Drive: The Surprising Truth About What Motivates Us

Drive: The Surprising Truth About What Motivates Us

Forget everything you thought you knew about how to motivate people?at work, at school, at home. It's wrong. As Daniel H. Pink (author of To Sell Is Human: The Surprising Truth About Motivating Others) explains in his paradigm-shattering book Drive, the secret to high performance and satisfaction in today's world is the deeply human need to direct our own lives, to learn a Forget everything you thought you knew about how to motivate people?at work, at school, at home. It's wrong. As Danie...

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Title:Drive: The Surprising Truth About What Motivates Us
Author:Daniel H. Pink
Rating:
Genres:Nonfiction
ISBN:Drive: The Surprising Truth About What Motivates Us
ISBN
Edition Language:English
Format Type:Hardcover
Number of Pages:242 pages pages

Drive: The Surprising Truth About What Motivates Us Reviews

  • Doug
    Dec 30, 2009

    Why am I writing this review on Goodreads, anyway? I'm not getting paid for it. There are plenty of other things I should be doing. And it's not like I have a coterie of devoted followers waiting with bated breath for my next review (in fact, the vast majority of reviews I write here g...

    I can think of a few alternate titles for this book. ?The Art of Beating a Dead Horse: Your Guide to Regurgitating the Same Point in Every Chapter? ?How to Filter Years of Other People?s Research into Broad Talking Points? ?You Too Can Write a Book With At Least 25...

    From the Fictive Desk of D.J. Ian: The End is Much More Exciting than It Was Once Upon a Time The story of GoodBetterBestReads has really only just begun, but we have already become the world?s largest community of potential readers, book buyers and Kindle users who have star-r...

    This book comes with its own summary ? a very handy thing: ?COCKTAIL PARTY SUMMARY When it comes to motivation, there?s a gap between what science knows and what business does. Our current business operating system?which is built around external, carrot-and-stick motivators...

    What frustrates me is the main premise has a contradiction that is never addressed. He begins the book with some research on monkeys that demonstrated an innate interest in solving puzzles. He then goes on to describe his big premise which is that we are are in the midst of a major mot...

    So, I listened to this entire book about motivation, and I can't figure out why I don't feel motivated to write a review. No carrot, no stick, no review. ...

    Only the first chapter is necessary. The rest is repetitious and filled with soon-to-be-obsolete computer metaphors. However, I've been thinking a lot about this book since I read it (a few weeks ago?), so two stars was perhaps a stingy rating. Everywhere I go lately, I see examples...

    Some good ideas, but for once I'd like to see a book where the case studies about flexible scheduling and autonomy don't involve software companies or consultants. I'd like to see an example where they motivate DMV employees to work harder to do the same menial work, but if giving DMV ...

  • David
    Sep 18, 2010

    Why am I writing this review on Goodreads, anyway? I'm not getting paid for it. There are plenty of other things I should be doing. And it's not like I have a coterie of devoted followers waiting with bated breath for my next review (in fact, the vast majority of reviews I write here g...

    I can think of a few alternate titles for this book. ?The Art of Beating a Dead Horse: Your Guide to Regurgitating the Same Point in Every Chapter? ?How to Filter Years of Other People?s Research into Broad Talking Points? ?You Too Can Write a Book With At Least 25...

    From the Fictive Desk of D.J. Ian: The End is Much More Exciting than It Was Once Upon a Time The story of GoodBetterBestReads has really only just begun, but we have already become the world?s largest community of potential readers, book buyers and Kindle users who have star-r...

    This book comes with its own summary ? a very handy thing: ?COCKTAIL PARTY SUMMARY When it comes to motivation, there?s a gap between what science knows and what business does. Our current business operating system?which is built around external, carrot-and-stick motivators...

    What frustrates me is the main premise has a contradiction that is never addressed. He begins the book with some research on monkeys that demonstrated an innate interest in solving puzzles. He then goes on to describe his big premise which is that we are are in the midst of a major mot...

    So, I listened to this entire book about motivation, and I can't figure out why I don't feel motivated to write a review. No carrot, no stick, no review. ...

    Only the first chapter is necessary. The rest is repetitious and filled with soon-to-be-obsolete computer metaphors. However, I've been thinking a lot about this book since I read it (a few weeks ago?), so two stars was perhaps a stingy rating. Everywhere I go lately, I see examples...

    Some good ideas, but for once I'd like to see a book where the case studies about flexible scheduling and autonomy don't involve software companies or consultants. I'd like to see an example where they motivate DMV employees to work harder to do the same menial work, but if giving DMV ...

    As a consultant, I am particularly sensitive to unhelpful jargon and the creation of distinctions without a difference. Enter "Drive." This could have been so much better. As Pink presents correctly, much of the research re human motivation IS counter-intuitive to what most of us tend ...

    Reading Pink's book, I endlessly thought about teachers and what motivates us (it's NOT merit-pay) and students and what motivates them to read (it's not pizza coupons or AR points). Funny, insightful, and supported by research, Drive has far-reaching implications for our society and h...

    2.5 ?'s rounded up to 3 ? Interesting approach for a hard to nail down answer. Most relevant for employers trying to extract optimum performance from employees, parents raising children, or those with general curiosity. We're born to be players, not pawns. We're meant to be aut...

    In Drive, Daniel H. Pink suggests that there is a gap between what "science knows and what business does." I was not shocked to learn that this gap exists, and I attributed Pink's decision to emphasize the existence of this gap to what I believe is the author's drive to attract corpora...

    Are you the type of person that is motivated by money and fame, or are you someone that is motivated by having a larger purpose in life? Or are you a combination of both? Financial gain has always been a motivator for me, but I'm also the type of person that will take on extra work, ne...

    I picked this up on a tangential reference from Leah and blitzed through it one gorgeous afternoon. It's a pretty concise roadmap (pardon the pun) of a "new" form of motivation theory, one that is centered less on external rewards and more on internal forces. Pulling from and conglomer...

    I imagine this is a great book to confuse those with a lot of management theory behind them. Luckily I'm not one of those, and this book has really struck home. Pink focuses begins by focusing on describing existing management processes as a carrot and stick reward system having evolve...

    This book has been on my "to read" shelf for some time, and while I had read some excerpts, understood the general ideas and seen the excellent RSA Animate excerpt (http://goo.gl/zH1QH), there is far more here than is generally summed up. This book became extremely interesting becau...

    In his essay about the spate of new books dealing with the effects of the internet on culture in a recent New Yorker (http://www.newyorker.com/arts/critics...), Adam Gopnik separates observers into three camps: the Never-Betters, the Better-Nevers, and the Ever-Wasers. Daniel Pink,...

    I got an early copy for the Bottom-line Bookclub. Look out for Drive on the shelves from 29 Dec. I'm LOVING this latest book by Dan Pink. A Whole New Mind is a stroke of genius in understanding the way that the world of work has changed, and DRIVE is a powerful extension to A Whole ...

    This is another great book by Daniel Pink. It may be a coincidence, but just a few weeks ago I read another book on the same theme: Punished by Rewards: The Trouble With Gold Stars, Incentive Plans, A'S, Praise, and Other Bribes by Alfie Kohn. The book by Kohn was published about 20 ye...

  • Trevor
    Aug 04, 2010

    Why am I writing this review on Goodreads, anyway? I'm not getting paid for it. There are plenty of other things I should be doing. And it's not like I have a coterie of devoted followers waiting with bated breath for my next review (in fact, the vast majority of reviews I write here g...

    I can think of a few alternate titles for this book. ?The Art of Beating a Dead Horse: Your Guide to Regurgitating the Same Point in Every Chapter? ?How to Filter Years of Other People?s Research into Broad Talking Points? ?You Too Can Write a Book With At Least 25...

    From the Fictive Desk of D.J. Ian: The End is Much More Exciting than It Was Once Upon a Time The story of GoodBetterBestReads has really only just begun, but we have already become the world?s largest community of potential readers, book buyers and Kindle users who have star-r...

    This book comes with its own summary ? a very handy thing: ?COCKTAIL PARTY SUMMARY When it comes to motivation, there?s a gap between what science knows and what business does. Our current business operating system?which is built around external, carrot-and-stick motivators...

  • Tomio
    May 02, 2010

    Why am I writing this review on Goodreads, anyway? I'm not getting paid for it. There are plenty of other things I should be doing. And it's not like I have a coterie of devoted followers waiting with bated breath for my next review (in fact, the vast majority of reviews I write here g...

    I can think of a few alternate titles for this book. ?The Art of Beating a Dead Horse: Your Guide to Regurgitating the Same Point in Every Chapter? ?How to Filter Years of Other People?s Research into Broad Talking Points? ?You Too Can Write a Book With At Least 25...

    From the Fictive Desk of D.J. Ian: The End is Much More Exciting than It Was Once Upon a Time The story of GoodBetterBestReads has really only just begun, but we have already become the world?s largest community of potential readers, book buyers and Kindle users who have star-r...

    This book comes with its own summary ? a very handy thing: ?COCKTAIL PARTY SUMMARY When it comes to motivation, there?s a gap between what science knows and what business does. Our current business operating system?which is built around external, carrot-and-stick motivators...

    What frustrates me is the main premise has a contradiction that is never addressed. He begins the book with some research on monkeys that demonstrated an innate interest in solving puzzles. He then goes on to describe his big premise which is that we are are in the midst of a major mot...

    So, I listened to this entire book about motivation, and I can't figure out why I don't feel motivated to write a review. No carrot, no stick, no review. ...

    Only the first chapter is necessary. The rest is repetitious and filled with soon-to-be-obsolete computer metaphors. However, I've been thinking a lot about this book since I read it (a few weeks ago?), so two stars was perhaps a stingy rating. Everywhere I go lately, I see examples...

    Some good ideas, but for once I'd like to see a book where the case studies about flexible scheduling and autonomy don't involve software companies or consultants. I'd like to see an example where they motivate DMV employees to work harder to do the same menial work, but if giving DMV ...

    As a consultant, I am particularly sensitive to unhelpful jargon and the creation of distinctions without a difference. Enter "Drive." This could have been so much better. As Pink presents correctly, much of the research re human motivation IS counter-intuitive to what most of us tend ...

    Reading Pink's book, I endlessly thought about teachers and what motivates us (it's NOT merit-pay) and students and what motivates them to read (it's not pizza coupons or AR points). Funny, insightful, and supported by research, Drive has far-reaching implications for our society and h...

    2.5 ?'s rounded up to 3 ? Interesting approach for a hard to nail down answer. Most relevant for employers trying to extract optimum performance from employees, parents raising children, or those with general curiosity. We're born to be players, not pawns. We're meant to be aut...

    In Drive, Daniel H. Pink suggests that there is a gap between what "science knows and what business does." I was not shocked to learn that this gap exists, and I attributed Pink's decision to emphasize the existence of this gap to what I believe is the author's drive to attract corpora...

    Are you the type of person that is motivated by money and fame, or are you someone that is motivated by having a larger purpose in life? Or are you a combination of both? Financial gain has always been a motivator for me, but I'm also the type of person that will take on extra work, ne...

    I picked this up on a tangential reference from Leah and blitzed through it one gorgeous afternoon. It's a pretty concise roadmap (pardon the pun) of a "new" form of motivation theory, one that is centered less on external rewards and more on internal forces. Pulling from and conglomer...

  • Laura
    Aug 30, 2010

    Why am I writing this review on Goodreads, anyway? I'm not getting paid for it. There are plenty of other things I should be doing. And it's not like I have a coterie of devoted followers waiting with bated breath for my next review (in fact, the vast majority of reviews I write here g...

    I can think of a few alternate titles for this book. ?The Art of Beating a Dead Horse: Your Guide to Regurgitating the Same Point in Every Chapter? ?How to Filter Years of Other People?s Research into Broad Talking Points? ?You Too Can Write a Book With At Least 25...

    From the Fictive Desk of D.J. Ian: The End is Much More Exciting than It Was Once Upon a Time The story of GoodBetterBestReads has really only just begun, but we have already become the world?s largest community of potential readers, book buyers and Kindle users who have star-r...

    This book comes with its own summary ? a very handy thing: ?COCKTAIL PARTY SUMMARY When it comes to motivation, there?s a gap between what science knows and what business does. Our current business operating system?which is built around external, carrot-and-stick motivators...

    What frustrates me is the main premise has a contradiction that is never addressed. He begins the book with some research on monkeys that demonstrated an innate interest in solving puzzles. He then goes on to describe his big premise which is that we are are in the midst of a major mot...

  • Ken
    Feb 03, 2011

    Why am I writing this review on Goodreads, anyway? I'm not getting paid for it. There are plenty of other things I should be doing. And it's not like I have a coterie of devoted followers waiting with bated breath for my next review (in fact, the vast majority of reviews I write here g...

  • Lars Guthrie
    Feb 18, 2011

    Why am I writing this review on Goodreads, anyway? I'm not getting paid for it. There are plenty of other things I should be doing. And it's not like I have a coterie of devoted followers waiting with bated breath for my next review (in fact, the vast majority of reviews I write here g...

    I can think of a few alternate titles for this book. ?The Art of Beating a Dead Horse: Your Guide to Regurgitating the Same Point in Every Chapter? ?How to Filter Years of Other People?s Research into Broad Talking Points? ?You Too Can Write a Book With At Least 25...

    From the Fictive Desk of D.J. Ian: The End is Much More Exciting than It Was Once Upon a Time The story of GoodBetterBestReads has really only just begun, but we have already become the world?s largest community of potential readers, book buyers and Kindle users who have star-r...

    This book comes with its own summary ? a very handy thing: ?COCKTAIL PARTY SUMMARY When it comes to motivation, there?s a gap between what science knows and what business does. Our current business operating system?which is built around external, carrot-and-stick motivators...

