomes. Heavy on the military angle--for those who think this is going to be another popular physics book. This is not a deep dive into the theory of various physics and engineering discip...

    This book needs to be read by every congressperson and their advisors as well as every college faculty member. At the same time, every college/university physicist should read explain this book to every social science and humanities faculty member. deGrasse Tyson challenges us ? ...

    Armies and Navies and militaries, in general, have depended on science for most of history. Astronomy is no exception. The symbiosis between Astronomy comes in the form of navigation technologies and sensing and detection. Be it navigating by the stars, using a telescope to survey a la...

    Needs to be organized a bit better. Too much chronological jumping around. Otherwise an interesting read. ...

    This is fantastic look at the history of astrophysics and its intersection with warming, much more thorough and well-sourced than most of Dr. Tyson's writing. It's aimed at an audience that wants to get into the weeds, so not those in a hurry. The first few chapters were interesting...

    "Space exploration may pull in the talent, but war pays the bills." -Neil deGrasse Tyson Tyson surveys the history of various inventions (e.g. telescope, missile, compass, GPS, etc.) and pens the story of how the military influenced the advent of them. The history is interesting. He...

    it was a good book ...

    This was one bad book. I actually hate to say that. I?ve seen Neil deGrasse Tyson so many times on television and found him so entertaining. He is the reason I even picked up this book. I saw him on Bill Maher as well as the Late Show with Stephen Colbert plugging this book. He descr...

  • Jennifer
    Sep 12, 2018

    An alternate (and, arguably, better) title for this could be THE HISTORY OF ASTROPHYSICS FOR PEOPLE IN LESS OF A HURRY, and it's just as fascinating and richly observed as Mr. Degrasse Tyson's slimmer volume from last year. Unfortunately, there's also a very long section in the middle ...

    "Many significant advances in our understanding of the cosmos are by-products of government investment in the apparatus of warfare, and many innovative instruments of destruction are by-products of advances in astrophysics." Neil deGrasse Tyson expands on this statement by leaps an...

  • Daniel Kukwa
    Oct 01, 2018

    An alternate (and, arguably, better) title for this could be THE HISTORY OF ASTROPHYSICS FOR PEOPLE IN LESS OF A HURRY, and it's just as fascinating and richly observed as Mr. Degrasse Tyson's slimmer volume from last year. Unfortunately, there's also a very long section in the middle ...

    "Many significant advances in our understanding of the cosmos are by-products of government investment in the apparatus of warfare, and many innovative instruments of destruction are by-products of advances in astrophysics." Neil deGrasse Tyson expands on this statement by leaps an...

    I received an advanced copy of this book in exchange for an honest review from NetGalley. For anyone interested in the linkage between the missions of science and warfighting, this book is for you. I feel like I can tell the pages written by Dr. Tyson, and those written by Avis Lang. T...

    After wading through the pages of medieval history, old rudimentary inventions like longitude, and the CNN opinion-like pages of anger at the American military, you got like five pages on the actual weapons of space and some information about a space war. The advertising and naming ...

    Wow, text-book level amount of history about scientific innovations and military advancements. Space, data, and the new "High-ground." I liked how this book had global information and did NOT just focus on American history and American scientific research. It was a bit like learning ho...

    A detailed account of the impact of specific sciences on military advancement and the resulting outcomes. Heavy on the military angle--for those who think this is going to be another popular physics book. This is not a deep dive into the theory of various physics and engineering discip...

    This book needs to be read by every congressperson and their advisors as well as every college faculty member. At the same time, every college/university physicist should read explain this book to every social science and humanities faculty member. deGrasse Tyson challenges us ? ...

    Armies and Navies and militaries, in general, have depended on science for most of history. Astronomy is no exception. The symbiosis between Astronomy comes in the form of navigation technologies and sensing and detection. Be it navigating by the stars, using a telescope to survey a la...

    Needs to be organized a bit better. Too much chronological jumping around. Otherwise an interesting read. ...

    This is fantastic look at the history of astrophysics and its intersection with warming, much more thorough and well-sourced than most of Dr. Tyson's writing. It's aimed at an audience that wants to get into the weeds, so not those in a hurry. The first few chapters were interesting...

    "Space exploration may pull in the talent, but war pays the bills." -Neil deGrasse Tyson Tyson surveys the history of various inventions (e.g. telescope, missile, compass, GPS, etc.) and pens the story of how the military influenced the advent of them. The history is interesting. He...

    it was a good book ...

    This was one bad book. I actually hate to say that. I?ve seen Neil deGrasse Tyson so many times on television and found him so entertaining. He is the reason I even picked up this book. I saw him on Bill Maher as well as the Late Show with Stephen Colbert plugging this book. He descr...

    Most space exploration initiatives and atmospheric technology has been funded by military departments and budgets. Most of the motivation behind putting monitoring devices and people into space has been driven by the desire to show military prowess. These two realities are the main poi...

    There is something frustrating about the organization of this book. It's packed with excellent scholarship and research, and many of the sections I thoroughly enjoyed...but only in isolation. Together they simply don't seem to cohere comfortably: a history of scientific advances, a sec...

  • Sirius Scientist
    Sep 30, 2018

    An alternate (and, arguably, better) title for this could be THE HISTORY OF ASTROPHYSICS FOR PEOPLE IN LESS OF A HURRY, and it's just as fascinating and richly observed as Mr. Degrasse Tyson's slimmer volume from last year. Unfortunately, there's also a very long section in the middle ...

    "Many significant advances in our understanding of the cosmos are by-products of government investment in the apparatus of warfare, and many innovative instruments of destruction are by-products of advances in astrophysics." Neil deGrasse Tyson expands on this statement by leaps an...

    I received an advanced copy of this book in exchange for an honest review from NetGalley. For anyone interested in the linkage between the missions of science and warfighting, this book is for you. I feel like I can tell the pages written by Dr. Tyson, and those written by Avis Lang. T...

    After wading through the pages of medieval history, old rudimentary inventions like longitude, and the CNN opinion-like pages of anger at the American military, you got like five pages on the actual weapons of space and some information about a space war. The advertising and naming ...

    Wow, text-book level amount of history about scientific innovations and military advancements. Space, data, and the new "High-ground." I liked how this book had global information and did NOT just focus on American history and American scientific research. It was a bit like learning ho...

    A detailed account of the impact of specific sciences on military advancement and the resulting outcomes. Heavy on the military angle--for those who think this is going to be another popular physics book. This is not a deep dive into the theory of various physics and engineering discip...

  • Marvin
    Sep 26, 2018

    An alternate (and, arguably, better) title for this could be THE HISTORY OF ASTROPHYSICS FOR PEOPLE IN LESS OF A HURRY, and it's just as fascinating and richly observed as Mr. Degrasse Tyson's slimmer volume from last year. Unfortunately, there's also a very long section in the middle ...

    "Many significant advances in our understanding of the cosmos are by-products of government investment in the apparatus of warfare, and many innovative instruments of destruction are by-products of advances in astrophysics." Neil deGrasse Tyson expands on this statement by leaps an...

    I received an advanced copy of this book in exchange for an honest review from NetGalley. For anyone interested in the linkage between the missions of science and warfighting, this book is for you. I feel like I can tell the pages written by Dr. Tyson, and those written by Avis Lang. T...

    After wading through the pages of medieval history, old rudimentary inventions like longitude, and the CNN opinion-like pages of anger at the American military, you got like five pages on the actual weapons of space and some information about a space war. The advertising and naming ...

    Wow, text-book level amount of history about scientific innovations and military advancements. Space, data, and the new "High-ground." I liked how this book had global information and did NOT just focus on American history and American scientific research. It was a bit like learning ho...

    A detailed account of the impact of specific sciences on military advancement and the resulting outcomes. Heavy on the military angle--for those who think this is going to be another popular physics book. This is not a deep dive into the theory of various physics and engineering discip...

    This book needs to be read by every congressperson and their advisors as well as every college faculty member. At the same time, every college/university physicist should read explain this book to every social science and humanities faculty member. deGrasse Tyson challenges us ? ...

    Armies and Navies and militaries, in general, have depended on science for most of history. Astronomy is no exception. The symbiosis between Astronomy comes in the form of navigation technologies and sensing and detection. Be it navigating by the stars, using a telescope to survey a la...

    Needs to be organized a bit better. Too much chronological jumping around. Otherwise an interesting read. ...

    This is fantastic look at the history of astrophysics and its intersection with warming, much more thorough and well-sourced than most of Dr. Tyson's writing. It's aimed at an audience that wants to get into the weeds, so not those in a hurry. The first few chapters were interesting...

    "Space exploration may pull in the talent, but war pays the bills." -Neil deGrasse Tyson Tyson surveys the history of various inventions (e.g. telescope, missile, compass, GPS, etc.) and pens the story of how the military influenced the advent of them. The history is interesting. He...

    it was a good book ...

    This was one bad book. I actually hate to say that. I?ve seen Neil deGrasse Tyson so many times on television and found him so entertaining. He is the reason I even picked up this book. I saw him on Bill Maher as well as the Late Show with Stephen Colbert plugging this book. He descr...

    Most space exploration initiatives and atmospheric technology has been funded by military departments and budgets. Most of the motivation behind putting monitoring devices and people into space has been driven by the desire to show military prowess. These two realities are the main poi...

    There is something frustrating about the organization of this book. It's packed with excellent scholarship and research, and many of the sections I thoroughly enjoyed...but only in isolation. Together they simply don't seem to cohere comfortably: a history of scientific advances, a sec...

    All the history that relates to how the military inspired, helped, funded, and used astrophysicists is incredible. So much of the technology we use and the military uses is inspired and lots of the times financed by the army of a country. This book is full of historical facts of when a...

    False advertising. One of the major contribution of astrophysics to war was/is celestial navigation - no where discussed. And the first chapter in talking about budgets the author needs to read the constitution - ?provide for the common defense and promote general welfare? - no...

    A very interesting look at the history of science development in the field of astrophysics and how progress is intricately linked to wars. This book did have some slow bits that bogged down the book somewhere the middle, but was very interesting and enjoyable on the whole. As times cha...

    Tyson is hard to read sometimes. He is sometimes very succinct, other times he's very drawn out. I glazed over a few times and had to re-read parts because I lost his point now and then. TL:DR Humans sure like to kill humans. There is a silver lining, technology that adds to qualit...

    After Prof. Harari?s 21 Lessons for the 21st Century, this is my favourite book of 2018 so far. If you?ve liked Neil deGrasse Tyson?s Astrophysics for People in a Hurry, you will love this book! Packed with historical accounts, the narration makes connections to the modern day...

    Didn't get the chance to read the entire book just read bits and bobs and the odd chapter or two. Bit of a disappointment, because I thought this book would be about " Star Wars " and the future of military in space. One chapter was devoted to 15th century about finding the longitude (...

    I was very disappointed with this. It reads like a term paper. I doubt that Tyson wrote much of this. The authors fill numerous pages with mundane information, such as how spyglasses were useful in the 18th and 19th centuries. ...

    A book written by someone with so much to say that they blurt it all out with little attention to how to create a cohesive narrative tone. ...

    The author of many excellent books and programs on astrophysics does a great job of exploring the history of war and its connection with physicists. ...

    Didn't finish; not really what I thought it would be. ...

    Highly informative writing on the marriage that produces our future. ...

    Not what I thought it was going to be. I got bored and gave up. Became very political and I lost interest. ...

    TMI ...