    What frustrates me is the main premise has a contradiction that is never addressed. He begins the book with some research on monkeys that demonstrated an innate interest in solving puzzles. He then goes on to describe his big premise which is that we are are in the midst of a major mot...

    So, I listened to this entire book about motivation, and I can't figure out why I don't feel motivated to write a review. No carrot, no stick, no review. ...

    Only the first chapter is necessary. The rest is repetitious and filled with soon-to-be-obsolete computer metaphors. However, I've been thinking a lot about this book since I read it (a few weeks ago?), so two stars was perhaps a stingy rating. Everywhere I go lately, I see examples...

    Some good ideas, but for once I'd like to see a book where the case studies about flexible scheduling and autonomy don't involve software companies or consultants. I'd like to see an example where they motivate DMV employees to work harder to do the same menial work, but if giving DMV ...

    As a consultant, I am particularly sensitive to unhelpful jargon and the creation of distinctions without a difference. Enter "Drive." This could have been so much better. As Pink presents correctly, much of the research re human motivation IS counter-intuitive to what most of us tend ...

    Reading Pink's book, I endlessly thought about teachers and what motivates us (it's NOT merit-pay) and students and what motivates them to read (it's not pizza coupons or AR points). Funny, insightful, and supported by research, Drive has far-reaching implications for our society and h...

    2.5 ?'s rounded up to 3 ? Interesting approach for a hard to nail down answer. Most relevant for employers trying to extract optimum performance from employees, parents raising children, or those with general curiosity. We're born to be players, not pawns. We're meant to be aut...

    In Drive, Daniel H. Pink suggests that there is a gap between what "science knows and what business does." I was not shocked to learn that this gap exists, and I attributed Pink's decision to emphasize the existence of this gap to what I believe is the author's drive to attract corpora...

    Are you the type of person that is motivated by money and fame, or are you someone that is motivated by having a larger purpose in life? Or are you a combination of both? Financial gain has always been a motivator for me, but I'm also the type of person that will take on extra work, ne...

    I picked this up on a tangential reference from Leah and blitzed through it one gorgeous afternoon. It's a pretty concise roadmap (pardon the pun) of a "new" form of motivation theory, one that is centered less on external rewards and more on internal forces. Pulling from and conglomer...

    I imagine this is a great book to confuse those with a lot of management theory behind them. Luckily I'm not one of those, and this book has really struck home. Pink focuses begins by focusing on describing existing management processes as a carrot and stick reward system having evolve...

    This book has been on my "to read" shelf for some time, and while I had read some excerpts, understood the general ideas and seen the excellent RSA Animate excerpt (http://goo.gl/zH1QH), there is far more here than is generally summed up. This book became extremely interesting becau...

    In his essay about the spate of new books dealing with the effects of the internet on culture in a recent New Yorker (http://www.newyorker.com/arts/critics...), Adam Gopnik separates observers into three camps: the Never-Betters, the Better-Nevers, and the Ever-Wasers. Daniel Pink,...

  • Clif Hostetler
    Nov 22, 2010

    Why am I writing this review on Goodreads, anyway? I'm not getting paid for it. There are plenty of other things I should be doing. And it's not like I have a coterie of devoted followers waiting with bated breath for my next review (in fact, the vast majority of reviews I write here g...

    I can think of a few alternate titles for this book. ?The Art of Beating a Dead Horse: Your Guide to Regurgitating the Same Point in Every Chapter? ?How to Filter Years of Other People?s Research into Broad Talking Points? ?You Too Can Write a Book With At Least 25...

    From the Fictive Desk of D.J. Ian: The End is Much More Exciting than It Was Once Upon a Time The story of GoodBetterBestReads has really only just begun, but we have already become the world?s largest community of potential readers, book buyers and Kindle users who have star-r...

    This book comes with its own summary ? a very handy thing: ?COCKTAIL PARTY SUMMARY When it comes to motivation, there?s a gap between what science knows and what business does. Our current business operating system?which is built around external, carrot-and-stick motivators...

    What frustrates me is the main premise has a contradiction that is never addressed. He begins the book with some research on monkeys that demonstrated an innate interest in solving puzzles. He then goes on to describe his big premise which is that we are are in the midst of a major mot...

    So, I listened to this entire book about motivation, and I can't figure out why I don't feel motivated to write a review. No carrot, no stick, no review. ...

    Only the first chapter is necessary. The rest is repetitious and filled with soon-to-be-obsolete computer metaphors. However, I've been thinking a lot about this book since I read it (a few weeks ago?), so two stars was perhaps a stingy rating. Everywhere I go lately, I see examples...

    Some good ideas, but for once I'd like to see a book where the case studies about flexible scheduling and autonomy don't involve software companies or consultants. I'd like to see an example where they motivate DMV employees to work harder to do the same menial work, but if giving DMV ...

    As a consultant, I am particularly sensitive to unhelpful jargon and the creation of distinctions without a difference. Enter "Drive." This could have been so much better. As Pink presents correctly, much of the research re human motivation IS counter-intuitive to what most of us tend ...

    Reading Pink's book, I endlessly thought about teachers and what motivates us (it's NOT merit-pay) and students and what motivates them to read (it's not pizza coupons or AR points). Funny, insightful, and supported by research, Drive has far-reaching implications for our society and h...

    2.5 ?'s rounded up to 3 ? Interesting approach for a hard to nail down answer. Most relevant for employers trying to extract optimum performance from employees, parents raising children, or those with general curiosity. We're born to be players, not pawns. We're meant to be aut...

    In Drive, Daniel H. Pink suggests that there is a gap between what "science knows and what business does." I was not shocked to learn that this gap exists, and I attributed Pink's decision to emphasize the existence of this gap to what I believe is the author's drive to attract corpora...

    Are you the type of person that is motivated by money and fame, or are you someone that is motivated by having a larger purpose in life? Or are you a combination of both? Financial gain has always been a motivator for me, but I'm also the type of person that will take on extra work, ne...

    I picked this up on a tangential reference from Leah and blitzed through it one gorgeous afternoon. It's a pretty concise roadmap (pardon the pun) of a "new" form of motivation theory, one that is centered less on external rewards and more on internal forces. Pulling from and conglomer...

    I imagine this is a great book to confuse those with a lot of management theory behind them. Luckily I'm not one of those, and this book has really struck home. Pink focuses begins by focusing on describing existing management processes as a carrot and stick reward system having evolve...

    This book has been on my "to read" shelf for some time, and while I had read some excerpts, understood the general ideas and seen the excellent RSA Animate excerpt (http://goo.gl/zH1QH), there is far more here than is generally summed up. This book became extremely interesting becau...

    In his essay about the spate of new books dealing with the effects of the internet on culture in a recent New Yorker (http://www.newyorker.com/arts/critics...), Adam Gopnik separates observers into three camps: the Never-Betters, the Better-Nevers, and the Ever-Wasers. Daniel Pink,...

    I got an early copy for the Bottom-line Bookclub. Look out for Drive on the shelves from 29 Dec. I'm LOVING this latest book by Dan Pink. A Whole New Mind is a stroke of genius in understanding the way that the world of work has changed, and DRIVE is a powerful extension to A Whole ...

    This is another great book by Daniel Pink. It may be a coincidence, but just a few weeks ago I read another book on the same theme: Punished by Rewards: The Trouble With Gold Stars, Incentive Plans, A'S, Praise, and Other Bribes by Alfie Kohn. The book by Kohn was published about 20 ye...

    ????? ?? ?????? ?? ????? ??? ??????? ?????? ????? ?? ????? ?????? ????? ??? ?????? ???? ?? ???? ?? ????? ?? ???? ???????. ??? ??????? ??? ?? ???? ????? ??????...

    As a homeschooling, self employed person, this book didn't come as a huge surprise, but it is one that I really enjoyed. I suspect it is because this is a book that sets down on paper what your gut has been telling you for years. Drawing on decades of research and numerous commercia...

    Amanda's Informal Notes: Surprisingly, pretty darn fascinating. I don't usually read a lot of non-fiction, so it took me a bit to get used to the author's style, but I'm glad I pushed through because Drive gave me some great food for thought: -So for hundreds of years, businesses...

    Cu?n sách này vi?t v? ǵ? M?t cu?c cách m?ng v? cách c? v? ??ng viên ng??i khác tr?i qua 3 giai ?o?n - H? 1.0 - ??ng l?c sinh h?c: th?a măn ???c m?y nhu c?u c? b?n nh?t c?a con ng??i: ?n, u?ng, ng? ngh?, t́nh d...

    This book was a really exciting read, it covered research into motivational field and opinions and theories of experts in psychology and business. It is rare that a textbook type of book captions my attention so much that I don't really want to read anything else, but this one did so. ...

    After watching Pink?s TED Talk years ago, I enthusiastically added Drive to my list of books to read. This book was such a disappointment. Watch the talk and read the first chapter. Then bail before his incessant jargon rehashing studies other researchers have conducted numbs your mi...

    An intriguing investigation of the factors that motivate people. Pink shows that science has learned much about motivation, but business and education still follow outdated models. The old systems of rewards and punishments are no longer effective for today?s non-routine, creative, c...

    I think the whole book could've been wrapped up in one or two chapters. I really get what Author is trying to say and it is important that Governments, Corporations understand that not everything that their employee (or a person) does for them is because they get paid for it. In fact, ...

    I have to confess I didn't really enjoy this book. I wanted to. I certainly enjoy the autonomy my job currently provides and am sympathetic to a book whose agenda is to propagate such. Keyword is propagate, as this book quickly became an annoying parade of unoriginal ideas wrapped i...

    Mediocre at best. Like many pop science writers, Pink regurgitates a bunch of other people's work and tries to put his own spin on it. Unfortunately, nothing in this book is new or even surprising, despite Pink's assertion to the contrary. Pink alternately sneers at the idea of "empowe...

    I recommend THIS REVIEW for a description of this book that's better than any review that I might write. This book describes how the usual measures taken to promote motivation in people can have results opposite of what was intended. These unintended consequences have long been demo...

  • Jeanette  "Astute Crabbist"
    Feb 07, 2011

    Why am I writing this review on Goodreads, anyway? I'm not getting paid for it. There are plenty of other things I should be doing. And it's not like I have a coterie of devoted followers waiting with bated breath for my next review (in fact, the vast majority of reviews I write here g...

    I can think of a few alternate titles for this book. ?The Art of Beating a Dead Horse: Your Guide to Regurgitating the Same Point in Every Chapter? ?How to Filter Years of Other People?s Research into Broad Talking Points? ?You Too Can Write a Book With At Least 25...

    From the Fictive Desk of D.J. Ian: The End is Much More Exciting than It Was Once Upon a Time The story of GoodBetterBestReads has really only just begun, but we have already become the world?s largest community of potential readers, book buyers and Kindle users who have star-r...

    This book comes with its own summary ? a very handy thing: ?COCKTAIL PARTY SUMMARY When it comes to motivation, there?s a gap between what science knows and what business does. Our current business operating system?which is built around external, carrot-and-stick motivators...

    What frustrates me is the main premise has a contradiction that is never addressed. He begins the book with some research on monkeys that demonstrated an innate interest in solving puzzles. He then goes on to describe his big premise which is that we are are in the midst of a major mot...

    So, I listened to this entire book about motivation, and I can't figure out why I don't feel motivated to write a review. No carrot, no stick, no review. ...

  • Donalyn
    May 23, 2010

    Why am I writing this review on Goodreads, anyway? I'm not getting paid for it. There are plenty of other things I should be doing. And it's not like I have a coterie of devoted followers waiting with bated breath for my next review (in fact, the vast majority of reviews I write here g...

    I can think of a few alternate titles for this book. ?The Art of Beating a Dead Horse: Your Guide to Regurgitating the Same Point in Every Chapter? ?How to Filter Years of Other People?s Research into Broad Talking Points? ?You Too Can Write a Book With At Least 25...

    From the Fictive Desk of D.J. Ian: The End is Much More Exciting than It Was Once Upon a Time The story of GoodBetterBestReads has really only just begun, but we have already become the world?s largest community of potential readers, book buyers and Kindle users who have star-r...

    This book comes with its own summary ? a very handy thing: ?COCKTAIL PARTY SUMMARY When it comes to motivation, there?s a gap between what science knows and what business does. Our current business operating system?which is built around external, carrot-and-stick motivators...

    What frustrates me is the main premise has a contradiction that is never addressed. He begins the book with some research on monkeys that demonstrated an innate interest in solving puzzles. He then goes on to describe his big premise which is that we are are in the midst of a major mot...

    So, I listened to this entire book about motivation, and I can't figure out why I don't feel motivated to write a review. No carrot, no stick, no review. ...

    Only the first chapter is necessary. The rest is repetitious and filled with soon-to-be-obsolete computer metaphors. However, I've been thinking a lot about this book since I read it (a few weeks ago?), so two stars was perhaps a stingy rating. Everywhere I go lately, I see examples...

    Some good ideas, but for once I'd like to see a book where the case studies about flexible scheduling and autonomy don't involve software companies or consultants. I'd like to see an example where they motivate DMV employees to work harder to do the same menial work, but if giving DMV ...

    As a consultant, I am particularly sensitive to unhelpful jargon and the creation of distinctions without a difference. Enter "Drive." This could have been so much better. As Pink presents correctly, much of the research re human motivation IS counter-intuitive to what most of us tend ...

    Reading Pink's book, I endlessly thought about teachers and what motivates us (it's NOT merit-pay) and students and what motivates them to read (it's not pizza coupons or AR points). Funny, insightful, and supported by research, Drive has far-reaching implications for our society and h...

  • Ethan
    Dec 10, 2012

    Why am I writing this review on Goodreads, anyway? I'm not getting paid for it. There are plenty of other things I should be doing. And it's not like I have a coterie of devoted followers waiting with bated breath for my next review (in fact, the vast majority of reviews I write here g...

    I can think of a few alternate titles for this book. ?The Art of Beating a Dead Horse: Your Guide to Regurgitating the Same Point in Every Chapter? ?How to Filter Years of Other People?s Research into Broad Talking Points? ?You Too Can Write a Book With At Least 25...

    From the Fictive Desk of D.J. Ian: The End is Much More Exciting than It Was Once Upon a Time The story of GoodBetterBestReads has really only just begun, but we have already become the world?s largest community of potential readers, book buyers and Kindle users who have star-r...

    This book comes with its own summary ? a very handy thing: ?COCKTAIL PARTY SUMMARY When it comes to motivation, there?s a gap between what science knows and what business does. Our current business operating system?which is built around external, carrot-and-stick motivators...

    What frustrates me is the main premise has a contradiction that is never addressed. He begins the book with some research on monkeys that demonstrated an innate interest in solving puzzles. He then goes on to describe his big premise which is that we are are in the midst of a major mot...

    So, I listened to this entire book about motivation, and I can't figure out why I don't feel motivated to write a review. No carrot, no stick, no review. ...

    Only the first chapter is necessary. The rest is repetitious and filled with soon-to-be-obsolete computer metaphors. However, I've been thinking a lot about this book since I read it (a few weeks ago?), so two stars was perhaps a stingy rating. Everywhere I go lately, I see examples...

    Some good ideas, but for once I'd like to see a book where the case studies about flexible scheduling and autonomy don't involve software companies or consultants. I'd like to see an example where they motivate DMV employees to work harder to do the same menial work, but if giving DMV ...

    As a consultant, I am particularly sensitive to unhelpful jargon and the creation of distinctions without a difference. Enter "Drive." This could have been so much better. As Pink presents correctly, much of the research re human motivation IS counter-intuitive to what most of us tend ...

    Reading Pink's book, I endlessly thought about teachers and what motivates us (it's NOT merit-pay) and students and what motivates them to read (it's not pizza coupons or AR points). Funny, insightful, and supported by research, Drive has far-reaching implications for our society and h...

    2.5 ?'s rounded up to 3 ? Interesting approach for a hard to nail down answer. Most relevant for employers trying to extract optimum performance from employees, parents raising children, or those with general curiosity. We're born to be players, not pawns. We're meant to be aut...

    In Drive, Daniel H. Pink suggests that there is a gap between what "science knows and what business does." I was not shocked to learn that this gap exists, and I attributed Pink's decision to emphasize the existence of this gap to what I believe is the author's drive to attract corpora...

    Are you the type of person that is motivated by money and fame, or are you someone that is motivated by having a larger purpose in life? Or are you a combination of both? Financial gain has always been a motivator for me, but I'm also the type of person that will take on extra work, ne...

    I picked this up on a tangential reference from Leah and blitzed through it one gorgeous afternoon. It's a pretty concise roadmap (pardon the pun) of a "new" form of motivation theory, one that is centered less on external rewards and more on internal forces. Pulling from and conglomer...

    I imagine this is a great book to confuse those with a lot of management theory behind them. Luckily I'm not one of those, and this book has really struck home. Pink focuses begins by focusing on describing existing management processes as a carrot and stick reward system having evolve...

    This book has been on my "to read" shelf for some time, and while I had read some excerpts, understood the general ideas and seen the excellent RSA Animate excerpt (http://goo.gl/zH1QH), there is far more here than is generally summed up. This book became extremely interesting becau...

    In his essay about the spate of new books dealing with the effects of the internet on culture in a recent New Yorker (http://www.newyorker.com/arts/critics...), Adam Gopnik separates observers into three camps: the Never-Betters, the Better-Nevers, and the Ever-Wasers. Daniel Pink,...

    I got an early copy for the Bottom-line Bookclub. Look out for Drive on the shelves from 29 Dec. I'm LOVING this latest book by Dan Pink. A Whole New Mind is a stroke of genius in understanding the way that the world of work has changed, and DRIVE is a powerful extension to A Whole ...

    This is another great book by Daniel Pink. It may be a coincidence, but just a few weeks ago I read another book on the same theme: Punished by Rewards: The Trouble With Gold Stars, Incentive Plans, A'S, Praise, and Other Bribes by Alfie Kohn. The book by Kohn was published about 20 ye...

    ????? ?? ?????? ?? ????? ??? ??????? ?????? ????? ?? ????? ?????? ????? ??? ?????? ???? ?? ???? ?? ????? ?? ???? ???????. ??? ??????? ??? ?? ???? ????? ??????...

    As a homeschooling, self employed person, this book didn't come as a huge surprise, but it is one that I really enjoyed. I suspect it is because this is a book that sets down on paper what your gut has been telling you for years. Drawing on decades of research and numerous commercia...

    Amanda's Informal Notes: Surprisingly, pretty darn fascinating. I don't usually read a lot of non-fiction, so it took me a bit to get used to the author's style, but I'm glad I pushed through because Drive gave me some great food for thought: -So for hundreds of years, businesses...

    Cu?n sách này vi?t v? ǵ? M?t cu?c cách m?ng v? cách c? v? ??ng viên ng??i khác tr?i qua 3 giai ?o?n - H? 1.0 - ??ng l?c sinh h?c: th?a măn ???c m?y nhu c?u c? b?n nh?t c?a con ng??i: ?n, u?ng, ng? ngh?, t́nh d...

    This book was a really exciting read, it covered research into motivational field and opinions and theories of experts in psychology and business. It is rare that a textbook type of book captions my attention so much that I don't really want to read anything else, but this one did so. ...

    After watching Pink?s TED Talk years ago, I enthusiastically added Drive to my list of books to read. This book was such a disappointment. Watch the talk and read the first chapter. Then bail before his incessant jargon rehashing studies other researchers have conducted numbs your mi...

    An intriguing investigation of the factors that motivate people. Pink shows that science has learned much about motivation, but business and education still follow outdated models. The old systems of rewards and punishments are no longer effective for today?s non-routine, creative, c...

    I think the whole book could've been wrapped up in one or two chapters. I really get what Author is trying to say and it is important that Governments, Corporations understand that not everything that their employee (or a person) does for them is because they get paid for it. In fact, ...

    I have to confess I didn't really enjoy this book. I wanted to. I certainly enjoy the autonomy my job currently provides and am sympathetic to a book whose agenda is to propagate such. Keyword is propagate, as this book quickly became an annoying parade of unoriginal ideas wrapped i...

    Mediocre at best. Like many pop science writers, Pink regurgitates a bunch of other people's work and tries to put his own spin on it. Unfortunately, nothing in this book is new or even surprising, despite Pink's assertion to the contrary. Pink alternately sneers at the idea of "empowe...

  • Ryan
    Feb 25, 2012

    Why am I writing this review on Goodreads, anyway? I'm not getting paid for it. There are plenty of other things I should be doing. And it's not like I have a coterie of devoted followers waiting with bated breath for my next review (in fact, the vast majority of reviews I write here g...

    I can think of a few alternate titles for this book. ?The Art of Beating a Dead Horse: Your Guide to Regurgitating the Same Point in Every Chapter? ?How to Filter Years of Other People?s Research into Broad Talking Points? ?You Too Can Write a Book With At Least 25...

    From the Fictive Desk of D.J. Ian: The End is Much More Exciting than It Was Once Upon a Time The story of GoodBetterBestReads has really only just begun, but we have already become the world?s largest community of potential readers, book buyers and Kindle users who have star-r...

    This book comes with its own summary ? a very handy thing: ?COCKTAIL PARTY SUMMARY When it comes to motivation, there?s a gap between what science knows and what business does. Our current business operating system?which is built around external, carrot-and-stick motivators...

    What frustrates me is the main premise has a contradiction that is never addressed. He begins the book with some research on monkeys that demonstrated an innate interest in solving puzzles. He then goes on to describe his big premise which is that we are are in the midst of a major mot...

    So, I listened to this entire book about motivation, and I can't figure out why I don't feel motivated to write a review. No carrot, no stick, no review. ...

    Only the first chapter is necessary. The rest is repetitious and filled with soon-to-be-obsolete computer metaphors. However, I've been thinking a lot about this book since I read it (a few weeks ago?), so two stars was perhaps a stingy rating. Everywhere I go lately, I see examples...

    Some good ideas, but for once I'd like to see a book where the case studies about flexible scheduling and autonomy don't involve software companies or consultants. I'd like to see an example where they motivate DMV employees to work harder to do the same menial work, but if giving DMV ...

    As a consultant, I am particularly sensitive to unhelpful jargon and the creation of distinctions without a difference. Enter "Drive." This could have been so much better. As Pink presents correctly, much of the research re human motivation IS counter-intuitive to what most of us tend ...

    Reading Pink's book, I endlessly thought about teachers and what motivates us (it's NOT merit-pay) and students and what motivates them to read (it's not pizza coupons or AR points). Funny, insightful, and supported by research, Drive has far-reaching implications for our society and h...

    2.5 ?'s rounded up to 3 ? Interesting approach for a hard to nail down answer. Most relevant for employers trying to extract optimum performance from employees, parents raising children, or those with general curiosity. We're born to be players, not pawns. We're meant to be aut...

    In Drive, Daniel H. Pink suggests that there is a gap between what "science knows and what business does." I was not shocked to learn that this gap exists, and I attributed Pink's decision to emphasize the existence of this gap to what I believe is the author's drive to attract corpora...

  • Phoebe
    Jan 04, 2010

    Why am I writing this review on Goodreads, anyway? I'm not getting paid for it. There are plenty of other things I should be doing. And it's not like I have a coterie of devoted followers waiting with bated breath for my next review (in fact, the vast majority of reviews I write here g...

    I can think of a few alternate titles for this book. ?The Art of Beating a Dead Horse: Your Guide to Regurgitating the Same Point in Every Chapter? ?How to Filter Years of Other People?s Research into Broad Talking Points? ?You Too Can Write a Book With At Least 25...

    From the Fictive Desk of D.J. Ian: The End is Much More Exciting than It Was Once Upon a Time The story of GoodBetterBestReads has really only just begun, but we have already become the world?s largest community of potential readers, book buyers and Kindle users who have star-r...

    This book comes with its own summary ? a very handy thing: ?COCKTAIL PARTY SUMMARY When it comes to motivation, there?s a gap between what science knows and what business does. Our current business operating system?which is built around external, carrot-and-stick motivators...

    What frustrates me is the main premise has a contradiction that is never addressed. He begins the book with some research on monkeys that demonstrated an innate interest in solving puzzles. He then goes on to describe his big premise which is that we are are in the midst of a major mot...

    So, I listened to this entire book about motivation, and I can't figure out why I don't feel motivated to write a review. No carrot, no stick, no review. ...

    Only the first chapter is necessary. The rest is repetitious and filled with soon-to-be-obsolete computer metaphors. However, I've been thinking a lot about this book since I read it (a few weeks ago?), so two stars was perhaps a stingy rating. Everywhere I go lately, I see examples...

  • Chad Warner
    May 14, 2011

    Why am I writing this review on Goodreads, anyway? I'm not getting paid for it. There are plenty of other things I should be doing. And it's not like I have a coterie of devoted followers waiting with bated breath for my next review (in fact, the vast majority of reviews I write here g...

    I can think of a few alternate titles for this book. ?The Art of Beating a Dead Horse: Your Guide to Regurgitating the Same Point in Every Chapter? ?How to Filter Years of Other People?s Research into Broad Talking Points? ?You Too Can Write a Book With At Least 25...

    From the Fictive Desk of D.J. Ian: The End is Much More Exciting than It Was Once Upon a Time The story of GoodBetterBestReads has really only just begun, but we have already become the world?s largest community of potential readers, book buyers and Kindle users who have star-r...

    This book comes with its own summary ? a very handy thing: ?COCKTAIL PARTY SUMMARY When it comes to motivation, there?s a gap between what science knows and what business does. Our current business operating system?which is built around external, carrot-and-stick motivators...

    What frustrates me is the main premise has a contradiction that is never addressed. He begins the book with some research on monkeys that demonstrated an innate interest in solving puzzles. He then goes on to describe his big premise which is that we are are in the midst of a major mot...

    So, I listened to this entire book about motivation, and I can't figure out why I don't feel motivated to write a review. No carrot, no stick, no review. ...

    Only the first chapter is necessary. The rest is repetitious and filled with soon-to-be-obsolete computer metaphors. However, I've been thinking a lot about this book since I read it (a few weeks ago?), so two stars was perhaps a stingy rating. Everywhere I go lately, I see examples...

    Some good ideas, but for once I'd like to see a book where the case studies about flexible scheduling and autonomy don't involve software companies or consultants. I'd like to see an example where they motivate DMV employees to work harder to do the same menial work, but if giving DMV ...

    As a consultant, I am particularly sensitive to unhelpful jargon and the creation of distinctions without a difference. Enter "Drive." This could have been so much better. As Pink presents correctly, much of the research re human motivation IS counter-intuitive to what most of us tend ...

    Reading Pink's book, I endlessly thought about teachers and what motivates us (it's NOT merit-pay) and students and what motivates them to read (it's not pizza coupons or AR points). Funny, insightful, and supported by research, Drive has far-reaching implications for our society and h...

    2.5 ?'s rounded up to 3 ? Interesting approach for a hard to nail down answer. Most relevant for employers trying to extract optimum performance from employees, parents raising children, or those with general curiosity. We're born to be players, not pawns. We're meant to be aut...

    In Drive, Daniel H. Pink suggests that there is a gap between what "science knows and what business does." I was not shocked to learn that this gap exists, and I attributed Pink's decision to emphasize the existence of this gap to what I believe is the author's drive to attract corpora...