  • David
    Sep 27, 2018

    An alternate (and, arguably, better) title for this could be THE HISTORY OF ASTROPHYSICS FOR PEOPLE IN LESS OF A HURRY, and it's just as fascinating and richly observed as Mr. Degrasse Tyson's slimmer volume from last year. Unfortunately, there's also a very long section in the middle ...

    "Many significant advances in our understanding of the cosmos are by-products of government investment in the apparatus of warfare, and many innovative instruments of destruction are by-products of advances in astrophysics." Neil deGrasse Tyson expands on this statement by leaps an...

    I received an advanced copy of this book in exchange for an honest review from NetGalley. For anyone interested in the linkage between the missions of science and warfighting, this book is for you. I feel like I can tell the pages written by Dr. Tyson, and those written by Avis Lang. T...

    After wading through the pages of medieval history, old rudimentary inventions like longitude, and the CNN opinion-like pages of anger at the American military, you got like five pages on the actual weapons of space and some information about a space war. The advertising and naming ...

    Wow, text-book level amount of history about scientific innovations and military advancements. Space, data, and the new "High-ground." I liked how this book had global information and did NOT just focus on American history and American scientific research. It was a bit like learning ho...

    A detailed account of the impact of specific sciences on military advancement and the resulting outcomes. Heavy on the military angle--for those who think this is going to be another popular physics book. This is not a deep dive into the theory of various physics and engineering discip...

    This book needs to be read by every congressperson and their advisors as well as every college faculty member. At the same time, every college/university physicist should read explain this book to every social science and humanities faculty member. deGrasse Tyson challenges us ? ...

    Armies and Navies and militaries, in general, have depended on science for most of history. Astronomy is no exception. The symbiosis between Astronomy comes in the form of navigation technologies and sensing and detection. Be it navigating by the stars, using a telescope to survey a la...

    Needs to be organized a bit better. Too much chronological jumping around. Otherwise an interesting read. ...

    This is fantastic look at the history of astrophysics and its intersection with warming, much more thorough and well-sourced than most of Dr. Tyson's writing. It's aimed at an audience that wants to get into the weeds, so not those in a hurry. The first few chapters were interesting...

    "Space exploration may pull in the talent, but war pays the bills." -Neil deGrasse Tyson Tyson surveys the history of various inventions (e.g. telescope, missile, compass, GPS, etc.) and pens the story of how the military influenced the advent of them. The history is interesting. He...

    it was a good book ...

    This was one bad book. I actually hate to say that. I?ve seen Neil deGrasse Tyson so many times on television and found him so entertaining. He is the reason I even picked up this book. I saw him on Bill Maher as well as the Late Show with Stephen Colbert plugging this book. He descr...

    Most space exploration initiatives and atmospheric technology has been funded by military departments and budgets. Most of the motivation behind putting monitoring devices and people into space has been driven by the desire to show military prowess. These two realities are the main poi...

    There is something frustrating about the organization of this book. It's packed with excellent scholarship and research, and many of the sections I thoroughly enjoyed...but only in isolation. Together they simply don't seem to cohere comfortably: a history of scientific advances, a sec...

    All the history that relates to how the military inspired, helped, funded, and used astrophysicists is incredible. So much of the technology we use and the military uses is inspired and lots of the times financed by the army of a country. This book is full of historical facts of when a...

    False advertising. One of the major contribution of astrophysics to war was/is celestial navigation - no where discussed. And the first chapter in talking about budgets the author needs to read the constitution - ?provide for the common defense and promote general welfare? - no...

    A very interesting look at the history of science development in the field of astrophysics and how progress is intricately linked to wars. This book did have some slow bits that bogged down the book somewhere the middle, but was very interesting and enjoyable on the whole. As times cha...

    Tyson is hard to read sometimes. He is sometimes very succinct, other times he's very drawn out. I glazed over a few times and had to re-read parts because I lost his point now and then. TL:DR Humans sure like to kill humans. There is a silver lining, technology that adds to qualit...

    After Prof. Harari?s 21 Lessons for the 21st Century, this is my favourite book of 2018 so far. If you?ve liked Neil deGrasse Tyson?s Astrophysics for People in a Hurry, you will love this book! Packed with historical accounts, the narration makes connections to the modern day...

    Didn't get the chance to read the entire book just read bits and bobs and the odd chapter or two. Bit of a disappointment, because I thought this book would be about " Star Wars " and the future of military in space. One chapter was devoted to 15th century about finding the longitude (...

    I was very disappointed with this. It reads like a term paper. I doubt that Tyson wrote much of this. The authors fill numerous pages with mundane information, such as how spyglasses were useful in the 18th and 19th centuries. ...

    A book written by someone with so much to say that they blurt it all out with little attention to how to create a cohesive narrative tone. ...

    The author of many excellent books and programs on astrophysics does a great job of exploring the history of war and its connection with physicists. ...

  • Ahdom
    Sep 23, 2018

    An alternate (and, arguably, better) title for this could be THE HISTORY OF ASTROPHYSICS FOR PEOPLE IN LESS OF A HURRY, and it's just as fascinating and richly observed as Mr. Degrasse Tyson's slimmer volume from last year. Unfortunately, there's also a very long section in the middle ...

    "Many significant advances in our understanding of the cosmos are by-products of government investment in the apparatus of warfare, and many innovative instruments of destruction are by-products of advances in astrophysics." Neil deGrasse Tyson expands on this statement by leaps an...

    I received an advanced copy of this book in exchange for an honest review from NetGalley. For anyone interested in the linkage between the missions of science and warfighting, this book is for you. I feel like I can tell the pages written by Dr. Tyson, and those written by Avis Lang. T...

    After wading through the pages of medieval history, old rudimentary inventions like longitude, and the CNN opinion-like pages of anger at the American military, you got like five pages on the actual weapons of space and some information about a space war. The advertising and naming ...

    Wow, text-book level amount of history about scientific innovations and military advancements. Space, data, and the new "High-ground." I liked how this book had global information and did NOT just focus on American history and American scientific research. It was a bit like learning ho...

    A detailed account of the impact of specific sciences on military advancement and the resulting outcomes. Heavy on the military angle--for those who think this is going to be another popular physics book. This is not a deep dive into the theory of various physics and engineering discip...

    This book needs to be read by every congressperson and their advisors as well as every college faculty member. At the same time, every college/university physicist should read explain this book to every social science and humanities faculty member. deGrasse Tyson challenges us ? ...

    Armies and Navies and militaries, in general, have depended on science for most of history. Astronomy is no exception. The symbiosis between Astronomy comes in the form of navigation technologies and sensing and detection. Be it navigating by the stars, using a telescope to survey a la...

    Needs to be organized a bit better. Too much chronological jumping around. Otherwise an interesting read. ...

    This is fantastic look at the history of astrophysics and its intersection with warming, much more thorough and well-sourced than most of Dr. Tyson's writing. It's aimed at an audience that wants to get into the weeds, so not those in a hurry. The first few chapters were interesting...

    "Space exploration may pull in the talent, but war pays the bills." -Neil deGrasse Tyson Tyson surveys the history of various inventions (e.g. telescope, missile, compass, GPS, etc.) and pens the story of how the military influenced the advent of them. The history is interesting. He...

    it was a good book ...

    This was one bad book. I actually hate to say that. I?ve seen Neil deGrasse Tyson so many times on television and found him so entertaining. He is the reason I even picked up this book. I saw him on Bill Maher as well as the Late Show with Stephen Colbert plugging this book. He descr...

    Most space exploration initiatives and atmospheric technology has been funded by military departments and budgets. Most of the motivation behind putting monitoring devices and people into space has been driven by the desire to show military prowess. These two realities are the main poi...

    There is something frustrating about the organization of this book. It's packed with excellent scholarship and research, and many of the sections I thoroughly enjoyed...but only in isolation. Together they simply don't seem to cohere comfortably: a history of scientific advances, a sec...

    All the history that relates to how the military inspired, helped, funded, and used astrophysicists is incredible. So much of the technology we use and the military uses is inspired and lots of the times financed by the army of a country. This book is full of historical facts of when a...

    False advertising. One of the major contribution of astrophysics to war was/is celestial navigation - no where discussed. And the first chapter in talking about budgets the author needs to read the constitution - ?provide for the common defense and promote general welfare? - no...

    A very interesting look at the history of science development in the field of astrophysics and how progress is intricately linked to wars. This book did have some slow bits that bogged down the book somewhere the middle, but was very interesting and enjoyable on the whole. As times cha...

  • Mike
    Sep 20, 2018

    An alternate (and, arguably, better) title for this could be THE HISTORY OF ASTROPHYSICS FOR PEOPLE IN LESS OF A HURRY, and it's just as fascinating and richly observed as Mr. Degrasse Tyson's slimmer volume from last year. Unfortunately, there's also a very long section in the middle ...

    "Many significant advances in our understanding of the cosmos are by-products of government investment in the apparatus of warfare, and many innovative instruments of destruction are by-products of advances in astrophysics." Neil deGrasse Tyson expands on this statement by leaps an...

    I received an advanced copy of this book in exchange for an honest review from NetGalley. For anyone interested in the linkage between the missions of science and warfighting, this book is for you. I feel like I can tell the pages written by Dr. Tyson, and those written by Avis Lang. T...

    After wading through the pages of medieval history, old rudimentary inventions like longitude, and the CNN opinion-like pages of anger at the American military, you got like five pages on the actual weapons of space and some information about a space war. The advertising and naming ...

    Wow, text-book level amount of history about scientific innovations and military advancements. Space, data, and the new "High-ground." I liked how this book had global information and did NOT just focus on American history and American scientific research. It was a bit like learning ho...

    A detailed account of the impact of specific sciences on military advancement and the resulting outcomes. Heavy on the military angle--for those who think this is going to be another popular physics book. This is not a deep dive into the theory of various physics and engineering discip...

    This book needs to be read by every congressperson and their advisors as well as every college faculty member. At the same time, every college/university physicist should read explain this book to every social science and humanities faculty member. deGrasse Tyson challenges us ? ...

    Armies and Navies and militaries, in general, have depended on science for most of history. Astronomy is no exception. The symbiosis between Astronomy comes in the form of navigation technologies and sensing and detection. Be it navigating by the stars, using a telescope to survey a la...

    Needs to be organized a bit better. Too much chronological jumping around. Otherwise an interesting read. ...

    This is fantastic look at the history of astrophysics and its intersection with warming, much more thorough and well-sourced than most of Dr. Tyson's writing. It's aimed at an audience that wants to get into the weeds, so not those in a hurry. The first few chapters were interesting...

    "Space exploration may pull in the talent, but war pays the bills." -Neil deGrasse Tyson Tyson surveys the history of various inventions (e.g. telescope, missile, compass, GPS, etc.) and pens the story of how the military influenced the advent of them. The history is interesting. He...

    it was a good book ...

    This was one bad book. I actually hate to say that. I?ve seen Neil deGrasse Tyson so many times on television and found him so entertaining. He is the reason I even picked up this book. I saw him on Bill Maher as well as the Late Show with Stephen Colbert plugging this book. He descr...

    Most space exploration initiatives and atmospheric technology has been funded by military departments and budgets. Most of the motivation behind putting monitoring devices and people into space has been driven by the desire to show military prowess. These two realities are the main poi...

    There is something frustrating about the organization of this book. It's packed with excellent scholarship and research, and many of the sections I thoroughly enjoyed...but only in isolation. Together they simply don't seem to cohere comfortably: a history of scientific advances, a sec...