    Are you the type of person that is motivated by money and fame, or are you someone that is motivated by having a larger purpose in life? Or are you a combination of both? Financial gain has always been a motivator for me, but I'm also the type of person that will take on extra work, ne...

    I picked this up on a tangential reference from Leah and blitzed through it one gorgeous afternoon. It's a pretty concise roadmap (pardon the pun) of a "new" form of motivation theory, one that is centered less on external rewards and more on internal forces. Pulling from and conglomer...

    I imagine this is a great book to confuse those with a lot of management theory behind them. Luckily I'm not one of those, and this book has really struck home. Pink focuses begins by focusing on describing existing management processes as a carrot and stick reward system having evolve...

    This book has been on my "to read" shelf for some time, and while I had read some excerpts, understood the general ideas and seen the excellent RSA Animate excerpt (http://goo.gl/zH1QH), there is far more here than is generally summed up. This book became extremely interesting becau...

    In his essay about the spate of new books dealing with the effects of the internet on culture in a recent New Yorker (http://www.newyorker.com/arts/critics...), Adam Gopnik separates observers into three camps: the Never-Betters, the Better-Nevers, and the Ever-Wasers. Daniel Pink,...

    I got an early copy for the Bottom-line Bookclub. Look out for Drive on the shelves from 29 Dec. I'm LOVING this latest book by Dan Pink. A Whole New Mind is a stroke of genius in understanding the way that the world of work has changed, and DRIVE is a powerful extension to A Whole ...

    This is another great book by Daniel Pink. It may be a coincidence, but just a few weeks ago I read another book on the same theme: Punished by Rewards: The Trouble With Gold Stars, Incentive Plans, A'S, Praise, and Other Bribes by Alfie Kohn. The book by Kohn was published about 20 ye...

    ????? ?? ?????? ?? ????? ??? ??????? ?????? ????? ?? ????? ?????? ????? ??? ?????? ???? ?? ???? ?? ????? ?? ???? ???????. ??? ??????? ??? ?? ???? ????? ??????...

    As a homeschooling, self employed person, this book didn't come as a huge surprise, but it is one that I really enjoyed. I suspect it is because this is a book that sets down on paper what your gut has been telling you for years. Drawing on decades of research and numerous commercia...

    Amanda's Informal Notes: Surprisingly, pretty darn fascinating. I don't usually read a lot of non-fiction, so it took me a bit to get used to the author's style, but I'm glad I pushed through because Drive gave me some great food for thought: -So for hundreds of years, businesses...

    Cu?n sách này vi?t v? ǵ? M?t cu?c cách m?ng v? cách c? v? ??ng viên ng??i khác tr?i qua 3 giai ?o?n - H? 1.0 - ??ng l?c sinh h?c: th?a măn ???c m?y nhu c?u c? b?n nh?t c?a con ng??i: ?n, u?ng, ng? ngh?, t́nh d...

    This book was a really exciting read, it covered research into motivational field and opinions and theories of experts in psychology and business. It is rare that a textbook type of book captions my attention so much that I don't really want to read anything else, but this one did so. ...

    After watching Pink?s TED Talk years ago, I enthusiastically added Drive to my list of books to read. This book was such a disappointment. Watch the talk and read the first chapter. Then bail before his incessant jargon rehashing studies other researchers have conducted numbs your mi...

    An intriguing investigation of the factors that motivate people. Pink shows that science has learned much about motivation, but business and education still follow outdated models. The old systems of rewards and punishments are no longer effective for today?s non-routine, creative, c...

  • Carrie Kellenberger
    Jan 12, 2010

    Why am I writing this review on Goodreads, anyway? I'm not getting paid for it. There are plenty of other things I should be doing. And it's not like I have a coterie of devoted followers waiting with bated breath for my next review (in fact, the vast majority of reviews I write here g...

    I can think of a few alternate titles for this book. ?The Art of Beating a Dead Horse: Your Guide to Regurgitating the Same Point in Every Chapter? ?How to Filter Years of Other People?s Research into Broad Talking Points? ?You Too Can Write a Book With At Least 25...

    From the Fictive Desk of D.J. Ian: The End is Much More Exciting than It Was Once Upon a Time The story of GoodBetterBestReads has really only just begun, but we have already become the world?s largest community of potential readers, book buyers and Kindle users who have star-r...

    This book comes with its own summary ? a very handy thing: ?COCKTAIL PARTY SUMMARY When it comes to motivation, there?s a gap between what science knows and what business does. Our current business operating system?which is built around external, carrot-and-stick motivators...

    What frustrates me is the main premise has a contradiction that is never addressed. He begins the book with some research on monkeys that demonstrated an innate interest in solving puzzles. He then goes on to describe his big premise which is that we are are in the midst of a major mot...

    So, I listened to this entire book about motivation, and I can't figure out why I don't feel motivated to write a review. No carrot, no stick, no review. ...

    Only the first chapter is necessary. The rest is repetitious and filled with soon-to-be-obsolete computer metaphors. However, I've been thinking a lot about this book since I read it (a few weeks ago?), so two stars was perhaps a stingy rating. Everywhere I go lately, I see examples...

    Some good ideas, but for once I'd like to see a book where the case studies about flexible scheduling and autonomy don't involve software companies or consultants. I'd like to see an example where they motivate DMV employees to work harder to do the same menial work, but if giving DMV ...

    As a consultant, I am particularly sensitive to unhelpful jargon and the creation of distinctions without a difference. Enter "Drive." This could have been so much better. As Pink presents correctly, much of the research re human motivation IS counter-intuitive to what most of us tend ...

    Reading Pink's book, I endlessly thought about teachers and what motivates us (it's NOT merit-pay) and students and what motivates them to read (it's not pizza coupons or AR points). Funny, insightful, and supported by research, Drive has far-reaching implications for our society and h...

    2.5 ?'s rounded up to 3 ? Interesting approach for a hard to nail down answer. Most relevant for employers trying to extract optimum performance from employees, parents raising children, or those with general curiosity. We're born to be players, not pawns. We're meant to be aut...

    In Drive, Daniel H. Pink suggests that there is a gap between what "science knows and what business does." I was not shocked to learn that this gap exists, and I attributed Pink's decision to emphasize the existence of this gap to what I believe is the author's drive to attract corpora...

    Are you the type of person that is motivated by money and fame, or are you someone that is motivated by having a larger purpose in life? Or are you a combination of both? Financial gain has always been a motivator for me, but I'm also the type of person that will take on extra work, ne...

  • Jay Connor
    May 15, 2010

    Why am I writing this review on Goodreads, anyway? I'm not getting paid for it. There are plenty of other things I should be doing. And it's not like I have a coterie of devoted followers waiting with bated breath for my next review (in fact, the vast majority of reviews I write here g...

    I can think of a few alternate titles for this book. ?The Art of Beating a Dead Horse: Your Guide to Regurgitating the Same Point in Every Chapter? ?How to Filter Years of Other People?s Research into Broad Talking Points? ?You Too Can Write a Book With At Least 25...

    From the Fictive Desk of D.J. Ian: The End is Much More Exciting than It Was Once Upon a Time The story of GoodBetterBestReads has really only just begun, but we have already become the world?s largest community of potential readers, book buyers and Kindle users who have star-r...

    This book comes with its own summary ? a very handy thing: ?COCKTAIL PARTY SUMMARY When it comes to motivation, there?s a gap between what science knows and what business does. Our current business operating system?which is built around external, carrot-and-stick motivators...

    What frustrates me is the main premise has a contradiction that is never addressed. He begins the book with some research on monkeys that demonstrated an innate interest in solving puzzles. He then goes on to describe his big premise which is that we are are in the midst of a major mot...

    So, I listened to this entire book about motivation, and I can't figure out why I don't feel motivated to write a review. No carrot, no stick, no review. ...

    Only the first chapter is necessary. The rest is repetitious and filled with soon-to-be-obsolete computer metaphors. However, I've been thinking a lot about this book since I read it (a few weeks ago?), so two stars was perhaps a stingy rating. Everywhere I go lately, I see examples...

    Some good ideas, but for once I'd like to see a book where the case studies about flexible scheduling and autonomy don't involve software companies or consultants. I'd like to see an example where they motivate DMV employees to work harder to do the same menial work, but if giving DMV ...

    As a consultant, I am particularly sensitive to unhelpful jargon and the creation of distinctions without a difference. Enter "Drive." This could have been so much better. As Pink presents correctly, much of the research re human motivation IS counter-intuitive to what most of us tend ...

  • Amanda
    Jul 11, 2013

    Why am I writing this review on Goodreads, anyway? I'm not getting paid for it. There are plenty of other things I should be doing. And it's not like I have a coterie of devoted followers waiting with bated breath for my next review (in fact, the vast majority of reviews I write here g...

    I can think of a few alternate titles for this book. ?The Art of Beating a Dead Horse: Your Guide to Regurgitating the Same Point in Every Chapter? ?How to Filter Years of Other People?s Research into Broad Talking Points? ?You Too Can Write a Book With At Least 25...

    From the Fictive Desk of D.J. Ian: The End is Much More Exciting than It Was Once Upon a Time The story of GoodBetterBestReads has really only just begun, but we have already become the world?s largest community of potential readers, book buyers and Kindle users who have star-r...

    This book comes with its own summary ? a very handy thing: ?COCKTAIL PARTY SUMMARY When it comes to motivation, there?s a gap between what science knows and what business does. Our current business operating system?which is built around external, carrot-and-stick motivators...

    What frustrates me is the main premise has a contradiction that is never addressed. He begins the book with some research on monkeys that demonstrated an innate interest in solving puzzles. He then goes on to describe his big premise which is that we are are in the midst of a major mot...

    So, I listened to this entire book about motivation, and I can't figure out why I don't feel motivated to write a review. No carrot, no stick, no review. ...

    Only the first chapter is necessary. The rest is repetitious and filled with soon-to-be-obsolete computer metaphors. However, I've been thinking a lot about this book since I read it (a few weeks ago?), so two stars was perhaps a stingy rating. Everywhere I go lately, I see examples...

    Some good ideas, but for once I'd like to see a book where the case studies about flexible scheduling and autonomy don't involve software companies or consultants. I'd like to see an example where they motivate DMV employees to work harder to do the same menial work, but if giving DMV ...

    As a consultant, I am particularly sensitive to unhelpful jargon and the creation of distinctions without a difference. Enter "Drive." This could have been so much better. As Pink presents correctly, much of the research re human motivation IS counter-intuitive to what most of us tend ...

    Reading Pink's book, I endlessly thought about teachers and what motivates us (it's NOT merit-pay) and students and what motivates them to read (it's not pizza coupons or AR points). Funny, insightful, and supported by research, Drive has far-reaching implications for our society and h...

    2.5 ?'s rounded up to 3 ? Interesting approach for a hard to nail down answer. Most relevant for employers trying to extract optimum performance from employees, parents raising children, or those with general curiosity. We're born to be players, not pawns. We're meant to be aut...

    In Drive, Daniel H. Pink suggests that there is a gap between what "science knows and what business does." I was not shocked to learn that this gap exists, and I attributed Pink's decision to emphasize the existence of this gap to what I believe is the author's drive to attract corpora...

    Are you the type of person that is motivated by money and fame, or are you someone that is motivated by having a larger purpose in life? Or are you a combination of both? Financial gain has always been a motivator for me, but I'm also the type of person that will take on extra work, ne...

    I picked this up on a tangential reference from Leah and blitzed through it one gorgeous afternoon. It's a pretty concise roadmap (pardon the pun) of a "new" form of motivation theory, one that is centered less on external rewards and more on internal forces. Pulling from and conglomer...

    I imagine this is a great book to confuse those with a lot of management theory behind them. Luckily I'm not one of those, and this book has really struck home. Pink focuses begins by focusing on describing existing management processes as a carrot and stick reward system having evolve...

    This book has been on my "to read" shelf for some time, and while I had read some excerpts, understood the general ideas and seen the excellent RSA Animate excerpt (http://goo.gl/zH1QH), there is far more here than is generally summed up. This book became extremely interesting becau...

    In his essay about the spate of new books dealing with the effects of the internet on culture in a recent New Yorker (http://www.newyorker.com/arts/critics...), Adam Gopnik separates observers into three camps: the Never-Betters, the Better-Nevers, and the Ever-Wasers. Daniel Pink,...

    I got an early copy for the Bottom-line Bookclub. Look out for Drive on the shelves from 29 Dec. I'm LOVING this latest book by Dan Pink. A Whole New Mind is a stroke of genius in understanding the way that the world of work has changed, and DRIVE is a powerful extension to A Whole ...

    This is another great book by Daniel Pink. It may be a coincidence, but just a few weeks ago I read another book on the same theme: Punished by Rewards: The Trouble With Gold Stars, Incentive Plans, A'S, Praise, and Other Bribes by Alfie Kohn. The book by Kohn was published about 20 ye...

    ????? ?? ?????? ?? ????? ??? ??????? ?????? ????? ?? ????? ?????? ????? ??? ?????? ???? ?? ???? ?? ????? ?? ???? ???????. ??? ??????? ??? ?? ???? ????? ??????...

    As a homeschooling, self employed person, this book didn't come as a huge surprise, but it is one that I really enjoyed. I suspect it is because this is a book that sets down on paper what your gut has been telling you for years. Drawing on decades of research and numerous commercia...

    Amanda's Informal Notes: Surprisingly, pretty darn fascinating. I don't usually read a lot of non-fiction, so it took me a bit to get used to the author's style, but I'm glad I pushed through because Drive gave me some great food for thought: -So for hundreds of years, businesses...