    All the history that relates to how the military inspired, helped, funded, and used astrophysicists is incredible. So much of the technology we use and the military uses is inspired and lots of the times financed by the army of a country. This book is full of historical facts of when a...

    False advertising. One of the major contribution of astrophysics to war was/is celestial navigation - no where discussed. And the first chapter in talking about budgets the author needs to read the constitution - ?provide for the common defense and promote general welfare? - no...

    A very interesting look at the history of science development in the field of astrophysics and how progress is intricately linked to wars. This book did have some slow bits that bogged down the book somewhere the middle, but was very interesting and enjoyable on the whole. As times cha...

    Tyson is hard to read sometimes. He is sometimes very succinct, other times he's very drawn out. I glazed over a few times and had to re-read parts because I lost his point now and then. TL:DR Humans sure like to kill humans. There is a silver lining, technology that adds to qualit...

  • Bria
    Sep 21, 2018

    An alternate (and, arguably, better) title for this could be THE HISTORY OF ASTROPHYSICS FOR PEOPLE IN LESS OF A HURRY, and it's just as fascinating and richly observed as Mr. Degrasse Tyson's slimmer volume from last year. Unfortunately, there's also a very long section in the middle ...

    "Many significant advances in our understanding of the cosmos are by-products of government investment in the apparatus of warfare, and many innovative instruments of destruction are by-products of advances in astrophysics." Neil deGrasse Tyson expands on this statement by leaps an...

    I received an advanced copy of this book in exchange for an honest review from NetGalley. For anyone interested in the linkage between the missions of science and warfighting, this book is for you. I feel like I can tell the pages written by Dr. Tyson, and those written by Avis Lang. T...

    After wading through the pages of medieval history, old rudimentary inventions like longitude, and the CNN opinion-like pages of anger at the American military, you got like five pages on the actual weapons of space and some information about a space war. The advertising and naming ...

  • Roger Smitter
    Sep 19, 2018

    An alternate (and, arguably, better) title for this could be THE HISTORY OF ASTROPHYSICS FOR PEOPLE IN LESS OF A HURRY, and it's just as fascinating and richly observed as Mr. Degrasse Tyson's slimmer volume from last year. Unfortunately, there's also a very long section in the middle ...

    "Many significant advances in our understanding of the cosmos are by-products of government investment in the apparatus of warfare, and many innovative instruments of destruction are by-products of advances in astrophysics." Neil deGrasse Tyson expands on this statement by leaps an...

    I received an advanced copy of this book in exchange for an honest review from NetGalley. For anyone interested in the linkage between the missions of science and warfighting, this book is for you. I feel like I can tell the pages written by Dr. Tyson, and those written by Avis Lang. T...

    After wading through the pages of medieval history, old rudimentary inventions like longitude, and the CNN opinion-like pages of anger at the American military, you got like five pages on the actual weapons of space and some information about a space war. The advertising and naming ...

    Wow, text-book level amount of history about scientific innovations and military advancements. Space, data, and the new "High-ground." I liked how this book had global information and did NOT just focus on American history and American scientific research. It was a bit like learning ho...

    A detailed account of the impact of specific sciences on military advancement and the resulting outcomes. Heavy on the military angle--for those who think this is going to be another popular physics book. This is not a deep dive into the theory of various physics and engineering discip...

    This book needs to be read by every congressperson and their advisors as well as every college faculty member. At the same time, every college/university physicist should read explain this book to every social science and humanities faculty member. deGrasse Tyson challenges us ? ...

  • William
    Sep 30, 2018

    An alternate (and, arguably, better) title for this could be THE HISTORY OF ASTROPHYSICS FOR PEOPLE IN LESS OF A HURRY, and it's just as fascinating and richly observed as Mr. Degrasse Tyson's slimmer volume from last year. Unfortunately, there's also a very long section in the middle ...

    "Many significant advances in our understanding of the cosmos are by-products of government investment in the apparatus of warfare, and many innovative instruments of destruction are by-products of advances in astrophysics." Neil deGrasse Tyson expands on this statement by leaps an...

    I received an advanced copy of this book in exchange for an honest review from NetGalley. For anyone interested in the linkage between the missions of science and warfighting, this book is for you. I feel like I can tell the pages written by Dr. Tyson, and those written by Avis Lang. T...

    After wading through the pages of medieval history, old rudimentary inventions like longitude, and the CNN opinion-like pages of anger at the American military, you got like five pages on the actual weapons of space and some information about a space war. The advertising and naming ...

    Wow, text-book level amount of history about scientific innovations and military advancements. Space, data, and the new "High-ground." I liked how this book had global information and did NOT just focus on American history and American scientific research. It was a bit like learning ho...

    A detailed account of the impact of specific sciences on military advancement and the resulting outcomes. Heavy on the military angle--for those who think this is going to be another popular physics book. This is not a deep dive into the theory of various physics and engineering discip...

    This book needs to be read by every congressperson and their advisors as well as every college faculty member. At the same time, every college/university physicist should read explain this book to every social science and humanities faculty member. deGrasse Tyson challenges us ? ...

    Armies and Navies and militaries, in general, have depended on science for most of history. Astronomy is no exception. The symbiosis between Astronomy comes in the form of navigation technologies and sensing and detection. Be it navigating by the stars, using a telescope to survey a la...

    Needs to be organized a bit better. Too much chronological jumping around. Otherwise an interesting read. ...

    This is fantastic look at the history of astrophysics and its intersection with warming, much more thorough and well-sourced than most of Dr. Tyson's writing. It's aimed at an audience that wants to get into the weeds, so not those in a hurry. The first few chapters were interesting...

    "Space exploration may pull in the talent, but war pays the bills." -Neil deGrasse Tyson Tyson surveys the history of various inventions (e.g. telescope, missile, compass, GPS, etc.) and pens the story of how the military influenced the advent of them. The history is interesting. He...

    it was a good book ...

    This was one bad book. I actually hate to say that. I?ve seen Neil deGrasse Tyson so many times on television and found him so entertaining. He is the reason I even picked up this book. I saw him on Bill Maher as well as the Late Show with Stephen Colbert plugging this book. He descr...

    Most space exploration initiatives and atmospheric technology has been funded by military departments and budgets. Most of the motivation behind putting monitoring devices and people into space has been driven by the desire to show military prowess. These two realities are the main poi...

    There is something frustrating about the organization of this book. It's packed with excellent scholarship and research, and many of the sections I thoroughly enjoyed...but only in isolation. Together they simply don't seem to cohere comfortably: a history of scientific advances, a sec...

    All the history that relates to how the military inspired, helped, funded, and used astrophysicists is incredible. So much of the technology we use and the military uses is inspired and lots of the times financed by the army of a country. This book is full of historical facts of when a...

    False advertising. One of the major contribution of astrophysics to war was/is celestial navigation - no where discussed. And the first chapter in talking about budgets the author needs to read the constitution - ?provide for the common defense and promote general welfare? - no...

    A very interesting look at the history of science development in the field of astrophysics and how progress is intricately linked to wars. This book did have some slow bits that bogged down the book somewhere the middle, but was very interesting and enjoyable on the whole. As times cha...

    Tyson is hard to read sometimes. He is sometimes very succinct, other times he's very drawn out. I glazed over a few times and had to re-read parts because I lost his point now and then. TL:DR Humans sure like to kill humans. There is a silver lining, technology that adds to qualit...

    After Prof. Harari?s 21 Lessons for the 21st Century, this is my favourite book of 2018 so far. If you?ve liked Neil deGrasse Tyson?s Astrophysics for People in a Hurry, you will love this book! Packed with historical accounts, the narration makes connections to the modern day...

    Didn't get the chance to read the entire book just read bits and bobs and the odd chapter or two. Bit of a disappointment, because I thought this book would be about " Star Wars " and the future of military in space. One chapter was devoted to 15th century about finding the longitude (...

    I was very disappointed with this. It reads like a term paper. I doubt that Tyson wrote much of this. The authors fill numerous pages with mundane information, such as how spyglasses were useful in the 18th and 19th centuries. ...

    A book written by someone with so much to say that they blurt it all out with little attention to how to create a cohesive narrative tone. ...

    The author of many excellent books and programs on astrophysics does a great job of exploring the history of war and its connection with physicists. ...

    Didn't finish; not really what I thought it would be. ...

    Highly informative writing on the marriage that produces our future. ...

  • Cathy Hodge
    Sep 16, 2018

    An alternate (and, arguably, better) title for this could be THE HISTORY OF ASTROPHYSICS FOR PEOPLE IN LESS OF A HURRY, and it's just as fascinating and richly observed as Mr. Degrasse Tyson's slimmer volume from last year. Unfortunately, there's also a very long section in the middle ...

    "Many significant advances in our understanding of the cosmos are by-products of government investment in the apparatus of warfare, and many innovative instruments of destruction are by-products of advances in astrophysics." Neil deGrasse Tyson expands on this statement by leaps an...

    I received an advanced copy of this book in exchange for an honest review from NetGalley. For anyone interested in the linkage between the missions of science and warfighting, this book is for you. I feel like I can tell the pages written by Dr. Tyson, and those written by Avis Lang. T...

    After wading through the pages of medieval history, old rudimentary inventions like longitude, and the CNN opinion-like pages of anger at the American military, you got like five pages on the actual weapons of space and some information about a space war. The advertising and naming ...

    Wow, text-book level amount of history about scientific innovations and military advancements. Space, data, and the new "High-ground." I liked how this book had global information and did NOT just focus on American history and American scientific research. It was a bit like learning ho...

  • Anthony
    Sep 22, 2018

    An alternate (and, arguably, better) title for this could be THE HISTORY OF ASTROPHYSICS FOR PEOPLE IN LESS OF A HURRY, and it's just as fascinating and richly observed as Mr. Degrasse Tyson's slimmer volume from last year. Unfortunately, there's also a very long section in the middle ...

    "Many significant advances in our understanding of the cosmos are by-products of government investment in the apparatus of warfare, and many innovative instruments of destruction are by-products of advances in astrophysics." Neil deGrasse Tyson expands on this statement by leaps an...

    I received an advanced copy of this book in exchange for an honest review from NetGalley. For anyone interested in the linkage between the missions of science and warfighting, this book is for you. I feel like I can tell the pages written by Dr. Tyson, and those written by Avis Lang. T...

    After wading through the pages of medieval history, old rudimentary inventions like longitude, and the CNN opinion-like pages of anger at the American military, you got like five pages on the actual weapons of space and some information about a space war. The advertising and naming ...

    Wow, text-book level amount of history about scientific innovations and military advancements. Space, data, and the new "High-ground." I liked how this book had global information and did NOT just focus on American history and American scientific research. It was a bit like learning ho...

    A detailed account of the impact of specific sciences on military advancement and the resulting outcomes. Heavy on the military angle--for those who think this is going to be another popular physics book. This is not a deep dive into the theory of various physics and engineering discip...

    This book needs to be read by every congressperson and their advisors as well as every college faculty member. At the same time, every college/university physicist should read explain this book to every social science and humanities faculty member. deGrasse Tyson challenges us ? ...

    Armies and Navies and militaries, in general, have depended on science for most of history. Astronomy is no exception. The symbiosis between Astronomy comes in the form of navigation technologies and sensing and detection. Be it navigating by the stars, using a telescope to survey a la...

    Needs to be organized a bit better. Too much chronological jumping around. Otherwise an interesting read. ...

    This is fantastic look at the history of astrophysics and its intersection with warming, much more thorough and well-sourced than most of Dr. Tyson's writing. It's aimed at an audience that wants to get into the weeds, so not those in a hurry. The first few chapters were interesting...

    "Space exploration may pull in the talent, but war pays the bills." -Neil deGrasse Tyson Tyson surveys the history of various inventions (e.g. telescope, missile, compass, GPS, etc.) and pens the story of how the military influenced the advent of them. The history is interesting. He...

    it was a good book ...

    This was one bad book. I actually hate to say that. I?ve seen Neil deGrasse Tyson so many times on television and found him so entertaining. He is the reason I even picked up this book. I saw him on Bill Maher as well as the Late Show with Stephen Colbert plugging this book. He descr...

    Most space exploration initiatives and atmospheric technology has been funded by military departments and budgets. Most of the motivation behind putting monitoring devices and people into space has been driven by the desire to show military prowess. These two realities are the main poi...

    There is something frustrating about the organization of this book. It's packed with excellent scholarship and research, and many of the sections I thoroughly enjoyed...but only in isolation. Together they simply don't seem to cohere comfortably: a history of scientific advances, a sec...

    All the history that relates to how the military inspired, helped, funded, and used astrophysicists is incredible. So much of the technology we use and the military uses is inspired and lots of the times financed by the army of a country. This book is full of historical facts of when a...

    False advertising. One of the major contribution of astrophysics to war was/is celestial navigation - no where discussed. And the first chapter in talking about budgets the author needs to read the constitution - ?provide for the common defense and promote general welfare? - no...

    A very interesting look at the history of science development in the field of astrophysics and how progress is intricately linked to wars. This book did have some slow bits that bogged down the book somewhere the middle, but was very interesting and enjoyable on the whole. As times cha...

    Tyson is hard to read sometimes. He is sometimes very succinct, other times he's very drawn out. I glazed over a few times and had to re-read parts because I lost his point now and then. TL:DR Humans sure like to kill humans. There is a silver lining, technology that adds to qualit...

    After Prof. Harari?s 21 Lessons for the 21st Century, this is my favourite book of 2018 so far. If you?ve liked Neil deGrasse Tyson?s Astrophysics for People in a Hurry, you will love this book! Packed with historical accounts, the narration makes connections to the modern day...

    Didn't get the chance to read the entire book just read bits and bobs and the odd chapter or two. Bit of a disappointment, because I thought this book would be about " Star Wars " and the future of military in space. One chapter was devoted to 15th century about finding the longitude (...

    I was very disappointed with this. It reads like a term paper. I doubt that Tyson wrote much of this. The authors fill numerous pages with mundane information, such as how spyglasses were useful in the 18th and 19th centuries. ...

    A book written by someone with so much to say that they blurt it all out with little attention to how to create a cohesive narrative tone. ...

    The author of many excellent books and programs on astrophysics does a great job of exploring the history of war and its connection with physicists. ...

    Didn't finish; not really what I thought it would be. ...

  • Richard
    Oct 04, 2018

    An alternate (and, arguably, better) title for this could be THE HISTORY OF ASTROPHYSICS FOR PEOPLE IN LESS OF A HURRY, and it's just as fascinating and richly observed as Mr. Degrasse Tyson's slimmer volume from last year. Unfortunately, there's also a very long section in the middle ...

    "Many significant advances in our understanding of the cosmos are by-products of government investment in the apparatus of warfare, and many innovative instruments of destruction are by-products of advances in astrophysics." Neil deGrasse Tyson expands on this statement by leaps an...

    I received an advanced copy of this book in exchange for an honest review from NetGalley. For anyone interested in the linkage between the missions of science and warfighting, this book is for you. I feel like I can tell the pages written by Dr. Tyson, and those written by Avis Lang. T...

    After wading through the pages of medieval history, old rudimentary inventions like longitude, and the CNN opinion-like pages of anger at the American military, you got like five pages on the actual weapons of space and some information about a space war. The advertising and naming ...

    Wow, text-book level amount of history about scientific innovations and military advancements. Space, data, and the new "High-ground." I liked how this book had global information and did NOT just focus on American history and American scientific research. It was a bit like learning ho...

    A detailed account of the impact of specific sciences on military advancement and the resulting outcomes. Heavy on the military angle--for those who think this is going to be another popular physics book. This is not a deep dive into the theory of various physics and engineering discip...

    This book needs to be read by every congressperson and their advisors as well as every college faculty member. At the same time, every college/university physicist should read explain this book to every social science and humanities faculty member. deGrasse Tyson challenges us ? ...

    Armies and Navies and militaries, in general, have depended on science for most of history. Astronomy is no exception. The symbiosis between Astronomy comes in the form of navigation technologies and sensing and detection. Be it navigating by the stars, using a telescope to survey a la...

    Needs to be organized a bit better. Too much chronological jumping around. Otherwise an interesting read. ...

    This is fantastic look at the history of astrophysics and its intersection with warming, much more thorough and well-sourced than most of Dr. Tyson's writing. It's aimed at an audience that wants to get into the weeds, so not those in a hurry. The first few chapters were interesting...

    "Space exploration may pull in the talent, but war pays the bills." -Neil deGrasse Tyson Tyson surveys the history of various inventions (e.g. telescope, missile, compass, GPS, etc.) and pens the story of how the military influenced the advent of them. The history is interesting. He...

    it was a good book ...

    This was one bad book. I actually hate to say that. I?ve seen Neil deGrasse Tyson so many times on television and found him so entertaining. He is the reason I even picked up this book. I saw him on Bill Maher as well as the Late Show with Stephen Colbert plugging this book. He descr...

    Most space exploration initiatives and atmospheric technology has been funded by military departments and budgets. Most of the motivation behind putting monitoring devices and people into space has been driven by the desire to show military prowess. These two realities are the main poi...

    There is something frustrating about the organization of this book. It's packed with excellent scholarship and research, and many of the sections I thoroughly enjoyed...but only in isolation. Together they simply don't seem to cohere comfortably: a history of scientific advances, a sec...

    All the history that relates to how the military inspired, helped, funded, and used astrophysicists is incredible. So much of the technology we use and the military uses is inspired and lots of the times financed by the army of a country. This book is full of historical facts of when a...

    False advertising. One of the major contribution of astrophysics to war was/is celestial navigation - no where discussed. And the first chapter in talking about budgets the author needs to read the constitution - ?provide for the common defense and promote general welfare? - no...

    A very interesting look at the history of science development in the field of astrophysics and how progress is intricately linked to wars. This book did have some slow bits that bogged down the book somewhere the middle, but was very interesting and enjoyable on the whole. As times cha...

    Tyson is hard to read sometimes. He is sometimes very succinct, other times he's very drawn out. I glazed over a few times and had to re-read parts because I lost his point now and then. TL:DR Humans sure like to kill humans. There is a silver lining, technology that adds to qualit...

    After Prof. Harari?s 21 Lessons for the 21st Century, this is my favourite book of 2018 so far. If you?ve liked Neil deGrasse Tyson?s Astrophysics for People in a Hurry, you will love this book! Packed with historical accounts, the narration makes connections to the modern day...

    Didn't get the chance to read the entire book just read bits and bobs and the odd chapter or two. Bit of a disappointment, because I thought this book would be about " Star Wars " and the future of military in space. One chapter was devoted to 15th century about finding the longitude (...

  • Christine D
    Oct 03, 2018

    An alternate (and, arguably, better) title for this could be THE HISTORY OF ASTROPHYSICS FOR PEOPLE IN LESS OF A HURRY, and it's just as fascinating and richly observed as Mr. Degrasse Tyson's slimmer volume from last year. Unfortunately, there's also a very long section in the middle ...

    "Many significant advances in our understanding of the cosmos are by-products of government investment in the apparatus of warfare, and many innovative instruments of destruction are by-products of advances in astrophysics." Neil deGrasse Tyson expands on this statement by leaps an...

    I received an advanced copy of this book in exchange for an honest review from NetGalley. For anyone interested in the linkage between the missions of science and warfighting, this book is for you. I feel like I can tell the pages written by Dr. Tyson, and those written by Avis Lang. T...

    After wading through the pages of medieval history, old rudimentary inventions like longitude, and the CNN opinion-like pages of anger at the American military, you got like five pages on the actual weapons of space and some information about a space war. The advertising and naming ...

    Wow, text-book level amount of history about scientific innovations and military advancements. Space, data, and the new "High-ground." I liked how this book had global information and did NOT just focus on American history and American scientific research. It was a bit like learning ho...

    A detailed account of the impact of specific sciences on military advancement and the resulting outcomes. Heavy on the military angle--for those who think this is going to be another popular physics book. This is not a deep dive into the theory of various physics and engineering discip...

    This book needs to be read by every congressperson and their advisors as well as every college faculty member. At the same time, every college/university physicist should read explain this book to every social science and humanities faculty member. deGrasse Tyson challenges us ? ...

    Armies and Navies and militaries, in general, have depended on science for most of history. Astronomy is no exception. The symbiosis between Astronomy comes in the form of navigation technologies and sensing and detection. Be it navigating by the stars, using a telescope to survey a la...

    Needs to be organized a bit better. Too much chronological jumping around. Otherwise an interesting read. ...

    This is fantastic look at the history of astrophysics and its intersection with warming, much more thorough and well-sourced than most of Dr. Tyson's writing. It's aimed at an audience that wants to get into the weeds, so not those in a hurry. The first few chapters were interesting...

    "Space exploration may pull in the talent, but war pays the bills." -Neil deGrasse Tyson Tyson surveys the history of various inventions (e.g. telescope, missile, compass, GPS, etc.) and pens the story of how the military influenced the advent of them. The history is interesting. He...

    it was a good book ...

    This was one bad book. I actually hate to say that. I?ve seen Neil deGrasse Tyson so many times on television and found him so entertaining. He is the reason I even picked up this book. I saw him on Bill Maher as well as the Late Show with Stephen Colbert plugging this book. He descr...

    Most space exploration initiatives and atmospheric technology has been funded by military departments and budgets. Most of the motivation behind putting monitoring devices and people into space has been driven by the desire to show military prowess. These two realities are the main poi...

    There is something frustrating about the organization of this book. It's packed with excellent scholarship and research, and many of the sections I thoroughly enjoyed...but only in isolation. Together they simply don't seem to cohere comfortably: a history of scientific advances, a sec...

    All the history that relates to how the military inspired, helped, funded, and used astrophysicists is incredible. So much of the technology we use and the military uses is inspired and lots of the times financed by the army of a country. This book is full of historical facts of when a...

    False advertising. One of the major contribution of astrophysics to war was/is celestial navigation - no where discussed. And the first chapter in talking about budgets the author needs to read the constitution - ?provide for the common defense and promote general welfare? - no...

    A very interesting look at the history of science development in the field of astrophysics and how progress is intricately linked to wars. This book did have some slow bits that bogged down the book somewhere the middle, but was very interesting and enjoyable on the whole. As times cha...

    Tyson is hard to read sometimes. He is sometimes very succinct, other times he's very drawn out. I glazed over a few times and had to re-read parts because I lost his point now and then. TL:DR Humans sure like to kill humans. There is a silver lining, technology that adds to qualit...

    After Prof. Harari?s 21 Lessons for the 21st Century, this is my favourite book of 2018 so far. If you?ve liked Neil deGrasse Tyson?s Astrophysics for People in a Hurry, you will love this book! Packed with historical accounts, the narration makes connections to the modern day...