  • Cath Duncan
    Dec 01, 2009

    Why am I writing this review on Goodreads, anyway? I'm not getting paid for it. There are plenty of other things I should be doing. And it's not like I have a coterie of devoted followers waiting with bated breath for my next review (in fact, the vast majority of reviews I write here g...

    I can think of a few alternate titles for this book. ?The Art of Beating a Dead Horse: Your Guide to Regurgitating the Same Point in Every Chapter? ?How to Filter Years of Other People?s Research into Broad Talking Points? ?You Too Can Write a Book With At Least 25...

    From the Fictive Desk of D.J. Ian: The End is Much More Exciting than It Was Once Upon a Time The story of GoodBetterBestReads has really only just begun, but we have already become the world?s largest community of potential readers, book buyers and Kindle users who have star-r...

    This book comes with its own summary ? a very handy thing: ?COCKTAIL PARTY SUMMARY When it comes to motivation, there?s a gap between what science knows and what business does. Our current business operating system?which is built around external, carrot-and-stick motivators...

    What frustrates me is the main premise has a contradiction that is never addressed. He begins the book with some research on monkeys that demonstrated an innate interest in solving puzzles. He then goes on to describe his big premise which is that we are are in the midst of a major mot...

    So, I listened to this entire book about motivation, and I can't figure out why I don't feel motivated to write a review. No carrot, no stick, no review. ...

    Only the first chapter is necessary. The rest is repetitious and filled with soon-to-be-obsolete computer metaphors. However, I've been thinking a lot about this book since I read it (a few weeks ago?), so two stars was perhaps a stingy rating. Everywhere I go lately, I see examples...

    Some good ideas, but for once I'd like to see a book where the case studies about flexible scheduling and autonomy don't involve software companies or consultants. I'd like to see an example where they motivate DMV employees to work harder to do the same menial work, but if giving DMV ...

    As a consultant, I am particularly sensitive to unhelpful jargon and the creation of distinctions without a difference. Enter "Drive." This could have been so much better. As Pink presents correctly, much of the research re human motivation IS counter-intuitive to what most of us tend ...

    Reading Pink's book, I endlessly thought about teachers and what motivates us (it's NOT merit-pay) and students and what motivates them to read (it's not pizza coupons or AR points). Funny, insightful, and supported by research, Drive has far-reaching implications for our society and h...

    2.5 ?'s rounded up to 3 ? Interesting approach for a hard to nail down answer. Most relevant for employers trying to extract optimum performance from employees, parents raising children, or those with general curiosity. We're born to be players, not pawns. We're meant to be aut...

    In Drive, Daniel H. Pink suggests that there is a gap between what "science knows and what business does." I was not shocked to learn that this gap exists, and I attributed Pink's decision to emphasize the existence of this gap to what I believe is the author's drive to attract corpora...

    Are you the type of person that is motivated by money and fame, or are you someone that is motivated by having a larger purpose in life? Or are you a combination of both? Financial gain has always been a motivator for me, but I'm also the type of person that will take on extra work, ne...

    I picked this up on a tangential reference from Leah and blitzed through it one gorgeous afternoon. It's a pretty concise roadmap (pardon the pun) of a "new" form of motivation theory, one that is centered less on external rewards and more on internal forces. Pulling from and conglomer...

    I imagine this is a great book to confuse those with a lot of management theory behind them. Luckily I'm not one of those, and this book has really struck home. Pink focuses begins by focusing on describing existing management processes as a carrot and stick reward system having evolve...

    This book has been on my "to read" shelf for some time, and while I had read some excerpts, understood the general ideas and seen the excellent RSA Animate excerpt (http://goo.gl/zH1QH), there is far more here than is generally summed up. This book became extremely interesting becau...

    In his essay about the spate of new books dealing with the effects of the internet on culture in a recent New Yorker (http://www.newyorker.com/arts/critics...), Adam Gopnik separates observers into three camps: the Never-Betters, the Better-Nevers, and the Ever-Wasers. Daniel Pink,...

    I got an early copy for the Bottom-line Bookclub. Look out for Drive on the shelves from 29 Dec. I'm LOVING this latest book by Dan Pink. A Whole New Mind is a stroke of genius in understanding the way that the world of work has changed, and DRIVE is a powerful extension to A Whole ...

  • Paul Eckert
    Jul 11, 2010

    Why am I writing this review on Goodreads, anyway? I'm not getting paid for it. There are plenty of other things I should be doing. And it's not like I have a coterie of devoted followers waiting with bated breath for my next review (in fact, the vast majority of reviews I write here g...

    I can think of a few alternate titles for this book. ?The Art of Beating a Dead Horse: Your Guide to Regurgitating the Same Point in Every Chapter? ?How to Filter Years of Other People?s Research into Broad Talking Points? ?You Too Can Write a Book With At Least 25...

  • Michael Halligan
    Jan 19, 2011

    Why am I writing this review on Goodreads, anyway? I'm not getting paid for it. There are plenty of other things I should be doing. And it's not like I have a coterie of devoted followers waiting with bated breath for my next review (in fact, the vast majority of reviews I write here g...

    I can think of a few alternate titles for this book. ?The Art of Beating a Dead Horse: Your Guide to Regurgitating the Same Point in Every Chapter? ?How to Filter Years of Other People?s Research into Broad Talking Points? ?You Too Can Write a Book With At Least 25...

    From the Fictive Desk of D.J. Ian: The End is Much More Exciting than It Was Once Upon a Time The story of GoodBetterBestReads has really only just begun, but we have already become the world?s largest community of potential readers, book buyers and Kindle users who have star-r...

    This book comes with its own summary ? a very handy thing: ?COCKTAIL PARTY SUMMARY When it comes to motivation, there?s a gap between what science knows and what business does. Our current business operating system?which is built around external, carrot-and-stick motivators...

    What frustrates me is the main premise has a contradiction that is never addressed. He begins the book with some research on monkeys that demonstrated an innate interest in solving puzzles. He then goes on to describe his big premise which is that we are are in the midst of a major mot...

    So, I listened to this entire book about motivation, and I can't figure out why I don't feel motivated to write a review. No carrot, no stick, no review. ...

    Only the first chapter is necessary. The rest is repetitious and filled with soon-to-be-obsolete computer metaphors. However, I've been thinking a lot about this book since I read it (a few weeks ago?), so two stars was perhaps a stingy rating. Everywhere I go lately, I see examples...

    Some good ideas, but for once I'd like to see a book where the case studies about flexible scheduling and autonomy don't involve software companies or consultants. I'd like to see an example where they motivate DMV employees to work harder to do the same menial work, but if giving DMV ...

    As a consultant, I am particularly sensitive to unhelpful jargon and the creation of distinctions without a difference. Enter "Drive." This could have been so much better. As Pink presents correctly, much of the research re human motivation IS counter-intuitive to what most of us tend ...

    Reading Pink's book, I endlessly thought about teachers and what motivates us (it's NOT merit-pay) and students and what motivates them to read (it's not pizza coupons or AR points). Funny, insightful, and supported by research, Drive has far-reaching implications for our society and h...

    2.5 ?'s rounded up to 3 ? Interesting approach for a hard to nail down answer. Most relevant for employers trying to extract optimum performance from employees, parents raising children, or those with general curiosity. We're born to be players, not pawns. We're meant to be aut...

    In Drive, Daniel H. Pink suggests that there is a gap between what "science knows and what business does." I was not shocked to learn that this gap exists, and I attributed Pink's decision to emphasize the existence of this gap to what I believe is the author's drive to attract corpora...

    Are you the type of person that is motivated by money and fame, or are you someone that is motivated by having a larger purpose in life? Or are you a combination of both? Financial gain has always been a motivator for me, but I'm also the type of person that will take on extra work, ne...

    I picked this up on a tangential reference from Leah and blitzed through it one gorgeous afternoon. It's a pretty concise roadmap (pardon the pun) of a "new" form of motivation theory, one that is centered less on external rewards and more on internal forces. Pulling from and conglomer...

    I imagine this is a great book to confuse those with a lot of management theory behind them. Luckily I'm not one of those, and this book has really struck home. Pink focuses begins by focusing on describing existing management processes as a carrot and stick reward system having evolve...

  • Ian "Marvin" Graye
    Oct 12, 2013

    Why am I writing this review on Goodreads, anyway? I'm not getting paid for it. There are plenty of other things I should be doing. And it's not like I have a coterie of devoted followers waiting with bated breath for my next review (in fact, the vast majority of reviews I write here g...

    I can think of a few alternate titles for this book. ?The Art of Beating a Dead Horse: Your Guide to Regurgitating the Same Point in Every Chapter? ?How to Filter Years of Other People?s Research into Broad Talking Points? ?You Too Can Write a Book With At Least 25...

    From the Fictive Desk of D.J. Ian: The End is Much More Exciting than It Was Once Upon a Time The story of GoodBetterBestReads has really only just begun, but we have already become the world?s largest community of potential readers, book buyers and Kindle users who have star-r...

  • Fiona Leonard
    Apr 05, 2013

    Why am I writing this review on Goodreads, anyway? I'm not getting paid for it. There are plenty of other things I should be doing. And it's not like I have a coterie of devoted followers waiting with bated breath for my next review (in fact, the vast majority of reviews I write here g...

    I can think of a few alternate titles for this book. ?The Art of Beating a Dead Horse: Your Guide to Regurgitating the Same Point in Every Chapter? ?How to Filter Years of Other People?s Research into Broad Talking Points? ?You Too Can Write a Book With At Least 25...

    From the Fictive Desk of D.J. Ian: The End is Much More Exciting than It Was Once Upon a Time The story of GoodBetterBestReads has really only just begun, but we have already become the world?s largest community of potential readers, book buyers and Kindle users who have star-r...

    This book comes with its own summary ? a very handy thing: ?COCKTAIL PARTY SUMMARY When it comes to motivation, there?s a gap between what science knows and what business does. Our current business operating system?which is built around external, carrot-and-stick motivators...

    What frustrates me is the main premise has a contradiction that is never addressed. He begins the book with some research on monkeys that demonstrated an innate interest in solving puzzles. He then goes on to describe his big premise which is that we are are in the midst of a major mot...

    So, I listened to this entire book about motivation, and I can't figure out why I don't feel motivated to write a review. No carrot, no stick, no review. ...

    Only the first chapter is necessary. The rest is repetitious and filled with soon-to-be-obsolete computer metaphors. However, I've been thinking a lot about this book since I read it (a few weeks ago?), so two stars was perhaps a stingy rating. Everywhere I go lately, I see examples...

    Some good ideas, but for once I'd like to see a book where the case studies about flexible scheduling and autonomy don't involve software companies or consultants. I'd like to see an example where they motivate DMV employees to work harder to do the same menial work, but if giving DMV ...

    As a consultant, I am particularly sensitive to unhelpful jargon and the creation of distinctions without a difference. Enter "Drive." This could have been so much better. As Pink presents correctly, much of the research re human motivation IS counter-intuitive to what most of us tend ...

    Reading Pink's book, I endlessly thought about teachers and what motivates us (it's NOT merit-pay) and students and what motivates them to read (it's not pizza coupons or AR points). Funny, insightful, and supported by research, Drive has far-reaching implications for our society and h...

    2.5 ?'s rounded up to 3 ? Interesting approach for a hard to nail down answer. Most relevant for employers trying to extract optimum performance from employees, parents raising children, or those with general curiosity. We're born to be players, not pawns. We're meant to be aut...

    In Drive, Daniel H. Pink suggests that there is a gap between what "science knows and what business does." I was not shocked to learn that this gap exists, and I attributed Pink's decision to emphasize the existence of this gap to what I believe is the author's drive to attract corpora...

    Are you the type of person that is motivated by money and fame, or are you someone that is motivated by having a larger purpose in life? Or are you a combination of both? Financial gain has always been a motivator for me, but I'm also the type of person that will take on extra work, ne...

    I picked this up on a tangential reference from Leah and blitzed through it one gorgeous afternoon. It's a pretty concise roadmap (pardon the pun) of a "new" form of motivation theory, one that is centered less on external rewards and more on internal forces. Pulling from and conglomer...

    I imagine this is a great book to confuse those with a lot of management theory behind them. Luckily I'm not one of those, and this book has really struck home. Pink focuses begins by focusing on describing existing management processes as a carrot and stick reward system having evolve...

    This book has been on my "to read" shelf for some time, and while I had read some excerpts, understood the general ideas and seen the excellent RSA Animate excerpt (http://goo.gl/zH1QH), there is far more here than is generally summed up. This book became extremely interesting becau...

    In his essay about the spate of new books dealing with the effects of the internet on culture in a recent New Yorker (http://www.newyorker.com/arts/critics...), Adam Gopnik separates observers into three camps: the Never-Betters, the Better-Nevers, and the Ever-Wasers. Daniel Pink,...

    I got an early copy for the Bottom-line Bookclub. Look out for Drive on the shelves from 29 Dec. I'm LOVING this latest book by Dan Pink. A Whole New Mind is a stroke of genius in understanding the way that the world of work has changed, and DRIVE is a powerful extension to A Whole ...

    This is another great book by Daniel Pink. It may be a coincidence, but just a few weeks ago I read another book on the same theme: Punished by Rewards: The Trouble With Gold Stars, Incentive Plans, A'S, Praise, and Other Bribes by Alfie Kohn. The book by Kohn was published about 20 ye...

    ????? ?? ?????? ?? ????? ??? ??????? ?????? ????? ?? ????? ?????? ????? ??? ?????? ???? ?? ???? ?? ????? ?? ???? ???????. ??? ??????? ??? ?? ???? ????? ??????...

    As a homeschooling, self employed person, this book didn't come as a huge surprise, but it is one that I really enjoyed. I suspect it is because this is a book that sets down on paper what your gut has been telling you for years. Drawing on decades of research and numerous commercia...