    Didn't get the chance to read the entire book just read bits and bobs and the odd chapter or two. Bit of a disappointment, because I thought this book would be about " Star Wars " and the future of military in space. One chapter was devoted to 15th century about finding the longitude (...

    I was very disappointed with this. It reads like a term paper. I doubt that Tyson wrote much of this. The authors fill numerous pages with mundane information, such as how spyglasses were useful in the 18th and 19th centuries. ...

    A book written by someone with so much to say that they blurt it all out with little attention to how to create a cohesive narrative tone. ...

    The author of many excellent books and programs on astrophysics does a great job of exploring the history of war and its connection with physicists. ...

    Didn't finish; not really what I thought it would be. ...

    Highly informative writing on the marriage that produces our future. ...

    Not what I thought it was going to be. I got bored and gave up. Became very political and I lost interest. ...

  • Brian Mikołajczyk
    Sep 19, 2018

    An alternate (and, arguably, better) title for this could be THE HISTORY OF ASTROPHYSICS FOR PEOPLE IN LESS OF A HURRY, and it's just as fascinating and richly observed as Mr. Degrasse Tyson's slimmer volume from last year. Unfortunately, there's also a very long section in the middle ...

    "Many significant advances in our understanding of the cosmos are by-products of government investment in the apparatus of warfare, and many innovative instruments of destruction are by-products of advances in astrophysics." Neil deGrasse Tyson expands on this statement by leaps an...

    I received an advanced copy of this book in exchange for an honest review from NetGalley. For anyone interested in the linkage between the missions of science and warfighting, this book is for you. I feel like I can tell the pages written by Dr. Tyson, and those written by Avis Lang. T...

    After wading through the pages of medieval history, old rudimentary inventions like longitude, and the CNN opinion-like pages of anger at the American military, you got like five pages on the actual weapons of space and some information about a space war. The advertising and naming ...

    Wow, text-book level amount of history about scientific innovations and military advancements. Space, data, and the new "High-ground." I liked how this book had global information and did NOT just focus on American history and American scientific research. It was a bit like learning ho...

    A detailed account of the impact of specific sciences on military advancement and the resulting outcomes. Heavy on the military angle--for those who think this is going to be another popular physics book. This is not a deep dive into the theory of various physics and engineering discip...

    This book needs to be read by every congressperson and their advisors as well as every college faculty member. At the same time, every college/university physicist should read explain this book to every social science and humanities faculty member. deGrasse Tyson challenges us ? ...

    Armies and Navies and militaries, in general, have depended on science for most of history. Astronomy is no exception. The symbiosis between Astronomy comes in the form of navigation technologies and sensing and detection. Be it navigating by the stars, using a telescope to survey a la...

    Needs to be organized a bit better. Too much chronological jumping around. Otherwise an interesting read. ...

    This is fantastic look at the history of astrophysics and its intersection with warming, much more thorough and well-sourced than most of Dr. Tyson's writing. It's aimed at an audience that wants to get into the weeds, so not those in a hurry. The first few chapters were interesting...

    "Space exploration may pull in the talent, but war pays the bills." -Neil deGrasse Tyson Tyson surveys the history of various inventions (e.g. telescope, missile, compass, GPS, etc.) and pens the story of how the military influenced the advent of them. The history is interesting. He...

  • Peter Mcloughlin
    Sep 18, 2018

    An alternate (and, arguably, better) title for this could be THE HISTORY OF ASTROPHYSICS FOR PEOPLE IN LESS OF A HURRY, and it's just as fascinating and richly observed as Mr. Degrasse Tyson's slimmer volume from last year. Unfortunately, there's also a very long section in the middle ...

    "Many significant advances in our understanding of the cosmos are by-products of government investment in the apparatus of warfare, and many innovative instruments of destruction are by-products of advances in astrophysics." Neil deGrasse Tyson expands on this statement by leaps an...

    I received an advanced copy of this book in exchange for an honest review from NetGalley. For anyone interested in the linkage between the missions of science and warfighting, this book is for you. I feel like I can tell the pages written by Dr. Tyson, and those written by Avis Lang. T...

    After wading through the pages of medieval history, old rudimentary inventions like longitude, and the CNN opinion-like pages of anger at the American military, you got like five pages on the actual weapons of space and some information about a space war. The advertising and naming ...

    Wow, text-book level amount of history about scientific innovations and military advancements. Space, data, and the new "High-ground." I liked how this book had global information and did NOT just focus on American history and American scientific research. It was a bit like learning ho...

    A detailed account of the impact of specific sciences on military advancement and the resulting outcomes. Heavy on the military angle--for those who think this is going to be another popular physics book. This is not a deep dive into the theory of various physics and engineering discip...

    This book needs to be read by every congressperson and their advisors as well as every college faculty member. At the same time, every college/university physicist should read explain this book to every social science and humanities faculty member. deGrasse Tyson challenges us ? ...

    Armies and Navies and militaries, in general, have depended on science for most of history. Astronomy is no exception. The symbiosis between Astronomy comes in the form of navigation technologies and sensing and detection. Be it navigating by the stars, using a telescope to survey a la...

  • Nathan Lamb
    Oct 05, 2018

    An alternate (and, arguably, better) title for this could be THE HISTORY OF ASTROPHYSICS FOR PEOPLE IN LESS OF A HURRY, and it's just as fascinating and richly observed as Mr. Degrasse Tyson's slimmer volume from last year. Unfortunately, there's also a very long section in the middle ...

    "Many significant advances in our understanding of the cosmos are by-products of government investment in the apparatus of warfare, and many innovative instruments of destruction are by-products of advances in astrophysics." Neil deGrasse Tyson expands on this statement by leaps an...

    I received an advanced copy of this book in exchange for an honest review from NetGalley. For anyone interested in the linkage between the missions of science and warfighting, this book is for you. I feel like I can tell the pages written by Dr. Tyson, and those written by Avis Lang. T...

    After wading through the pages of medieval history, old rudimentary inventions like longitude, and the CNN opinion-like pages of anger at the American military, you got like five pages on the actual weapons of space and some information about a space war. The advertising and naming ...

    Wow, text-book level amount of history about scientific innovations and military advancements. Space, data, and the new "High-ground." I liked how this book had global information and did NOT just focus on American history and American scientific research. It was a bit like learning ho...

    A detailed account of the impact of specific sciences on military advancement and the resulting outcomes. Heavy on the military angle--for those who think this is going to be another popular physics book. This is not a deep dive into the theory of various physics and engineering discip...

    This book needs to be read by every congressperson and their advisors as well as every college faculty member. At the same time, every college/university physicist should read explain this book to every social science and humanities faculty member. deGrasse Tyson challenges us ? ...

    Armies and Navies and militaries, in general, have depended on science for most of history. Astronomy is no exception. The symbiosis between Astronomy comes in the form of navigation technologies and sensing and detection. Be it navigating by the stars, using a telescope to survey a la...

    Needs to be organized a bit better. Too much chronological jumping around. Otherwise an interesting read. ...

    This is fantastic look at the history of astrophysics and its intersection with warming, much more thorough and well-sourced than most of Dr. Tyson's writing. It's aimed at an audience that wants to get into the weeds, so not those in a hurry. The first few chapters were interesting...

    "Space exploration may pull in the talent, but war pays the bills." -Neil deGrasse Tyson Tyson surveys the history of various inventions (e.g. telescope, missile, compass, GPS, etc.) and pens the story of how the military influenced the advent of them. The history is interesting. He...

    it was a good book ...

    This was one bad book. I actually hate to say that. I?ve seen Neil deGrasse Tyson so many times on television and found him so entertaining. He is the reason I even picked up this book. I saw him on Bill Maher as well as the Late Show with Stephen Colbert plugging this book. He descr...

    Most space exploration initiatives and atmospheric technology has been funded by military departments and budgets. Most of the motivation behind putting monitoring devices and people into space has been driven by the desire to show military prowess. These two realities are the main poi...

    There is something frustrating about the organization of this book. It's packed with excellent scholarship and research, and many of the sections I thoroughly enjoyed...but only in isolation. Together they simply don't seem to cohere comfortably: a history of scientific advances, a sec...

    All the history that relates to how the military inspired, helped, funded, and used astrophysicists is incredible. So much of the technology we use and the military uses is inspired and lots of the times financed by the army of a country. This book is full of historical facts of when a...

    False advertising. One of the major contribution of astrophysics to war was/is celestial navigation - no where discussed. And the first chapter in talking about budgets the author needs to read the constitution - ?provide for the common defense and promote general welfare? - no...

    A very interesting look at the history of science development in the field of astrophysics and how progress is intricately linked to wars. This book did have some slow bits that bogged down the book somewhere the middle, but was very interesting and enjoyable on the whole. As times cha...

    Tyson is hard to read sometimes. He is sometimes very succinct, other times he's very drawn out. I glazed over a few times and had to re-read parts because I lost his point now and then. TL:DR Humans sure like to kill humans. There is a silver lining, technology that adds to qualit...

    After Prof. Harari?s 21 Lessons for the 21st Century, this is my favourite book of 2018 so far. If you?ve liked Neil deGrasse Tyson?s Astrophysics for People in a Hurry, you will love this book! Packed with historical accounts, the narration makes connections to the modern day...

    Didn't get the chance to read the entire book just read bits and bobs and the odd chapter or two. Bit of a disappointment, because I thought this book would be about " Star Wars " and the future of military in space. One chapter was devoted to 15th century about finding the longitude (...

    I was very disappointed with this. It reads like a term paper. I doubt that Tyson wrote much of this. The authors fill numerous pages with mundane information, such as how spyglasses were useful in the 18th and 19th centuries. ...

    A book written by someone with so much to say that they blurt it all out with little attention to how to create a cohesive narrative tone. ...

  • Brandon Forsyth
    Jul 23, 2018

    An alternate (and, arguably, better) title for this could be THE HISTORY OF ASTROPHYSICS FOR PEOPLE IN LESS OF A HURRY, and it's just as fascinating and richly observed as Mr. Degrasse Tyson's slimmer volume from last year. Unfortunately, there's also a very long section in the middle ...

  • Angie
    Sep 11, 2018

    An alternate (and, arguably, better) title for this could be THE HISTORY OF ASTROPHYSICS FOR PEOPLE IN LESS OF A HURRY, and it's just as fascinating and richly observed as Mr. Degrasse Tyson's slimmer volume from last year. Unfortunately, there's also a very long section in the middle ...

    "Many significant advances in our understanding of the cosmos are by-products of government investment in the apparatus of warfare, and many innovative instruments of destruction are by-products of advances in astrophysics." Neil deGrasse Tyson expands on this statement by leaps an...

    I received an advanced copy of this book in exchange for an honest review from NetGalley. For anyone interested in the linkage between the missions of science and warfighting, this book is for you. I feel like I can tell the pages written by Dr. Tyson, and those written by Avis Lang. T...

    After wading through the pages of medieval history, old rudimentary inventions like longitude, and the CNN opinion-like pages of anger at the American military, you got like five pages on the actual weapons of space and some information about a space war. The advertising and naming ...

    Wow, text-book level amount of history about scientific innovations and military advancements. Space, data, and the new "High-ground." I liked how this book had global information and did NOT just focus on American history and American scientific research. It was a bit like learning ho...