  • Irene McHugh
    Jun 02, 2018

    Why am I writing this review on Goodreads, anyway? I'm not getting paid for it. There are plenty of other things I should be doing. And it's not like I have a coterie of devoted followers waiting with bated breath for my next review (in fact, the vast majority of reviews I write here g...

    I can think of a few alternate titles for this book. ?The Art of Beating a Dead Horse: Your Guide to Regurgitating the Same Point in Every Chapter? ?How to Filter Years of Other People?s Research into Broad Talking Points? ?You Too Can Write a Book With At Least 25...

    From the Fictive Desk of D.J. Ian: The End is Much More Exciting than It Was Once Upon a Time The story of GoodBetterBestReads has really only just begun, but we have already become the world?s largest community of potential readers, book buyers and Kindle users who have star-r...

    This book comes with its own summary ? a very handy thing: ?COCKTAIL PARTY SUMMARY When it comes to motivation, there?s a gap between what science knows and what business does. Our current business operating system?which is built around external, carrot-and-stick motivators...

    What frustrates me is the main premise has a contradiction that is never addressed. He begins the book with some research on monkeys that demonstrated an innate interest in solving puzzles. He then goes on to describe his big premise which is that we are are in the midst of a major mot...

    So, I listened to this entire book about motivation, and I can't figure out why I don't feel motivated to write a review. No carrot, no stick, no review. ...

    Only the first chapter is necessary. The rest is repetitious and filled with soon-to-be-obsolete computer metaphors. However, I've been thinking a lot about this book since I read it (a few weeks ago?), so two stars was perhaps a stingy rating. Everywhere I go lately, I see examples...

    Some good ideas, but for once I'd like to see a book where the case studies about flexible scheduling and autonomy don't involve software companies or consultants. I'd like to see an example where they motivate DMV employees to work harder to do the same menial work, but if giving DMV ...

    As a consultant, I am particularly sensitive to unhelpful jargon and the creation of distinctions without a difference. Enter "Drive." This could have been so much better. As Pink presents correctly, much of the research re human motivation IS counter-intuitive to what most of us tend ...

    Reading Pink's book, I endlessly thought about teachers and what motivates us (it's NOT merit-pay) and students and what motivates them to read (it's not pizza coupons or AR points). Funny, insightful, and supported by research, Drive has far-reaching implications for our society and h...

    2.5 ?'s rounded up to 3 ? Interesting approach for a hard to nail down answer. Most relevant for employers trying to extract optimum performance from employees, parents raising children, or those with general curiosity. We're born to be players, not pawns. We're meant to be aut...

    In Drive, Daniel H. Pink suggests that there is a gap between what "science knows and what business does." I was not shocked to learn that this gap exists, and I attributed Pink's decision to emphasize the existence of this gap to what I believe is the author's drive to attract corpora...

    Are you the type of person that is motivated by money and fame, or are you someone that is motivated by having a larger purpose in life? Or are you a combination of both? Financial gain has always been a motivator for me, but I'm also the type of person that will take on extra work, ne...

    I picked this up on a tangential reference from Leah and blitzed through it one gorgeous afternoon. It's a pretty concise roadmap (pardon the pun) of a "new" form of motivation theory, one that is centered less on external rewards and more on internal forces. Pulling from and conglomer...

    I imagine this is a great book to confuse those with a lot of management theory behind them. Luckily I'm not one of those, and this book has really struck home. Pink focuses begins by focusing on describing existing management processes as a carrot and stick reward system having evolve...

    This book has been on my "to read" shelf for some time, and while I had read some excerpts, understood the general ideas and seen the excellent RSA Animate excerpt (http://goo.gl/zH1QH), there is far more here than is generally summed up. This book became extremely interesting becau...

    In his essay about the spate of new books dealing with the effects of the internet on culture in a recent New Yorker (http://www.newyorker.com/arts/critics...), Adam Gopnik separates observers into three camps: the Never-Betters, the Better-Nevers, and the Ever-Wasers. Daniel Pink,...

    I got an early copy for the Bottom-line Bookclub. Look out for Drive on the shelves from 29 Dec. I'm LOVING this latest book by Dan Pink. A Whole New Mind is a stroke of genius in understanding the way that the world of work has changed, and DRIVE is a powerful extension to A Whole ...

    This is another great book by Daniel Pink. It may be a coincidence, but just a few weeks ago I read another book on the same theme: Punished by Rewards: The Trouble With Gold Stars, Incentive Plans, A'S, Praise, and Other Bribes by Alfie Kohn. The book by Kohn was published about 20 ye...

    ????? ?? ?????? ?? ????? ??? ??????? ?????? ????? ?? ????? ?????? ????? ??? ?????? ???? ?? ???? ?? ????? ?? ???? ???????. ??? ??????? ??? ?? ???? ????? ??????...

    As a homeschooling, self employed person, this book didn't come as a huge surprise, but it is one that I really enjoyed. I suspect it is because this is a book that sets down on paper what your gut has been telling you for years. Drawing on decades of research and numerous commercia...

    Amanda's Informal Notes: Surprisingly, pretty darn fascinating. I don't usually read a lot of non-fiction, so it took me a bit to get used to the author's style, but I'm glad I pushed through because Drive gave me some great food for thought: -So for hundreds of years, businesses...

    Cu?n sách này vi?t v? ǵ? M?t cu?c cách m?ng v? cách c? v? ??ng viên ng??i khác tr?i qua 3 giai ?o?n - H? 1.0 - ??ng l?c sinh h?c: th?a măn ???c m?y nhu c?u c? b?n nh?t c?a con ng??i: ?n, u?ng, ng? ngh?, t́nh d...

    This book was a really exciting read, it covered research into motivational field and opinions and theories of experts in psychology and business. It is rare that a textbook type of book captions my attention so much that I don't really want to read anything else, but this one did so. ...

    After watching Pink?s TED Talk years ago, I enthusiastically added Drive to my list of books to read. This book was such a disappointment. Watch the talk and read the first chapter. Then bail before his incessant jargon rehashing studies other researchers have conducted numbs your mi...

  • Ken
    May 23, 2011

    Why am I writing this review on Goodreads, anyway? I'm not getting paid for it. There are plenty of other things I should be doing. And it's not like I have a coterie of devoted followers waiting with bated breath for my next review (in fact, the vast majority of reviews I write here g...

    I can think of a few alternate titles for this book. ?The Art of Beating a Dead Horse: Your Guide to Regurgitating the Same Point in Every Chapter? ?How to Filter Years of Other People?s Research into Broad Talking Points? ?You Too Can Write a Book With At Least 25...

    From the Fictive Desk of D.J. Ian: The End is Much More Exciting than It Was Once Upon a Time The story of GoodBetterBestReads has really only just begun, but we have already become the world?s largest community of potential readers, book buyers and Kindle users who have star-r...

    This book comes with its own summary ? a very handy thing: ?COCKTAIL PARTY SUMMARY When it comes to motivation, there?s a gap between what science knows and what business does. Our current business operating system?which is built around external, carrot-and-stick motivators...

    What frustrates me is the main premise has a contradiction that is never addressed. He begins the book with some research on monkeys that demonstrated an innate interest in solving puzzles. He then goes on to describe his big premise which is that we are are in the midst of a major mot...

    So, I listened to this entire book about motivation, and I can't figure out why I don't feel motivated to write a review. No carrot, no stick, no review. ...

    Only the first chapter is necessary. The rest is repetitious and filled with soon-to-be-obsolete computer metaphors. However, I've been thinking a lot about this book since I read it (a few weeks ago?), so two stars was perhaps a stingy rating. Everywhere I go lately, I see examples...

    Some good ideas, but for once I'd like to see a book where the case studies about flexible scheduling and autonomy don't involve software companies or consultants. I'd like to see an example where they motivate DMV employees to work harder to do the same menial work, but if giving DMV ...

    As a consultant, I am particularly sensitive to unhelpful jargon and the creation of distinctions without a difference. Enter "Drive." This could have been so much better. As Pink presents correctly, much of the research re human motivation IS counter-intuitive to what most of us tend ...

    Reading Pink's book, I endlessly thought about teachers and what motivates us (it's NOT merit-pay) and students and what motivates them to read (it's not pizza coupons or AR points). Funny, insightful, and supported by research, Drive has far-reaching implications for our society and h...

    2.5 ?'s rounded up to 3 ? Interesting approach for a hard to nail down answer. Most relevant for employers trying to extract optimum performance from employees, parents raising children, or those with general curiosity. We're born to be players, not pawns. We're meant to be aut...

    In Drive, Daniel H. Pink suggests that there is a gap between what "science knows and what business does." I was not shocked to learn that this gap exists, and I attributed Pink's decision to emphasize the existence of this gap to what I believe is the author's drive to attract corpora...

    Are you the type of person that is motivated by money and fame, or are you someone that is motivated by having a larger purpose in life? Or are you a combination of both? Financial gain has always been a motivator for me, but I'm also the type of person that will take on extra work, ne...

    I picked this up on a tangential reference from Leah and blitzed through it one gorgeous afternoon. It's a pretty concise roadmap (pardon the pun) of a "new" form of motivation theory, one that is centered less on external rewards and more on internal forces. Pulling from and conglomer...

    I imagine this is a great book to confuse those with a lot of management theory behind them. Luckily I'm not one of those, and this book has really struck home. Pink focuses begins by focusing on describing existing management processes as a carrot and stick reward system having evolve...

    This book has been on my "to read" shelf for some time, and while I had read some excerpts, understood the general ideas and seen the excellent RSA Animate excerpt (http://goo.gl/zH1QH), there is far more here than is generally summed up. This book became extremely interesting becau...

  • Aljazi Al-Maghlouth
    Nov 12, 2016

    Why am I writing this review on Goodreads, anyway? I'm not getting paid for it. There are plenty of other things I should be doing. And it's not like I have a coterie of devoted followers waiting with bated breath for my next review (in fact, the vast majority of reviews I write here g...

    I can think of a few alternate titles for this book. ?The Art of Beating a Dead Horse: Your Guide to Regurgitating the Same Point in Every Chapter? ?How to Filter Years of Other People?s Research into Broad Talking Points? ?You Too Can Write a Book With At Least 25...

    From the Fictive Desk of D.J. Ian: The End is Much More Exciting than It Was Once Upon a Time The story of GoodBetterBestReads has really only just begun, but we have already become the world?s largest community of potential readers, book buyers and Kindle users who have star-r...

    This book comes with its own summary ? a very handy thing: ?COCKTAIL PARTY SUMMARY When it comes to motivation, there?s a gap between what science knows and what business does. Our current business operating system?which is built around external, carrot-and-stick motivators...

    What frustrates me is the main premise has a contradiction that is never addressed. He begins the book with some research on monkeys that demonstrated an innate interest in solving puzzles. He then goes on to describe his big premise which is that we are are in the midst of a major mot...

    So, I listened to this entire book about motivation, and I can't figure out why I don't feel motivated to write a review. No carrot, no stick, no review. ...

    Only the first chapter is necessary. The rest is repetitious and filled with soon-to-be-obsolete computer metaphors. However, I've been thinking a lot about this book since I read it (a few weeks ago?), so two stars was perhaps a stingy rating. Everywhere I go lately, I see examples...

    Some good ideas, but for once I'd like to see a book where the case studies about flexible scheduling and autonomy don't involve software companies or consultants. I'd like to see an example where they motivate DMV employees to work harder to do the same menial work, but if giving DMV ...

    As a consultant, I am particularly sensitive to unhelpful jargon and the creation of distinctions without a difference. Enter "Drive." This could have been so much better. As Pink presents correctly, much of the research re human motivation IS counter-intuitive to what most of us tend ...

    Reading Pink's book, I endlessly thought about teachers and what motivates us (it's NOT merit-pay) and students and what motivates them to read (it's not pizza coupons or AR points). Funny, insightful, and supported by research, Drive has far-reaching implications for our society and h...

    2.5 ?'s rounded up to 3 ? Interesting approach for a hard to nail down answer. Most relevant for employers trying to extract optimum performance from employees, parents raising children, or those with general curiosity. We're born to be players, not pawns. We're meant to be aut...

    In Drive, Daniel H. Pink suggests that there is a gap between what "science knows and what business does." I was not shocked to learn that this gap exists, and I attributed Pink's decision to emphasize the existence of this gap to what I believe is the author's drive to attract corpora...

    Are you the type of person that is motivated by money and fame, or are you someone that is motivated by having a larger purpose in life? Or are you a combination of both? Financial gain has always been a motivator for me, but I'm also the type of person that will take on extra work, ne...

    I picked this up on a tangential reference from Leah and blitzed through it one gorgeous afternoon. It's a pretty concise roadmap (pardon the pun) of a "new" form of motivation theory, one that is centered less on external rewards and more on internal forces. Pulling from and conglomer...

    I imagine this is a great book to confuse those with a lot of management theory behind them. Luckily I'm not one of those, and this book has really struck home. Pink focuses begins by focusing on describing existing management processes as a carrot and stick reward system having evolve...

    This book has been on my "to read" shelf for some time, and while I had read some excerpts, understood the general ideas and seen the excellent RSA Animate excerpt (http://goo.gl/zH1QH), there is far more here than is generally summed up. This book became extremely interesting becau...

    In his essay about the spate of new books dealing with the effects of the internet on culture in a recent New Yorker (http://www.newyorker.com/arts/critics...), Adam Gopnik separates observers into three camps: the Never-Betters, the Better-Nevers, and the Ever-Wasers. Daniel Pink,...

    I got an early copy for the Bottom-line Bookclub. Look out for Drive on the shelves from 29 Dec. I'm LOVING this latest book by Dan Pink. A Whole New Mind is a stroke of genius in understanding the way that the world of work has changed, and DRIVE is a powerful extension to A Whole ...

    This is another great book by Daniel Pink. It may be a coincidence, but just a few weeks ago I read another book on the same theme: Punished by Rewards: The Trouble With Gold Stars, Incentive Plans, A'S, Praise, and Other Bribes by Alfie Kohn. The book by Kohn was published about 20 ye...

    ????? ?? ?????? ?? ????? ??? ??????? ?????? ????? ?? ????? ?????? ????? ??? ?????? ???? ?? ???? ?? ????? ?? ???? ???????. ??? ??????? ??? ?? ???? ????? ??????...

  • Rohan
    Jun 26, 2012

    Why am I writing this review on Goodreads, anyway? I'm not getting paid for it. There are plenty of other things I should be doing. And it's not like I have a coterie of devoted followers waiting with bated breath for my next review (in fact, the vast majority of reviews I write here g...

    I can think of a few alternate titles for this book. ?The Art of Beating a Dead Horse: Your Guide to Regurgitating the Same Point in Every Chapter? ?How to Filter Years of Other People?s Research into Broad Talking Points? ?You Too Can Write a Book With At Least 25...

    From the Fictive Desk of D.J. Ian: The End is Much More Exciting than It Was Once Upon a Time The story of GoodBetterBestReads has really only just begun, but we have already become the world?s largest community of potential readers, book buyers and Kindle users who have star-r...

    This book comes with its own summary ? a very handy thing: ?COCKTAIL PARTY SUMMARY When it comes to motivation, there?s a gap between what science knows and what business does. Our current business operating system?which is built around external, carrot-and-stick motivators...

    What frustrates me is the main premise has a contradiction that is never addressed. He begins the book with some research on monkeys that demonstrated an innate interest in solving puzzles. He then goes on to describe his big premise which is that we are are in the midst of a major mot...

    So, I listened to this entire book about motivation, and I can't figure out why I don't feel motivated to write a review. No carrot, no stick, no review. ...

    Only the first chapter is necessary. The rest is repetitious and filled with soon-to-be-obsolete computer metaphors. However, I've been thinking a lot about this book since I read it (a few weeks ago?), so two stars was perhaps a stingy rating. Everywhere I go lately, I see examples...

    Some good ideas, but for once I'd like to see a book where the case studies about flexible scheduling and autonomy don't involve software companies or consultants. I'd like to see an example where they motivate DMV employees to work harder to do the same menial work, but if giving DMV ...

    As a consultant, I am particularly sensitive to unhelpful jargon and the creation of distinctions without a difference. Enter "Drive." This could have been so much better. As Pink presents correctly, much of the research re human motivation IS counter-intuitive to what most of us tend ...

    Reading Pink's book, I endlessly thought about teachers and what motivates us (it's NOT merit-pay) and students and what motivates them to read (it's not pizza coupons or AR points). Funny, insightful, and supported by research, Drive has far-reaching implications for our society and h...

    2.5 ?'s rounded up to 3 ? Interesting approach for a hard to nail down answer. Most relevant for employers trying to extract optimum performance from employees, parents raising children, or those with general curiosity. We're born to be players, not pawns. We're meant to be aut...

    In Drive, Daniel H. Pink suggests that there is a gap between what "science knows and what business does." I was not shocked to learn that this gap exists, and I attributed Pink's decision to emphasize the existence of this gap to what I believe is the author's drive to attract corpora...

    Are you the type of person that is motivated by money and fame, or are you someone that is motivated by having a larger purpose in life? Or are you a combination of both? Financial gain has always been a motivator for me, but I'm also the type of person that will take on extra work, ne...

    I picked this up on a tangential reference from Leah and blitzed through it one gorgeous afternoon. It's a pretty concise roadmap (pardon the pun) of a "new" form of motivation theory, one that is centered less on external rewards and more on internal forces. Pulling from and conglomer...

    I imagine this is a great book to confuse those with a lot of management theory behind them. Luckily I'm not one of those, and this book has really struck home. Pink focuses begins by focusing on describing existing management processes as a carrot and stick reward system having evolve...

    This book has been on my "to read" shelf for some time, and while I had read some excerpts, understood the general ideas and seen the excellent RSA Animate excerpt (http://goo.gl/zH1QH), there is far more here than is generally summed up. This book became extremely interesting becau...

    In his essay about the spate of new books dealing with the effects of the internet on culture in a recent New Yorker (http://www.newyorker.com/arts/critics...), Adam Gopnik separates observers into three camps: the Never-Betters, the Better-Nevers, and the Ever-Wasers. Daniel Pink,...

    I got an early copy for the Bottom-line Bookclub. Look out for Drive on the shelves from 29 Dec. I'm LOVING this latest book by Dan Pink. A Whole New Mind is a stroke of genius in understanding the way that the world of work has changed, and DRIVE is a powerful extension to A Whole ...

    This is another great book by Daniel Pink. It may be a coincidence, but just a few weeks ago I read another book on the same theme: Punished by Rewards: The Trouble With Gold Stars, Incentive Plans, A'S, Praise, and Other Bribes by Alfie Kohn. The book by Kohn was published about 20 ye...

    ????? ?? ?????? ?? ????? ??? ??????? ?????? ????? ?? ????? ?????? ????? ??? ?????? ???? ?? ???? ?? ????? ?? ???? ???????. ??? ??????? ??? ?? ???? ????? ??????...

    As a homeschooling, self employed person, this book didn't come as a huge surprise, but it is one that I really enjoyed. I suspect it is because this is a book that sets down on paper what your gut has been telling you for years. Drawing on decades of research and numerous commercia...

    Amanda's Informal Notes: Surprisingly, pretty darn fascinating. I don't usually read a lot of non-fiction, so it took me a bit to get used to the author's style, but I'm glad I pushed through because Drive gave me some great food for thought: -So for hundreds of years, businesses...

    Cu?n sách này vi?t v? ǵ? M?t cu?c cách m?ng v? cách c? v? ??ng viên ng??i khác tr?i qua 3 giai ?o?n - H? 1.0 - ??ng l?c sinh h?c: th?a măn ???c m?y nhu c?u c? b?n nh?t c?a con ng??i: ?n, u?ng, ng? ngh?, t́nh d...

    This book was a really exciting read, it covered research into motivational field and opinions and theories of experts in psychology and business. It is rare that a textbook type of book captions my attention so much that I don't really want to read anything else, but this one did so. ...

    After watching Pink?s TED Talk years ago, I enthusiastically added Drive to my list of books to read. This book was such a disappointment. Watch the talk and read the first chapter. Then bail before his incessant jargon rehashing studies other researchers have conducted numbs your mi...

    An intriguing investigation of the factors that motivate people. Pink shows that science has learned much about motivation, but business and education still follow outdated models. The old systems of rewards and punishments are no longer effective for today?s non-routine, creative, c...

    I think the whole book could've been wrapped up in one or two chapters. I really get what Author is trying to say and it is important that Governments, Corporations understand that not everything that their employee (or a person) does for them is because they get paid for it. In fact, ...

  • NguyĂªn ngá»™ ngá»™
    Dec 06, 2013

    Why am I writing this review on Goodreads, anyway? I'm not getting paid for it. There are plenty of other things I should be doing. And it's not like I have a coterie of devoted followers waiting with bated breath for my next review (in fact, the vast majority of reviews I write here g...

    I can think of a few alternate titles for this book. ?The Art of Beating a Dead Horse: Your Guide to Regurgitating the Same Point in Every Chapter? ?How to Filter Years of Other People?s Research into Broad Talking Points? ?You Too Can Write a Book With At Least 25...

    From the Fictive Desk of D.J. Ian: The End is Much More Exciting than It Was Once Upon a Time The story of GoodBetterBestReads has really only just begun, but we have already become the world?s largest community of potential readers, book buyers and Kindle users who have star-r...

    This book comes with its own summary ? a very handy thing: ?COCKTAIL PARTY SUMMARY When it comes to motivation, there?s a gap between what science knows and what business does. Our current business operating system?which is built around external, carrot-and-stick motivators...

    What frustrates me is the main premise has a contradiction that is never addressed. He begins the book with some research on monkeys that demonstrated an innate interest in solving puzzles. He then goes on to describe his big premise which is that we are are in the midst of a major mot...

    So, I listened to this entire book about motivation, and I can't figure out why I don't feel motivated to write a review. No carrot, no stick, no review. ...

    Only the first chapter is necessary. The rest is repetitious and filled with soon-to-be-obsolete computer metaphors. However, I've been thinking a lot about this book since I read it (a few weeks ago?), so two stars was perhaps a stingy rating. Everywhere I go lately, I see examples...

    Some good ideas, but for once I'd like to see a book where the case studies about flexible scheduling and autonomy don't involve software companies or consultants. I'd like to see an example where they motivate DMV employees to work harder to do the same menial work, but if giving DMV ...

    As a consultant, I am particularly sensitive to unhelpful jargon and the creation of distinctions without a difference. Enter "Drive." This could have been so much better. As Pink presents correctly, much of the research re human motivation IS counter-intuitive to what most of us tend ...

    Reading Pink's book, I endlessly thought about teachers and what motivates us (it's NOT merit-pay) and students and what motivates them to read (it's not pizza coupons or AR points). Funny, insightful, and supported by research, Drive has far-reaching implications for our society and h...

    2.5 ?'s rounded up to 3 ? Interesting approach for a hard to nail down answer. Most relevant for employers trying to extract optimum performance from employees, parents raising children, or those with general curiosity. We're born to be players, not pawns. We're meant to be aut...

    In Drive, Daniel H. Pink suggests that there is a gap between what "science knows and what business does." I was not shocked to learn that this gap exists, and I attributed Pink's decision to emphasize the existence of this gap to what I believe is the author's drive to attract corpora...

    Are you the type of person that is motivated by money and fame, or are you someone that is motivated by having a larger purpose in life? Or are you a combination of both? Financial gain has always been a motivator for me, but I'm also the type of person that will take on extra work, ne...

    I picked this up on a tangential reference from Leah and blitzed through it one gorgeous afternoon. It's a pretty concise roadmap (pardon the pun) of a "new" form of motivation theory, one that is centered less on external rewards and more on internal forces. Pulling from and conglomer...

    I imagine this is a great book to confuse those with a lot of management theory behind them. Luckily I'm not one of those, and this book has really struck home. Pink focuses begins by focusing on describing existing management processes as a carrot and stick reward system having evolve...

    This book has been on my "to read" shelf for some time, and while I had read some excerpts, understood the general ideas and seen the excellent RSA Animate excerpt (http://goo.gl/zH1QH), there is far more here than is generally summed up. This book became extremely interesting becau...

    In his essay about the spate of new books dealing with the effects of the internet on culture in a recent New Yorker (http://www.newyorker.com/arts/critics...), Adam Gopnik separates observers into three camps: the Never-Betters, the Better-Nevers, and the Ever-Wasers. Daniel Pink,...

    I got an early copy for the Bottom-line Bookclub. Look out for Drive on the shelves from 29 Dec. I'm LOVING this latest book by Dan Pink. A Whole New Mind is a stroke of genius in understanding the way that the world of work has changed, and DRIVE is a powerful extension to A Whole ...

    This is another great book by Daniel Pink. It may be a coincidence, but just a few weeks ago I read another book on the same theme: Punished by Rewards: The Trouble With Gold Stars, Incentive Plans, A'S, Praise, and Other Bribes by Alfie Kohn. The book by Kohn was published about 20 ye...

    ????? ?? ?????? ?? ????? ??? ??????? ?????? ????? ?? ????? ?????? ????? ??? ?????? ???? ?? ???? ?? ????? ?? ???? ???????. ??? ??????? ??? ?? ???? ????? ??????...

    As a homeschooling, self employed person, this book didn't come as a huge surprise, but it is one that I really enjoyed. I suspect it is because this is a book that sets down on paper what your gut has been telling you for years. Drawing on decades of research and numerous commercia...

    Amanda's Informal Notes: Surprisingly, pretty darn fascinating. I don't usually read a lot of non-fiction, so it took me a bit to get used to the author's style, but I'm glad I pushed through because Drive gave me some great food for thought: -So for hundreds of years, businesses...

    Cu?n sách này vi?t v? ǵ? M?t cu?c cách m?ng v? cách c? v? ??ng viên ng??i khác tr?i qua 3 giai ?o?n - H? 1.0 - ??ng l?c sinh h?c: th?a măn ???c m?y nhu c?u c? b?n nh?t c?a con ng??i: ?n, u?ng, ng? ngh?, t́nh d...

  • Vince
    Mar 08, 2012

    Why am I writing this review on Goodreads, anyway? I'm not getting paid for it. There are plenty of other things I should be doing. And it's not like I have a coterie of devoted followers waiting with bated breath for my next review (in fact, the vast majority of reviews I write here g...

    I can think of a few alternate titles for this book. ?The Art of Beating a Dead Horse: Your Guide to Regurgitating the Same Point in Every Chapter? ?How to Filter Years of Other People?s Research into Broad Talking Points? ?You Too Can Write a Book With At Least 25...

    From the Fictive Desk of D.J. Ian: The End is Much More Exciting than It Was Once Upon a Time The story of GoodBetterBestReads has really only just begun, but we have already become the world?s largest community of potential readers, book buyers and Kindle users who have star-r...

    This book comes with its own summary ? a very handy thing: ?COCKTAIL PARTY SUMMARY When it comes to motivation, there?s a gap between what science knows and what business does. Our current business operating system?which is built around external, carrot-and-stick motivators...

    What frustrates me is the main premise has a contradiction that is never addressed. He begins the book with some research on monkeys that demonstrated an innate interest in solving puzzles. He then goes on to describe his big premise which is that we are are in the midst of a major mot...