    A detailed account of the impact of specific sciences on military advancement and the resulting outcomes. Heavy on the military angle--for those who think this is going to be another popular physics book. This is not a deep dive into the theory of various physics and engineering discip...

    This book needs to be read by every congressperson and their advisors as well as every college faculty member. At the same time, every college/university physicist should read explain this book to every social science and humanities faculty member. deGrasse Tyson challenges us ? ...

    Armies and Navies and militaries, in general, have depended on science for most of history. Astronomy is no exception. The symbiosis between Astronomy comes in the form of navigation technologies and sensing and detection. Be it navigating by the stars, using a telescope to survey a la...

    Needs to be organized a bit better. Too much chronological jumping around. Otherwise an interesting read. ...

    This is fantastic look at the history of astrophysics and its intersection with warming, much more thorough and well-sourced than most of Dr. Tyson's writing. It's aimed at an audience that wants to get into the weeds, so not those in a hurry. The first few chapters were interesting...

  • Dan
    Sep 25, 2018

    An alternate (and, arguably, better) title for this could be THE HISTORY OF ASTROPHYSICS FOR PEOPLE IN LESS OF A HURRY, and it's just as fascinating and richly observed as Mr. Degrasse Tyson's slimmer volume from last year. Unfortunately, there's also a very long section in the middle ...

    "Many significant advances in our understanding of the cosmos are by-products of government investment in the apparatus of warfare, and many innovative instruments of destruction are by-products of advances in astrophysics." Neil deGrasse Tyson expands on this statement by leaps an...

    I received an advanced copy of this book in exchange for an honest review from NetGalley. For anyone interested in the linkage between the missions of science and warfighting, this book is for you. I feel like I can tell the pages written by Dr. Tyson, and those written by Avis Lang. T...

    After wading through the pages of medieval history, old rudimentary inventions like longitude, and the CNN opinion-like pages of anger at the American military, you got like five pages on the actual weapons of space and some information about a space war. The advertising and naming ...

    Wow, text-book level amount of history about scientific innovations and military advancements. Space, data, and the new "High-ground." I liked how this book had global information and did NOT just focus on American history and American scientific research. It was a bit like learning ho...

    A detailed account of the impact of specific sciences on military advancement and the resulting outcomes. Heavy on the military angle--for those who think this is going to be another popular physics book. This is not a deep dive into the theory of various physics and engineering discip...

    This book needs to be read by every congressperson and their advisors as well as every college faculty member. At the same time, every college/university physicist should read explain this book to every social science and humanities faculty member. deGrasse Tyson challenges us ? ...

    Armies and Navies and militaries, in general, have depended on science for most of history. Astronomy is no exception. The symbiosis between Astronomy comes in the form of navigation technologies and sensing and detection. Be it navigating by the stars, using a telescope to survey a la...

    Needs to be organized a bit better. Too much chronological jumping around. Otherwise an interesting read. ...

    This is fantastic look at the history of astrophysics and its intersection with warming, much more thorough and well-sourced than most of Dr. Tyson's writing. It's aimed at an audience that wants to get into the weeds, so not those in a hurry. The first few chapters were interesting...

    "Space exploration may pull in the talent, but war pays the bills." -Neil deGrasse Tyson Tyson surveys the history of various inventions (e.g. telescope, missile, compass, GPS, etc.) and pens the story of how the military influenced the advent of them. The history is interesting. He...

    it was a good book ...

    This was one bad book. I actually hate to say that. I?ve seen Neil deGrasse Tyson so many times on television and found him so entertaining. He is the reason I even picked up this book. I saw him on Bill Maher as well as the Late Show with Stephen Colbert plugging this book. He descr...

    Most space exploration initiatives and atmospheric technology has been funded by military departments and budgets. Most of the motivation behind putting monitoring devices and people into space has been driven by the desire to show military prowess. These two realities are the main poi...

    There is something frustrating about the organization of this book. It's packed with excellent scholarship and research, and many of the sections I thoroughly enjoyed...but only in isolation. Together they simply don't seem to cohere comfortably: a history of scientific advances, a sec...

    All the history that relates to how the military inspired, helped, funded, and used astrophysicists is incredible. So much of the technology we use and the military uses is inspired and lots of the times financed by the army of a country. This book is full of historical facts of when a...

    False advertising. One of the major contribution of astrophysics to war was/is celestial navigation - no where discussed. And the first chapter in talking about budgets the author needs to read the constitution - ?provide for the common defense and promote general welfare? - no...

  • Russ Szelag
    Oct 04, 2018

    An alternate (and, arguably, better) title for this could be THE HISTORY OF ASTROPHYSICS FOR PEOPLE IN LESS OF A HURRY, and it's just as fascinating and richly observed as Mr. Degrasse Tyson's slimmer volume from last year. Unfortunately, there's also a very long section in the middle ...

    "Many significant advances in our understanding of the cosmos are by-products of government investment in the apparatus of warfare, and many innovative instruments of destruction are by-products of advances in astrophysics." Neil deGrasse Tyson expands on this statement by leaps an...

    I received an advanced copy of this book in exchange for an honest review from NetGalley. For anyone interested in the linkage between the missions of science and warfighting, this book is for you. I feel like I can tell the pages written by Dr. Tyson, and those written by Avis Lang. T...

    After wading through the pages of medieval history, old rudimentary inventions like longitude, and the CNN opinion-like pages of anger at the American military, you got like five pages on the actual weapons of space and some information about a space war. The advertising and naming ...

    Wow, text-book level amount of history about scientific innovations and military advancements. Space, data, and the new "High-ground." I liked how this book had global information and did NOT just focus on American history and American scientific research. It was a bit like learning ho...

    A detailed account of the impact of specific sciences on military advancement and the resulting outcomes. Heavy on the military angle--for those who think this is going to be another popular physics book. This is not a deep dive into the theory of various physics and engineering discip...

    This book needs to be read by every congressperson and their advisors as well as every college faculty member. At the same time, every college/university physicist should read explain this book to every social science and humanities faculty member. deGrasse Tyson challenges us ? ...

    Armies and Navies and militaries, in general, have depended on science for most of history. Astronomy is no exception. The symbiosis between Astronomy comes in the form of navigation technologies and sensing and detection. Be it navigating by the stars, using a telescope to survey a la...

    Needs to be organized a bit better. Too much chronological jumping around. Otherwise an interesting read. ...

    This is fantastic look at the history of astrophysics and its intersection with warming, much more thorough and well-sourced than most of Dr. Tyson's writing. It's aimed at an audience that wants to get into the weeds, so not those in a hurry. The first few chapters were interesting...

    "Space exploration may pull in the talent, but war pays the bills." -Neil deGrasse Tyson Tyson surveys the history of various inventions (e.g. telescope, missile, compass, GPS, etc.) and pens the story of how the military influenced the advent of them. The history is interesting. He...

    it was a good book ...

    This was one bad book. I actually hate to say that. I?ve seen Neil deGrasse Tyson so many times on television and found him so entertaining. He is the reason I even picked up this book. I saw him on Bill Maher as well as the Late Show with Stephen Colbert plugging this book. He descr...

    Most space exploration initiatives and atmospheric technology has been funded by military departments and budgets. Most of the motivation behind putting monitoring devices and people into space has been driven by the desire to show military prowess. These two realities are the main poi...

    There is something frustrating about the organization of this book. It's packed with excellent scholarship and research, and many of the sections I thoroughly enjoyed...but only in isolation. Together they simply don't seem to cohere comfortably: a history of scientific advances, a sec...

    All the history that relates to how the military inspired, helped, funded, and used astrophysicists is incredible. So much of the technology we use and the military uses is inspired and lots of the times financed by the army of a country. This book is full of historical facts of when a...

    False advertising. One of the major contribution of astrophysics to war was/is celestial navigation - no where discussed. And the first chapter in talking about budgets the author needs to read the constitution - ?provide for the common defense and promote general welfare? - no...

    A very interesting look at the history of science development in the field of astrophysics and how progress is intricately linked to wars. This book did have some slow bits that bogged down the book somewhere the middle, but was very interesting and enjoyable on the whole. As times cha...

    Tyson is hard to read sometimes. He is sometimes very succinct, other times he's very drawn out. I glazed over a few times and had to re-read parts because I lost his point now and then. TL:DR Humans sure like to kill humans. There is a silver lining, technology that adds to qualit...

    After Prof. Harari?s 21 Lessons for the 21st Century, this is my favourite book of 2018 so far. If you?ve liked Neil deGrasse Tyson?s Astrophysics for People in a Hurry, you will love this book! Packed with historical accounts, the narration makes connections to the modern day...

    Didn't get the chance to read the entire book just read bits and bobs and the odd chapter or two. Bit of a disappointment, because I thought this book would be about " Star Wars " and the future of military in space. One chapter was devoted to 15th century about finding the longitude (...

    I was very disappointed with this. It reads like a term paper. I doubt that Tyson wrote much of this. The authors fill numerous pages with mundane information, such as how spyglasses were useful in the 18th and 19th centuries. ...

  • Ashley W.
    Sep 11, 2018

    An alternate (and, arguably, better) title for this could be THE HISTORY OF ASTROPHYSICS FOR PEOPLE IN LESS OF A HURRY, and it's just as fascinating and richly observed as Mr. Degrasse Tyson's slimmer volume from last year. Unfortunately, there's also a very long section in the middle ...

    "Many significant advances in our understanding of the cosmos are by-products of government investment in the apparatus of warfare, and many innovative instruments of destruction are by-products of advances in astrophysics." Neil deGrasse Tyson expands on this statement by leaps an...

    I received an advanced copy of this book in exchange for an honest review from NetGalley. For anyone interested in the linkage between the missions of science and warfighting, this book is for you. I feel like I can tell the pages written by Dr. Tyson, and those written by Avis Lang. T...

    After wading through the pages of medieval history, old rudimentary inventions like longitude, and the CNN opinion-like pages of anger at the American military, you got like five pages on the actual weapons of space and some information about a space war. The advertising and naming ...

    Wow, text-book level amount of history about scientific innovations and military advancements. Space, data, and the new "High-ground." I liked how this book had global information and did NOT just focus on American history and American scientific research. It was a bit like learning ho...

    A detailed account of the impact of specific sciences on military advancement and the resulting outcomes. Heavy on the military angle--for those who think this is going to be another popular physics book. This is not a deep dive into the theory of various physics and engineering discip...

    This book needs to be read by every congressperson and their advisors as well as every college faculty member. At the same time, every college/university physicist should read explain this book to every social science and humanities faculty member. deGrasse Tyson challenges us ? ...

    Armies and Navies and militaries, in general, have depended on science for most of history. Astronomy is no exception. The symbiosis between Astronomy comes in the form of navigation technologies and sensing and detection. Be it navigating by the stars, using a telescope to survey a la...

    Needs to be organized a bit better. Too much chronological jumping around. Otherwise an interesting read. ...

    This is fantastic look at the history of astrophysics and its intersection with warming, much more thorough and well-sourced than most of Dr. Tyson's writing. It's aimed at an audience that wants to get into the weeds, so not those in a hurry. The first few chapters were interesting...

    "Space exploration may pull in the talent, but war pays the bills." -Neil deGrasse Tyson Tyson surveys the history of various inventions (e.g. telescope, missile, compass, GPS, etc.) and pens the story of how the military influenced the advent of them. The history is interesting. He...

    it was a good book ...