    So, I listened to this entire book about motivation, and I can't figure out why I don't feel motivated to write a review. No carrot, no stick, no review. ...

    Only the first chapter is necessary. The rest is repetitious and filled with soon-to-be-obsolete computer metaphors. However, I've been thinking a lot about this book since I read it (a few weeks ago?), so two stars was perhaps a stingy rating. Everywhere I go lately, I see examples...

    Some good ideas, but for once I'd like to see a book where the case studies about flexible scheduling and autonomy don't involve software companies or consultants. I'd like to see an example where they motivate DMV employees to work harder to do the same menial work, but if giving DMV ...

    As a consultant, I am particularly sensitive to unhelpful jargon and the creation of distinctions without a difference. Enter "Drive." This could have been so much better. As Pink presents correctly, much of the research re human motivation IS counter-intuitive to what most of us tend ...

    Reading Pink's book, I endlessly thought about teachers and what motivates us (it's NOT merit-pay) and students and what motivates them to read (it's not pizza coupons or AR points). Funny, insightful, and supported by research, Drive has far-reaching implications for our society and h...

    2.5 ?'s rounded up to 3 ? Interesting approach for a hard to nail down answer. Most relevant for employers trying to extract optimum performance from employees, parents raising children, or those with general curiosity. We're born to be players, not pawns. We're meant to be aut...

    In Drive, Daniel H. Pink suggests that there is a gap between what "science knows and what business does." I was not shocked to learn that this gap exists, and I attributed Pink's decision to emphasize the existence of this gap to what I believe is the author's drive to attract corpora...

    Are you the type of person that is motivated by money and fame, or are you someone that is motivated by having a larger purpose in life? Or are you a combination of both? Financial gain has always been a motivator for me, but I'm also the type of person that will take on extra work, ne...

    I picked this up on a tangential reference from Leah and blitzed through it one gorgeous afternoon. It's a pretty concise roadmap (pardon the pun) of a "new" form of motivation theory, one that is centered less on external rewards and more on internal forces. Pulling from and conglomer...

    I imagine this is a great book to confuse those with a lot of management theory behind them. Luckily I'm not one of those, and this book has really struck home. Pink focuses begins by focusing on describing existing management processes as a carrot and stick reward system having evolve...

    This book has been on my "to read" shelf for some time, and while I had read some excerpts, understood the general ideas and seen the excellent RSA Animate excerpt (http://goo.gl/zH1QH), there is far more here than is generally summed up. This book became extremely interesting becau...

    In his essay about the spate of new books dealing with the effects of the internet on culture in a recent New Yorker (http://www.newyorker.com/arts/critics...), Adam Gopnik separates observers into three camps: the Never-Betters, the Better-Nevers, and the Ever-Wasers. Daniel Pink,...

    I got an early copy for the Bottom-line Bookclub. Look out for Drive on the shelves from 29 Dec. I'm LOVING this latest book by Dan Pink. A Whole New Mind is a stroke of genius in understanding the way that the world of work has changed, and DRIVE is a powerful extension to A Whole ...

    This is another great book by Daniel Pink. It may be a coincidence, but just a few weeks ago I read another book on the same theme: Punished by Rewards: The Trouble With Gold Stars, Incentive Plans, A'S, Praise, and Other Bribes by Alfie Kohn. The book by Kohn was published about 20 ye...

    ????? ?? ?????? ?? ????? ??? ??????? ?????? ????? ?? ????? ?????? ????? ??? ?????? ???? ?? ???? ?? ????? ?? ???? ???????. ??? ??????? ??? ?? ???? ????? ??????...

    As a homeschooling, self employed person, this book didn't come as a huge surprise, but it is one that I really enjoyed. I suspect it is because this is a book that sets down on paper what your gut has been telling you for years. Drawing on decades of research and numerous commercia...

    Amanda's Informal Notes: Surprisingly, pretty darn fascinating. I don't usually read a lot of non-fiction, so it took me a bit to get used to the author's style, but I'm glad I pushed through because Drive gave me some great food for thought: -So for hundreds of years, businesses...

    Cu?n sách này vi?t v? ǵ? M?t cu?c cách m?ng v? cách c? v? ??ng viên ng??i khác tr?i qua 3 giai ?o?n - H? 1.0 - ??ng l?c sinh h?c: th?a măn ???c m?y nhu c?u c? b?n nh?t c?a con ng??i: ?n, u?ng, ng? ngh?, t́nh d...

    This book was a really exciting read, it covered research into motivational field and opinions and theories of experts in psychology and business. It is rare that a textbook type of book captions my attention so much that I don't really want to read anything else, but this one did so. ...

    After watching Pink?s TED Talk years ago, I enthusiastically added Drive to my list of books to read. This book was such a disappointment. Watch the talk and read the first chapter. Then bail before his incessant jargon rehashing studies other researchers have conducted numbs your mi...

    An intriguing investigation of the factors that motivate people. Pink shows that science has learned much about motivation, but business and education still follow outdated models. The old systems of rewards and punishments are no longer effective for today?s non-routine, creative, c...

    I think the whole book could've been wrapped up in one or two chapters. I really get what Author is trying to say and it is important that Governments, Corporations understand that not everything that their employee (or a person) does for them is because they get paid for it. In fact, ...

    I have to confess I didn't really enjoy this book. I wanted to. I certainly enjoy the autonomy my job currently provides and am sympathetic to a book whose agenda is to propagate such. Keyword is propagate, as this book quickly became an annoying parade of unoriginal ideas wrapped i...

  • Klinta
    Mar 23, 2015

    Why am I writing this review on Goodreads, anyway? I'm not getting paid for it. There are plenty of other things I should be doing. And it's not like I have a coterie of devoted followers waiting with bated breath for my next review (in fact, the vast majority of reviews I write here g...

    I can think of a few alternate titles for this book. ?The Art of Beating a Dead Horse: Your Guide to Regurgitating the Same Point in Every Chapter? ?How to Filter Years of Other People?s Research into Broad Talking Points? ?You Too Can Write a Book With At Least 25...

    From the Fictive Desk of D.J. Ian: The End is Much More Exciting than It Was Once Upon a Time The story of GoodBetterBestReads has really only just begun, but we have already become the world?s largest community of potential readers, book buyers and Kindle users who have star-r...

    This book comes with its own summary ? a very handy thing: ?COCKTAIL PARTY SUMMARY When it comes to motivation, there?s a gap between what science knows and what business does. Our current business operating system?which is built around external, carrot-and-stick motivators...

    What frustrates me is the main premise has a contradiction that is never addressed. He begins the book with some research on monkeys that demonstrated an innate interest in solving puzzles. He then goes on to describe his big premise which is that we are are in the midst of a major mot...

    So, I listened to this entire book about motivation, and I can't figure out why I don't feel motivated to write a review. No carrot, no stick, no review. ...

    Only the first chapter is necessary. The rest is repetitious and filled with soon-to-be-obsolete computer metaphors. However, I've been thinking a lot about this book since I read it (a few weeks ago?), so two stars was perhaps a stingy rating. Everywhere I go lately, I see examples...

    Some good ideas, but for once I'd like to see a book where the case studies about flexible scheduling and autonomy don't involve software companies or consultants. I'd like to see an example where they motivate DMV employees to work harder to do the same menial work, but if giving DMV ...

    As a consultant, I am particularly sensitive to unhelpful jargon and the creation of distinctions without a difference. Enter "Drive." This could have been so much better. As Pink presents correctly, much of the research re human motivation IS counter-intuitive to what most of us tend ...

    Reading Pink's book, I endlessly thought about teachers and what motivates us (it's NOT merit-pay) and students and what motivates them to read (it's not pizza coupons or AR points). Funny, insightful, and supported by research, Drive has far-reaching implications for our society and h...

    2.5 ?'s rounded up to 3 ? Interesting approach for a hard to nail down answer. Most relevant for employers trying to extract optimum performance from employees, parents raising children, or those with general curiosity. We're born to be players, not pawns. We're meant to be aut...

    In Drive, Daniel H. Pink suggests that there is a gap between what "science knows and what business does." I was not shocked to learn that this gap exists, and I attributed Pink's decision to emphasize the existence of this gap to what I believe is the author's drive to attract corpora...

    Are you the type of person that is motivated by money and fame, or are you someone that is motivated by having a larger purpose in life? Or are you a combination of both? Financial gain has always been a motivator for me, but I'm also the type of person that will take on extra work, ne...

    I picked this up on a tangential reference from Leah and blitzed through it one gorgeous afternoon. It's a pretty concise roadmap (pardon the pun) of a "new" form of motivation theory, one that is centered less on external rewards and more on internal forces. Pulling from and conglomer...

    I imagine this is a great book to confuse those with a lot of management theory behind them. Luckily I'm not one of those, and this book has really struck home. Pink focuses begins by focusing on describing existing management processes as a carrot and stick reward system having evolve...

    This book has been on my "to read" shelf for some time, and while I had read some excerpts, understood the general ideas and seen the excellent RSA Animate excerpt (http://goo.gl/zH1QH), there is far more here than is generally summed up. This book became extremely interesting becau...

    In his essay about the spate of new books dealing with the effects of the internet on culture in a recent New Yorker (http://www.newyorker.com/arts/critics...), Adam Gopnik separates observers into three camps: the Never-Betters, the Better-Nevers, and the Ever-Wasers. Daniel Pink,...

    I got an early copy for the Bottom-line Bookclub. Look out for Drive on the shelves from 29 Dec. I'm LOVING this latest book by Dan Pink. A Whole New Mind is a stroke of genius in understanding the way that the world of work has changed, and DRIVE is a powerful extension to A Whole ...

    This is another great book by Daniel Pink. It may be a coincidence, but just a few weeks ago I read another book on the same theme: Punished by Rewards: The Trouble With Gold Stars, Incentive Plans, A'S, Praise, and Other Bribes by Alfie Kohn. The book by Kohn was published about 20 ye...

    ????? ?? ?????? ?? ????? ??? ??????? ?????? ????? ?? ????? ?????? ????? ??? ?????? ???? ?? ???? ?? ????? ?? ???? ???????. ??? ??????? ??? ?? ???? ????? ??????...

    As a homeschooling, self employed person, this book didn't come as a huge surprise, but it is one that I really enjoyed. I suspect it is because this is a book that sets down on paper what your gut has been telling you for years. Drawing on decades of research and numerous commercia...

    Amanda's Informal Notes: Surprisingly, pretty darn fascinating. I don't usually read a lot of non-fiction, so it took me a bit to get used to the author's style, but I'm glad I pushed through because Drive gave me some great food for thought: -So for hundreds of years, businesses...

    Cu?n sách này vi?t v? ǵ? M?t cu?c cách m?ng v? cách c? v? ??ng viên ng??i khác tr?i qua 3 giai ?o?n - H? 1.0 - ??ng l?c sinh h?c: th?a măn ???c m?y nhu c?u c? b?n nh?t c?a con ng??i: ?n, u?ng, ng? ngh?, t́nh d...

    This book was a really exciting read, it covered research into motivational field and opinions and theories of experts in psychology and business. It is rare that a textbook type of book captions my attention so much that I don't really want to read anything else, but this one did so. ...

  • Laura Noggle
    Dec 12, 2017

    Why am I writing this review on Goodreads, anyway? I'm not getting paid for it. There are plenty of other things I should be doing. And it's not like I have a coterie of devoted followers waiting with bated breath for my next review (in fact, the vast majority of reviews I write here g...

    I can think of a few alternate titles for this book. ?The Art of Beating a Dead Horse: Your Guide to Regurgitating the Same Point in Every Chapter? ?How to Filter Years of Other People?s Research into Broad Talking Points? ?You Too Can Write a Book With At Least 25...

    From the Fictive Desk of D.J. Ian: The End is Much More Exciting than It Was Once Upon a Time The story of GoodBetterBestReads has really only just begun, but we have already become the world?s largest community of potential readers, book buyers and Kindle users who have star-r...

    This book comes with its own summary ? a very handy thing: ?COCKTAIL PARTY SUMMARY When it comes to motivation, there?s a gap between what science knows and what business does. Our current business operating system?which is built around external, carrot-and-stick motivators...

    What frustrates me is the main premise has a contradiction that is never addressed. He begins the book with some research on monkeys that demonstrated an innate interest in solving puzzles. He then goes on to describe his big premise which is that we are are in the midst of a major mot...

    So, I listened to this entire book about motivation, and I can't figure out why I don't feel motivated to write a review. No carrot, no stick, no review. ...

    Only the first chapter is necessary. The rest is repetitious and filled with soon-to-be-obsolete computer metaphors. However, I've been thinking a lot about this book since I read it (a few weeks ago?), so two stars was perhaps a stingy rating. Everywhere I go lately, I see examples...

    Some good ideas, but for once I'd like to see a book where the case studies about flexible scheduling and autonomy don't involve software companies or consultants. I'd like to see an example where they motivate DMV employees to work harder to do the same menial work, but if giving DMV ...

    As a consultant, I am particularly sensitive to unhelpful jargon and the creation of distinctions without a difference. Enter "Drive." This could have been so much better. As Pink presents correctly, much of the research re human motivation IS counter-intuitive to what most of us tend ...

    Reading Pink's book, I endlessly thought about teachers and what motivates us (it's NOT merit-pay) and students and what motivates them to read (it's not pizza coupons or AR points). Funny, insightful, and supported by research, Drive has far-reaching implications for our society and h...

    2.5 ?'s rounded up to 3 ? Interesting approach for a hard to nail down answer. Most relevant for employers trying to extract optimum performance from employees, parents raising children, or those with general curiosity. We're born to be players, not pawns. We're meant to be aut...