  • Paul
    Sep 25, 2018

    An alternate (and, arguably, better) title for this could be THE HISTORY OF ASTROPHYSICS FOR PEOPLE IN LESS OF A HURRY, and it's just as fascinating and richly observed as Mr. Degrasse Tyson's slimmer volume from last year. Unfortunately, there's also a very long section in the middle ...

    "Many significant advances in our understanding of the cosmos are by-products of government investment in the apparatus of warfare, and many innovative instruments of destruction are by-products of advances in astrophysics." Neil deGrasse Tyson expands on this statement by leaps an...

    I received an advanced copy of this book in exchange for an honest review from NetGalley. For anyone interested in the linkage between the missions of science and warfighting, this book is for you. I feel like I can tell the pages written by Dr. Tyson, and those written by Avis Lang. T...

    After wading through the pages of medieval history, old rudimentary inventions like longitude, and the CNN opinion-like pages of anger at the American military, you got like five pages on the actual weapons of space and some information about a space war. The advertising and naming ...

    Wow, text-book level amount of history about scientific innovations and military advancements. Space, data, and the new "High-ground." I liked how this book had global information and did NOT just focus on American history and American scientific research. It was a bit like learning ho...

    A detailed account of the impact of specific sciences on military advancement and the resulting outcomes. Heavy on the military angle--for those who think this is going to be another popular physics book. This is not a deep dive into the theory of various physics and engineering discip...

    This book needs to be read by every congressperson and their advisors as well as every college faculty member. At the same time, every college/university physicist should read explain this book to every social science and humanities faculty member. deGrasse Tyson challenges us ? ...

    Armies and Navies and militaries, in general, have depended on science for most of history. Astronomy is no exception. The symbiosis between Astronomy comes in the form of navigation technologies and sensing and detection. Be it navigating by the stars, using a telescope to survey a la...

    Needs to be organized a bit better. Too much chronological jumping around. Otherwise an interesting read. ...

    This is fantastic look at the history of astrophysics and its intersection with warming, much more thorough and well-sourced than most of Dr. Tyson's writing. It's aimed at an audience that wants to get into the weeds, so not those in a hurry. The first few chapters were interesting...

    "Space exploration may pull in the talent, but war pays the bills." -Neil deGrasse Tyson Tyson surveys the history of various inventions (e.g. telescope, missile, compass, GPS, etc.) and pens the story of how the military influenced the advent of them. The history is interesting. He...

    it was a good book ...

    This was one bad book. I actually hate to say that. I?ve seen Neil deGrasse Tyson so many times on television and found him so entertaining. He is the reason I even picked up this book. I saw him on Bill Maher as well as the Late Show with Stephen Colbert plugging this book. He descr...

    Most space exploration initiatives and atmospheric technology has been funded by military departments and budgets. Most of the motivation behind putting monitoring devices and people into space has been driven by the desire to show military prowess. These two realities are the main poi...

    There is something frustrating about the organization of this book. It's packed with excellent scholarship and research, and many of the sections I thoroughly enjoyed...but only in isolation. Together they simply don't seem to cohere comfortably: a history of scientific advances, a sec...

    All the history that relates to how the military inspired, helped, funded, and used astrophysicists is incredible. So much of the technology we use and the military uses is inspired and lots of the times financed by the army of a country. This book is full of historical facts of when a...

    False advertising. One of the major contribution of astrophysics to war was/is celestial navigation - no where discussed. And the first chapter in talking about budgets the author needs to read the constitution - ?provide for the common defense and promote general welfare? - no...

    A very interesting look at the history of science development in the field of astrophysics and how progress is intricately linked to wars. This book did have some slow bits that bogged down the book somewhere the middle, but was very interesting and enjoyable on the whole. As times cha...

    Tyson is hard to read sometimes. He is sometimes very succinct, other times he's very drawn out. I glazed over a few times and had to re-read parts because I lost his point now and then. TL:DR Humans sure like to kill humans. There is a silver lining, technology that adds to qualit...

    After Prof. Harari?s 21 Lessons for the 21st Century, this is my favourite book of 2018 so far. If you?ve liked Neil deGrasse Tyson?s Astrophysics for People in a Hurry, you will love this book! Packed with historical accounts, the narration makes connections to the modern day...

    Didn't get the chance to read the entire book just read bits and bobs and the odd chapter or two. Bit of a disappointment, because I thought this book would be about " Star Wars " and the future of military in space. One chapter was devoted to 15th century about finding the longitude (...

    I was very disappointed with this. It reads like a term paper. I doubt that Tyson wrote much of this. The authors fill numerous pages with mundane information, such as how spyglasses were useful in the 18th and 19th centuries. ...

    A book written by someone with so much to say that they blurt it all out with little attention to how to create a cohesive narrative tone. ...

    The author of many excellent books and programs on astrophysics does a great job of exploring the history of war and its connection with physicists. ...

    Didn't finish; not really what I thought it would be. ...

    Highly informative writing on the marriage that produces our future. ...

    Not what I thought it was going to be. I got bored and gave up. Became very political and I lost interest. ...

    TMI ...

    ...

  • Alexander Rivas
    Oct 02, 2018

    An alternate (and, arguably, better) title for this could be THE HISTORY OF ASTROPHYSICS FOR PEOPLE IN LESS OF A HURRY, and it's just as fascinating and richly observed as Mr. Degrasse Tyson's slimmer volume from last year. Unfortunately, there's also a very long section in the middle ...

    "Many significant advances in our understanding of the cosmos are by-products of government investment in the apparatus of warfare, and many innovative instruments of destruction are by-products of advances in astrophysics." Neil deGrasse Tyson expands on this statement by leaps an...

    I received an advanced copy of this book in exchange for an honest review from NetGalley. For anyone interested in the linkage between the missions of science and warfighting, this book is for you. I feel like I can tell the pages written by Dr. Tyson, and those written by Avis Lang. T...

    After wading through the pages of medieval history, old rudimentary inventions like longitude, and the CNN opinion-like pages of anger at the American military, you got like five pages on the actual weapons of space and some information about a space war. The advertising and naming ...

    Wow, text-book level amount of history about scientific innovations and military advancements. Space, data, and the new "High-ground." I liked how this book had global information and did NOT just focus on American history and American scientific research. It was a bit like learning ho...

    A detailed account of the impact of specific sciences on military advancement and the resulting outcomes. Heavy on the military angle--for those who think this is going to be another popular physics book. This is not a deep dive into the theory of various physics and engineering discip...

    This book needs to be read by every congressperson and their advisors as well as every college faculty member. At the same time, every college/university physicist should read explain this book to every social science and humanities faculty member. deGrasse Tyson challenges us ? ...

    Armies and Navies and militaries, in general, have depended on science for most of history. Astronomy is no exception. The symbiosis between Astronomy comes in the form of navigation technologies and sensing and detection. Be it navigating by the stars, using a telescope to survey a la...

    Needs to be organized a bit better. Too much chronological jumping around. Otherwise an interesting read. ...

    This is fantastic look at the history of astrophysics and its intersection with warming, much more thorough and well-sourced than most of Dr. Tyson's writing. It's aimed at an audience that wants to get into the weeds, so not those in a hurry. The first few chapters were interesting...

    "Space exploration may pull in the talent, but war pays the bills." -Neil deGrasse Tyson Tyson surveys the history of various inventions (e.g. telescope, missile, compass, GPS, etc.) and pens the story of how the military influenced the advent of them. The history is interesting. He...

    it was a good book ...

    This was one bad book. I actually hate to say that. I?ve seen Neil deGrasse Tyson so many times on television and found him so entertaining. He is the reason I even picked up this book. I saw him on Bill Maher as well as the Late Show with Stephen Colbert plugging this book. He descr...

    Most space exploration initiatives and atmospheric technology has been funded by military departments and budgets. Most of the motivation behind putting monitoring devices and people into space has been driven by the desire to show military prowess. These two realities are the main poi...

    There is something frustrating about the organization of this book. It's packed with excellent scholarship and research, and many of the sections I thoroughly enjoyed...but only in isolation. Together they simply don't seem to cohere comfortably: a history of scientific advances, a sec...

    All the history that relates to how the military inspired, helped, funded, and used astrophysicists is incredible. So much of the technology we use and the military uses is inspired and lots of the times financed by the army of a country. This book is full of historical facts of when a...

  • John Munro
    Sep 16, 2018

    An alternate (and, arguably, better) title for this could be THE HISTORY OF ASTROPHYSICS FOR PEOPLE IN LESS OF A HURRY, and it's just as fascinating and richly observed as Mr. Degrasse Tyson's slimmer volume from last year. Unfortunately, there's also a very long section in the middle ...

    "Many significant advances in our understanding of the cosmos are by-products of government investment in the apparatus of warfare, and many innovative instruments of destruction are by-products of advances in astrophysics." Neil deGrasse Tyson expands on this statement by leaps an...

    I received an advanced copy of this book in exchange for an honest review from NetGalley. For anyone interested in the linkage between the missions of science and warfighting, this book is for you. I feel like I can tell the pages written by Dr. Tyson, and those written by Avis Lang. T...

    After wading through the pages of medieval history, old rudimentary inventions like longitude, and the CNN opinion-like pages of anger at the American military, you got like five pages on the actual weapons of space and some information about a space war. The advertising and naming ...

    Wow, text-book level amount of history about scientific innovations and military advancements. Space, data, and the new "High-ground." I liked how this book had global information and did NOT just focus on American history and American scientific research. It was a bit like learning ho...

    A detailed account of the impact of specific sciences on military advancement and the resulting outcomes. Heavy on the military angle--for those who think this is going to be another popular physics book. This is not a deep dive into the theory of various physics and engineering discip...

    This book needs to be read by every congressperson and their advisors as well as every college faculty member. At the same time, every college/university physicist should read explain this book to every social science and humanities faculty member. deGrasse Tyson challenges us ? ...

    Armies and Navies and militaries, in general, have depended on science for most of history. Astronomy is no exception. The symbiosis between Astronomy comes in the form of navigation technologies and sensing and detection. Be it navigating by the stars, using a telescope to survey a la...

    Needs to be organized a bit better. Too much chronological jumping around. Otherwise an interesting read. ...

  • Jon Stone
    Jul 19, 2018

    An alternate (and, arguably, better) title for this could be THE HISTORY OF ASTROPHYSICS FOR PEOPLE IN LESS OF A HURRY, and it's just as fascinating and richly observed as Mr. Degrasse Tyson's slimmer volume from last year. Unfortunately, there's also a very long section in the middle ...

    "Many significant advances in our understanding of the cosmos are by-products of government investment in the apparatus of warfare, and many innovative instruments of destruction are by-products of advances in astrophysics." Neil deGrasse Tyson expands on this statement by leaps an...

    I received an advanced copy of this book in exchange for an honest review from NetGalley. For anyone interested in the linkage between the missions of science and warfighting, this book is for you. I feel like I can tell the pages written by Dr. Tyson, and those written by Avis Lang. T...

  • Sami
    Sep 27, 2018

    An alternate (and, arguably, better) title for this could be THE HISTORY OF ASTROPHYSICS FOR PEOPLE IN LESS OF A HURRY, and it's just as fascinating and richly observed as Mr. Degrasse Tyson's slimmer volume from last year. Unfortunately, there's also a very long section in the middle ...

    "Many significant advances in our understanding of the cosmos are by-products of government investment in the apparatus of warfare, and many innovative instruments of destruction are by-products of advances in astrophysics." Neil deGrasse Tyson expands on this statement by leaps an...

    I received an advanced copy of this book in exchange for an honest review from NetGalley. For anyone interested in the linkage between the missions of science and warfighting, this book is for you. I feel like I can tell the pages written by Dr. Tyson, and those written by Avis Lang. T...

    After wading through the pages of medieval history, old rudimentary inventions like longitude, and the CNN opinion-like pages of anger at the American military, you got like five pages on the actual weapons of space and some information about a space war. The advertising and naming ...

    Wow, text-book level amount of history about scientific innovations and military advancements. Space, data, and the new "High-ground." I liked how this book had global information and did NOT just focus on American history and American scientific research. It was a bit like learning ho...

    A detailed account of the impact of specific sciences on military advancement and the resulting outcomes. Heavy on the military angle--for those who think this is going to be another popular physics book. This is not a deep dive into the theory of various physics and engineering discip...

    This book needs to be read by every congressperson and their advisors as well as every college faculty member. At the same time, every college/university physicist should read explain this book to every social science and humanities faculty member. deGrasse Tyson challenges us ? ...

    Armies and Navies and militaries, in general, have depended on science for most of history. Astronomy is no exception. The symbiosis between Astronomy comes in the form of navigation technologies and sensing and detection. Be it navigating by the stars, using a telescope to survey a la...

    Needs to be organized a bit better. Too much chronological jumping around. Otherwise an interesting read. ...

    This is fantastic look at the history of astrophysics and its intersection with warming, much more thorough and well-sourced than most of Dr. Tyson's writing. It's aimed at an audience that wants to get into the weeds, so not those in a hurry. The first few chapters were interesting...

    "Space exploration may pull in the talent, but war pays the bills." -Neil deGrasse Tyson Tyson surveys the history of various inventions (e.g. telescope, missile, compass, GPS, etc.) and pens the story of how the military influenced the advent of them. The history is interesting. He...

    it was a good book ...

    This was one bad book. I actually hate to say that. I?ve seen Neil deGrasse Tyson so many times on television and found him so entertaining. He is the reason I even picked up this book. I saw him on Bill Maher as well as the Late Show with Stephen Colbert plugging this book. He descr...

    Most space exploration initiatives and atmospheric technology has been funded by military departments and budgets. Most of the motivation behind putting monitoring devices and people into space has been driven by the desire to show military prowess. These two realities are the main poi...

    There is something frustrating about the organization of this book. It's packed with excellent scholarship and research, and many of the sections I thoroughly enjoyed...but only in isolation. Together they simply don't seem to cohere comfortably: a history of scientific advances, a sec...

    All the history that relates to how the military inspired, helped, funded, and used astrophysicists is incredible. So much of the technology we use and the military uses is inspired and lots of the times financed by the army of a country. This book is full of historical facts of when a...

    False advertising. One of the major contribution of astrophysics to war was/is celestial navigation - no where discussed. And the first chapter in talking about budgets the author needs to read the constitution - ?provide for the common defense and promote general welfare? - no...

    A very interesting look at the history of science development in the field of astrophysics and how progress is intricately linked to wars. This book did have some slow bits that bogged down the book somewhere the middle, but was very interesting and enjoyable on the whole. As times cha...

    Tyson is hard to read sometimes. He is sometimes very succinct, other times he's very drawn out. I glazed over a few times and had to re-read parts because I lost his point now and then. TL:DR Humans sure like to kill humans. There is a silver lining, technology that adds to qualit...

    After Prof. Harari?s 21 Lessons for the 21st Century, this is my favourite book of 2018 so far. If you?ve liked Neil deGrasse Tyson?s Astrophysics for People in a Hurry, you will love this book! Packed with historical accounts, the narration makes connections to the modern day...

  • Lasse
    Sep 26, 2018

    An alternate (and, arguably, better) title for this could be THE HISTORY OF ASTROPHYSICS FOR PEOPLE IN LESS OF A HURRY, and it's just as fascinating and richly observed as Mr. Degrasse Tyson's slimmer volume from last year. Unfortunately, there's also a very long section in the middle ...

    "Many significant advances in our understanding of the cosmos are by-products of government investment in the apparatus of warfare, and many innovative instruments of destruction are by-products of advances in astrophysics." Neil deGrasse Tyson expands on this statement by leaps an...

    I received an advanced copy of this book in exchange for an honest review from NetGalley. For anyone interested in the linkage between the missions of science and warfighting, this book is for you. I feel like I can tell the pages written by Dr. Tyson, and those written by Avis Lang. T...

    After wading through the pages of medieval history, old rudimentary inventions like longitude, and the CNN opinion-like pages of anger at the American military, you got like five pages on the actual weapons of space and some information about a space war. The advertising and naming ...

    Wow, text-book level amount of history about scientific innovations and military advancements. Space, data, and the new "High-ground." I liked how this book had global information and did NOT just focus on American history and American scientific research. It was a bit like learning ho...

    A detailed account of the impact of specific sciences on military advancement and the resulting outcomes. Heavy on the military angle--for those who think this is going to be another popular physics book. This is not a deep dive into the theory of various physics and engineering discip...

    This book needs to be read by every congressperson and their advisors as well as every college faculty member. At the same time, every college/university physicist should read explain this book to every social science and humanities faculty member. deGrasse Tyson challenges us ? ...

    Armies and Navies and militaries, in general, have depended on science for most of history. Astronomy is no exception. The symbiosis between Astronomy comes in the form of navigation technologies and sensing and detection. Be it navigating by the stars, using a telescope to survey a la...

    Needs to be organized a bit better. Too much chronological jumping around. Otherwise an interesting read. ...

    This is fantastic look at the history of astrophysics and its intersection with warming, much more thorough and well-sourced than most of Dr. Tyson's writing. It's aimed at an audience that wants to get into the weeds, so not those in a hurry. The first few chapters were interesting...

    "Space exploration may pull in the talent, but war pays the bills." -Neil deGrasse Tyson Tyson surveys the history of various inventions (e.g. telescope, missile, compass, GPS, etc.) and pens the story of how the military influenced the advent of them. The history is interesting. He...

    it was a good book ...

    This was one bad book. I actually hate to say that. I?ve seen Neil deGrasse Tyson so many times on television and found him so entertaining. He is the reason I even picked up this book. I saw him on Bill Maher as well as the Late Show with Stephen Colbert plugging this book. He descr...

    Most space exploration initiatives and atmospheric technology has been funded by military departments and budgets. Most of the motivation behind putting monitoring devices and people into space has been driven by the desire to show military prowess. These two realities are the main poi...

    There is something frustrating about the organization of this book. It's packed with excellent scholarship and research, and many of the sections I thoroughly enjoyed...but only in isolation. Together they simply don't seem to cohere comfortably: a history of scientific advances, a sec...

    All the history that relates to how the military inspired, helped, funded, and used astrophysicists is incredible. So much of the technology we use and the military uses is inspired and lots of the times financed by the army of a country. This book is full of historical facts of when a...

    False advertising. One of the major contribution of astrophysics to war was/is celestial navigation - no where discussed. And the first chapter in talking about budgets the author needs to read the constitution - ?provide for the common defense and promote general welfare? - no...

    A very interesting look at the history of science development in the field of astrophysics and how progress is intricately linked to wars. This book did have some slow bits that bogged down the book somewhere the middle, but was very interesting and enjoyable on the whole. As times cha...

    Tyson is hard to read sometimes. He is sometimes very succinct, other times he's very drawn out. I glazed over a few times and had to re-read parts because I lost his point now and then. TL:DR Humans sure like to kill humans. There is a silver lining, technology that adds to qualit...

    After Prof. Harari?s 21 Lessons for the 21st Century, this is my favourite book of 2018 so far. If you?ve liked Neil deGrasse Tyson?s Astrophysics for People in a Hurry, you will love this book! Packed with historical accounts, the narration makes connections to the modern day...

    Didn't get the chance to read the entire book just read bits and bobs and the odd chapter or two. Bit of a disappointment, because I thought this book would be about " Star Wars " and the future of military in space. One chapter was devoted to 15th century about finding the longitude (...

    I was very disappointed with this. It reads like a term paper. I doubt that Tyson wrote much of this. The authors fill numerous pages with mundane information, such as how spyglasses were useful in the 18th and 19th centuries. ...

    A book written by someone with so much to say that they blurt it all out with little attention to how to create a cohesive narrative tone. ...

    The author of many excellent books and programs on astrophysics does a great job of exploring the history of war and its connection with physicists. ...

    Didn't finish; not really what I thought it would be. ...

    Highly informative writing on the marriage that produces our future. ...

    Not what I thought it was going to be. I got bored and gave up. Became very political and I lost interest. ...

    TMI ...

    ...

    ...

  • Catherine Puma
    Sep 21, 2018

    An alternate (and, arguably, better) title for this could be THE HISTORY OF ASTROPHYSICS FOR PEOPLE IN LESS OF A HURRY, and it's just as fascinating and richly observed as Mr. Degrasse Tyson's slimmer volume from last year. Unfortunately, there's also a very long section in the middle ...

    "Many significant advances in our understanding of the cosmos are by-products of government investment in the apparatus of warfare, and many innovative instruments of destruction are by-products of advances in astrophysics." Neil deGrasse Tyson expands on this statement by leaps an...

    I received an advanced copy of this book in exchange for an honest review from NetGalley. For anyone interested in the linkage between the missions of science and warfighting, this book is for you. I feel like I can tell the pages written by Dr. Tyson, and those written by Avis Lang. T...

    After wading through the pages of medieval history, old rudimentary inventions like longitude, and the CNN opinion-like pages of anger at the American military, you got like five pages on the actual weapons of space and some information about a space war. The advertising and naming ...

    Wow, text-book level amount of history about scientific innovations and military advancements. Space, data, and the new "High-ground." I liked how this book had global information and did NOT just focus on American history and American scientific research. It was a bit like learning ho...

    A detailed account of the impact of specific sciences on military advancement and the resulting outcomes. Heavy on the military angle--for those who think this is going to be another popular physics book. This is not a deep dive into the theory of various physics and engineering discip...

    This book needs to be read by every congressperson and their advisors as well as every college faculty member. At the same time, every college/university physicist should read explain this book to every social science and humanities faculty member. deGrasse Tyson challenges us ? ...

    Armies and Navies and militaries, in general, have depended on science for most of history. Astronomy is no exception. The symbiosis between Astronomy comes in the form of navigation technologies and sensing and detection. Be it navigating by the stars, using a telescope to survey a la...

    Needs to be organized a bit better. Too much chronological jumping around. Otherwise an interesting read. ...

    This is fantastic look at the history of astrophysics and its intersection with warming, much more thorough and well-sourced than most of Dr. Tyson's writing. It's aimed at an audience that wants to get into the weeds, so not those in a hurry. The first few chapters were interesting...

    "Space exploration may pull in the talent, but war pays the bills." -Neil deGrasse Tyson Tyson surveys the history of various inventions (e.g. telescope, missile, compass, GPS, etc.) and pens the story of how the military influenced the advent of them. The history is interesting. He...

    it was a good book ...

    This was one bad book. I actually hate to say that. I?ve seen Neil deGrasse Tyson so many times on television and found him so entertaining. He is the reason I even picked up this book. I saw him on Bill Maher as well as the Late Show with Stephen Colbert plugging this book. He descr...

    Most space exploration initiatives and atmospheric technology has been funded by military departments and budgets. Most of the motivation behind putting monitoring devices and people into space has been driven by the desire to show military prowess. These two realities are the main poi...